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Encyclopedia > University of Vienna

University of Vienna
Universität Wien

Latin: Universitate Vindobonensi, also Alma Mater Rudolphina

Established 1365
Type public
Rector Professor Georg Winckler
Students c. 63,000
Location Vienna, Austria
Website http://www.univie.ac.at

The University of Vienna (German: Universität Wien) is a public university located in Vienna, Austria. Having opened in 1365, it is one of the oldest universities in Europe. Although, according to Austrian tradition, the school no longer qualifies as a full university, it still offers more than 130 courses of study, and is attended by more than 63,000 students. Its unofficial name among many Austrians is Hauptuni (English: "Main Uni"). Seal of the University of Vienna. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Vienna (disambiguation). ... Events Foundation of the University of Vienna Births John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (died 1394) Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (died 1399) Deaths May 17 - Louis VI the Roman, elector of Brandenburg (born 1328) July 27 - Duke Rudolf IV of Austria (born 1339) Categories: 1365 ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...

Contents

History

University of Vienna, main building, seen from the Ringstraße
University of Vienna, main building, seen from the Ringstraße
The grand staircase (Feststiege) in the main building
The grand staircase (Feststiege) in the main building
Ceremonial Hall (Festsaal) in the main building
Ceremonial Hall (Festsaal) in the main building

The University was founded on March 12, 1365 by Duke Rudolph IV and his brothers Albert III and Leopold III, hence the additional name "Alma Mater Rudolphina". After the Charles University in Prague, the University of Vienna is the second oldest university in Central Europe and the oldest university in the German-speaking world. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 823 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Vienna Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2560x1920, 823 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Vienna Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 966 KB) Summary Description: View of one of the main stairs (Hauptstiege) in the University of Vienna. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 966 KB) Summary Description: View of one of the main stairs (Hauptstiege) in the University of Vienna. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1300 KB) Festsaal (Ceremony Hall) in the main building of the University of Vienna, Austria. ... Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 1300 KB) Festsaal (Ceremony Hall) in the main building of the University of Vienna, Austria. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events Foundation of the University of Vienna Births John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (died 1394) Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (died 1399) Deaths May 17 - Louis VI the Roman, elector of Brandenburg (born 1328) July 27 - Duke Rudolf IV of Austria (born 1339) Categories: 1365 ... Rudolf IV der Stifter (the Founder) (born November 1, 1339 in Vienna, died July 27, 1365 in Milan) was a member of the House of Habsburg and Duke and self-proclaimed Archduke of Austria from 1358 to 1365. ... Albert III (born September 9, 1349 in Vienna; died August 29, 1395 on Castle Laxenburg; known as Albert with the Pigtail) was a duke of Austria. ... Duke Leopold III of Austria, Duke of Inner Austria (November 1, 1351, Vienna – July 9, 1386, Sempach) from the Habsburg family was a Duke of Austria, Styria and Carinthia. ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ...


In 1365, Rudolph IV sanctioned a deed of foundation for a doctoral-level university in Vienna, modelled on the University of Paris. However, Pope Urban V did not ratify the deed, specifically in relation to the department of theology, presumably due to pressure exerted by Emperor Charles IV who wished to avoid competition for Prague University. Approval was finally received from the Pope in 1384 and Vienna University was granted the status of a full university (including the theology department). The first university building opened in 1385. Events Foundation of the University of Vienna Births John de Ros, 6th Baron de Ros (died 1394) Thomas de Mowbray, 1st Duke of Norfolk (died 1399) Deaths May 17 - Louis VI the Roman, elector of Brandenburg (born 1328) July 27 - Duke Rudolf IV of Austria (born 1339) Categories: 1365 ... The Sorbonne, Paris, in a 17th century engraving The historic University of Paris (French: ) first appeared in the second half of the 12th century, but was in 1970 reorganised as 13 autonomous universities (University of Paris I–XIII). ... Blessed Urban V, né Guillaume Grimoard (1310 – December 19, 1370), Pope from 1362 to 1370, was a native of Grizac in Languedoc (today part of the commune of Le Pont-de-Montvert, département of Lozère). ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Charles IV, Holy Roman Emperor. ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ... Year 1384 was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1385 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...


The current main building on the Ringstraße was built between 1877 and 1884 by Heinrich von Ferstel. The previous main building was located close to the Stuben Gate (Stubentor) on Iganz Seipel Square, current home of the old University Church (Universitätskirche) and the Austrian Academy of Sciences (Österreichische Akademie der Wissenschaften). The Ringstraße at night The Ringstraße is a circular road surrounding the Innere Stadt district of Vienna, Austria and is one of its main sights. ... 1877 (MDCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Women were admitted as full students from 1897, although their studies were limited to philosophy. The remaining departments gradually followed suit, although with considerable delay: medicine in 1900, law in 1919, Protestant theology in 1923, and finally Catholic theology in 1946. Eight years after the admission of the first female students, Elise Richter became the first woman to receive habilitation, becoming professor of Romance Languages in 1905; she was also the first female distinguished professor. The first female chair of the university was not awarded until after the Second World War, to physicist Berta Karlik. 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elise Monk (born March 2, 1865) was a professor of Romantic philology at the University of Vienna. ... Habilitation is the highest academic qualification a person can achieve by his/her own pursuit in certain European countries. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


Location

The academic facilities of the University of Vienna occupy more than sixty locations throughout the city of Vienna. The historical Main Building on the Ringstraße constitutes the University's center, as the seat of the university’s executive and most of its administrative offices. The nearby University Campus forms an additional, more spacious, focus of the University. A large number of academic facilities, including the new lecture hall complex, are situated there. The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


National and international rankings

The University of Vienna was placed 65th in the The Times Higher Education Supplement University World Ranking in 2005,[1]PDF (311 KiB) rising from 94th place in 2004. Amongst European universities, the University of Vienna was ranked 19th in 2005, up from 31st in 2004. The University is also ranked 40th in the world in the field of biomedicine, and 42nd in the field of social sciences. These world rankings make the University the most highly ranked in Austria.[2]PDF (311 KiB) The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that treat patients. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to...


Despite these rankings, in 2006, the German newspaper, Die Zeit, ranked the University poorly, stating its performance in chemistry, biology, and physics as primary factors.[citation needed] DIE ZEIT (pronounced , in English, literally The Time, more idiomatically The Times) is a German nationwide weekly newspaper that is highly respected for its quality journalism. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...


Organization

The University of Vienna (like all universities and academies in Austria) once featured a novel system of democratic representation. Power in the university was divided equally among three groups: students (the largest group), junior faculty, and full professors. All groups had the right to send representatives to boards who then voted on almost every issue. While this system guaranteed that all groups had equal opportunity to introduce change, some people have argued[attribution needed] that it led to corruption, especially in the nomination of persons into prestigious positions.


The former government, headed by then-chancellor Wolfgang Schüssel, reformed the university system so that power is now concentrated with the full professors. The reform also introduced a board of governors and tuition fees (less than €400 per semester in 2007). The reforms also separated the medical departments into separate medical schools, such as the Medical University of Vienna. This change meant that the traditional sense of the word university no longer applies to the University of Vienna. Wolfgang Schüssel Wolfgang Schüssel (born on June 7, 1945 in Vienna, Austria) is a Christian Democratic Austrian politician. ... The Medical University of Vienna , formerly the faculty of medicine of the University of Vienna, became an independent university on January 1, 2004. ...


Research and teaching

The research activity of the university is undertaken by some 6,100 scholars. Of these, around 3,200 are active as staff of the University of Vienna, and approximately 900 are active in projects financed by third parties. About 2,000 belong to external teaching engagements, many of them still contributing to the scholarship of the university.


Departments and Centers

The departments of the University include: Catholic Theology, Protestant Theology, Law, Economics, Computer Science, History-Culture, Philology-Culture, Philosophy, Pedagogy, Psychology, Social Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Geology, Geography, Astronomy, Life Sciences, Translatology, Sport Science, University Sports. The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... Protestantism encompasses the forms of Christian faith and practice that originated with the doctrines of the Reformation. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... This article is about the study of time in human terms. ... For other uses, see Culture (disambiguation). ... Philology, etymologically, is the love of words. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... Pedagogy (IPA: ) , the art or science of being a teacher, generally refers to strategies of instruction, or a style of instruction[1]. The word comes from the Ancient Greek (paidagōgeō; from (child) and (lead)): literally, to lead the child”. In Ancient Greece, was (usually) a slave who supervised the... Psychological science redirects here. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ...


Famous members

Faculty and scholars

Nobel Prize Laureates who taught at the University of Vienna include Robert Bárány, Julius Wagner-Jauregg, Hans Fischer, Karl Landsteiner, Erwin Schrödinger, Victor Franz Hess, Otto Loewi, Konrad Lorenz and Friedrich Hayek. The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... Robert Bárány Robert Bárány (April 22, 1876 – April 8, 1936) was an Austrian physician of Hungarian-Jewish descent. ... Julius Wagner Ritter von Jauregg, after the abolition of titles of nobility in Austria in 1919 Julius Wagner-Jauregg, (March 7, 1857 Wels, Upper Austria – September 27, 1940 Vienna) was an Austrian physician. ... Hans Fischer (July 27, 1881 – March 31, 1945) was a German organic chemist and the recipient of the 1930 Nobel Prize for Chemistry. ... Karl Landsteiner Karl Landsteiner (June 14, 1868 – June 26, 1943), was an Austrian biologist and physician. ... Schrödinger in 1933, when he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics Bust of Schrödinger, in the courtyard arcade of the main building, University of Vienna, Austria. ... Victor Francis Hess (June 24, 1883 – December 17, 1964) was an Austrian-American physicist. ... Otto Loewi (June 3, 1873 – December 25, 1961) was a Austrian-German-American pharmacologist. ... Lorenz being followed by his imprinted geese Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (November 7, 1903 in Vienna – February 27, 1989 in Vienna) was an Austrian zoologist, animal psychologist, and ornithologist. ... Friedrich August von Hayek, CH (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian-born British economist and political philosopher known for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ...


The University of Vienna was the cradle of the Austrian School of economics. The founders of this school who studied here included Carl Menger, Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk, Friedrich von Wieser, Joseph Schumpeter, Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek. The Austrian School, also known as the Vienna School or the Psychological School, is a school of economic thought that advocates adherence to strict methodological individualism. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Austrian School economist Carl Menger Carl Menger Carl Menger (February 28, 1840 – February 26, 1921) was the founder of the Austrian School of economics. ... Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk Eugen von Böhm-Bawerk (February 12, 1851 – August 27, 1914) made important contributions to the development of Austrian economics. ... Friedrich von Wieser Friedrich von Wieser (July 10, 1851 - July 22, 1926) was an early member of the Austrian School of economics. ... Joseph Schumpeter Joseph Alois Schumpeter (February 8, 1883 – January 8, 1950) was an economist from Austria and an influential political scientist. ... Ludwig Heinrich Edler von Mises (September 29, 1881 – October 10, 1973) (pronounced was a notable economist and a major influence on the modern libertarian movement. ... Friedrich August von Hayek, CH (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian-born British economist and political philosopher known for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ...


Other famous scholars who have taught at the University of Vienna: Theodor Adorno, Theodor Billroth, Ludwig Boltzmann, Anton Bruckner, Rudolf Carnap, Can Kerim Aykac, Conrad Celtis, Viktor Frankl, Sigmund Freud, Eduard Hanslick, Berthold Hatschek, Moritz Hoernes, Hans Kelsen, Johann Josef Loschmidt, Oskar Morgenstern, Otto Neurath, Johann Palisa, Richard Pittioni, Pius II, Karl Freiherr von Rokitansky, August Schleicher, Moritz Schlick, Ludwig Karl Schmarda, Joseph von Sonnenfels, Josef Stefan, Carl Auer von Welsbach Max Horkheimer (front left), Theodor Adorno (front right), and Jürgen Habermas in the background, right, in 1965 at Heidelberg. ... Theodor Billroth, founding father of modern abdominal surgery Christian Albert Theodor Billroth (born 26 August 1829 in Bergen auf Rügen, Germany; died 6 February 1894 in Opatija, Austria-Hungary, now Croatia), a German-born Austrian surgeon, is generally regarded as the founding father of modern abdominal surgery. ... Ludwig Eduard Boltzmann (Vienna, Austrian Empire, February 20, 1844 – Duino near Trieste, September 5, 1906) was an Austrian physicist famous for his founding contributions in the fields of statistical mechanics and statistical thermodynamics. ... “Bruckner” redirects here. ... Rudolf Carnap (May 18, 1891, Ronsdorf, Germany – September 14, 1970, Santa Monica, California) was an influential philosopher who was active in central Europe before 1935 and in the United States thereafter. ... Conrad Celtes (February 1, 1459 - February 4, 1508) was a German Humanist scholar. ... Viktor Emil Frankl, M.D., Ph. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Hans Kelsen Hans Kelsen (Prague, October 11, 1881 – April 19, 1973) was an Austrian -American jurist of Jewish descent. ... Jan or Johann Josef Loschmidt (March 15, 1821 - July 8, 1895) who referred to himself mostly as Josef (omitting his first name), was a notable Austrian scientist who performed groundbreaking work in chemistry, physics (thermodynamics, optics, electrodynamics) and crystal forms. ... Oskar Morgenstern (January 24, 1902 - July 26, 1977) was an German- American economist who, working with John von Neumann, helped found the mathematical field of game theory. ... Otto Neurath (December 10, 1882-December 22, 1945) was an Austrian sociologist, political economist, and an unorthodox Marxist. ... Johann Palisa (December 6, 1848 – May 2, 1925) was an Austrian astronomer, born in Troppau in Austrian Silesia (now in the Czech Republic). ... Pope Pius II. Pius II, né Enea Silvio Piccolomini, in Latin Aeneas Sylvius (October 18, 1405 - August 14, 1464) was pope from 1458 to 1464. ... Karel Rokitansky Carl Freiherr¹ von Rokitansky (Czech: Karel Rokytanský) (b. ... August Schleicher August Schleicher (February 19, 1821 - December 6, 1868) was a German linguist. ... Moritz Schlick around 1930 Moritz Schlick ( )(April 14, 1882–June 22, 1936) was a German philosopher and the founding father of logical positivism and the Vienna Circle. ... Ludwig Karl Schmarda (1819-1908) was an Austrian naturalist and traveler, born at Olmütz, Moravia. ... Joseph von Sonnenfels (1732, Nikolsburg/Mikulov, Moravia - April 25, 1817, Vienna) was an Austrian and German jurist and novelist He is a son of Perlin Lipmann, and brother of Franz Anton von Sonnenfels. ... Joseph Stefan (Slovenian Jožef Stefan) (March 24, 1835 - January 7, 1893) was a Slovenian physicist, mathematician and poet. ... Carl Auer von Welsbach ( 9 September 1858 - 8 April 1929) was an Austrian scientist and inventor who had a talent for not only discovering advances, but turning them into commercially successful products. ...


Alumni

Some of its better-known students include: Franz Alt, Bruno Bettelheim, Rudolph Bing, Lucian Blaga, Josef Breuer, Elias Canetti, Otto Maria Carpeaux, Felix Ehrenhaft, Janko Ferk, Paul Feyerabend, Heinz Fischer, O. W. Fischer, Iwan Franko, Sigmund Freud, Evren Genis, Kurt Gödel, Franz Grillparzer, Jörg Haider, Ernst Gombrich, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, John J. Shea, Jr., Elfriede Jelinek, Percy Julian, Karl Kautsky, Rudolf Kirchschläger, Elisabeth Kehrer, Arthur Koestler, Hans Kelsen, Karl Kraus, Richard Kuhn, Paul Lazarsfeld, Gustav Mahler, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, Lise Meitner, Gregor Mendel, Mordkhe Schaechter Franz Mesmer, Alois Mock, Pius III, Karl Popper, Peter Porsch, Wilhelm Reich, Nabil AlNayeb, Peter Safar, Wolfgang Schüssel, Arthur Schnitzler, Adalbert Stifter, Kurt Waldheim, Otto Weininger, Huldrych Zwingli, Albin Schram. Dr. Franz L. Alt (Born 1910 in Vienna, Austria - ). American mathematician who made major contributions to computer science in its early days. ... Bruno Bettelheim (August 28, 1903 - March 13, 1990) was an Austrian-born American writer and child psychologist. ... Sir Rudolph Bing Sir Rudolph Bing (January 9, 1902 – September 2, 1997) was an Austrian-born operatic impresario. ... Lucian Blaga (May 9, 1895 - May 6, 1961) Romanian poet, playwright, and philosopher. ... Josef Breuer (January 15, 1842- June 20, 1925) was an Austrian psychologist whose works symbolised the foundation of psychoanalysis. ... Elias Canetti, Nobel Laureate in Literature Canettis tomb-stone in Zürich, Switzerland Elias Canetti (Rousse, Bulgaria, 25 July 1905 – 14 August 1994, Zurich) was a Bulgaria-born novelist of Sephardi Jewish ancestry who wrote in German and won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1981. ... Felix Ehrenhaft (April 24, 1879 - March 4, 1952) was an Austrian-Hungarian physicist known for his maverick style and controversy. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Paul Karl Feyerabend (January 13, 1924 – February 11, 1994) was an Austrian-born philosopher of science best known for his work as a professor of philosophy at the University of California, Berkeley, where he worked for three decades (1958-1989). ... Heinz Fischer (born 9 October 1938) is the federal president of Austria. ... O. W. Fischer Otto Wilhelm Fischer (April 1, 1915 – January 29, 2004) was an Austrian actor. ... Ivan Franko Ivan Franko (Іван Франко) (August 15, 1856 – May 28, 1916) was a Ukrainian poet and writer, social and literary critic, journalist, economist, and political activist. ... Sigmund Freud (IPA: ), born Sigismund Schlomo Freud (May 6, 1856 – September 23, 1939), was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist who founded the psychoanalytic school of psychology. ... Evren Genis (who also uses his middle name of Yigit) is a classical music composer. ... Kurt Gödel (IPA: ) (April 28, 1906 Brünn, Austria-Hungary (now Brno, Czech Republic) – January 14, 1978 Princeton, New Jersey) was an Austrian American mathematician and philosopher. ... Franz Seraphicus Grillparzer (January 15, 1791 - January 21, 1872), Austrian dramatic poet, was born in Vienna. ... Jörg Haider Jörg Haider (born 26 January 1950) is an Austrian politician. ... Sir Ernst Hans Josef Gombrich, OM, CBE (30 March 1909 – 3 November 2001) was an Austrian-born art historian, who spent most of his working life in the United Kingdom. ... Hugo von Hofmannsthal Hugo von Hofmannsthal (February 1, 1874 – July 15, 1929), was an Austrian novelist, librettist, poet, dramatist, narrator, and essayist. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Elfriede Jelinek (born 20 October 1946) is an Austrian feminist playwright and novelist. ... Percy Lavon Julian (April 11, 1899-April 19, 1975) was an American research chemist of international renown, and a pioneer in the chemical synthesis of medicinal drugs. ... Karl Kautsky (October 18, 1854 - October 17, 1938) was a leading theoretician of social democracy. ... Rudolf Kirchschläger Rudolf Kirchschläger (born March 20, 1915, death March 30, 2000) was an Austrian diplomat, politician, judge and from 1974 to 1986 Austrian president. ... Elisabeth Kehrer (1961-) is the Austrian Consul General in Chicago. ... Arthur Koestler (September 5, 1905, Budapest – March 3, 1983, London) was a Hungarian polymath who became a naturalized British subject. ... Hans Kelsen Hans Kelsen (Prague, October 11, 1881 – April 19, 1973) was an Austrian -American jurist of Jewish descent. ... Karl Kraus (April 28, 1874 - June 12, 1936) was an eminent Austrian writer and journalist, known as a satirist, essayist, aphorist, playwright and poet. ... Richard Kuhn (December 3, 1900 – August 1, 1967) was a German biochemist, born in Vienna, Austria. ... Image needed Paul Felix Lazarsfeld (1901-1976) was one of the major figures in 20th century American Sociology. ... “Mahler” redirects here. ... Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (sometimes called Thomas Masaryk in English) (March 7, 1850 - September 14, 1937) advocated Czechoslovak independence and became the first President of Czechoslovakia. ... Lise Meitner ca. ... “Mendel” redirects here. ... Mordkhe Schaechter, a world-renowned Yiddish linguist. ... Franz Anton Mesmer His Grave Franz Anton Mesmer (May 23, 1734 – March 5, 1815) discovered what he called animal magnetism and others often called mesmerism. ... Dr. Alois Mock (born June 10, 1934) is a politician and member of the Christian-conservative Austrian Peoples Party (ÖVP). ... Pius III, né Francesco Todeschini Piccolomini (May 9, 1439 - October 18, 1503), was pope from September 22 to October 18, 1503. ... Sir Karl Raimund Popper, CH, FRS, FBA, (July 28, 1902 – September 17, 1994), was an Austrian and British[1] philosopher and a professor at the London School of Economics. ... Wilhelm Reich (March 24, 1897 – November 3, 1957) was an Austrian psychiatrist and psychoanalyst. ... Peter Safar was an Austrian physician of Czech descent, born April 12, 1924 in Vienna (Austria), died August 2, 2003 in Mt. ... Wolfgang Schüssel Wolfgang Schüssel (born on June 7, 1945 in Vienna, Austria) is a Christian Democratic Austrian politician. ... Arthur Schnitzler Arthur Schnitzler (May 15, 1862 - October 21, 1931) was an Austrian writer and doctor. ... Adalbert Stifter (23 October 1805 – 28 January 1868) was an Austrian writer, poet, painter, and pedagogue. ... Kurt Josef Waldheim (21 December 1918 – 14 June 2007) was an Austrian diplomat and politician. ... Otto Weininger (April 3, 1880 – October 4, 1903) was an Austrian philosopher. ... Huldrych (or Ulrich) Zwingli or Ulricus Zuinglius (January 1, 1484 – October 11, 1531) was the leader of the Protestant Reformation in Switzerland, and founder of the Swiss Reformed Churches. ... Albin Schram (1926-2005) was one of the greatest collectors of autograph letters by shapers of world history. ...


The University Library

Vienna University Library, main reading room
Vienna University Library, main reading room

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 881 KB) Summary Description: Interior view of the main library reading hall (Hauptlesesaal) of the University of Vienna. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1920x2560, 881 KB) Summary Description: Interior view of the main library reading hall (Hauptlesesaal) of the University of Vienna. ...

Largest research library in Austria

The University Library of the University of Vienna comprises the Main Library and the 50 departmental libraries at the various university locations throughout Vienna. The library's primary responsibility is to the members of the university; however, the library's 350 staff members also provide access to the public. Use of the books in the reading halls is open to all persons without the need for identification, which is only required for checking out books. The library's website provides direct access to information such as electronic journals and online indices and databases.


Library statistics (2005)

  • Book inventory: 6,531,875 (of which 2,564,591 belong to the Main Library)
  • Journals: 11,536 (of which 2,944 belong to the Main Library)
  • Active borrowers: 84,650
  • Search queries on OPAC each day: ca. 388,000
  • Borrowings and renewals of books each day: 9,200
  • Oldest book: Plinius, Historia naturalis (1469)

The OPAC System used at the Vyners School LRC An online public access catalog or OPAC is a computerized online catalog of the materials held in a library, or library system. ... Pliny the Elder: an imaginative 19th Century portrait. ... Events July 26 - Battle of Edgecote Moor October 17 - Prince Ferdinand of Aragon wed princess Isabella of Castile. ...

Library history

In a letter on March 12, 1365, Duke Rudolph IV spelled out his idea of a publica libraria, where the most valuable bequeathed books of deceased university members should be collected. This collection was enlarged by many legates and became the core of the old “Libreye”, which shared a room with a student hospital. Starting in the 17th century, there was a revival of interest in the old library with its manuscripts and incunabula, and the modern library in the Jesuit College came into prominence. A bequest is the disposition of property by will. ... The word legate comes from the Latin legare (to send). It has several meanings, all related to representatives: A legate is a member of a diplomatic embassy. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ...


In 1756, the University Library was finally opened, annexing the Imperial Library (2,787 volumes). After the expulsion of the Jesuits in 1773, the new Academic Library amalgamated the book collections of the five Lower Austrian Colleges and a large number of duplicate books in the Imperial Library. 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1773 (MDCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ...


On May 13, 1777 (the birthday of Empress Maria Theresia), the library was re-opened in the building of the Academic College. The inventory contained 45,000 books and was soon expanded during the Josephine dissolution of the monasteries. In contrast to its predecessors, the new library was publicly accessible. Year 1777 (MDCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This page is about Maria Theresa of Austria (often only known as Empress Maria Theresa), ruler of the Habsburg Empire from 1740-1780. ...


Between 1827 and 1829 it received the neoclassical annex (Postgasse 9) to the Academic College, which remained there until 1884. In that year, the main library moved its 300,000 volumes into the new main building built by architect Heinrich von Ferstel on the Ringstraße, where magazines for some 500,000 volumes awaited the collection. With an annual increase of up to 30,000 volumes, the reserved space was quickly exhausted, and the library continually requires expansions for book space. Today, the Vienna University Library has the largest book collection in Austria.


Gallery

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
University of Vienna

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... The Republic of Austria has a free and public school system, and nine years of education are mandatory. ... The Klimt University of Vienna Ceiling Paintings were a series of paintings made by Gustav Klimt for the ceiling of the University of Viennas Great Hall between the years of 1900-1907. ...

External links

  • Official website (English version)
  • Study in Austria: A Guide

Coordinates: 48°12′47″N, 16°21′35″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Vienna University of Technology : TU Vienna (116 words)
The Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) is located in the heart of Europe, in a cosmopolitan city of great cultural diversity.
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CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: University of Vienna (3008 words)
The university was not altogether wrong in regarding as an infringement of its privileges the permission granted the Jesuits in 1570 to hold philosophical and theological courses in their college.
Thus in 1755 the conferring of the degrees at St. Stephen's was abolished, and the influence of the chancellor limited; in 1757 the Jesuit rector was removed from the university consistory, and in 1759 the directors of studies belonging to the Society were removed.
The Catholic character of the university is at present limited to the theological faculty, for the "Protestant theological institute" that was raised to a faculty in 1850 is not a part of the university.
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