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Encyclopedia > University of Virginia

University of Virginia

Established 1819
Type Public university
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $4.5 billion[1]
President John T. Casteen III
Faculty 2,053
Undergraduates 13,353
Postgraduates 6,490
Location Charlottesville, Va., USA
Campus World Heritage Site, small city, 1,682 acres (681 hectares)
Founder Thomas Jefferson
Colors Orange and Navy Blue            
Mascot Virginia Cavalier
Athletics NCAA Division I ACC
25 varsity teams
Affiliations AAU, Universitas 21
Website Virginia.edu
Monticello and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville*
UNESCO World Heritage Site

Homer statue on the Lawn
State Party United States of America
Type Cultural
Criteria i, iv, vi
Reference 442
Region Europe and North America
Inscription History
Inscription 1987  (11th Session)
* Name as inscribed on World Heritage List.
Region as classified by UNESCO.

The University of Virginia (also called U.Va., UVA, Mr. Jefferson's University, or The University[2]) is a highly-selective, public research university in Charlottesville, Virginia, founded by Thomas Jefferson. Conceived by 1800 and established in 1819, it is the only university in North America that is designated as a World Heritage Site by UNESCO, an honor it shares with nearby Monticello. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Princess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III of England. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... Founding Fathers are persons instrumental not only in the establishment (founding) of a political institution, but also in the origination of the idea of the institution. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... See also Orange (disambiguation) for other meanings of the word. ... ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... Image File history File links V-sabres. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Download high resolution version (1290x966, 339 KB)Homer Statue on the Lawn at the University of Virginia taken on 24 March 2005 in Charlottesville, Virginia at 1:19 PM EST. File links The following pages link to this file: University of Virginia User:Uris Categories: User-created public domain images... As of 2006, there are a total of 830 World Heritage Sites located in 138 State Parties. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... This is a list of the UNESCO World Heritage Sites in Europe. ... This is a list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites in North America, Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Princess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III of England. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ...


The University is notable in U.S. history for being the first to offer academic specializations in disciplines now common, such as Architecture, Astronomy, and Philosophy. Its School of Engineering and Applied Science was the first engineering school in the United States associated with a university. Officially, U.Va. is incorporated as The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia. “American history” redirects here. ... This article is about building architecture. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), established in 1836, is the oldest engineering school in the United States[1] associated with a university. ...

Contents

History

On January 18, 1800, Thomas Jefferson, then Vice President of the United States, alluded to plans for a new college in a letter written to British scientist Joseph Priestley: "We wish to establish in the upper country of Virginia, and more centrally for the State, a University on a plan so broad and liberal and modern, as to be worth patronizing with the public support, and be a temptation to the youth of other States to come and drink of the cup of knowledge and fraternize with us."[3] In 1802, then serving as President of the United States, Jefferson wrote to artist Charles Willson Peale that his concept of the new university would be "on the most extensive and liberal scale that our circumstances would call for and our faculties meet."[4] Although Virginia was already home to one university, the College of William and Mary, Jefferson had lost confidence in his alma mater, partly because of its religious biases and lack of education in the sciences.[5] is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // ON MAY 5 1853 MR.FADER HAD SEX WITH A MAN NAME MR WIEN THEN THEY HAD SON NAMEDMRS COTURE AND MR MANOOGIAN WENT INTO MRS HASKELLS OFFICE NAKED AND DANCED AROUND AND MASTERBATED ON HER CHEST AND SHE LICKED IT OFF THEN THEY HAD ORAL SEEX WITH NAPLOEAN OF... The Vice President of the United States (sometimes referred to as VPOTUS[1] or Veep) is the first in the presidential line of succession, becoming the new President of the United States upon the death, resignation, or removal of the president. ... Priestley by Ellen Sharples (1794)[1] Joseph Priestley (March 13, 1733 (old style) – February 8, 1804) was an eighteenth-century British natural philosopher, Dissenting clergyman, political theorist, theologian, and educator. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Charles Willson Peale (1741-1827), self-portrait from 1822 Charles Willson Peale (April 15, 1741 – February 22, 1827) was an American painter, soldier and naturalist. ... The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ...


The University of Virginia stands on land purchased in 1788 by an American Revolutionary War veteran, James Monroe. The farmland just outside Charlottesville was purchased from Monroe by the Board of Visitors of what was then Central College in 1817; Monroe was beginning the first of his own two terms in the White House. Guided by Jefferson, the school laid its first building's cornerstone later in 1817 and the Commonwealth of Virginia would charter the new university on January 25, 1819. This article is about military actions only. ... For other persons named James Monroe, see James Monroe (disambiguation). ... Charlottesville is an independent city located within the confines of Albemarle County in the Commonwealth of Virginia, United States, and named after Princess Sophia Charlotte of Mecklenburg-Strelitz, the wife of King George III of England. ... For other uses, see White House (disambiguation). ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1819 common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...


In the presence of James Madison, the Marquis de Lafayette toasted Jefferson as "father" of the University of Virginia at the school's inaugural banquet in 1824. The University's first classes met in March 1825. Other universities of the day allowed only three choices of specialization: Medicine, Law, and Religion, but under Jefferson's guidance, the University of Virginia became the first in the United States to allow specializations in such diverse fields as Astronomy, Architecture, Botany, Philosophy, and Political Science. Jefferson explained, "This institution will be based on the illimitable freedom of the human mind. For here we are not afraid to follow truth wherever it may lead, nor to tolerate any error so long as reason is left free to combat it."[6] “Madison” redirects here. ... Lieutenant General & National Guard Commander-in-Chief Lafayette in 1792 at ~35yrs. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... This article is about building architecture. ... Pinguicula grandiflora Example of a Cross Section of a Stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ...


An even more controversial direction was taken for the new university based on a daring vision that higher education should be completely separated from religious doctrine. One of the largest construction projects in North America up to that time, the new Grounds were centered upon a library (then housed in the Rotunda) rather than a church—further distinguishing it from peer universities of the United States, most of which were still primarily functioning as seminaries for one particular religion or another.[7] Jefferson even went so far as to ban the teaching of Theology altogether. In a letter to Thomas Cooper in October 1814, Jefferson stated, "a professorship of theology should have no place in our institution" and, true to form, the University never had a Divinity school or department, and was established independent of any religious sect. Replacing the then-standard specialization in Religion, the University undertook groundbreaking specializations in scientific subjects such as Astronomy and Botany. (However, today the University does maintain one of the highest-rated Religious Studies departments in the U.S. and a non-denominational chapel, notably absent from Jefferson's original plans, was constructed in 1890 near the Rotunda.) Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... Dr. Thomas Cooper (October 22, 1759- May 1840 ), American educationalist and political philosopher was born in London, England. ...

The Lawn during winter, with tracks through the snow. At center is the Rotunda, which was the original library building at the head of Jefferson's Academical Village.

Jefferson was intimately involved in the University, hosting Sunday dinners at his Monticello home for faculty and students, until his death. So taken with the import of what he viewed the University's foundations and potential to be, and counting it amongst his greatest accomplishments, Jefferson insisted his grave mention only his status as author of the Declaration of Independence and Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom, and father of the University of Virginia. Thus, he eschewed mention of his Presidency and national accomplishments in favor of being remembered for the newly established university. Image File history File links Lawn. ... Image File history File links Lawn. ... The West Lawn in snow, 1914. ... Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... This is about the Jefferson residence. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... Thomas Jefferson was the author of the Virginia Statute for Religious Freedom. ...


In 1826, the nation's fourth President James Madison became Rector of the University of Virginia, at the same time America's fifth President James Monroe made his home on the Grounds (at Monroe Hill) and was a member of the Board of Visitors. Both former Presidents stayed at the University until their deaths in the 1830s. “Madison” redirects here. ... For other persons named James Monroe, see James Monroe (disambiguation). ... Brown College at Monroe Hill is a residential college at the University of Virginia. ...


The School of Engineering and Applied Science opened in 1836, making it the oldest engineering school in the United States associated with a university. The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), established in 1836, is the oldest engineering school in the United States[1] associated with a university. ...


At the onset of the American Civil War, the University of Virginia was the largest in the Southern United States and second nationwide only to Harvard University in its scope.[8] Unlike many other colleges in the South, the University was kept open throughout the conflict, an especially remarkable feat with its state being the site of more battles than any other. In March 1865, Union General George Armstrong Custer marched troops into Charlottesville, whereupon faculty and community leaders convinced him to spare the University. Though Union troops camped on the Lawn and damaged many of the Pavilions, Custer's men left four days later without bloodshed and the University was able to return to its educational routines. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Historic Southern United States. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... “Custer” redirects here. ... The 21st Michigan Infantry, a company of Shermans veterans. ...


Jefferson, ever the skeptic of central authority and bureaucracy, had originally decided the University of Virginia would have no President. Rather, this power was to be shared by a Rector and a Board of Visitors. As the nineteenth century waned, it became obvious this arrangement was incapable of adequately handling the many administrative and fundraising tasks which had become regrettably but unavoidably necessary amid the inner-workings of the growing University. A board of governors is usually the governing board of a public entity. ...

Father of the University of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson was the first and only President of the United States to found an institution of higher learning
Father of the University of Virginia, Thomas Jefferson was the first and only President of the United States to found an institution of higher learning

In 1904, Edwin Alderman resigned as President of Tulane University to take the same position at the University of Virginia. As the University's first President, he embarked on a number of reforms for both the University and the state of Virginia's public educational systems in general. A reform specific to the University of Virginia was one of the first school-sponsored financial aid programs in all of higher learning and, though primitive by today's standards, it included a loan provision for those "needy young men" who were unable to pay. Initially controversial and opposed by many at what had become a very traditional school, Alderman's progressive ideas stood the test of time and he today remains the longest-serving President in the University's history, having served for nearly thirty years until his death in 1931. Alderman Library, a popular landmark among today's students, is his namesake. Download high resolution version (755x860, 47 KB) The Edgehill Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Gilbert Stuart, 1805. ... Download high resolution version (755x860, 47 KB) The Edgehill Portrait of Thomas Jefferson by Gilbert Stuart, 1805. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... Edwin A. Alderman Edwin Anderson Alderman (born May 15, 1861 in Wilmington, North Carolina; died April 30, 1931 in Charlottesville, Virginia) served as the President of three universities. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ...


Pulitzer and Nobel Prize winner William Faulkner became writer-in-residence at the University in 1957, keeping open office hours until his death in 1962. He was also a lecturer at the school, as well as taking the title "Consultant on American Literature to the Alderman Library". Faulkner had a large collection of his manuscripts and typesets given to and made available (the request reaffirmed by his wife and daughter) at the library upon his death. William Cuthbert Faulkner (September 25, 1897 – July 6, 1962) was an American novelist and poet whose works feature his native state of Mississippi. ...


In 2004, resulting from a stark decrease in state support, the University of Virginia became the first public university in the United States to receive more of its funding from private sources than from the state with which it is associated. Thanks to a Charter initiative that recently passed the Virginia legislature, the University—and any other public universities in the state that choose to do so—will have greater autonomy over its own affairs.

James Madison served as the second Rector of the University of Virginia until his death (1826–1836)

In the same year, the 100th anniversary of Alderman becoming President, the University announced the AccessUVa financial aid program. This program guarantees the University will meet 100% of a student's demonstrated need. It also provides low-income students (up to 200% of the poverty line – as of 2006, about $40,000 for a family of four) with full grants to cover all of their educational needs, and it caps the level of need-based loans for all other students. This program is the first to guarantee full grants to students of low-income families at any public university in the United States. James Madison This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... James Madison This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... “Madison” redirects here. ... In the United States, official statistics on poverty and the official poverty line are kept by the US Census Bureau. ...


Though all-white until 1950 and generally all-male until 1970 (women had for many years prior been admitted to the education and nursing schools), the University of Virginia is now more diverse. The makeup of the Class of 2008 was 10% African-American, 14% Asian-American, 5% Hispanic, 5% Other and 5% International. Fewer than two-thirds identified themselves as being white. Eighty-five percent of the University's entering Class of 2009 were ranked in the top 10% of their graduating high school class and 56% are female.


Today, minority students are particularly successful at the University of Virginia. According to the Fall 2005 issue of Journal of Blacks in Higher Education,[9] the University "has the highest black student graduation rate of the Public Ivies at 86 percent." The journal goes on to state that "by far the most impressive is the University of Virginia with its high black student graduation rate and its small racial difference in graduation rates." Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wren Building (College of William and Mary) Alumni Hall (Miami U) Sather Gate (UC Berkeley) Central Campus Diag (U of Michigan) Old Well (UNC-Chapel Hill) UT Tower (U of Texas) Williams Hall (U of Vermont) The Rotunda (U of Virginia) Public Ivy is a colloquialism for a state-funded...


The University of Virginia joined with Harvard University and Princeton University as the three universities announced the end of their Early Decision and Early Action programs in September 2006, stating that such policies limit low-income and middle class students from competing on an equal footing with applicants from wealthy families.[10][11] For its part, U.Va. noted that of 947 Early Decision acceptances for the Class of 2010, fewer than 20 of those students had applied for financial aid.[12] Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Early decision is a common early admission policy used in college admissions in the United States for admitting freshmen to undergraduate programs. ... Early action is a type of early admission process for admission to colleges and universities in the United States. ... September 2006 is the ninth month of 2006 and has begun on a Friday. ... The middle class (or middle classes) comprises a social group once defined by exception as an intermediate social class between the nobility and the peasantry. ...


Grounds

Main articles: The Lawn, The Rotunda, and The Range
Elevation of The Rotunda drawn by Thomas Jefferson in 1819
Elevation of The Rotunda drawn by Thomas Jefferson in 1819
The Great Rotunda Fire, 1895
The Great Rotunda Fire, 1895
The Rotunda today
The Rotunda today

Throughout its history, the University of Virginia has won praise for its unique Jeffersonian architecture. In January 1895, less than a year before the Great Rotunda Fire, The New York Times said that the design of the University of Virginia "was incomparably the most ambitious and monumental architectural project that had or has yet been conceived in this century".[13] In the United States Bicentennial issue of their AIA Journal, the American Institute of Architects called it "the proudest achievement of American architecture in the past 200 years".[14] Today, the University of Virginia remains an architectural landmark and popular tourist destination. The West Lawn in snow, 1914. ... Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... The Range is part of the original grounds of the University of Virginia as designed by Thomas Jefferson. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 596 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (632 × 636 pixel, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Virginia... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 596 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (632 × 636 pixel, file size: 110 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) +/- File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Virginia... In Mosta, Malta, the Rotunda of Santa Marija Assunta is covered by a saucer dome. ... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Rotunda at the University of Virginia. ... The Rotunda at the University of Virginia. ... Monticello Jeffersonian Architecture or Jeffersonian Colonial is an American form of Neo-Classicism or Classical Revivalist architecture based on U.S. president and patriot, Thomas Jeffersons designs of his home, Monticello, his retreat at Poplar Forest, and the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ... The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ...


The University, together with Jefferson's home at Monticello, is a World Heritage Site, one of only three modern sites so listed in the 50 states. The others are the Statue of Liberty and Independence Hall. It was the first collegiate campus worldwide to be awarded the designation. This is about the Jefferson residence. ... A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other monuments to freedom, see Monument of Liberty. ... Independence Hall is a U.S. national landmark located in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania on Chestnut Street between 5th and 6th Streets. ...


Jefferson's original architectural design revolves around The Lawn, a grand, terraced green-space surrounded by residential and academic buildings. He called it the "Academical Village", and that name remains in use today to describe both the specific area of the Lawn and the larger University surrounding it. The principal building of the design, The Rotunda (RotundaCam), stands at the north end of the Lawn, and is the most recognizable symbol of the University. It is half the height of the Pantheon in Rome, which was the primary inspiration for the building. The Lawn and the Rotunda were the model for many similar designs of "centralized green areas" at universities across the country (most notably those at Duke University in 1892, Johns Hopkins University in 1902, Rice University in 1910, Peabody College of Vanderbilt University in 1915, the Green at the University of Delaware in 1916, and Killian Court at MIT in 1916 — the last of which was coincidentally founded by William Barton Rogers, who immediately prior to founding MIT was a Natural Philosophy professor at the University of Virginia for 19 years). Frank E. Grizzard, Jr., a scholar at the University, has written the definitive book on the original academic buildings at the University.[15] The West Lawn in snow, 1914. ... Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... Facade of the Pantheon The Pantheon (Latin Pantheon[1], from Greek Πάνθεον Pantheon, meaning Temple of all the gods) is a building in Rome which was originally built as a temple to the seven deities of the seven planets in the state religion of Ancient Rome. ... Nickname: Motto: SPQR: Senatus Populusque Romanus Location of the city of Rome (yellow) within the Province of Rome (red) and region of Lazio (grey) Coordinates: Region Lazio Province Province of Rome Founded 21 April 753 BC Government  - Mayor Walter Veltroni Area  - City 1,285 km²  (580 sq mi)  - Urban 5... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... Vanderbilt University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The University of Delaware (UD) is the largest university in the U.S. state of Delaware. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... William Barton Rogers (1804-1882) is best known for incorporating the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1861. ... Natural philosophy or the philosophy of nature, known in Latin as philosophia naturalis, is a term applied to the objective study of nature and the physical universe that was regnant before the development of modern science. ...


Flanking both sides of the Rotunda and extending down the length of the Lawn are 10 Pavilions interspersed with student rooms. Each has its own classical architectural style, as well as its own walled garden separated by Jeffersonian Serpentine walls. These walls are called "serpentine" because they run a sinusoidal course, one that lends strength to the wall and allows for the wall to be only one brick thick, one of many innovations by which Jefferson attempted to combine aesthetics with utility.


On October 27, 1895, the Rotunda burned to the ground with the unfortunate help of overzealous faculty member William "Reddy" Echols, who attempted to save it by throwing roughly 100 pounds (45 kg) of dynamite into the main fire in the hopes that the blast would separate the burning Annex from the main building. His last-ditch effort ultimately failed. (Perhaps ironically, one of the University's main honors student programs is named for him.) University officials swiftly approached celebrity architect Stanford White to rebuild the Rotunda. White took the charge further, redesigning the Rotunda interior — making it two floors instead of three, adding three buildings to the foot of the Lawn, and designing a President's House. He did omit rebuilding the Rotunda Annex, which had been built in 1853 to house classroom space. The classes formerly occupying the annex were now moved to the South Lawn in White's new buildings. is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... William Holding Echols William Holding Echols was a former professor of mathematics at the University of Virginia. ... Dynamite is an explosive based on the explosive potential of nitroglycerin, initially using diatomaceous earth (kieselguhr) as an adsorbent. ... Stanford White (1853-1906) Washington Square Arch New York American on June 25, 1906 Stanford White (November 9, 1853 – June 25, 1906) was an American architect and partner in the architectural firm of McKim, Mead, and White, the frontrunner among Beaux-Arts firms. ...


Although undoubtedly useful to the University in providing additional classroom space, and not unattractive, if pedestrian in comparison to the Jeffersonian Pavilions, the White buildings have the effect of closing off the sweeping perspective, as originally conceived by Jefferson, down the Lawn across open countryside towards Monticello. The White buildings at the foot of the Lawn effectively create a huge "quadrangle", albeit one far grander than any traditional college quadrangle at Cambridge or Oxford. This article is about the city in England. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ...


In concert with the United States Bicentennial in 1976, Stanford White's changes to the Rotunda were removed and the building was returned to Jefferson's original design. Renovated according to original sketches and historical photographs, a three-story Rotunda opened on Jefferson's birthday, April 13, 1976. The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Though student enrollment has grown well beyond the original Lawn facilities, the University further distinguishes itself by extending the original Academical Village ideal with two exclusively First-Year (freshman) living areas: The Old Dorms (Bonnycastle, Dabney, Echols, Emmet, Hancock, Humphreys, Kent, Lefevre, Metcalf, Page), located on McCormick Road, and The New Dorms (Balz, Cauthen, Courtenay, Dobie, Dunglison, Dunnington, Fitzhugh, Lile, Maupin, Tuttle, Watson, Webb, Woody), adjacent to Scott Stadium, both situated wholly on Grounds and considered integral to establishing peer discourse. The common bonding experience proves such a fixture to the University experience, students often identify themselves by individual "Old" or "New" dormitory. First-Year living areas also include Hereford Residential College, International Residence College, and Brown College at Monroe Hill. The Carl Smith Center, Home of David A. Harrison III Field at Scott Stadium, located in Charlottesville, Virginia, is the home of the Virginia Cavaliers football team. ... Brown College at Monroe Hill is a residential college at the University of Virginia. ...


In 2001, John Kluge donated 7,378 acres (30 km²) of additional lands to the University. Kluge desired the core of the land to be developed by the University, and the surrounding land to be sold to fund an endowment supporting the core. A large part of the gift was soon sold to musician Dave Matthews, of the Dave Matthews Band, to be utilized in an organic farming project. It is unknown what the University will do with its "core" portion of the land. John Werner Kluge (born September 21, 1914) is an entrepreneur who was born in Chemnitz, Germany, best known as a television industry mogul in the United States. ... David John Matthews (born January 9, 1967) is a South African, now naturalized American, Grammy-winning lead vocalist and guitarist for the Dave Matthews Band. ... Dave Matthews Band (also known by the initialism DMB) is a United States rock band, originally formed in Charlottesville, Virginia, in 1991 by singer, songwriter, and guitarist Dave Matthews. ... Organic farming is a form of agriculture which avoids or largely excludes the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, plant growth regulators, and livestock feed additives. ...


The Virginia Department of Transportation maintains the roads through the University grounds as State Route 302.[16] The Virginia Department of Transportation, or VDOT, is the government agency responsible for building, maintaining and operating Virginias roads, bridges and tunnels. ... State Route 302 is a primary state highway in the U.S. state of Virginia. ...


Modern luminary gatherings and events

On June 10, 1940, U.S. President Franklin D. Roosevelt came to the University's Memorial Gymnasium to watch his son Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. graduate, and to give the commencement address. Instead, "in this university founded by the first great American teacher of democracy" he made his impromptu "Stab in the Back"[17] speech denouncing the act of Italy joining beside Nazi Germany to invade France on that day.[17] (Graduation ceremonies are traditionally held on the Lawn, but rain had forced a move to "Mem Gym" for the Class of 1940.) is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nazi Germany, or the Third Reich, commonly refers to Germany in the years 1933–1945, when it was under the firm control of the totalitarian and fascist ideology of the Nazi Party, with the Führer Adolf Hitler as dictator. ...


Nearly two decades later, in 1958, Senator John F. Kennedy visited and spoke in the same space with brothers Robert Kennedy and Ted Kennedy, the latter of whom was managing JFK's 1958 Senatorial re-election campaign from his dormitory at the University of Virginia. John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Robert Kennedy Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy, also called RFK (November 20, 1925–June 6, 1968) was the younger brother of President John F. Kennedy, and was appointed by his brother as Attorney General for his administration. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ...


To commemorate the anniversary of America's independence, Britain's Queen Elizabeth II strolled The Lawn and lunched in the Dome Room of The Rotunda, one of five American sites she publicly visited. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


The Dalai Lama and Desmond Tutu stayed on Grounds for one week in 1998 while attending the University's Nobel Laureates Conference. Tenzin Gyatso is the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ...


Admissions

A column-lined brick walkway adjacent to The Lawn

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The West Lawn in snow, 1914. ...

Early Decision abolished

Three leading American universities (Harvard University, Princeton University, and U.Va.) announced in September 2006 that they were discontinuing their Early Decision or Early Action rounds of admission in an effort to promote economic diversity in their student bodies.[10][11] Early Decision programs force a student to accept an offer of admission before evaluating the financial aid offers of various universities, while Early Action entails no commitment upfront but may also prevent a comparison of offers before making a decision. The College Board states that an applicant "should not apply under an Early Decision or Action plan if he plans to weigh offers and financial aid packages from several colleges later in the spring."[18] Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... September 2006 is the ninth month of 2006 and has begun on a Friday. ... Early decision is a common early admission policy used in college admissions in the United States for admitting freshmen to undergraduate programs. ... Early action is a type of early admission process for admission to colleges and universities in the United States. ... Student financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ... The College Board is a not-for-profit examination board in the United States that was formed in the nineteenth century as the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). ...


Through the 2006-2007 admissions cycle, 30% of each class at the University was made up of Early Decision applicants. Financially, their families were far wealthier than those of other students at the University. In the most recent year, only 1 student received a full financial aid package under the AccessUVa program out of 947 students who were accepted under Early Decision.[19] Less than 2% of Early Decision candidates applied for any financial aid at all.[12]


Beginning in the 2007-2008 admissions cycle, there will be no early round at the University for the first time since the 1960s[19] and all undergraduate applications will be due on one date: January 2. This will allow each successful applicant to U.Va. to evaluate their financial aid package before accepting an offer of admission. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Admissions statistics

For the Class of 2011, the University of Virginia received a record 18,013 applications for 3,170 spots.[20] 34% of applicants were accepted. The University saw increased interest from various groups of students, as applications rose by 13 percent for African American applicants, 20 percent for Asian Americans, 16 percent for Hispanic Americans, and 26 percent for international students. The University plans to enroll 70 more first-years than it did the previous year, as it continues to expand the scope of the School of Engineering and Applied Science. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanics in the United States, or Hispanic Americans, are American citizens or residents of Hispanic ethnicity who identify themselves as having Hispanic Cultural heritage. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), established in 1836, is the oldest engineering school in the United States[1] associated with a university. ...


Academics

Degrees from the University of Virginia must be earned academically – there has never been an honorary degree offered.[21] The policy was instituted by Thomas Jefferson. When the Virginia Legislature's Committee of Schools and Colleges was reconsidering it in 1845, then-U.Va. professor and future Massachusetts Institute of Technology founder William Barton Rogers wrote "the legislators of the University have, we think, wisely made their highest academic honor—that of Master of Arts of the University of Virginia—the genuine test of diligent and successful literary training, and, disdaining such literary almsgiving, have firmly barred the door against the demands of spurious merit and noisy popularity." Sixteen years later in 1861 when MIT was chartered, Rogers carried the U.Va. policy through to the new institute.[22] “MIT” redirects here. ... William Barton Rogers (1804-1882) is best known for incorporating the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in 1861. ...

Georgia O'Keeffe (photo at U.Va.–1915) was inspired to take up painting again during Summer Session, and was later a Teaching Assistant for several years, before becoming one of the world's most famous modernists.
Georgia O'Keeffe (photo at U.Va.–1915) was inspired to take up painting again during Summer Session, and was later a Teaching Assistant for several years, before becoming one of the world's most famous modernists.

The University of Virginia places #1 among state-supported universities in the United States[23] in the production of Rhodes Scholars. Its most recent winners were two awarded in 2004, bringing it to a cumulative total of 45. Image File history File links Georgia_OKeefe_UVa. ... Image File history File links Georgia_OKeefe_UVa. ... Georgia Tottoeanocomita OKeeffe (November 15, 1887—March 6, 1986) was an American artist. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For Christian theological modernism, see Liberal Christianity and Modernism (Roman Catholicism). ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...


Tuition is lower for both in-state and out-of-state students than at most other top universities. The student composition of the University is such that it was described in the 2006 America's Best Colleges edition of U.S. News and World Report as being "chock full of academic stars who turn down private schools like Duke, Princeton, and Cornell for, they say, a better value."[24] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Edgar Allan Poe attended the University during its second session before going into debt and dropping out.
Edgar Allan Poe attended the University during its second session before going into debt and dropping out.

In the popular U.S. News and World Report rankings, the University of Virginia consistently ranks in the top handful of public universities nationwide. In the 2007 edition, the undergraduate program at U.Va. ranked #2 out of roughly 200 public universities in the United States and #22 overall (including privates).[25] In the 20-year history of the rankings, U.Va. has never dropped out of the Top 25 listing, and in the ten years since U.S. News began ranking public universities as a separate category, U.Va. has ranked either #1 or #2.[26] In every published edition of the report going back to 1983, the University of Virginia has retained its position as the highest ranking doctoral-research university, public or private, in its home state. It is considered one of the original eight Public Ivys. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (605x750, 87 KB) Date of Photo: May 12, 1913. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (605x750, 87 KB) Date of Photo: May 12, 1913. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ...


The Jefferson Scholars Foundation offers four year full-tuition scholarships based on regional, international, and at-large competitions. Students are nominated by their high schools, interviewed, then invited to weekend-long series of tests of character, aptitude, and general suitability. Approximately 3% of those nominated are successful.


Echols (College of Arts and Sciences) and Rodman (School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) Scholars, which include 6-7% of undergraduate students, receive no financial benefits, but are entitled to special advisors, priority course registration, and residence in designated dorms, and fewer curricular constraints than other students.


The University offers 48 bachelor's degrees, 94 master's degrees, 55 doctoral degrees, 6 educational specialist degrees, and 2 first-professional degrees (Medicine and Law) to its students. For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aquatint of a Doctor of Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ...


The University of Virginia Library System holds 5 million volumes. Its Electronic Text Center, established in 1992, has put 70,000 books online as well as 350,000 images that go with them. No university in the world can claim more electronic texts. These e-texts are open to anyone and, as of 2002, were receiving 37,000 daily visits (compared to 6,000 daily visitors to the physical libraries).[27] 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The University of Virginia is a member of a consortium engaged in the construction and operation of the Large Binocular Telescope in the Mount Graham International Observatory of the Pinaleno Mountains of southeastern Arizona. It is also a member of both the Astrophysical Research Consortium, which operates telescopes at Apache Point Observatory in New Mexico, and the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy which operates the National Optical Astronomy Observatory, the Gemini Observatory and the Space Telescope Science Institute. The University of Virginia hosts the headquarters of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory, which operates the Green Bank Telescope in West Virginia and the Very Large Array radio telescope made famous in the Carl Sagan television documentary Cosmos and film Contact. The North American Atacama Large Millimeter Array Science Center is also located at the Charlottesville NRAO site. The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT, originally named the Columbus Project) is located on 10,700-foot Mount Graham in the Pinaleno Mountains of southeastern Arizona and is a part of the Mount Graham International Observatory. ... Mount Graham International Observatory (MGIO) is a division of the Steward Observatory and is primarily maintained by the University of Arizona. ... Arizonas Pinaleño Mountains. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... The Apache Point Observatory is located in the Sacramento Mountains in Sunspot, New Mexico (USA) 18 miles south of Cloudcroft. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Largest metro area Albuquerque metropolitan area Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ... The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) is a consortium of universities and other institutions. ... The National Optical Astronomy Observatory consists of four observatories under one management structure: Kitt Peak National Observatory Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory Gemini Observatory National Solar Observatory See also: List of observatories External link http://www. ... The Gemini Observatory is an astronomical observatory consisting of two 8-metre telescopes at different sites. ... The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) is an organization founded by NASA to manage and direct research done with the Hubble Space Telescope. ... The National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) is an institution set up by the United States government for the purpose of radio astronomy. ... The Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) is the worlds largest fully steerable radio telescope. ... Official language(s) English Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Area  Ranked 41st  - Total 24,244 sq mi (62,809 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 240 miles (385 km)  - % water 0. ... The Very Large Array (VLA) is a radio astronomy observatory located on the Plains of San Augustin, between the towns of Magdalena and Datil, some fifty miles (80 km) west of Socorro, New Mexico, USA. U.S. Route 60 passes through the complex. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Cosmos: A Personal Voyage was the name of a thirteen part television series produced by Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan which was first broadcast by the Public Broadcasting Service in 1980. ... Contact is a 1997 science fiction film adapted from the novel by Carl Sagan. ... The Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) is an international astronomy project that consists of a system of radio telescopes in an array formation, located at Llano de Chajnantor Observatory in the Atacama desert in northern Chile. ...


UVA also hosts the Rare Book School, a non-profit organization that studies the history of books and printing. The University is one of 60 elected members of the Association of American Universities, and the only member representing the Commonwealth of Virginia. It is the United States' sole member of Universitas 21, an international consortium of research-intensive universities. On 14 May 2007, University President John Casteen was named Chairman of the Board of the organization. The Rare Book School is an independent non-profit organization that studies the history of manuscripts, rare books, and special collections. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ...


Faculty

The University of Virginia possesses a distinguished faculty, including a Nobel Laureate, 25 Guggenheim fellows, 26 Fulbright fellows, six National Endowment for the Humanities fellows, two Presidential Young Investigator Award winners, three Sloan award winners, and three Packard Foundation Award winners. The University's faculty were particularly instrumental in the evolution of Internet networking and connectivity. Physics professor James McCarthy was the lead academic liaison to the government in the establishment of SURANET, and the University has also participated in ARPANET, Abilene, Internet2, and Lambda Rail. On March 19, 1986 the University's address Virginia.edu became the first .EDU contribution to the Internet originating from the Commonwealth of Virginia.[28] The Southeastern Universities Research Association network. ... ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ... Abilene Network is the U.S. high-performance backbone network created by the Internet2 community. ... The network as of October 2005. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This article or section may be confusing or unclear for some readers, and should be edited to rectify this. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...

Julian Bond - University Professor and current Chairman of the NAACP
Julian Bond - University Professor and current Chairman of the NAACP

Faculty were originally housed in the Academical Village among the students, serving as both instructors and advisors, continuing on to include the McCormick Road Old Dorms, though this has been phased out in favor of undergraduate student resident advisors (RAs). Several of the faculty, however, continue the University tradition of living on Grounds, either on the Lawn in the various Pavilions, or as fellows at one of three residential colleges (Brown College at Monroe Hill, Hereford College, and the International Residential College). Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 387 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (627 × 971 pixel, file size: 91 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 387 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (627 × 971 pixel, file size: 91 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Julian Bond (2004) Horace Julian Bond (born January 14, 1940) is an American leader of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... The West Lawn in snow, 1914. ... Brown College at Monroe Hill is a residential college at the University of Virginia. ...


Some of the University of Virginia's faculty have become well-known national personalities during their time in Charlottesville. Larry Sabato has, according to The Wall Street Journal and The Washington Post, become the most cited professor in the country by national and regional news organizations, both on the Internet and in print.[29] Julian Bond, a lecturer at the University since 1990, has been the Chairman of the NAACP since 1998. Larry J. Sabato is the Robert Kent Gooch Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia and is director of their Center for Politics. ... The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... The Washington Post is the largest newspaper in Washington, D.C.. It is also one of the citys oldest papers, having been founded in 1877. ... Julian Bond (2004) Horace Julian Bond (born January 14, 1940) is an American leader of the American Civil Rights Movement. ... The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), is one of the oldest and most influential hate organizations in the United States. ...


The Cavalier Daily student newspaper posted faculty compensation for 2002 online.[30] The Cavalier Daily is the fully independent student-run newspaper at the University of Virginia, founded in 1890. ...


Endowment

With $4.5 billion as of September, 2007 for approximately 19,850 full-time students, the University of Virginia ($226,700 per student) has the largest per capita endowment of any national public university in the United States. Considering public university endowments across the country, the University of Michigan ($142,000) is second to U.Va. among national publics in per capita endowment funds. Both are in the top 5 for recent growth rates nationwide. USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... This list of US and colleges and universities by endowment contains the 56 universities in the United States that have an endowment of at least 1 billion US dollars (at fiscal year-end 2005). ...


When compared to other public universities of its state, the per-student endowment at the University of Virginia is several times larger than its nearest competitors, the College of William and Mary ($75,900 per student) and Virginia Tech ($16,000). It is also several times larger than the highest among institutions of nearby states, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill ($55,000) and University of Maryland at College Park ($8,600). The College of William and Mary (also known as William & Mary, W&M or The College) is a small, selective, coeducational public university located in Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UMD or UM, formerly UMCP) is a public coeducational university situated in suburban Maryland just outside Washington, DC. The flagship university of the University System of Maryland, it is commonly referred to as simply the University of Maryland, but the formal...


Colleges and schools

The University is also endowed with several affiliated centers including The Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service, The Sorensen Institute for Political Leadership, and The Miller Center of Public Affairs. The School of Architecture of the University of Virginia offers undergraduate studies in architecture, architectural history, and urban and environmental planning , as well as graduate studies in architecture, architectural history, landscape architecture, and urban and environmental planning. ... The University of Virginia College and Graduate School of Arts & Sciences is the largest of the University of Virginias ten schools. ... The Darden Graduate School of Business Administration, founded in 1954, is the graduate business school associated with the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... The McIntire School of Commerce is the University of Virginias undergraduate business school. ... The School of Continuing and Professional Studies (SCPS) is committed to bringing the outstanding academic resources of the University of Virginia to adult learners. ... The Curry School of Education at the University of Virginia is one of the premier schools of education in the United States, and is particularly outstanding in its use of instructional technology. ... The University of Virginia School of Engineering and Applied Science (SEAS), established in 1836, is the oldest engineering school in the United States[1] associated with a university. ... The University of Virginia School of Law was founded in Charlottesville in 1819 by Thomas Jefferson as one of the original subjects taught at his academical village, the University of Virginia. ... We dont have an article called University of Virginia School of Medicine Start this article Search for University of Virginia School of Medicine in. ... The University of Virginia Nursing School has an enrollment of approximately 550 undergraduate and graduate students. ... On April 12, 2007, former Landmark Communications CEO and University of Virginia alumnus Frank Batten made a gift of $100 million to establish this as the University of Virginias newest school. ... April 2007 is the fourth month of the year. ... The University of Virginias College at Wise, commonly called UVa-Wise, is a public liberal arts college and a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges located in Wise, Virginia. ... Wise is a town located in Wise County, Virginia. ... Thomas Jefferson wrote, “Come forward then and give us the aid of your talents and the weight of your character towards the new establishment of democracy. ... The Miller Center of Public Affairs is a non-partisan research institute affiliated with the University of Virginia. ...


Graduate placement

In 2003, The Wall Street Journal studied the undergraduate backgrounds of entering students at "elite" graduate programs (e.g., Harvard Business School and Yale Medical School).[31] The University of Virginia with 82 placements (2.6% of class) placed 33rd overall and third among all state-supported universities in elite graduate placement.[32] No other state university on the Atlantic Seaboard had greater than one-third the number of placements as the University of Virginia (e.g., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill had 26 placements, Georgia Institute of Technology had 20). The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Yale School of Medicine is a private medical school located in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France and Singapore. ...


Athletics

The Virginia Cavalier mascot during pre-game introductions of a basketball game at John Paul Jones Arena
The Virginia Cavalier mascot during pre-game introductions of a basketball game at John Paul Jones Arena
Main article: Virginia Cavaliers

The University of Virginia's athletics program competes in Division I (and the Football Bowl Subdivision for football) and since 1953 as a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference. The Virginia Cavaliers, also called "Wahoos" or "Hoos", have won 19 recognized national championships, 14 of them since 1980. Virginia has won multiple national titles in five different sports, including three men's sports (lacrosse, 6; soccer, 5; and boxing, 2) and two women's sports (lacrosse, 3; and cross country, 2). It also holds a national championship in track and field. The men's college basketball team has won either the ACC regular season (1981, 1982, 1983, 1995, 2007) or ACC Tournament (1976) titles six times and has been to the Final Four twice, while the women's squad has been three times. The college football team is historically notable for enjoying the South's Oldest Rivalry with UNC, and for winning a share of the ACC Championship in 1989 (with Steve Spurrier's Duke) and 1995 (with FSU). Image File history File links Virginia-Cavalier-mascot. ... Image File history File links Virginia-Cavalier-mascot. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ...   The John Paul Jones Arena, to be opened for the 2006-2007 basketball season, is located at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... UTs Bevo with the BCS Division I-A National Championship trophy in an ESPN College GameDay broadcast. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... The Virginia Cavaliers are the athletics teams of the University of Virginia. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... For other senses of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer (disambiguation). ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... The ACC Mens Basketball Tournament (popularly known as the ACC Tournament) is the conference championship tournament in basketball for the Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC). ... // Final four redirects here. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... This article is about the rivalry between UVA and UNC. For the rivalry between Georgia and Auburn, see Deep Souths Oldest Rivalry. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... Stephen Orr Spurrier (born April 20, 1945 in Miami Beach, Florida) is a former American football player and currently the head coach of the University of South Carolina football team. ... Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ... The Florida State Seminoles are the mens and womens sports teams of Florida State University. ...


In 2006, Virginia's latest National Championship season culminated with its fourth NCAA Men's Lacrosse Championship, and sixth including the pre-tournament era. Virginia handily won the final game 15-7 over UMass in front of a record crowd of 47,062 at Lincoln Financial Field in Philadelphia, the first lacrosse crowd to surpass the Final Four of men's basketball and the largest crowd to witness any NCAA Championship during the year.[33] The team finished the season a perfect 17–0, the best record in NCAA Lacrosse history. Each year, the NCAA Championship determines the top lacrosse team in the NCAA Division I, Division II, and Division III. Past Winners // Division I 1971 -- Cornell 12-6 Maryland 1972 -- Virginia 13-12 Johns Hopkins 1973 -- Maryland 10-9 (2 OT) Johns Hopkins 1974 -- Johns Hopkins 17-12 Maryland 1975... The University of Massachusetts Amherst (otherwise known as UMass Amherst or UMass) is a research and land-grant university in Amherst, USA. The University of Massachusetts Amherst offers over 90 undergraduate and 65 graduate areas of study. ... Lincoln Financial Field, familiarly known as The Linc, is the home stadium of the National Football Leagues Philadelphia Eagles. ... Nickname: City of Brotherly Love, Philly, the Quaker City Motto: Philadelphia maneto (Let brotherly love continue) Location in Pennsylvania Coordinates: Country United States State Pennsylvania County Philadelphia Founded October 27, 1682 Incorporated October 25, 1701 Mayor John F. Street (D) Area    - City 369. ...


The new John Paul Jones Arena opened in the fall of 2006 for men's and women's basketball. It seats 15,219 fans, making it the third largest on-campus basketball facility in the ACC and the largest arena not located in a major metropolitan area. The arena's inaugural year witnessed the Virginia men's basketball team's first place finish in the ACC, and Cavaliers coach Dave Leitao was named the ACC Coach of the Year for 2007.   The John Paul Jones Arena, to be opened for the 2006-2007 basketball season, is located at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... There are two official definitions of metropolitan area used today in the United States, metropolitan statistical areas, and combined statistical areas, the former restrictive, the latter more extensive. ... Dave Leitao (May 18, 1960 – ) is the 10th and current University of Virginia Cavaliers mens basketball coach. ...


Davenport Field, where the UVa baseball team plays, is also new, opening in 2002. In Brian O'Connor's first 4 seasons a the helm after being made the head baseball coach in July 2003, the team has averaged 44 wins per year and become a nationally-ranked power. The team has led the ACC in team ERA for 4 consecutive years. Davenport Field is a baseball stadium in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... City Charlottesville, Virginia Mascot Cavalier Colors Orange and Navy Blue Coach Brian OConnor Stadium Davenport Field League/Conference affiliations Atlantic Coast Conference Coastal Division (2006-present) Team history All-Time Record (through 2007 season): 1836-1556-39 ACC Championships (1) 1996 NCAA Appearances (7) 1972, 1985, 1996, 2004, 2005... Brian OConnor is the head coach of the University of Virginia baseball team. ... 2003 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December A timeline of events in the news for July, 2003. ... In baseball statistics, earned run average (ERA) is the mean of earned runs given up by a pitcher per nine innings pitched. ...


The soccer teams are also national powers, with men's soccer having won 5 national championships to date. The women's team is regularly ranked in the top 5 nationally. The teams play their home matches at Klöckner Stadium, the largest soccer stadium in the ACC. The men's team has been invited to the NCAA Tournament for 26 consecutive years. Klöckner Stadium is home to four national powerhouse programs — Virginia mens and womens soccer in the fall and mens and womens lacrosse teams in the spring. ...


The Aquatics and Fitness Center (webcam) has been popular among University students for working out and swimming since its opening in Fall 1996, and it is also where the Swimming & Diving teams compete in home meets. The men's swimming and diving team won 8 consecutive ACC Championships between 1999 and 2006. Swimmer redirects here. ... For other uses, see Dive. ...


Also winning consecutive ACC titles has been the men's tennis team, which has won 4 consecutive regular season ACC Championships. Playing their home matches at the Sheridan Snyder Tennis Center, the men's tennis team had their best season ever in 2007, finishing with a 30-4 record and a #2 national ranking. Junior Somdev Devvarman became the first ACC player in conference history to win the NCAA Singles Championship. The Sheridan Snyder Tennis Center at the University of Virginia opened in 1997 right next to Memorial Gymnasium. ... Somdev Devvarman (also known as Somdev Dev Varman) is the current (2007) NCAA Mens Singles Champion. ...


Now that Virginia Tech has joined the ACC, the Virginia-Virginia Tech rivalry has been strengthened across a number of sports. This rivalry is followed statewide. This article or section should include material from Virginia Bioinformatics Institute. ... Virginia Tech meets Virginia for the Hokies first visit to John Paul Jones Arena on March 1, 2007. ...


Student life

Student life at the University of Virginia is marked by a number of unique traditions. The campus of the University is referred to as "the Grounds." Freshmen, sophomores, juniors, and seniors are instead called first-, second-, third-, and fourth-years in order to reflect Jefferson's belief that learning is a never-ending process, rather than one to be completed within four years. Also, students do not "graduate" from the University - instead they take their degrees. Professors are traditionally addressed as "Mr." or "Ms." instead of "Doctor" or "Professor" (although medical doctors are the exception and are called "Doctor") in deference to Thomas Jefferson's desire to have an equality of ideas, discriminated by merit and unburdened by title.

Edgar Allan Poe's room, #13 West Range, no longer has a student in residence. It has been restored to its 1826 form.

In 2005, the University was named "Hottest for Fitness" by Newsweek magazine,[34] due in part to 94% of its students using one of the four indoor athletics facilities. Particularly popular is the Aquatics and Fitness Center, situated across the street from New Dorms. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 319 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The original photograph, with Creative Commons Attribution 2. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 319 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The original photograph, with Creative Commons Attribution 2. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... The Range is part of the original grounds of the University of Virginia as designed by Thomas Jefferson. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


The University of Virginia sent more workers to the Peace Corps in 2006 than any other "medium-sized" university in the United States.[35] Volunteerism at the University is centered in Madison House, which offers numerous opportunities to serve others. Among the numerous programs offered are tutoring, housing improvement, and an organization called Hoos Against Hunger, which gives leftover food made at restaurants to Charlottesville's homeless rather than allowing it to be thrown away. It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


A number of secret societies at the University, most notably the Seven Society, Z Society, and IMP Society, have operated for decades, leaving their painted marks on University buildings. Other significant secret societies include Eli Banana, T.I.L.K.A., the Purple Shadows (who commemorate Jefferson's birthday shortly after dawn on the Lawn each April 13), the Rotunda Burning Society (who commemorate the Great Rotunda Fire), and the 21 Society. Not all the secret societies keep their membership unknown, but even those who don't hide their identities generally keep most of their good works and activities far from the public eye. The following is a list of some of the more well known of the secret societies at the University of Virginia. ... The Seven Society (founded circa 1905) is the most secretive of the University of Virginias secret societies. ... The Z Society (or Zeta Society) is a philanthropic organization that was founded at the University of Virginia in 1892, making it the oldest secret society on the universitys grounds. ... The IMP Society, was founded in 1902 at the University of Virginia as a secret society called Hot Feet, which was disbanded and recreated as the IMP Society, an acronym generally believed to stand for Incarnate Memories Prevail. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...


Student Societies have existed on grounds since the early 19th Century. The Jefferson Literary and Debating Society, founded in 1825, is the oldest collegiate debating organization in the United States, and the second oldest Greek-Lettered organization in the nation. It continues to meet every Friday at 7:29 PM in The Hall. The Washington Literary Society and Debating Union also meets every week, and the two organizations often engage in a friendly rivalry. In the days before social fraternities existed and intercollegiate athletics became popular, these Societies were often the focal point of social activity on grounds.[36] Several fraternities were later founded at the University of Virginia including Pi Kappa Alpha (1 March 1868) and Kappa Sigma (10 December 1869). The Jefferson Literary and Debating Society is the oldest continually existing collegiate debating society in North America. ... Jefferson Hall - more formally known as Hotel C - is a building on the West Range of the University of Virginia. ... The Washington Literary Society and Debating Union (also known as the Washington Society or the Wash) is a literary and debating group at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ...

Alderman Library is a favorite study spot for students. This plaque in honor of the university's first President Edwin Alderman, with a quote from Jefferson, was donated by the Seven Society, one of the University's many secret societies.

The student life building on the University of Virginia is called Newcomb Hall. It is home to the Student Activities Center, where student groups can get leadership consulting and use computing and copying resources, as well as several meeting rooms for student groups. Most publications on grounds are produced here, as it is home to both the office of the independent student newspaper The Declaration, The Cavalier Daily, and the Consortium of University Publications. It is also home to the University Programs Council, which uses money from student activities fees to provide events for the student community. Newcomb Hall includes a dining hall, a theatre, a ballroom, an art gallery, and several rooms for magazine and newspaper production. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (942x896, 501 KB)Source: http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (942x896, 501 KB)Source: http://www. ... Edwin A. Alderman Edwin Anderson Alderman (born May 15, 1861 in Wilmington, North Carolina; died April 30, 1931 in Charlottesville, Virginia) served as the President of three universities. ... The Seven Society (founded circa 1905) is the most secretive of the University of Virginias secret societies. ... The following is a list of some of the more well known of the secret societies at the University of Virginia. ... For the studio album by contemporary R&B/pop singer Ashanti, see The Declaration (album) The Declaration is a weekly tabloid-format news magazine edited and constructed by students at the University of Virginia. ... The Cavalier Daily is the fully independent student-run newspaper at the University of Virginia, founded in 1890. ...


A national publication's survey recently revealed that U.Va.'s students give their library system higher marks than students at any other school in the United States. The best-known library is Alderman Library for the humanities and social sciences, which contains 10 floors of stacks with many useful study nooks hidden among them. U.Va.'s renowned Small Special Collections Library feature one of the premier collections of American Literature in the country as well as an original copy of the Declaration of Independence. It was in this library in 2006 that Robert Stilling, an English Graduate Student, discovered an unpublished Robert Frost poem from 1918.[37] Clemons Library, next to Alderman, is a popular study spot. Hundreds of students can be found gathered on its various quiet floors on any given night. Clark Hall, home of the Science & Engineering Library, also scores high marks. Clark Hall is also notable for a large Greek-style mural on the ceiling and walls of the library entrance. As of 2006, the University and Google were working on the digitization of selected collections from the library system.[38] A Dunlap broadside is one of 25 original printings of the United States Declaration of Independence. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of Great Britain. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the corporation. ...


As at many universities, heavy drinking characterizes the social life of some undergraduate students at the University. Responding to the prevalence of alcohol and a recent tradition observed by a portion of the student body called the Fourth-Year Fifth (where some fourth-year students strive to drink a fifth (750 ml) of alcohol during the day of the last home football game),[39] President Casteen announced a $2.5 million donation from Anheuser-Busch to fund a new UVA-based Social Norms Institute in September 2006.[40] A spokesman said: "the goal is to get students to emulate the positive behavior of the vast majority of students." Anheuser-Busch Companies, Inc. ... September 2006 is the ninth month of 2006 and has begun on a Friday. ...


One of the largest events at the University of Virginia is called Springfest. It takes place every year in the spring, and features a large free concert and various inflatables and games.


Honor System

HONOR PLEDGE

On my honor as a student, I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment/examination.

The University of Virginia has an honor code, formally known as the Honor System.[41] The Honor System is entirely student-run and was founded by Virginia students in the 1840s after a professor, who was attempting to resolve a conflict between students, was shot to death. The student is presumed to be a lady or a gentleman unless and until proved otherwise, and is expected to conduct him or herself accordingly. The Honor System is composed of only three tenets: a student will not lie, cheat, or steal. It extends to all matters academic and personal, and the sole sanction for a confirmed Honor System violation is dismissal from the University. This is called the "single sanction". An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ... // First use of general anesthesia in an operation, by Crawford Long The first electrical telegraph sent by Samuel Morse on May 24, 1844 from Baltimore to Washington, D.C.. First signing of the Treaty of Waitangi (Te Tiriti o Waitangi) on February 6, 1840 at Waitangi, Northland New Zealand. ... This article is about untruthfulness. ... “Cheat” redirects here. ... A young waif steals a pair of boots “Stealing” redirects here. ...


The system is not without its detractors — it has been criticized because the required severe penalty may prevent more moderate violations from being reported or acted upon.[42] As the system is entirely student run, a change to the Honor Council constitution could have the effect of ending the single sanction system of punishment. Although students have voted on numerous proposals to weaken or eliminate the single sanction over the past few decades, none has ever succeeded. Support for the honor system has waned in recent years, and in the Spring of 2007 a referendum to limit single sanction failed to pass after earning 49.5% of the votes cast. [43]


In theory, the Honor System allows the faculty to do such things as assigning timed take-home examinations, and research or studies to be done in a particular way, with the assurance that the strictures placed on the student will be observed. However, no professor is required to extend such courtesies and in large classes professors are rare to grant students any honor privileges. The student is often required to sign all examinations or assignments with the following pledge: "On my honor as a student, I have neither given nor received aid on this assignment/examination." The Honor System allows the student to purchase books and supplies on-Grounds upon giving his or her word to pay, and some members of the Charlottesville community accept the word of the student regarding off-Grounds business transactions.


While cheating is unusual (only 24 students were dismissed during the 2003 academic year, and 21 more were dismissed in 2004), one large cheating scandal occurred in 2001. Physics professor and Hereford College Dean Louis Bloomfield, based on a student's complaint, had suspicions that some of his students had copied portions of their term papers from fraternity archives in his Introduction to Physics class. After devising a computer program to detect copied phrases of at least six sequential words, over 150 students were accused of plagiarizing or allowing others to plagiarize their work over the previous five semesters. Although over 100 of these students were eventually exonerated, 48 students either admitted guilt or were convicted, and were therefore dismissed from the University. Three of these students had already graduated, and their degrees were subsequently revoked. Look up fraternity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Distinguished alumni

Among the individuals who have attended or graduated from the University of Virginia are poet Edgar Allan Poe, medical researcher Walter Reed, painter Georgia O'Keeffe, polar explorer Richard Byrd, three NASA astronauts, NASA Launch Director Michael D. Leinbach, Director of the Human Genome Project Francis Collins, journalist Katie Couric, comedian Tina Fey, musician Boyd Tinsley, 3-time NCAA Player of the Year for men's basketball Ralph Sampson, 3-time Olympic Gold Medalist for women's basketball Dawn Staley, NFL Pro Bowlers Ronde Barber and Tiki Barber, Buffalo Bills founder and owner Ralph Wilson, billionaire commodity trader Paul Tudor Jones, influential indie rock artist Stephen Malkmus and interior designer and TV personality Vern Yip. The University of Virginia has also been home to several top soccer players throughout the years. Seven former UVA players have gone on to play for the United States men's national soccer team, including former U.S. team captains Claudio Reyna and John Harkes. Ryan Zimmerman, the 2005 first round pick of the Major League Baseball team the Washington Nationals, also graduated from the University of Virginia. This page is a partial list of distinguished alumni of the University of Virginia. ... Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Major Walter Reed, M.D., (September 13, 1851 - November 23, 1902) was a U.S. Army physician who in 1900 led the team which confirmed the theory (first set forth in 1881 by Cuban doctor/scientist Carlos Finlay) that yellow fever is transmitted by mosquitoes, rather than by direct contact. ... Georgia Tottoeanocomita OKeeffe (November 15, 1887—March 6, 1986) was an American artist. ... Rear Admiral Richard Evelyn Byrd, USN (October 25, 1888 – March 11, 1957) was a pioneering American polar explorer and famous aviator. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... Michael D. Leinbach is the Shuttle Launch Director at NASAs John F. Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida. ... The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a project undertaken with a goal to understand the genetic make-up of the human species by determining the DNA sequence of the human genome and the genome of a few model organisms. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... Katherine Anne Katie Couric (born January 7, 1957) is an American media personality who became well-known as co-host of NBCs Today. ... Elizabeth Stamatina Tina Fey (born May 18, 1970) is an American writer, comedian and an Emmy-winning actress. ... Boyd Tinsley (b. ... The Naismith College Player of the Year award, named for basketball inventor James Naismith, is given annually by the Atlanta Tipoff Club to college basketballs top male and female player. ... Image:Ralph Sampson. ... Dawn Staley on the Houston Comets Dawn Michelle Staley (born May 4, 1970 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an US-American basketball player and coach. ... Jamael Orondé Barber (born April 7, 1975 in Roanoke, Virginia) is an American football player who currently plays as a cornerback for the Tampa Bay Buccaneers of the NFL. He is the identical twin brother of New York Giants running back Tiki Barber. ... Atiim Kiambu Hakeem-ah Tiki Barber (born April 7, 1975 in Roanoke, Virginia) is a news and sports broadcaster, author, and former American football running back for the New York Giants. ... For other uses, see Buffalo Bills (disambiguation). ... Ralph C. Wilson, Jr. ... A billionaire is a person who has a net worth of at least one billion units of currency, such as United States Dollars (USD), Pounds or Euros. ... Paul Tudor Jones Paul Tudor Jones is one of the most famous and accomplished commodity traders in the 21st Century. ... Indie rock is a subgenre of rock music often used to refer to bands that are on small independent record labels or that arent on labels at all. ... Stephen Malkmus (born May 30, 1966 , Santa Monica, California) is an indie rock musician and a former member of the band Pavement. ... First international Unofficial: USA 0 - 1 Canada  (Newark, NJ, USA; November 28, 1885) Official:  Sweden 2 - 3 USA (Stockholm, Sweden; August 20, 1916) Biggest win USA 8 - 1 Cayman Islands  (Mission Viejo, CA, USA; November 14, 1993) USA 7 - 0 El Salvador  (Los Angeles, CA, USA; December 5, 1993) USA... Claudio Reyna (born July 20, 1973 in Livingston, New Jersey) is an American soccer player. ... John Harkes (born March 8, 1967 in Kearny, New Jersey) is a former American soccer player and currently an assistant coach with Red Bull New York of Major League Soccer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Major league affiliations National League (1969–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 42 Name Washington Nationals (2005–present) Montreal Expos (1969-2004) Other nicknames Nats, Nacionales (Spanish) Ballpark RFK Stadium (2005–present) Hiram Bithorn Stadium[3] (San Juan) (2003-2004) Olympic Stadium (Montreal) (1977-2004) Jarry Park...


Numerous political leaders have also attended the University of Virginia including 28th U.S. President Woodrow Wilson, 1968 Presidential candidate Robert F. Kennedy, his son Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., and his brother, Senator Ted Kennedy. Other alumni in leadership roles include three United States Supreme Court Justices, two Surgeons General, a Speaker of the House, a Senate Majority Leader, numerous Senators and Representatives, Secretaries of State, Defense, Energy, Transportation, Treasury, and the Navy, and the Secretary General of both NATO and the Council of the European Union. Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Robert Francis Kennedy Jr. ... Edward Moore Ted Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior United States Senator from Massachusetts and a member of the Democratic Party. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Federal courts Supreme Court Chief Justice Associate Justices Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Counties, Cities, and Towns Other countries Politics Portal      The Speaker of the United States House of Representatives is the presiding officer of the... The Senate Majority and Minority Leaders (also called Floor Leaders) are two United States Senators who are elected by the party conferences that hold the majority and the minority respectively. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Type Bicameral Speaker of the House of Representatives House Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Steny Hoyer, (D) since January 4, 2007 House Minority Leader John Boehner, (R) since January 4, 2007 Members 435 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party... Seal of the United States Department of State. ... The United States Secretary of Defense (SECDEF) is the head of the U.S. Department of Defense (DoD), concerned with the armed services and military matters. ... The United States Secretary of the Treasury is the finance minister of the Federal Government of the United States. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... A large number of international organizations and other bodies have a secretary general or secretary-general as their chief administrative officers or in other administrative capacities. ... This article is about the military alliance. ... Established 1952 Presiding Country Portugal President Luís Amado President in Office José Sócrates Members 27 (at one time) Political parties 7, including: European Peoples Party Party of European Socialists Meeting place Justus Lipsius, Brussels, Belgium, European Union Web site http://www. ...


Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2976x3623, 1136 KB) Description President of the United States Thomas Woodrow Wilson, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2976x3623, 1136 KB) Description President of the United States Thomas Woodrow Wilson, head-and-shoulders portrait, facing left. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... Image File history File links Robert_F._Kennedy. ... Image File history File links Robert_F._Kennedy. ... Robert Francis Bobby Kennedy (November 20, 1925 – June 6, 1968), also called RFK, was one of two younger brothers of U.S. President John F. Kennedy and served as United States Attorney General from 1961 to 1964. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1980x2940, 1426 KB)NATO Secretary General Javier Solana, of Spain, listens to remarks made by Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen during an award ceremony for Solana in the Pentagon on Sept. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1980x2940, 1426 KB)NATO Secretary General Javier Solana, of Spain, listens to remarks made by Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen during an award ceremony for Solana in the Pentagon on Sept. ... Javier Solana Madariaga (born July 14, 1942 in Madrid, Spain) is the High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy (CFSP) and the Secretary-General of both the Council of the European Union (EU) and the Western European Union (WEU). ... Image File history File links Couric_headshot. ... Image File history File links Couric_headshot. ... Katherine Anne Katie Couric (born January 7, 1957) is an American media personality who became well-known as co-host of NBCs Today. ...


References

This Gutzon Borglum sculpture located near Alderman Library commemorates James R. McConnell, U.Va. alum and Lafayette Escadrille aviator for France, shot down before the U.S. entered World War I
  1. ^ http://www.dailyprogress.com/servlet/Satellite?pagename=CDP%2FMGArticle%2FCDP_BasicArticle&cid=1173352684392
  2. ^ Many universities' students and alumni refer to their respective institutions as "the university" for short. At the University of Virginia, this title is capitalized as a proper noun (i.e., "The University" or "the University")[1] in reference only to this particular school, much like The Lawn and The Rotunda. In recent decades many of the school's alumni and students have sported university-licensed bumper stickers and window decals of simply THE UNIVERSITY in the school's colors ([2]), a practice not always well understood or appreciated by outsiders, leaving some to declare such usage to be elitist.[3] However, the vernacular tradition goes back more than a hundred years, as indicated in the following excerpt from a 1903 novel.[4]

    But hardest of all to leave had been Archie, best and most promising of young brothers—Archie, who had come out ahead of his class in the high-school, all ready to go to The University—the University of Virginia is always "The University"; but who, it had seemed at a certain dark season, must give up this long-cherished hope for lack of the wherewithal... Photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Gutzon Borglum File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Photo by Einar Einarsson Kvaran Gutzon Borglum File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Mt Rushmore, Black Hills, South Dakota (John) Gutzon Borglum (March 25, 1867 –March 6, 1941). ... A SPAD S.XIII in Lafayette Escadrille livery James Norman Hall (1887-1951) of the Lafayette Escadrille, 1917 The Lafayette Escadrille (from the French Escadrille Lafayette) was a squadron of the French Air Service, the Aéronautique militaire, during World War I composed largely of American pilots flying fighters. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... The West Lawn in snow, 1914. ... Jeffersons Rotunda, University of Virginia. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ...

    Marie Manning, 1903, Judith of the Plains Marie Manning (January 22, 1872—November 28, 1945) was a newspaper columnist and novelist in the early 20th century. ...

  3. ^ Noble E. Cunningham, Jr., In Pursuit of Reason: The Life of Thomas Jefferson, p. 336.
  4. ^ Alf J. Mapp, Jr., Thomas Jefferson: Passionate Pilgrim, p. 19.
  5. ^ Phillips Russell, Jefferson, Champion of the Free Mind, p. 335.
  6. ^ Dumas Malone, Jefferson and His Time: The Sage of Monticello, p. 417-418.
  7. ^ Joseph J. Ellis, American Sphinx, p. 283.
  8. ^ Encyclopædia Britannica, University of Virginia, retrieved June 20, 2006.
  9. ^ Comparing Black Enrollments at the Public Ivies. The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education. 2005
  10. ^ a b Early admissions - for better or worse? (HTML) (English). Springfield Republican (November 15, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  11. ^ a b University of Virginia sends out last 'early decision' letters (HTML) (English). Daily Press (December 7, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  12. ^ a b Virginia Ends Early Decision (HTML) (English). Inside Higher Education (September 26, 2006). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  13. ^ Architectural Record," 4 (January-March 1895), pp. 351-353
  14. ^ AIA Journal, 65 (July 1976), p. 91
  15. ^ Grizzard, Frank E.Documentary history of the construction of the buildings at the University of Virginia, 1817-1828. University of Virginia Libraries. 1996-2002.
  16. ^ Virginia Route IndexPDF (239 KiB), revised July 1, 2003
  17. ^ a b Roosevelt, Franklin D. Stab in the Back. Scripps Library and Multimedia Archive. June 10, 1940.
  18. ^ Early Decision and Early Action (HTML) (English). College Board (September 26, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-06-14.
  19. ^ a b University of Virginia to End Early Decision Program in Admissions (HTML) (English). University of Virginia News Office (June 25, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  20. ^ University of Virginia Extends Admissions Offers to the Class of 2011 (HTML) (English). University of Virginia News Office (April 1, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-25.
  21. ^ Rector and Visitors of The University of Virginia (1995). Chapter 4: University Regulations: Honorary Degrees. Rector and Visitors of The University of Virginia. Retrieved on 2006-05-07. "The University of Virginia does not award honorary degrees. In conjunction with the Thomas Jefferson Memorial Foundation, the University presents the Thomas Jefferson Medal in Architecture and the Thomas Jefferson Award in Law each spring. The awards, recognizing excellence in two fields of interest to Jefferson, constitute the University's highest recognition of scholars outside the University."
  22. ^ No honorary degrees is an MIT tradition going back to ... Thomas Jefferson. MIT News Office (2001-06-08). Retrieved on 2006-05-07.:"MIT's founder, William Barton Rogers, regarded the practice of giving honorary degrees as 'literary almsgiving ... of spurious merit and noisy popularity....' Rogers was a geologist from the University of Virginia who believed in Thomas Jefferson's policy barring honorary degrees at the university, which was founded in 1819."
  23. ^ Two for the Rhodes: With 45, U.Va. boasts most Rhodes Scholars among nation’s public universities. U.Va. News Office (2004-12-03). Retrieved on 2006-12-07.
  24. ^ Butler, Carolyn Kleiner. "Jefferson's Public Ivy", America's Best Colleges 2006, U.S. News & World Report, 2005-8-19. Retrieved on 2006-12-20. (English) 
  25. ^ "America's Best Colleges 2007", U.S. News & World Report, 2006-8-18. Retrieved on 2006-12-20. (English) 
  26. ^ "UVA Short History", University of Virginia. Retrieved on 2007-06-25. (English) 
  27. ^ Electronic Center at UVa Library. Digital Scholarship Services. Retrieved on 2006-12-20.
  28. ^ University of Virginia - virginia.edu (HTML). Alexa Internet, Inc.. Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  29. ^ Center For Politics website. Retrieved June 23, 2006.
  30. ^ Faculty Salaries 2002 (HTML). The Cavalier Daily. Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  31. ^ Ranking the Colleges... (PDF). Wall Street Journal (2003-09-23). Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  32. ^ How State Schools Did (PDF). Wall Street Journal (2003-09-23). Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  33. ^ "Virginia Claims National Title, and a Victory for Lacrosse", The New York Times, May 30, 2006, p. D5. 
  34. ^ "America's 25 Hot Schools", Newsweek, August 2004 (2005 edition). 
  35. ^ Peace Corps - Top Producing Colleges and Universities (HTML) (English). Peace Corps. Retrieved on 2006-12-08.
  36. ^ Society History (HTML) (English). Karl Saur. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  37. ^ Grad student discovers unpublished Frost poem (HTML) (English). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  38. ^ College Dean Search and Diversity Report Main Focus of Senate Meeting (HTML) (English). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  39. ^ High spirits: Wahoos tackle fourth-year fifth (HTML) (English). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  40. ^ Busch league: UVA gets big bucks to ban binging (HTML) (English). Retrieved on 2006-12-11.
  41. ^ The Honor Committee (HTML). University of Virginia (2006-12-11). Retrieved on 2007-01-09.
  42. ^ Professors Tepid about the Honor System (HTML). The Daily Progress (newspaper) (2006-12-27). Retrieved on 2007-04-21.
  43. ^ Students decide on referenda (HTML). The Daily Progress (newspaper) (2007-03-01). Retrieved on 2007-09-17.

Dumas Malone was a biographer of Thomas Jefferson. ... Joseph J. Ellis is an American professor, historian and best-selling author of books about the Founding Fathers of the United States, including Founding Brothers: The Revolutionary Generation, which won the Pulitzer Prize for history in 2001, American Sphinx: The Character of Thomas Jefferson (1997), and His Excellency: George Washington... The Encyclopædia Britannica is a general English-language encyclopaedia published by Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Springfield Republican is a newspaper based in Springfield, Massachusetts. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Daily Press is a newspaper published in Newport News, Virginia. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 161st day of the year (162nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The College Board is a not-for-profit examination board in the United States that was formed in the nineteenth century as the College Entrance Examination Board (CEEB). ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cavalier Daily is the fully independent student-run newspaper at the University of Virginia, founded in 1890. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Abernethy, Thomas Perkins. Historical Sketch of the University of Virginia. Richmond: Dietz Press, 1948.
  • Addis, Cameron. "Jefferson's Vision for Education, 1760-1845." New York: Peter Lang Publishing, 2003.
  • Barker, David Michael. "Thomas Jefferson and the Founding of the University of Virginia." Ph.D. diss., University of Illinois, 2000.
  • Bruce, Philip Alexander. History of the University of Virginia, 1819-1919. 5 vols. New York: Macmillan, 1920-22.
  • Dabney, Virginius. Mr. Jefferson's University: A History. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1981.
  • Hein, David. Noble Powell and the Episcopal Establishment in the Twentieth Century. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 2001. [Chapter two covers student and faculty life at the University of Virginia in the 1920s, when Powell was de facto chaplain to the University.]
  • Hitchcock, Susan Tyler. The University of Virginia: A Pictorial History. Charlottesville: University Press of Virginia, 1999.
  • Mapp, Alf J. Thomas Jefferson: Passionate Pilgrim. Lanham, Md.: Madison Books, 1991.
  • Waggoner, Jennings L. Jefferson and Education. Chapel Hill, N.C.: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

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