FACTOID # 21: 15% of Army recruits from South Dakota are Native American, which is roughly the same percentage for female Army recruits in the state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of Washington

University of Washington

Motto Lux sit
(Latin for "Let there be light")[1]
Established 1861
Type Public
Sea-grant
Space-grant
Academic term Quarter
Endowment US $1.8 billion [14]
President Mark Emmert
Provost Phyllis Wise
Staff 3,623
Undergraduates 30,790
Postgraduates 12,117
Location Seattle, Washington, USA
Campus Urban
643 acres (2.8 km²)
Mascot Huskies (Harry the Husky)
Colors Purple and gold            
Website washington.edu

The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. Also known as Washington and locally as The U or UW (usually pronounced "U-Dub"), it is the largest university in the Northwestern United States and the oldest public university on the West Coast. The UW maintains three locations, with its flagship campus in Seattle's University District and branch campuses in Tacoma and Bothell. Its operating budget for fiscal year 2005 was $3.1 billion.[2] The university is known as a Public Ivy, an American term for state-funded institutions of higher learning that "provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price." University of Washington Seal This work is copyrighted. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Let there be light is an English translation of the Hebrew ×™Ö°×”Ö´×™ אוֹר (or yehiy or). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Mark Emmert has, since 2004, been the 30th president of the University of Washington, and is a former chancellor of Louisiana State University. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Seattle redirects here. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... “km” redirects here. ... Husky is a general term for several breeds of dogs used as sled dogs. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Seattle redirects here. ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... City nickname Emerald City City bird Great Blue Heron City flower Dahlia City mottos The City of Flowers The City of Goodwill City song Seattle, the Peerless City Mayor Greg Nickels County King County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water   - % water 369. ... See also College town. ... The University of Washington, Tacoma (UW, Tacoma, or UWT) is one of the two newest campuses in the University of Washington system, located in Tacoma, south of the main campus in Seattle, Washington, USA. The other satellite campus is in Bothell; both opened in temporary facilities in 1990, and moved... The University of Washington, Bothell (UW Bothell) is one of the two newest campuses of the University of Washington, located in Bothell. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ...

Contents

Academics and research

In 2006, the University of Washington research budget passed the $1 billion milestone[3]. Virtually all of the funding came from peer-reviewed research proposals. UW research budget consistently ranks among the top 5 in both public and private universities in the United States [2][4]. UW is also the largest recipient of federal research funding among public universities and second among all public and private universities in the country, a position that the university has held each year since 1974.[5] The university is an elected member of the Association of American Universities. The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ...


As of the 2006-07 autumn term, the university has 40,216 students.[6] In 2007, the average high school GPA of incoming freshmen was 3.75, and the average SAT (math and critical reading) score was 1,251. About 33% of all undergraduates are members of ethnic minority groups.[7][8] For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... “Minority” redirects here. ...


Among the faculty, there are eight Nobel laureates (another three among UW alumni), 57 members in the National Academy of Sciences, 15 members in the National Academy of Engineering, 44 members in the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, and 56 members in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Overall, the faculty is ranked fourth among public institutions with National Academy members and fifth in national faculty awards.[4] Additionally, the UW faculty has eleven MacArthur Fellows, 13 Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators, eight Gairdner Foundation International Award winners, five Lasker Award winners, 11 MERIT (Method to Extend Research in Time) Award winners, 19 PECASE (Presidential Early Career Awards in Science and Engineering), four American Philosophical Society, one Fields Medal, two National Book Award, one National Medal of Arts, five National Medal of Science, two Pulitzer Prize and one Academy of Management Hall of Fame Gold Member (another one among UW alumni) holders.[5] The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Founded in 1964, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in the United States provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. ... The Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, is an American organization whose purpose is to provide national advice on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine, and health (National Academy of Sciences, n. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The United States National Academies consist of four organizations: the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council. ... The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation is a private, independent grantmaking institution. ... The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) is a United States non-profit medical research institute based in Chevy Chase, Maryland and originally founded by the aviator and engineer Howard Hughes in 1953. ... The Gairdner Foundation International Award is given annually at a special dinner to three to six people for outstanding discoveries or contributions to medical science. ... The Albert Lasker Medical Research Awards have been awarded annually since 1946 to living persons who have made major contributions to medical science. ... THE PRESIDENTIAL EARLY CAREER AWARDS FOR SCIENTISTS AND ENGINEERS (PECASE) PROGRAM In February 1996, the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC), was commissioned by President Clinton to create an award program that would honor and support the extraordinary achievements of young professionals at the outset of their independent research careers... The American Philosophical Society is a discussion group founded as the Junto in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. ... The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... The National Book Awards is one of the most preeminent literary prizes in the United States. ... The National Medal of Arts is an award and title bestowed on selected honorees by the National Endowment for the Arts. ... National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...

Suzzallo Library reading room

The University of Washington library system is among the largest academic libraries in the United States, with holdings of more than 6.5 million volumes and 7.5 million microforms. The Association of Research Libraries ranked the UW library system between the top fifth and fifteenth in various categories.[9] Suzzallo Librarys Graduate Reading Room at the University of Washington. ... Suzzallo Librarys Graduate Reading Room at the University of Washington. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. ... Suzzallo Library Reading Room, University of Washington University of Washington Libraries Box 352900 Seattle, WA 98195-2900 206-543-0242 http://www. ...


UW is also the host university of ResearchChannel program, the only TV channel in the United States dedicated solely for the dissemination of research from academic institutions and research organizations.[10] Current participation of ResearchChannel includes 36 universities, 15 research organizations, two corporate research centers and many other affiliates.[11] UW also disseminates knowledge through its proprietary UWTV channel and online.[12]


To promote equal academic opportunity, especially for people of low income, UW launched Husky Promise in 2006. Families of income up to 65 percent of state median income or 235 percent of federal poverty level are eligible. With this, up to 30 percent of undergraduate students may be eligible. The cut-off income level that UW set is the highest in the nation, making top quality education available to more people. UW President, Mark Emmert, simply said that being "elitist is not in our DNA". [13] [14] "Last year, the University of Washington moved to a more comprehensive approach [to admissions], in which the admissions staff reads the entire application and looks at grades within the context of the individual high school, rather than relying on computerized cutoffs."[15]


Rankings

The following lists UW national and international rankings in alphabetical order.


National

Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index

A more-fact-oriented ranking of Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index by Academic Analytics ranks University of Washington #1 in research productivity in many important disciplines: Business Administration, Genetics, Fisheries Science and Management, Microbiology, Pharmaceutical Science and Medicinal Pharmacy and Zoology. UW is #2 in Anatomy, Marine Biology and Biological Oceanography, Nutrition, Epidemiology and Forestry. UW is in the top ten for 20 other major disciplines. The variables used in the ranking are faculty publications, citations, research grants and awards.[16][17][18] UW has a total of 6 number 1 rankings for various disciplines. Out of the 354 institutions studied, only one school has more #1 rankings than UW and only two other schools have as many.


Peace Corps

University of Washington ranks #1 in Peace Corps volunteers in 2007 and #3 throughout the years. [19][20] It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


The Top American Research Universities

The Top American Research Universities report from the Center at Arizona State ranked UW eleventh overall and third among public institutions.[4]


US News and World Report

Many of the UW's programs are ranked in the top ten by U.S. News and World Report including #1 rankings for both the UW School of Medicine (primary care) and nursing school.[21] UW's rank for medical research has recently moved up from seventh in 2007 (along with Stanford) to sixth in 2008. [22] UW Medicine received $573.2 million in grants from National Institutes of Health in the fiscal year of 2006, second highest among all universities in the US. By 2006, UW School of Medicine has overall been ranked #1 for 14 consecutive years by U.S. News. UW is also the only medical school in the nation that ranked in the top 10 for all eight specialties.[23] The UW School of Nursing has been ranked #1 in the nation since 1984, when the first survey of nursing schools was conducted. However, U.S News & World Report only began ranking nursing schools in 1993, ever since which UW has also always been #1.[24] In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM) is a public medical school located in Seattle, Washington. ... Primary care may be provided in community health centres. ... Nursing school is a type of educational institution, or part thereof, where people undergo formal education and training to become a nurse. ...


In addition, its graduate program in social work is ranked third by U.S. News and World Report along with Columbia University, the University of Chicago and the University of California-Berkeley.[25] The UW also boasts third ranked graduate programs in both audiology and speech-language pathology,[26][27] and a third ranked specialist program in the fine art of ceramics.[28] The UW's bioengineering department was ranked fourth and the computer science program ranked 7th. The specialist field of nuclear physics also ranked 2nd in the country.[29] Biological engineering (also biosystems engineering and bioengineering) deals with engineering biological processes in general. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ...


The graduate school of education was also ranked 8th in the nation.[30] while the school of engineering tied for 21st alongside Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University and Northwestern University [31] in the U.S. News and World Report rankings. The undergraduate and graduate business schools ranked 18th and 29th, respectively. The UW School of Law has consistently ranked 27th out of a field of 180 American Bar Association accredited law schools. The UW also holds a #1 specialist ranking for its graduate program in law librarianship[32] The University of Washington, School of Law is the law school of the University of Washington. ... American Bar Associations Washington, DC office The American Bar Association (ABA) is a voluntary bar association of lawyers and law students, which is not specific to any jurisdiction in the United States. ...


In the 2008 rankings of "America's Best Colleges" by U.S. News and World Report, the UW tied for 42nd among doctoral universities and tied for 11th among public doctoral universities.[33]


Washington Monthly

A private review by the National Opinion Research Center, and published in the Washington Monthly[34], ranked the university 14th in the United States. In its last published survey in 1995, the The National Research Council ranked UW ninth in the United States in a study that spanned 41 graduate disciplines. The National Opinion Research Center (NORC),established in 1941, is one of the largest and highly respected national social research organizations in the United States. ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... The United States National Research Council puts out a ranking of United States graduate programs about every 10 years, although the time elapsed between each new ranking has exceeded 10 years. ...


Others

The UW Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship was ranked 5th best in the country by Entrepreneur magazine.[35] The UW Executive MBA is ranked third of its kind by The Economist.[36] The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


International

Academic Ranking of World Universities

The University of Washington was rated as the 17th best university in the world by the 2006 edition of the Academic Ranking of World Universities[37]. Issued by Shanghai Jiao Tong University, this ranking is also used by The Economist. // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


G-Factor

The G-Factor International University Ranking (2006) methodology, which indicates an extensive and objective peer review of a university through its website, ranked UW 7th in the world.


Newsweek

Newsweek ranked UW 22nd in the world in their 2006 "Top 100 Global Universities"[38] survey (ranked 5th among public research universities). The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


Webometrics

The Webometrics[39] ranking of world universities, which is based on the web-presence of the university, ranked UW 6th among all world universities. The science of webometrics (also cybermetrics, web metrics) tries to measure the Internet to get knowledge about number and types of hyperlinks, structure of the World Wide Web and usage patterns. ...


Wuhan University ranking

Another ranking by Research Center for Chinese Science Evaluation of Wuhan University ranks UW #3 in the world. The ranking is based on Essential Science Indicators (ESI), which provides data of journal article publication counts and citation frequencies in over 11,000 journals around the world in 22 research fields. The website has not been translated into English [40]. Wuhan University (WHU) (Simplified Chinese: 武汉大学; Traditional Chinese: 武漢大學; Pinyin: Wǔhàn Dàxué; colloquially 武大, Pinyin: Wǔdà) is a key university directly under the administration of the Education Ministry of the Peoples Republic of China. ...


History

The city of Seattle was one of several settlements in the mid to late 19th century vying for primacy in the newly formed Washington Territory. In 1854, territorial governor Isaac Stevens recommended the establishment of a university in Washington. Several prominent Seattle-area residents, chief among them Methodist preacher Daniel Bagley, saw the siting of this University as a chance to add to the city's prestige. They were able to convince early founder of Seattle and member of the territorial legislature Arthur A. Denny of the importance of Seattle winning the school. The legislature initially chartered two universities, one in Seattle and one in Lewis County, but later repealed its decision in favor of a single university in Lewis County, provided locally donated land could be found. When no site emerged, the legislature, encouraged by Denny, relocated the university to Seattle in 1858. Categories: Historical stubs | Washington history | U.S. historical regions and territories ... Isaac Ingalls Stevens (March 25, 1818 - September 1, 1862) was the first governor of Washington Territory, and served as a brigadier general in the Union Army during the Civil War until his death at the Battle of Chantilly. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Arthur A. Denny (1822 – 1899) was an early founder of Seattle, Washington (see Denny Party), and a member of the territorial legislature. ... Lewis County is a county located in the state of Washington. ...


In 1861, scouting began for an appropriate 10 acre (40,000 m²) site in Seattle to serve as the campus for a new university. Denny, along with fellow pioneers Edward Lander and Charlie Terry, donated a site on "Denny's Knoll" in downtown Seattle. This tract was bounded by 4th and 6th Avenues on the west and east and Union and Seneca Streets on the north and south. An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Downtown Seattle, from top of Space Needle (looking south) Map of downtown Seattle Downtown is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington. ...

The original University building on Denny's Knoll, c1870
The original University building on Denny's Knoll, c1870

The UW opened officially on November 4, 1861, as the Territorial University of Washington. The following year, the legislature passed articles formally incorporating the University and establishing a Board of Regents. The school struggled initially, closing three times: in 1863 for lack of students, and again in 1867 and 1876 due to shortage of funds. But by the time Washington entered the Union in 1889, both Seattle and the University had grown substantially. Enrollment had increased from an initial 30 students to nearly 300, and the relative isolation of the campus had given way to encroaching development. A special legislative committee headed by UW graduate Edmond Meany was created for the purpose of finding a new campus better able to serve the growing student population. The committee selected a site on Union Bay northeast of downtown, and the legislature appropriated funds for its purchase and subsequent construction. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the capital city of the United States, see Washington, D.C.. For other uses, see Washington (disambiguation). ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Edmond S. Meany (1862-1935) was a professor of botany and history at the University of Washington and a UW alumnus, having graduated as the valedictorian of his class in 1885. ... Union Bay, Washington is that part of Lake Washington west of a line drawn between Webster Point in Seattles Laurelhurst neighborhood in the north and the northeast corner of the Madison Park neighborhood in the south. ... Downtown Seattle, from top of Space Needle (looking south) Map of downtown Seattle Downtown is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington. ...


The University relocated from downtown to the new campus in 1895, moving into the newly built Denny Hall. The regents tried and failed to sell the old campus, and eventually settled on leasing the area. The University still owns what is now called the Metropolitan Tract. In the heart of the city, it is among the most valuable pieces of real estate in Seattle and generates millions of dollars in revenue annually. The metropolitan tract is a term used to describe 11 acres of land in downtown Seattle owned by the University of Washington. ... Real estate is a legal term that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... USD redirects here. ...


The original Territorial University building was torn down in 1908 and its former site currently houses the Fairmont Olympic Hotel. The sole surviving remnants of the UW's first building are four 24-foot, white, hand-fluted cedar, Ionic columns. They were salvaged by Edmond S. Meany--one of the University's first graduates and the former head of the history department. Meany and his colleague, Dean Herbert T. Condon, dubbed each of the columns "Loyalty," "Industry," "Faith" and "Efficiency," or "LIFE." The columns now stand in the Sylvan Grove Theater. [15] Edmond S. Meany (1862-1935) was a professor of botany and history at the University of Washington and a UW alumnus, having graduated as the valedictorian of his class in 1885. ...

The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition's lower campus axis toward Mount Rainier
The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition's lower campus axis toward Mount Rainier

Organizers of the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition eyed the still largely undeveloped campus as a prime setting for their world's fair. They came to an agreement with the Board of Regents that allowed them to use the campus grounds for the exposition. In exchange, the University would be able to take advantage of the development of the campus for the fair after its conclusion. This included a detailed site plan and several buildings. The plan for the A-Y-P Exposition prepared by John Charles Olmsted was later incorporated into the overall campus master plan and permanently affected the layout of the campus. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition with a view of Mount Rainier The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was a worlds fair held in Seattle in 1909, publicizing the development of the Pacific Northwest. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... The Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition with a view of Mount Rainier The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was a worlds fair held in Seattle in 1909, publicizing the development of the Pacific Northwest. ... Worlds Fair is any of various large expositions held since the mid-19th century. ... John Charles Olmsted (1852-1920) was a noted American landscape architect. ...


Both World Wars brought the military to the campus, with certain facilities temporarily loaned to the federal government. The subsequent post-war periods were times of dramatic growth for the University. The period between the wars saw significant expansion on the upper campus. Construction of the liberal arts quadrangle, known to students as "The Quad," began in 1916 and continued in stages until 1939. The first two wings of Suzzallo Library, considered the architectural centerpiece of the University, were built in 1926 and 1935, respectively. Further growth came with the end of World War II and passage of the G.I. Bill. Among the most important developments of this period was the opening of the medical school in 1946. It would eventually grow into the University of Washington Medical Center, now ranked by U.S. News and World Report among the top ten hospitals in the United States. A world war is a war affecting the majority of the worlds major nations. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Stamp commemorating the G.I. Bill or Servicemens Readjustment Act The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G. I.s) as well as one-year... The University of Washington Medical Center is a hospital in the University District of Seattle, Washington. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


In the early 1950s, the University of Washington Police Department was established. It currently has jurisdiction over the University of Washington campus and University-owned housing, except for the Radford Court apartments in Sand Point. Sand Point is a neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, named after and consisting mostly of the Sand Point peninsula that juts into Lake Washington, which is itself largely given over to Magnuson Park. ...


The 1960s and 1970s are known as the "golden age" of the university due to the tremendous growth in students, facilities, operating budget and prestige under the leadership of Charles Odegaard from 1958 to 1973. Enrollment at the UW more than doubled--from around 16,000 to 34,000--as the baby boom generation came of age. As was the case at many American universities, this era was marked by high levels of student activism, with much of the unrest focused around opposition to the Vietnam War. Odegaard instituted a vision of building a "community of scholars" and convinced the state of Washington legislatures to increase their investments towards the university. Additionally, Washington senators, Henry M. Jackson and Warren G. Magnuson used their political clout to funnel federal research monies to the University of Washington and to this day, UW is among the top recipients of federal research funds in the United States. The results included an operating budget increase of $37 million in 1958, to over $400 million in 1973, and 35 new buildings that doubled the floor space of the university. Charles E. Odegaard (Born on January 10, 1911 in Chicago Heights, Illinois. ... A US postage stamp depicting the increase in birth rate that country experienced after World War II. As is often the case with a large war, the elation of victory and large numbers of returning males to their country triggered a baby boom after the end of World War II... Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Henry Martin Scoop Jackson (May 31, 1912 – September 1, 1983) was a U.S. Congressman and Senator for Washington State from 1941 until his death. ... Warren G. Magnuson Warren Grant Maggie Magnuson (April 12, 1905–May 20, 1989) was a United States Senator of the Democratic Party from Washington from 1944 until 1981. ...


The University opened branch campuses in Bothell and Tacoma in 1990. Initially, these campuses offered curricula for students seeking bachelor's degrees who have already completed two years of higher education, but both schools will transition to four year universities accepting its first freshman class in the fall of 2006. Both campuses offer master's degree programs as well. The University of Washington, Bothell (UW Bothell) is one of the two newest campuses of the University of Washington, located in Bothell. ... The University of Washington, Tacoma (UW, Tacoma, or UWT) is one of the two newest campuses in the University of Washington system, located in Tacoma, south of the main campus in Seattle, Washington, USA. The other satellite campus is in Bothell; both opened in temporary facilities in 1990, and moved... For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Organization

The current president of the University of Washington is Dr. Mark Emmert, the former chancellor of Louisiana State University. Emmert, a 1975 graduate, took office as the University's 30th president on June 14, 2004. Mark Emmert has, since 2004, been the 30th president of the University of Washington, and is a former chancellor of Louisiana State University. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The University is governed by ten regents, one of whom is a student. Its most notable current regent is likely William H. Gates, Sr., father of Bill Gates. The undergraduate student government is the Associated Students of the University of Washington (ASUW) and the graduate student government is the Graduate & Professional Student Senate (GPSS). William Henry Gates, Sr. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... The Associated Students of the University of Washington (ASUW) is the student government on campus at the University of Washington. ...


The University offers bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees through its 140 departments, themselves organized into various colleges and schools: For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Gould hall atrium The College of Architecture and Urban Planning or CAUP is made up of four Departments, Architecture, Construction Management, Landscape Architecture and Urban Design & Planning, as well as several interdisciplinary centers and institutes. ... The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences or CAS is the is the liberal arts and sciences unit of the University of Washington. ... The University of Washington Business School is the business school at the University of Washington, Seattle. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... Mary Gates hall, home of the Information School The Information School (or iSchool) at the University of Washington is an undergraduate and graduate school that offers BS, MLIS, MSIM, and PhD degrees. ... Thompson Hall, home of the Jackson School The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is a school within the University of Washingtons College of Arts and Sciences, in Seattle, Washington. ... The University of Washington, School of Law is the law school of the University of Washington, Seattle. ... The University of Washington School of Medicine (UWSOM) is a public medical school located in Seattle, Washington. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Thermohaline circulation Oceanography (from Ocean + Greek γράφειν = write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... A fishery (plural: fisheries) is an organized effort by humans to catch fish or other aquatic species, an activity known as fishing. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... Daniel Jackson Evans Daniel Jackson Evans (born November 11, 1925) served three terms as governor of the state of Washington from 1965 to 1977, and represented the state in the United States Senate from 1983 to 1989. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ... The University of Washington School of Public Health and Community Medicine serves as the public health school for the University of Washington. ... Social Workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ...

Campus setting and architecture

Panoramic view from the Alberg Terrace of the Allen Building (Computer Science & Engineering) looking East between the Mechanical Engineering building (left) and Civil Engineering building (right). Husky Stadium is in the distance to the right.

The University of Washington, Seattle campus is situated on the shores of Union and Portage Bays, with views of the Cascade Range to the east and the Olympic Mountains to the west. Its most popular views are from Suzzallo Library, which has a vista of Mount Rainier to the southeast, the Quad and its Yoshino cherry trees that bloom spectacularly each spring to the north, and Red Square spreading out in front of it to the west. There is consistently a live Web camera aimed at Red Square and other areas of the campus. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 172 pixelsFull resolution (10730 × 2303 pixel, file size: 5. ... Husky Stadium is the University of Washingtons football and track and field venue in Seattle, USA, located between Montlake Boulevard N.E. and Union Bay just north of the Montlake Cut. ... Union Bay, Washington is that part of Lake Washington west of a line drawn between Webster Point in Seattles Laurelhurst neighborhood in the north and the northeast corner of the Madison Park neighborhood in the south. ... Portage Bay is an arm of Seattle, Washingtons Lake Union and is part of the Lake Washington Ship Canal. ... “Cascades” redirects here. ... The Olympic Mountains The Olympic Mountains are a mountain range on the Olympic Peninsula of western Washington in the United States. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Cherry (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Spring. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Red Square, officially Central Plaza, is a large open square on the campus of the University of Washington that serves as a hub for two of the Universitys major axes, connecting the campuss northern Liberal Arts Quadrangle (The Quad) with the...

Cherry trees in bloom in the Quad.
Cherry trees in bloom in the Quad.

The main campus is bounded on the west by 15th Avenue N.E., on the north by N.E. 45th Street, on the east by Montlake Boulevard N.E., and on the south by N.E. Pacific Street. East Campus stretches east of Montlake Boulevard to Laurelhurst and is largely taken up by wetlands and sports fields. South Campus occupies the land between Pacific Street and the Lake Washington Ship Canal which used to be a golf course and is given over to the health sciences, oceanography, fisheries, and the University of Washington Medical Center. West Campus is less of a separate entity than the others, many of its facilities being on city streets, and stretches between 15th Avenue and Interstate 5 from the Ship Canal to N.E. 41st Street. University Way, known locally as "The Ave", lies nearby and is a focus for much student life at the university. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Laurelhurst Laurelhurst is a well-to-do, peninsular residential neighborhood in Seattle, Washington, USA. It is bounded on the northeast by Ivanhoe Place N.E., beyond which is Windermere; on the northwest by Sand Point Way N.E. and N.E. 45th Street, beyond which are Hawthorne Hills, Ravenna, and... A subtropical wetland in Florida, USA, with an endangered American Crocodile. ... The Lake Washington Ship Canal, which runs through Seattle, Washington connecting Lake Washington to Puget Sound, is a system consisting of, from east to west, Union Bay, the Montlake Cut, Portage Bay, Lake Union, the Fremont Cut, Salmon Bay, the Hiram M. Chittenden Locks, and Shilshole Bay. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... Thermohaline circulation Oceanography (from Ocean + Greek γράφειν = write), also called oceanology or marine science, is the branch of Earth Sciences that studies the Earths oceans and seas. ... A fishery (plural: fisheries) is an organized effort by humans to catch fish or other aquatic species, an activity known as fishing. ... The University of Washington Medical Center is a hospital in the University District of Seattle, Washington. ... Interstate 5 (abbreviated I-5) is the westernmost interstate highway in the continental United States. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ...


The oldest building on campus is Denny Hall. Built in 1895 in the French Renaissance style, it was named in honor of Seattle pioneers Arthur A. and Mary Denny. It served as the core of the University for many years. The Theodore Jacobsen Observatory, the on campus observatory situated just north of Denny Hall, was built from the left over material used in the construction of Denny Hall. Although it is rarely used today, the observatory is the second oldest building on campus. After other structures were erected near Denny Hall with apparently little overall planning, the Board of Regents determined that a master plan was needed. Early plans, including a preliminary proposal by John Charles Olmsted, stepson of renowned landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted, had little impact. This article is about the cultural movement known as the French Renaissance. ... Arthur A. Denny (1822 – 1899) was an early founder of Seattle, Washington (see Denny Party), and a member of the territorial legislature. ... Inside the dome The Theodore Jacobsen Observatory is the on-campus observatory of the University of Washington. ... John Charles Olmsted (1852-1920) was a noted American landscape architect. ... Central Park, like all parks, is an example of landscape architecture. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ...

Suzzallo Library looking east across Red Square
Suzzallo Library looking east across Red Square

Instead, it was the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition that defined much of the campus' future layout. The exposition plan, also designed by John C. Olmsted, defined the University's major axis on the lower campus. Oriented to the southeast, it provides the University with its primary vista of Mount Rainier on clear days. Most of the University's science and engineering buildings line this axis. Suzzallo Library across Red Square at the University of Washington. ... Suzzallo Library across Red Square at the University of Washington. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Red Square, officially Central Plaza, is a large open square on the campus of the University of Washington that serves as a hub for two of the Universitys major axes, connecting the campuss northern Liberal Arts Quadrangle (The Quad) with the... The Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition with a view of Mount Rainier The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was a worlds fair held in Seattle in 1909, publicizing the development of the Pacific Northwest. ... For other uses, see Mount Rainier (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ...


After the exposition, the Board of Regents sought a master plan that would unite the newly developed lower campus with the original buildings of the upper campus including Denny Hall. Rejecting a further proposal from Olmsted, the regents instead turned to local architects Carl F. Gould and Charles H. Bebb. Their proposal was accepted, and came to be called the Regents' Plan. It specified a northeast-southwest axis on upper campus around which would be centered the University's liberal arts departments. This axis joins the lower campus axis laid down during the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition at an open space left behind after a large temporary structure built for the fair was torn down. This space was later paved with a distinctive red brick and has come to be known as Red Square. Some of the buildings from the exposition were kept by the university and have been retrofitted over the years since. One of these is Architecture Hall. Carl Freylinghausen Gould (24 November, 1873 - 21 June, 1942) was a leading architect in the Pacific Northwest, and founder and first chair of the architecture program at the University of Washington. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Red Square, officially Central Plaza, is a large open square on the campus of the University of Washington that serves as a hub for two of the Universitys major axes, connecting the campuss northern Liberal Arts Quadrangle (The Quad) with the...


Bebb and Gould's plan also called for all future construction to adhere to a Collegiate Gothic style. This style is best exemplified on the University campus by the early wings of Suzzallo Library, the University's central library. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Suzzallo Library, looking east across Red Square Suzzallo Library is the central library of the University of Washington in Seattle, and perhaps the most recognizable building on campus. ...


New construction in the 1960s saw a deviation from the Collegiate Gothic style as specified in the Regents' Plan. Business facilities on the upper campus, science and engineering structures on lower campus, and a new wing of Suzzallo Library, were all built in a modernist style, as was a unique, glass-walled building housing an experimental nuclear reactor. The reactor opened in 1961; a small radiation leak in 1972 resulted only in a temporary shutdown, but security concerns eventually led to it being decommissioned. As of 2005 it is in the process of being dismantled. This article focuses on the cultural movement labeled modernism or the modern movement. See also: Modernism (Roman Catholicism) or Modernist Christianity; Modernismo for specific art movement(s) in Spain and Catalonia. ... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... The radiation warning symbol (trefoil). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


An apparent attempt to harmonize future development with the Regents' Plan can be seen in the University's most recent construction, including the 1990 Kenneth Allen wing of the central library and a new generation of medical, science and engineering buildings. Significant funding came from Microsoft co-founders Paul Allen and Bill Gates, who have strong family connections to the university but did not attend UW. Mary Gates Hall opened in May 2000, and in September 2003, the UW law school relocated to the $74 million William H. Gates Hall on the northwest corner of campus, and the $90 million UW Medical Center surgery pavilion opened for operation. The $72 million Paul Allen computer science and engineering building opened in October 2003. In March 2006, the $150 million William H. Foege bioengineering and genome sciences building was dedicated by Bill Gates and former U.S. president Jimmy Carter. For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Mary Maxwell Gates (born 1929) served 18 years (1975-1993) on the University of Washington board of regents. ... Bill Gates William Henry Gates III (born October 28, 1955), commonly known as Bill Gates, is an American businessman and a microcomputer pioneer. ... The University of Washington Medical Center is a hospital in the University District of Seattle, Washington. ... For other persons named Paul Allen, see Paul Allen (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... William Foege, MD, MPH is an American epidemiologist who had worked extensively with smallpox, particularly its control in Nigeria. ... Biological engineering (also biosystems engineering and bioengineering) deals with engineering biological processes in general. ... For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ...


In September 2006, President Emmert announced that the University had finalized the purchase of the neighboring 22-story Safeco Plaza (a University District landmark) as well as several adjacent buildings for the sum of $130 million. At present, plans are being finalized to relocate UW administration and support services to the complex, leaving the main campus (one block away) for teaching and research.


Most of the streets and major walkways on campus are named after the state's counties. Major exceptions are Memorial Way and George Washington Lane. Memorial Way is named in honor of members of the UW community who died in World War I and also features a flagpole engraved at its base with the members of the UW community who died in World War II. List of Washington counties: Washington counties Adams County Asotin County Benton County Chelan County Clallam County Clark County Columbia County Cowlitz County Douglas County Ferry County Franklin County Garfield County Grant County Grays Harbor County Island County Jefferson County King County Kitsap County Kittitas County Klickitat County Lewis County Lincoln... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799)[1] led Americas Continental Army to victory over Britain in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and in 1789 was elected the first President of the United States of America. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Other attractions on campus include the Henry Art Gallery and the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture. The Washington Park Arboretum, south of main campus across Union Bay, is run by the university, though owned by the city of Seattle. The Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Center is also an interesting attraction. The building, at 5,740,200 square feet, is the second largest office building in the United States. The Henry Art Gallery is the art museum of the University of Washington in Seattle, Washington, USA. Located on the west edge of campus along 15th Avenue N.E. in the University District, it was founded in 1927 and was the first public art museum in the state of Washington. ... The Thomas Burke Memorial Washington State Museum is a museum in the northwest corner of the campus of the University of Washington, at the intersection of N.E. 45th Street and 15th Avenue N.E. in Seattle, Washington, USAs University District. ... 1911 Lynn Street Aqueduct The parks northern entrance Same location, closer up Washington Park is a public park in Seattle, Washington, most of which is taken up by the Washington Park Arboretum. ... Union Bay from Union Bay Natural Area with Laurelhurst, the Evergreen Point Floating Bridge and Madison Park (left to right) beyond Winter view across Union Bay, looking from the Museum of History and Industry toward Laurelhurst. ... The Warren G. Magnuson Health Sciences Building is part of the University of Washington (Seattle, WA) and was established in 1970, although many of its component units have been operating for much longer. ...


Athletics and traditions

Main article: Washington Huskies
Washington Huskies logo.

UW students, sports teams, and alumni are called Washington Huskies, and often referred to metonymically as "Montlake," due to the campus's location on Montlake Boulevard N.E. [41] (It should be noted that the traditional bounds of the Montlake neighborhood do not extend north of the Montlake Cut to include the campus.) The husky was selected as the school mascot by student committee in 1922. It replaced the "Sun Dodger," an abstract reference to the local weather that was quickly dropped in favor of something more tangible. The costumed "Harry the Husky" performs at sporting and special events, and a live Alaskan Malamute, currently named Spirit, has traditionally led the UW football team onto the field at the start of games. The school colors of purple and gold were adopted in 1892 by student vote. The choice was purportedly inspired by the first stanza of Lord Byron's The Destruction of Sennacherib:
The term properly applies to any sports team at the school. ... Image File history File links University_of_Washington_primary_logo. ... Image File history File links University_of_Washington_primary_logo. ... The term properly applies to any sports team at the school. ... Montlake is a generally quiet neighborhood in central Seattle. ... Montlake Cut, looking west The Montlake Cut is the easternmost section of the Lake Washington Ship Canal, which passes through the city of Seattle, linking Lake Washington to Puget Sound. ... Husky is a general term for several breeds of dogs used as sled dogs. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Seattle redirects here. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article is about the color. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... In poetry, a stanza is a unit within a larger poem. ... Lord Byron, English poet Lord Byron (1803), as painted by Elisabeth Vigee-Lebrun George Gordon Byron, 6th Baron Byron, (January 22, 1788 – April 19, 1824) was the most widely read English language poet of his day. ... Wikisource has original text related to this article: The Destruction of Sennacherib The Destruction of Sennacherib is a poem by Lord Byron first published in 1815. ...

The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold,
And his cohorts were gleaming in purple and gold;
And the sheen of their spears was like stars on the sea,
When the blue wave rolls nightly on deep Galilee.

The sports teams participate in the National Collegiate Athletic Association's Division I-A and in the Pacific Ten Conference. Among its facilities on campus are Husky Stadium (football and track & field), the Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion (basketball and volleyball), Husky ballpark (baseball), Husky Softball Stadium, the Nordstrom Tennis Center, Dempsey Indoor (Indoor track & field, football) and the Conibear Shellhouse (rowing). The golf team plays at the Washington National Golf Club and the swimming team calls the Weyerhaeuser Aquatic Center and the Husky pool home. For other uses, see Assyria (disambiguation). ... The Sea of Galilee or Lake Kinneret (Hebrew ים כנרת), is Israels largest freshwater lake. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... Husky Stadium is the University of Washingtons football and track and field venue in Seattle, USA, located between Montlake Boulevard N.E. and Union Bay just north of the Montlake Cut. ... Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion, commonly known as Hec Ed, is a 10,000-seat basketball arena on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle. ... This is the page for the department store. ... This article is about the sport. ... Swimmer redirects here. ... Weyerhaeuser is one of the largest pulp and paper companies in the world; the worlds largest private owner of softwood timberland; and the second largest owner in the United States, behind International Paper. ...


The University football team is traditionally competitive, having won a share of the national championship in the 1991 and 1960 seasons, to go along with eight Rose Bowl victories and an Orange Bowl title. From 1907 to 1917, Washington football teams were unbeaten in 63 consecutive games, an NCAA record. Tailgating by boat has been a Husky Stadium tradition since 1920 when the stadium was first built on the shores of Lake Washington. The Apple Cup game is an annual game against cross-state rival Washington State University that was first contested in 1900 with UW leading the all-time series, 64 wins to 29 losses and 6 ties. Tyrone Willingham is the current head football coach. College Football has a long and storied history at the University of Washington. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... The Orange Bowl is an annual college football game that is usually played on January 1 in the Miami, Florida metro area, in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... A tailgate party at the 2005 Big 12 Championship game - note the pickup truck tailgates In North America, a tailgate party is an often celebratory social event held on and around the open tailgate of a vehicle. ... Lake Washington is the second largest natural lake in Washington State, USA, after Lake Chelan, and the largest lake in King County. ... The Apple Cup is the annual college football game between cross-state rivals the University of Washington (UW) and Washington State University (WSU), the two largest universities in Washington. ... Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ... Lionel Tyrone Willingham, or Ty Willingham (born December 30, 1953 in Kinston, North Carolina) is the head football coach at the University of Washington. ...

Hec Edmundson Pavilion is used for basketball and volleyball.
Hec Edmundson Pavilion is used for basketball and volleyball.

The men's basketball team has been moderately successful, though recently the team has enjoyed a resurgence under coach Lorenzo Romar. With Romar as head coach, the team went to three straight NCAA tournaments (2004-2006), consecutive top 16 (sweet sixteen) appearances, and secured a #1 seed in 2005. On December 23, 2005, the men's basketball team notched their 800th victory in Hec Edmundson Pavilion, the most wins for any NCAA team in its current arena. In 2007, the basketball team, playing in an extremely strong Pac-10 Conference, failed to make the postseason after finishing 7th. Image File history File links Hec_Edmundson_Pavilion. ... Image File history File links Hec_Edmundson_Pavilion. ... Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion Bank of America Arena at Hec Edmundson Pavilion, commonly known as Hec Ed, is a 10,000-seat basketball arena on the campus of the University of Washington in Seattle. ... This article is about the sport. ... Image:2002161931. ... // Final four redirects here. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Rowing is a longstanding tradition at the University of Washington dating back to 1901. The Washington men's crew gained international prominence by winning the gold medal at the 1936 Summer Olympics in Berlin, defeating the German and Italian crews much to the chagrin of Adolf Hitler who was in attendance [42]. In 1958, the men's crew furthered their lore with a shocking win over Leningrad Trud's world champion rowers in Moscow, resulting in the first American sporting victory on Soviet soil, and certainly the first time a Russian crowd gave any American team a standing ovation during the Cold War [43]. The Washington men's crew is the current collegiate national champion for 2007. In all, the men's crew team have won 12 national titles, 15 Olympic gold medals, two silver and five bronze. The women have 10 national titles and two Olympic gold medals. Rowing is the oldest intercollegiate sport in the United States. ... Gold Medal is an album by American band The Donnas, released in 2004. ... The 1936 Summer Olympics, officially known as the Games of the XI Olympiad, were held in 1936 in Berlin, Germany. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ... Hitler redirects here. ... Saint Petersburg (Russian: Санкт-Петербу́рг, English transliteration: Sankt-Peterburg), colloquially known as Питер (transliterated Piter), formerly known as Leningrad (Ленингра́д, 1924–1991) and... Trud can mean several things: Trud is an alternative name for the Valkyrie Thrud. ... For other uses, see Moscow (disambiguation). ... Soviet redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ...


Other recent national champions include the 2005-2006 women's volleyball team that became the first team in NCAA division I volleyball history to win the national championship tournament by sweeping all six matches with a score of three games to none, including an upset of the #1 Nebraska Cornhuskers in the championship game. Individually, James Lepp was the 2005 NCAA men's golf champion. Ryan Brown (men's 800 meters) and Amy Lia (women's 1500 meters) won individual titles at the 2006 NCAA Track & Field Championships. Ryan Brown also won the 800 meter title at the 2007 NCAA Indoor Track & Field Championships. For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ... James Lepp (born November 19, 1983 in Abbotsford, British Columbia) is a Canadian golfer. ... This article is about the sport. ... A womens 400 m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track in the Helsinki Olympic Stadium in Finland. ...


The University of Washington Husky Marching Band performs at many Husky sporting events including all football games. The band was founded in 1929, and today it is a cornerstone of Husky spirit. The band marches using a traditional high step, and it is one of only a few marching bands left in the United States to do so. Like many college bands, the Husky band has several traditional songs that it has played for decades, including the official fight song "Bow Down to Washington" and "Tequila", as well as fan-favorite "Africano". An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... Bow Down to Washington is the official fight song of the University of Washington. ... Disambiguation: Tequila is also the name of a hit by the band Terrorvision Tequila is a 1958 surf instrumental by the music band The Champs. ...


While often disputed, many claim Husky Stadium to be the birthplace of the crowd phenomenon known as "The Wave". The wave is often said to have been invented in October of 1981 by Husky graduate Robb Weller and UW band director Bill Bissel. Stadium crowd performing the wave at the Confederations Cup 2005 in Frankfurt A packed crowd in a stadium does the wave (in some places outside of North America known as the Mexican wave) when a wave is created in the crowd by successive groups of spectators briefly standing and raising...


The student newspaper is The Daily of the University of Washington, usually referred to as simply The Daily. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Presidents

The following individuals have held the Office of President of the University of Washington. ...

Notable UW people

Warren G. Magnuson, United States Senator from Washington This page lists noted students, alumni and faculty members of the University of Washington. ...

UW student organizations

This page lists University of Washington student organizations. ...

See also

The Manastash Ridge Observatory is an astronomical observatory built in 1972 by the University of Washington. ... Inside the dome The Theodore Jacobsen Observatory is the on-campus observatory of the University of Washington. ... Benson Hall Benson Hall is a building in the University of Washington campus. ... Hansee (Blaine) in the snow. ... Educational oversight Secretary Deputy Secretary U.S. Department of Education Margaret Spellings Raymond Simon National education budget $1. ... The Internationales Kulturinstitut (English: International Cultural Institute) is an educational institution based in Vienna, Austria. ... GU8 or Global U8 is a consortium that consists of 8 universities from USA, Israel, Japan, China, Australia, France and Republic of Korea. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Buhain, Venice (May 25, 1999), "But what does it mean?", The Daily, <http://72.14.253.104/search?q=cache:DhKyii5JvccJ:archives.thedaily.washington.edu/1999/052599/NF2.factoid.html>
  2. ^ a b University of Washington Annual Report (January 2006).
  3. ^ UW passed $1 billion research budget mark
  4. ^ a b c The Top American Research Universities (December 2005)
  5. ^ a b UW Excellence in Research
  6. ^ "Student Headcount By Campus and Term, making it the largest university (in terms of student population) on the west coast." Office of Institutional Studies. University of Washington.
  7. ^ "Undergraduates." Office of News and Information. University of Washington.
  8. ^ UW culls the best for 2007 incoming freshmen
  9. ^ ARL Statistics 2004
  10. ^ ResearchChannel contact UW
  11. ^ ResearchChannel participants
  12. ^ UWTV
  13. ^ Inside HigherEd Husky Promise
  14. ^ UW Husky Promise
  15. ^ http://www.collegejournal.com/aidadmissions/newstrends/20061114-keates.html
  16. ^ Academic Analytics
  17. ^ The Chronicle of Higher Education
  18. ^ UW News
  19. ^ UW First in Peace Corps 2007
  20. ^ Peace Corps Top Colleges 2007
  21. ^ [1][2]
  22. ^ [3]
  23. ^ [4]
  24. ^ [5]
  25. ^ [6]
  26. ^ "America's Best Grad Schools 2007: Health: Audiology." U.S. News and World Report.
  27. ^ "America's Best Grad Schools 2007: Health: Speech-Language Pathology." U.S. News and World Report.
  28. ^ [7]
  29. ^ [8]
  30. ^ [9]
  31. ^ [10]
  32. ^ [11]
  33. ^ "[12]" US News and World Report, America's Best Colleges 2008
  34. ^ The Washington Monthly College Guide. The Washington Monthly.
  35. ^ UW CIE ranked fifth best in nation
  36. ^ UW Executive MBA ranked third by The Economist
  37. ^ Top 500 World Universities (2006) Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University
  38. ^ Top 100 Global Universities (2006). Newsweek.
  39. ^ Webometrics Ranking of World Universities (2006)
  40. ^ World ranking by Wuhan University
  41. ^ [13]
  42. ^ Events of the Century, Seattle PI, December 21, 1999.
  43. ^ Water World, Sports Illustrated, November 17, 2003.

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
University of Washington

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Washington - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2850 words)
Also known as Washington and locally as The U or UW (pronounced "U-Dub"), it is the largest university in the Pacific Northwest and the oldest public university on the West Coast of the United States.
The University of Washington, Seattle campus is situated on the shores of Union and Portage Bays, with views of the Cascade Range to the east and the Olympic Mountains to the west.
University Way, known locally as "The Ave", lies nearby and is a focus for much student life at the university.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m