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Encyclopedia > University of Warsaw

University of Warsaw
Uniwersytet Warszawski

Latin: Universitas Varsoviensis

Established November 19, 1816
Type Public
Rector Professor Katarzyna Chałasińska-Macukow
Staff 5531
Students 56858 (November 2005)
Doctoral students 2148
Location Warsaw, Poland
Address Krakowskie Przedmieście 26/28, 00-927
Telephone +48 (22) 552 03 55
Campus Urban
Affiliations EUA, Socrates-Erasmus
Website www.uw.edu.pl

University of Warsaw (Polish: Uniwersytet Warszawski) is the largest university in Poland. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... November 19 is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Aquatint of a Doctor in Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ... Motto: Contemnit procellas (It defies the storms) Semper invicta (Always invincible) Coordinates: Country Poland Voivodeship Masovia Powiat city county Gmina Warszawa Districts 18 boroughs City Rights turn of the 13th century Government  - Mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz (PO) Area  - City 516. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... The ERASMUS programme was established in 1987 and forms a major part of the European Union Lifelong Learning Programme 2007-2013. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...

Contents

History

1816-1831

The Royal University of Warsaw was established in 1816, when the partitions of Poland separated Warsaw from the oldest and most influential academic center in Kraków. The School of Law and the Medical School were first established in the Duchy of Warsaw. In 1816 Alexander I permitted the Polish authorities to create a university, composed of five faculties: Law and Administration, Medicine, Philosophy, Theology and Art and Humanities. Soon the university grew and the number of students reached 800 while the number of professors reached 50. 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Motto: Contemnit procellas (It defies the storms) Semper invicta (Always invincible) Coordinates: Country Poland Voivodeship Masovia Powiat city county Gmina Warszawa Districts 18 boroughs City Rights turn of the 13th century Government  - Mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz (PO) Area  - City 516. ... Wawel Hill, Old Town, Kraków. ... Location Official languages Polish Established church Roman Catholic Capital Warsaw Largest City Warsaw Head of state Duke of Warsaw Area about 155,000 km² Population about 4. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Aleksandr I Pavlovich (Russian: Александр I Павлович) (December 23, 1777–December 1, 1825), was Emperor of Russia from 23 March 1801-1 December 1825 and King of Poland from 1815–1825, as well as the first Grand Duke of Finland. ...


However, after most of the students and professors took part in the November Uprising between 1830 and 1831, the university was closed down. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution 1830 (MDCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


1857-1869

After the Crimean War, Russia entered a brief period of liberalization called the Post-Sevastopolian Thaw. A creation of a Polish medical and surgical college in Warsaw was permitted (Akademia Medyko-Chirurgiczna). In 1862 faculties of Law and Administration, Philology and History and Mathematics and Physics were opened. The newly-established college gained much importance and was soon renamed to "Main School" (Szkoła Główna). However, after the January Uprising the liberal period ended and all schools with Polish language were closed again. During its short existence the Main School managed to educate more than 3 000 students, many of whom became the backbone of Polish intelligentsia. Combatants Allies: Second French Empire United Kingdom Ottoman Empire Kingdom of Sardinia Russian Empire Bulgarian volunteers Casualties 90,000 French 35,000 Turkish 17,500 British 2,050 Sardinian killed, wounded and died of disease 256,000 killed, wounded and died of disease The Crimean War (1854–1856) was fought... 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Polonia (Poland), 1863, by Jan Matejko, 1864, oil on canvas, 156 × 232 cm, National Museum, Kraków. ... Polish (jÄ™zyk polski, polszczyzna) is the official language of Poland. ... The notion of an intellectual elite as a distinguished social stratum can be traced far back in history. ...


1870-1915

The Main School was replaced with a Russian language "Imperial University of Warsaw". Its purpose was to provide education for the Russian military garrison of Warsaw, however the main group of the students (up to 70% out of an average of 1 500 to 2 000 students) were Poles. The tsarist authorities believed that the Russian university would become a perfect means of russification of the Polish society and spent significant effort on building a new university campus. However, various underground organizations soon started to spread out and the students became their leaders in Warsaw. Most notable of these groups (the supporters of Polish revival and the socialists) joined the ranks of the 1905 Revolution. Afterwards a boycott of Russian educational facilities was proclaimed and the number of Polish students dropped to below 10%. Most of the students who wanted to continue their education left for Galicia and Western Europe. Russian ( , transliteration: russkiy yazyk, ) is the most widely spoken language of Eurasia and the most widespread of the Slavic languages. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Socialism refers to a broad array of doctrines or political movements that envisage a socio-economic system in which property and the distribution of wealth are subject to social control. ... (Redirected from 1905 Revolution) The Russian Revolution of 1905 was a country-wide spasm of anti-government and undirected violence. ... Look up Boycott in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Coat-of-arms of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria Galicia (Ukrainian: , Polish: , Russian: , German: , Hungarian: , Czech: , Yiddish: , Turkish: , Romanian: ) is an historical region in East Central Europe, currently divided between Poland and Ukraine. ...


1915-1918

Main gate of the University of Warsaw
Main gate of the University of Warsaw

During the World War I Warsaw was seized by Germany in 1915. In order to win the Poles for their case and secure the Polish area behind the front lines the governments of Germany and Austria-Hungary allowed for a certain liberalization of life in Poland. In accordance with the concept of Mitteleuropa, German military authorities allowed for several Polish social and educational societies to be recreated. Among them was the University of Warsaw. Polish language was reintroduced and the professors were allowed to return to their work. In order not to let the Polish patriotic movement out of control the number of lecturers was kept low (usually not more than 50), but there were no limits on the number of students. Until 1918 their number rose from merely 1 000 to over 4 500. Download high resolution version (824x616, 222 KB) Main gate of Warsaw University in Warsaw, Poland. ... Download high resolution version (824x616, 222 KB) Main gate of Warsaw University in Warsaw, Poland. ... This article is becoming very long. ... 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar). ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Mitteleuropa (Middle-Europe) is a German term approximately equal to Central Europe. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


1918-1939

After Poland regained its independence in 1918 University of Warsaw started to grow very quickly. It was reformed; all the important posts (the rector, senate, deans and councils) became democratically elected and the state spent considerable amounts of money to modernize and equip it. Many professors came back from exile and cooperated in the effort. By the late 1920s the level of education in Warsaw had reached a western European level. World War I After World War I and the collapse of the Russian, German and Austro-Hungarian Empires, Poland became an independent republic. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... The 1920s is a decade sometimes referred to as the Jazz Age or the Roaring Twenties, usually applied to America. ...


By the beginning of the 1930s University of Warsaw became the biggest university in Poland, with over 250 lecturers and 10,000 students. However, the financial problems of the newly-reborn state did not allow for education to be free of charge and students had to pay a tuition fee for their studies (an average monthly salary per year). Also, the number of scholarships was very limited and only approximately 3% of students were able to get it. Despite these economic problems, University of Warsaw grew rapidly. New faculties were opened and the main campus was expanded. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... Scholarship is the pursuit of academic research, whether in the arts and humanities or sciences, and in all such fields means deep mastery of a subject, often through study at institutions of higher education. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


After the death of Józef Piłsudski the senate of the University of Warsaw renamed the university "Józef Piłsudski University of Warsaw" (Uniwersytet Warszawski im. Józefa Piłsudskiego). A time of troubles started for academics in Poland as the Sanacja government started to limit the autonomy of the universities and rightist students started to organize anti-Semitic demonstrations and riots. The government was forced to back down in 1937 and the right-wing followers of the nationalist parties were peacefully pacified, but professors and students remained divided for the rest of the 1930s. Office Chief of State, Marshal of Poland Term of office from November 14, 1918 until December 9, 1922 Profession Statesman Political party none (see Sanacja for details), formerly PPS Spouse Maria PiÅ‚sudska Aleksandra PiÅ‚sudska Date of birth December 5, 1867 Place of birth Zułów, in todays... Flag of the Chief of State (1919-1927) Sanacja was a coalition political movement of the Second Polish Republic in the inter war years. ... Community organizing is a process by which people are brought together to act in common self-interest. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Eugène Delacroixs Liberty Leading the People, symbolising French nationalism during the July Revolution. ...


1939-1944

For more details on this period see: Underground Education in Poland During World War II

After the Polish Defensive War of 1939 the German authorities of the General Gouvernment closed all the institutions of higher education in Poland. The equipment and most of the laboratories were taken to Germany and divided among the German universities while the main campus of the University of Warsaw was turned into military barracks. This article covers the topic of underground education in Poland (Polish Tajne szkolnictwo) during World War II. After the Polish defeat in the Polish Defence War of 1939 and the subsequent German occupation of most of Polish territory, Poland was divided onto the areas directly incorporated into the Reich and... Combatants Poland Germany, Soviet Union, Slovakia Commanders Edward Rydz-ÅšmigÅ‚y Fedor von Bock (Army Group North), Gerd von Rundstedt (Army Group South), Mikhail Kovalov (Belorussian Front), Semyon Timoshenko (Ukrainian Front), Ferdinand ÄŒatloÅ¡ (Field Army Bernolak) Strength 39 divisions, 16 brigades, 4,300 guns, 880 tanks, 400 aircraft Total: 950... The General Government (in full General government for the occupied Polish areas, in German Generalgouvernement für die besetzten polnischen Gebiete) was the name given by Germany to the governing authority in Poland after its occupation by the Wehrmacht in September and October 1939. ... There are 331 universities and colleges in Germany, 159 Fachhochschulen (Universities of Applied Science), 95 non-state institutions (of these 51 privately-, 44 church-operated), and 56 which teach arts or music only. ...


German racist theories assumed that no education of Poles was needed and the whole nation was to be turned into uneducated serfs of the German race. Education in Polish was banned and punished with death. However, many professors organized the so-called "Secret University of Warsaw" (Tajny Uniwersytet Warszawski). The lectures were held in small groups in private apartments and the attendants were constantly risking deconspiration and death. However, the net of underground faculties spread rapidly and by 1944 there were more than 300 lecturers and 3 500 students at various courses. Manifestations Slavery · Racial profiling · Lynching Hate speech · Hate crime · Hate groups Genocide · Holocaust · Pogrom Ethnocide · Ethnic cleansing · Race war Religious persecution · Gay bashing Pedophobia · Ephebiphobia Movements Discriminatory Aryanism · Neo-Nazism · Supremacism Kahanism Anti-discriminatory Abolitionism · Civil rights · Gay rights Womens/Universal suffrage · Mens rights Childrens rights · Youth... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Most of the students took part in the Warsaw Uprising as the soldiers of Armia Krajowa and Szare Szeregi. The German-held campus of the University was turned into a well-fortified area with bunkers and machine gun nests. Also, it was located close to the buildings occupied by the German garrison of Warsaw. Heavy fights for the campus started on the first day of the Uprising, but the partisans were not able to break through the fortified gates. Several assaults were bloodily repelled and the campus remained in German hands until the end of the fights. Combatants Poland Germany Commanders Tadeusz Bór-Komorowski, Antoni Chruściel, Tadeusz Pełczyński Erich von dem Bach, Rainer Stahel, Heinz Reinefarth, Bronislav Kaminski Strength 50,000 troops 25,000 troops Casualties 18,000 killed, 12,000 wounded, 15,000 taken prisoner 250,000 civilians killed 10,000 killed... Armia Krajowa (the Home Army), abbreviated AK, was the dominant Polish resistance movement in World War II German-occupied Poland. ... Szare Szeregi (Polish for Grey Ranks) was a codename for the underground Polish Scouting Association (Związek Harcerstwa Polskiego) during World War II. The organisation was created on September 27, 1939, in Warsaw and largely contributed to all resistance actions of the Polish Secret State and its members were among... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ...


During the uprising and the occupation 63 professors were killed, either during fights or as an effect of German policy of extermination of Polish inteligentsia. The University lost 60% of its buildings as an effect of the fights in 1944. Up to 80% of the collections (including priceless pieces of art and books donated to the University) were either destroyed or transported to Germany - never to return. The intelligentsia is a social class of intellectuals and social groups close to them (e. ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


1945-1956

After the World War II it was not clear whether the university would be restored and whether Warsaw would be rebuilt at all. However, many professors who survived the war returned to Poland and started to organize the University of Warsaw from scratch. In December 1945 lectures were resumed for almost 4 000 students in the ruins of the campus and the buildings were gradually rebuilt. Until late 1940s the University remained relatively independent. However, soon the communist authorities of Poland started to impose controls and the period of Stalinism started. Many professors were arrested by the Urząd Bezpieczeństwa (Secret Police), the books were censored and ideological criteria in admission of new lecturers and students were introduced. However, at the same time education in Poland became free of charge and the number of young people to receive the state scholarships reached 60% of all the students. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday. ... Communism is an ideology that seeks to establish a classless, stateless social organization based on common ownership of the means of production. ... Joseph Stalin Stalinism is the political and economic system named after Joseph Stalin, who implemented it in the Soviet Union. ... SÅ‚użba BezpieczeÅ„stwa (SB, until 1956 UrzÄ…d BezpieczeÅ„stwa, UB) was the name of the communist intelligence agency and secret police in the Peoples Republic of Poland. ... Censorship is the removal or withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ... Scholarship is the pursuit of academic research, whether in the arts and humanities or sciences, and in all such fields means deep mastery of a subject, often through study at institutions of higher education. ...


1956-1989

The Kazimierzowski Palace, seat of the rector, in 1964
The Kazimierzowski Palace, seat of the rector, in 1964

After Władysław Gomułka rose to power in Poland in 1956 a brief period of liberalization ensued. Although communist ideology still played a major role in most faculties (especially in such faculties as history, law, economics and political science), international cooperation was resumed and the level of education rose. However, the government soon started to suppress freedom of thought, which led to increasing unrest among the students. An anti-Semitic and anti-democratic campaign in 1968 led to an outbreak of student demonstrations in Warsaw which were brutally crushed by the militia and groups of ordinary workers. As a result, a large number of students and professors were expelled from the university while some were drafted into the army. Most professors of Jewish descent were forced to emigrate while the leaders of the democratic movement, Jacek Kuroń and Karol Modzelewski, were sentenced to 3.5 years in prison. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1825 KB) Kazimierzowski Palace, seat of the rector and the rectorate of the Warsaw University, in 1964. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2304x1728, 1825 KB) Kazimierzowski Palace, seat of the rector and the rectorate of the Warsaw University, in 1964. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw GomuÅ‚ka (February 6, 1905, Krosno – September 1, 1982) was a Polish Communist leader. ... 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Banners from March 1968. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... Jacek Jan KuroÅ„ (b. ... Karol Modzelewski (born 1937) is a Polish historian, writer and politician. ...


Nevertheless, the University remained a relative centre of free thought and education. What professors could not say during lectures they expressed during informal meetings with their students. Many of them became leaders and members of the Solidarity movement and other societies of the democratic opposition. The scientists working at the University of Warsaw were also among the most prominent printers of books forbidden by censorship. Solidarity (Polish:  ; full name: Independent Self-governing Trade Union Solidarity — Niezależny SamorzÄ…dny ZwiÄ…zek Zawodowy Solidarność) is a Polish trade union federation founded in September 1980 at the Lenin Shipyards, and originally led by Lech WaÅ‚Ä™sa. ... Censorship is the removal or withholding of information from the public by a controlling group or body. ...


Campus

The main campus of the University of Warsaw is located in downtown Warsaw, at Krakowskie Przedmieście street in the Old Town area. It consists of several historical palaces, mostly nationalized in 19th century. Among the most important buildings are: The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Kazimierzowski palace (Pałac Kazimierzowski) - the seat of the rector and the senate
  • Old Library (Stary BUW) - currently after refurbishment a secondary lecture hall
  • The Main School (Szkoła Główna) - the seat of the Main School until the January Uprising, later the faculty of biology; currently after refurbishment seat of the institute of archaeology
  • Auditorium Maximum - the main lecture hall with seats for several hundred students.

There is also a New Library ( Nowy BUW ) - an impressive new building with spectacular roof gardens and several smaller campuses in other parts of the city, most notably the physical and chemical centre at Banacha street where also Mathematics, Informatics and Mechanics department (MIM) is located. The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... A senate is a deliberative body, often the upper house or chamber of a legislature. ... Polonia (Poland), 1863, by Jan Matejko, 1864, oil on canvas, 156 × 232 cm, National Museum, Kraków. ...


Altogether the University of Warsaw owns 126 different buildings. Further developments and a vigorous refurbishment project of the main campus are underway. The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


Faculties

  1. Faculty of Applied Linguistics and East-Slavonic Philology ([1])
  2. Faculty of Applied Social Sciences and Resocialization
  3. Faculty of Biology ([2])
  4. Faculty of Chemistry ([3])
  5. Faculty of Economic Sciences ([4])
  6. Faculty of Education
  7. Faculty of Geography and Regional Studies ([5])
  8. Faculty of Geology ([6])
  9. Faculty of History
  10. Faculty of Journalism and Political Science
  11. Faculty of Law and Administration ([7])
  12. Faculty of Management ([8])
  13. Faculty of Mathematics, Informatics, and Mechanics ([9])
  14. Faculty of Modern Languages and Oriental Studies
  15. Faculty of Philosophy and Sociology ([10])
  16. Faculty of Physics ([11])
  17. Faculty of Polish Studies
  18. Faculty of Psychology ([12])

Other units

  • British Studies Centre
  • Centre de Civilisation Francaise et d'Etudes Francophones aupres de l`Universite de Varsovie
  • Centre for Archaeological Research at Novae
  • Centre for Environmental Study
  • Centre for Europe
  • Centre for Inter-Faculty Individual Studies in the Humanities ([13])
  • Centre for Foreign Language Teaching
  • Centre for Open Multimedia Education
  • Centre for the Study of Classical Tradition in Poland and East-Central Europe
  • Centre of Studies in Territorial Self-Government and Local Development
  • Chaire UNESCO du Developpement Durable de l`Universite de Vaersovie
  • Comite Polonais de l`Alliance Francais
  • Erasmus of Rotterdam Chair
  • University of Warsaw for Foreign Language Teacher Training and European Education
  • University College of English Language Teacher Education
  • University College of French Language Teacher Education
  • University College of German Language Teacher Education
  • Heavy Ion Laboratory
  • Institute of Americas and Europe
  • Centre for Latin-American Studies (CESLA)
  • Centre for European Regional and Local Studies
  • American Studies Centre
  • Interdisciplinary Centre for Behavioural Genetics
  • Interdisciplinary Centre for Mathematical and Computational Modelling ([14])
  • Inter-Faculty Institute for Social Studies
  • Physical Education and Sports Centre
  • Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology
  • University Centre for Technology Transfer
  • Individual Inter-faculty Studies in Mathematics and Natural Sciences ([15])
  • Inter-faculty Study Programme in Environmental Protection

French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... A nova is a cataclysmic nuclear explosion caused by the accretion of hydrogen onto the surface of a white dwarf star. ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... Heavy-ion refers to ion of atom which is usually heavier than carbon. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ...

Institutions

  • Warsaw University Libraries ([16])
  • Institute of Scientific Information and Book Studies ([17])
  • The Institute of Polish Language and Culture 'Polonicum' ([18])

Notable alumni

Paul Erdos Paul ErdÅ‘s (March 26, 1913 – September 20, 1996) was an immensely prolific and famously eccentric mathematician who, with hundreds of collaborators, worked on problems in combinatorics, graph theory, number theory, classical analysis, approximation theory, set theory and probability theory. ... Jerzy Andrzejewski (August 19, 1909, Warsaw, Poland - April 19, 1983, Warsaw) was a prolific Polish author. ... Krzysztof Kamil BaczyÅ„ski, (code-name Jan Bugaj, 1921-1944) - Polish poet and Home Army soldier. ...   (August 16, 1913 – March 9, 1992) (Hebrew: מְנַחֵם בְּגִין) was a Polish-Jewish head of the Zionist underground group the Irgun, Nobel Peace Prize laureate and the first Likud Prime Minister of Israel. ... A bilingual poster in Romanian and Hungarian promoting a film about Jewish settlement in Palestine, 1930s. ... Tadeusz Borowski (1922-1951) was a Polish writer and journalist, and a Holocaust survivor. ... Marian Brandys (born in 1912, died in 1998) was a Polish writer and screenwriter. ... The only known photograph of Frédéric Chopin (commonly mistaken for a daguerreotype), believed to have been taken by Louis-Auguste Bisson in 1849 “Chopin” redirects here. ... WÅ‚odzimierz Cimoszewicz (born September 13, 1950 in Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish politician, the Prime Minister of Poland from 1996 to autumn 1997, the Foreign Minister of Poland in the governments of Leszek Miller (2001-2004) and Marek Belka (2004-2005) , and speaker of the Sejm (lower chamber of... Joseph Epstein, also known as Colonel Gilles, was a leader of the French Resistance during the Second World War. ... Professor BronisÅ‚aw Geremek Professor BronisÅ‚aw Geremek (born March 6, 1932 in Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish (son of Rabbi) social historian and politician. ... Witold Gombrowicz (August 4, 1904, MaÅ‚oszyce, near Kielce, Poland – July 24, 1969, Vence, near Nice, France) was a Polish novelist and dramatist active from the 1930s until the end of his life. ... Jan Tomasz Gross (born December 8, 1947 in Warsaw)- a controversial Polish-American historian of Jewish origin. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... Gustaw Herling GrudziÅ„ski (b. ... Gulag ( , Russian: ) is an acronym for Главное Управление Исправительно—Трудовых Лагерей и колоний, Glavnoye Upravleniye Ispravitelno-trudovykh Lagerey i kolonii, The Chief Directorate [or Administration] of Corrective Labour Camps and Colonies of the NKVD. Anne Applebaum, in her book Gulag: A History, explains: The word Gulag has also come to signify not only the administration of the... Russian literature refers to the literature of Russia or its émigrés, and to the Russian-language literature of several independent nations once a part of what was historically Russia or the Soviet Union. ... Alpha Oumar Konaré (born 2 February 1946) was the president of Mali for two five-year terms (1992 to 2002), and has been Chairman of the Commission of the African Union since 2003. ... Tadeusz Mazowiecki (born April 18, 1927 in PÅ‚ock) is a Polish author, journalist, social worker and politician, formerly one of the leaders of the Solidarity movement, and the first non-communist prime minister in Central and Eastern Europe after World War II. Tadeusz Mazowiecki as Prime Minister of Poland... Adam Michnik(Szechter) (born October 17, 1946 in Warsaw, Poland) is the editor-in-chief of Gazeta Wyborcza (Election Gazette), the second largest Polish newspaper. ... Karol Modzelewski (born 1937) is a Polish historian, writer and politician. ... Jan Ferdynand Olszewski (born August 20, 1930 in Warszawa) is a Polish lawyer and political figure. ... Janusz Onyszkiewicz (born 1937) is a Polish mathematician, alpinist, politician and a vice-president of the European Parliament (since 20 July 2004). ... BolesÅ‚aw Piasecki BolesÅ‚aw Bogdan Piasecki (alias Leon CaÅ‚ka, Sablewski; born February 18, 1915 in Łódź, died January 1, 1979 in Warsaw) was a Polish politician and writer. ...  , (born June 18, 1949) is the President of the Republic of Poland and a politician of the conservative party Prawo i Sprawiedliwość (Law and Justice, PiS.) KaczyÅ„ski served as President of Warsaw from 2002 until December 22, 2005, the day before his presidential inauguration. ... Motto: Contemnit procellas (It defies the storms) Semper invicta (Always invincible) Coordinates: Country Poland Voivodeship Masovia Powiat city county Gmina Warszawa Districts 18 boroughs City Rights turn of the 13th century Government  - Mayor Hanna Gronkiewicz-Waltz (PO) Area  - City 516. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Aleksander KamiÅ„ski codename: Kamyk, DÄ…browski, J. DÄ…browski, Fabrykant, Faktor, Juliusz Górecki, Hubert, Kaźmierczak (b. ... Fleur-de-lys, the symbol of the ZHP ZwiÄ…zek Harcerstwa Polskiego (Polish Scouting and Guiding Association, ZHP) is the coeducational Polish Scouting organization recognized by the World Organization of the Scout Movement. ... Ryszard KapuÅ›ciÅ„ski Ryszard KapuÅ›ciÅ„ski   (born March 4, 1932 in PiÅ„sk) is a popular Polish journalist, both at home and abroad. ... MieczysÅ‚aw KarÅ‚owicz (December 11, 1876 - February 8, 1909) was a Polish composer, born in the Polish province of Vilna. ... Before a wall map of the Warsaw Ghetto at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Jan Karski recalls his secret 1942 missions into the Nazi prison-city-within-a-city. ... Janusz Korwin-Mikke During presidents campaign in 2000 Janusz Korwin-Mikke (born October 27, 1942 in Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish liberal conservative political commentator and politician. ... This article deals with the libertarianism as defined in America and several other nations. ... Marek KotaÅ„ski, known by his given name Marek, (March 11, 1942 - August 19, 2002) was a Polish charity worker and campaigner on behalf of disadvantaged people, including the homeless and those with HIV. He died in a car accident in Nowy Dwór Mazowiecki, near Warsaw. ... Jacek Jan KuroÅ„ (b. ... The term English literature refers to literature written in the English language, including literature composed in English by writers not necessarily from England; Joseph Conrad was Polish, Robert Burns was Scottish, James Joyce was Irish, Dylan Thomas was Welsh, Edgar Allan Poe was American, Salman Rushdie is Indian, V.S... Bohdan PaczyÅ„ski (born 8 February 1940) is a Polish astronomer, a leading scientist in theory of the evolution of stars. ... Longin Hieronim Pastusiak (b. ... Krzysztof Marek Piesiewicz (born on October 25, 1945 in Warsaw, Poland) is a Polish lawyer, screenwriter, and politician, who is currently a member of the Polish Parliament and head of the Ruch Społeczny (RS) or Social Movement Party. ... BolesÅ‚aw Prus BolesÅ‚aw Prus (pronounced: [bÉ”lεswaf prus]; August 20, 1847 – May 19, 1912), born Aleksander GÅ‚owacki, was a Polish journalist, short-story writer, and novelist. ... Józef Rotblats ID badge photo from Los Alamos. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... StanisÅ‚aw Sedlaczek (b. ... Fleur-de-lys, the symbol of the ZHP ZwiÄ…zek Harcerstwa Polskiego (Polish Scouting and Guiding Association, ZHP) is the coeducational Polish Scouting organization recognized by the World Organization of the Scout Movement. ... (Hebrew יִצְחָק שָׁמִיר) (born October 15, 1915) was Prime Minister of Israel from 1983 to 1984 and again from 1986 to 1992. ... The Prime Minister of Israel (Hebrew: ראש הממשלה, Rosh HaMemshala, lit. ... Julian Tuwim (September 13, 1894 – December 27, 1953) was a Polish poet of Jewish descent; born in the city of Łódź in Poland, educated in Łódź and Warsaw (studied Law and Philosophy at Warsaw University). ... Janusz Andrzej Zajdel (born on August 15, 1938 in Warsaw - July 19, 1985 in Warsaw, Poland) was a Polish science fiction author. ... Anna Zawadzka (b. ... Fleur-de-lys, the symbol of the ZHP ZwiÄ…zek Harcerstwa Polskiego (Polish Scouting and Guiding Association, ZHP) is the coeducational Polish Scouting organization recognized by the World Organization of the Scout Movement. ... Maciej Zembaty (born 1944) is a Polish artist, writer, journalist, singer, poet and comic. ... Leonard Norman Cohen, CC (born September 21, 1934 in Westmount, Quebec) is a Canadian poet, novelist, and singer-songwriter. ... Andrew Paulukiewichz (born 5/7/1958) is a micro-biologist from Poland. ... Pneumonia is an illness of the lungs and respiratory system in which the alveoli (microscopic air-filled sacs of the lung responsible for absorbing oxygen from the atmosphere) become inflamed and flooded with fluid. ... An apparatus (4-5 cm length, with nine short needles) used for BCG vaccination in Japan. ... RafaÅ‚ A. Ziemkiewicz RafaÅ‚ Aleksander Ziemkiewicz (born September 13, 1964) is a Polish science fiction author and journalist. ... Florian Zaniecki // Florian Witold Znaniecki (January 15, 1882 - March 23, 1958) was a philosopher and a sociologist. ...

Notable professors

  • Osman Achmatowicz (1899-1988), chemist, rector of the Technical University of Łódź (1946-1953)
  • Szymon Askenazy, historian
  • Karol Borsuk (1905-1982), mathematician
  • Cezaria Anna Baudouin de Courtenay-Ehrenkreutz-Jędrzejewiczowa (1885-1967), ethnologist and anthropologist, one of the founders of Polish modern ethnology
  • Jan Niecisław Baudouin de Courtenay (1845-1929), linguist, inventor of phoneme
  • Zygmunt Bauman (b. 1925), sociologist
  • Benedykt Dybowski (1833-1930), biologist and explorer of Siberia and Baikal area
  • Michel Foucault, French philosopher, at the University dean-faculty of the French Centre 1958-1959
  • Aleksander Gieysztor (1916-1999), historian
  • Stanisław Grabski (1871-1949), economist
  • Henryk Greniewski (1903-1972), mathematician, informatician and pioneer of computers in Poland
  • Henryk Jabłoński (1909-2003), historian, nominal head of state of Poland (1972-1985)
  • Feliks Pawel Jarocki (1790 - 1865), zoologist
  • Irena Jurgielewiczowa (1903-2003), writer
  • Leszek Kołakowski (b. 1927), philosopher
  • Kazimierz Kuratowski (1896-1980), mathematician
  • Joachim Lelewel (1786-1861), historian, politician and freedom fighter
  • Antoni Leśniowski (1867-1940), surgeon and medic, one of the discoverers of Crohn's disease
  • Edward Lipiński (1888-1986), economist, founder of the Main Statistical Office
  • Jan Łukasiewicz (1878-1956), mathematician and logician
  • Kazimierz Michałowski (1901-1981), archaeologist, explorer of Deir el Bahari and Faras
  • Andrzej Mostowski (1913-1975), mathematician
  • Stanisław Ossowski (1897-1963), sociologist
  • Juliusz Owidzki (1921-1986), actor and radio speaker
  • Grigol Peradze (1899-1942), Orthodox theologian
  • Leon Petrażycki (1867-1931), jurist, philosopher and logician, one of the founders of sociology of law
  • Wlasyslaw Pilars de Pilar - (*Opatowek 1874- +Chorzow 1952), a literature professor at the Warsaw University, poet and entrepreneur
  • Adam Podgórecki (1925-1998), sociologist of law
  • Henryk Samsonowicz (b. 1930), historian, rector (1980-1982)
  • Wacław Sierpiński (1882-1969), mathematician
  • Nikolay Yakovlevich Sonin (1849-1915), mathematician
  • Jan Strelau (b. 1931), psychologist
  • Jerzy Szacki (b. 1929), sociologist and historian
  • Stanisław Thugutt (1873-1941), politician, rector (1919-1920)
  • Włodzimierz Zonn (1905-1985), astronomer

The Technical University of Łódź was created in 1945 and has developed into one of the biggest in Poland. ... Szymon Askenazy (1866?-1935) was a Polish historian, diplomat and politician, founder of the Askenazy school. ... Karol Borsuk (May 8, 1905 - January 24, 1982) was a Polish mathematician born in Warsaw. ... Jan Niecislaw Baudouin de Courtenay (March 13, 1845 - November 3, 1929) was a Polish linguist, best known for his theory of the phoneme and phonetic alternations. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Zygmunt Bauman (born 1925 in Poznan, Poland) is a British sociologist of Polish-Jewish descent. ... Benedykt Ivanovich Dybowski (May 12, 1833-January 31, 1930) was a Polish naturalist and physician. ... Siberian Federal District (darker red) and the broadest definition of Siberia (red) arctic northeast Siberia Udachnaya pipe Siberia (Russian: , Sibir; Tatar: ) is a vast region of Russia constituting almost all of Northern Asia and comprising a large part of the Euro-Asian Steppe. ... The references in this article would be clearer with a different and/or consistent style of citation, footnoting or external linking. ... Michel Foucault (IPA pronunciation: ) (October 15, 1926 – June 25, 1984) was a French philosopher and historian. ... StanisÅ‚aw Grabski (5 April 1871 - 6 May 1949) was a Polish politician and economist, an ideologue of endecja known for his support of the polonization policies during the time of the Second Polish Republic. ... Henryk JabÅ‚oÅ„ski (27 December 1909 - 27 January 2003) was a Polish politician, socialist, historian and professor at Warsaw University. ... Feliks Paweł Jarocki (b. ... Leszek KoÅ‚akowski (born 23 October 1927 in Radom, Poland) is a Polish philosopher and historian of ideas. ... Kazimierz Kuratowski (born February 2, 1896, Warsaw, died June 18, 1980, Warsaw) was a Polish mathematician. ... Joachim Lelewel (Warsaw, March 22, 1786- May 29, 1861), was a Polish historian and politician, from a naturalized Polish family of Prussian background. ... Crohns disease (also known as regional enteritis) is a chronic, episodic, inflammatory condition of the gastrointestinal tract characterized by transmural inflammation (affecting the entire wall of the involved bowel) and skip lesions (areas of inflammation with areas of normal lining in between). ... Central Statistical Office of Poland (Główny UrzÄ…d Statystyczny, GUS) is the main government executive agency of Poland charged with the collection and publication of statistics related to the economy, population and society of the Poland, at both national and local levels. ... // Jan Łukasiewicz (21 December 1878 - 13 February 1956) was a Polish mathematician born in Lemberg, Galicia, Austria-Hungary (now Lviv, Ukraine). ... Kazimierz MichaÅ‚owski (b. ... Djeser-Djeseru – the focal point of the complex Deir el-Bahri (Arabic دير البحري dayr al-baḥrÄ«, literally meaning, “The Northern Monastery”) is a complex of mortuary temples and tombs located on the west bank of the Nile, opposite the city of Luxor, Egypt. ... Faras, known in ancient times as Pachoras, was a major city in Lower Nubia in modern Egypt. ... Andrzej Mostowski (1 November 1913 - 22 August 1975) was a Polish mathematician. ... Stanislaw Ossowski was one of the most important Polish sociologists. ... Grigol Peradze (), (September 13, 1899 - December 6, 1942) was a famous Georgian ecclesiastic figure, theologian, historian, Archimandrite, Ph. ... Leon Petrażycki (13 April 1867 - 15 May 1931) was a philosopher, legal scholar and sociologist. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... An approach to law stressing the actual social effects of legal institutions, doctrines, and practices and vice versa. ... WÅ‚adysÅ‚aw (also Ladislaus) Pilars de Pilar (Opatówek, March 3, 1874 - Chorzów, November 22, 1952), a literature professor at the Warsaw University. ... Opatówek is a town in Poland. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Motto: none Voivodship Silesian Municipal government Urząd Miasta Chorz w Mayor Marek Kopel Area 33,5 km Population  - city  - urban  - density 117 430 - 2856/km Founded City rights - - Latitude Longitude 50 18 N 57 E Area code +48 32 Car plates SH Twin towns - Municipal Website Chorz w... 1952 (MCMLII) was a Leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Warsaw University (Polish: ) is one of the largest universities in Poland. ... An approach to law stressing the actual social effects of legal institutions, doctrines, and practices and vice versa. ... WacÅ‚aw Franciszek SierpiÅ„ski (March 14, 1882 — October 21, 1969), a Polish mathematician, was born and died in Warsaw. ... Nikolay Yakovlevich Sonin (February 22, 1849 - February 27, 1915) was a Russian mathematician. ... Jerzy Szacki, 2004 Jerzy Ryszard Szacki (b. ...

See also

The Askenazy school (Polish Szkoła Askenazego, sometimes referred to as Lwów-Warsaw School of History - Lwowsko-warszawska szkoła historyczna) was an informal group of Polish historians formed in the early 20th century under the influence of Szymon Askenazy in the University of Lwow and Warsaw...

External links

  • Official website of the University of Warsaw
  • The University's computer network
  • Website of The Universiy New Library
  • The WU Students Association

  Results from FactBites:
 
Warsaw University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1943 words)
The Royal University of Warsaw was established in 1816, when the partitions of Poland separated Warsaw from the oldest and most influential academic center in Kraków.
The tsarist authorities believed that the Russian university would become a perfect means of russification of the Polish society and spent significant effort on building a new university campus.
The scientist working at the Warsaw University were also one of the most prominents printers of the books forbidden by the censorship.
University of Warsaw - definition of University of Warsaw in Encyclopedia (1926 words)
The Royal University of Warsaw was established in 1816, when the partitions of Poland separated Warsaw from the oldest and most influential academic center in Cracow.
The government was forced to back down in 1937 and the right-wing followers of the nationalist parties were peacefuly pacified, but the professors and the students remained divided for the rest of the thirties.
The scientist working at the Warsaw Uiversity were also one of the most prominents printers of the books forbidden by the censorship.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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