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Encyclopedia > University of Vermont

The University of Vermont UVM may mean: The University of Vermont UV mapping, a 3D modelling process of making a 2D map representing a 3D model. ...

Motto Studiis et Rebus Honestis
(Latin: For studies and other honest pursuits)
Established 1791
Type Public university
Endowment $244,267,000[1]
President Daniel Mark Fogel
Staff 1,185
Undergraduates 9,859[1]
Postgraduates 1,351
Location Burlington, Vermont, U.S.
Campus Burlington, 450 acres (1.82 km²)
Colors Green and Gold            
Nickname Catamounts
Athletics NCAA Division I, 8 men's varsity teams, 10 women'sUVM Athletics
Website www.uvm.edu

The University of Vermont and State Agricultural College, or simply "The University of Vermont," is a public university located in Burlington, Vermont, USA. The university was chartered at the impetus of Ira Allen in 1791, under the name "University of the Green Mountains," or in Latin Universitas Viridis Montis (UVM), and is the fifth oldest college in New England, after Brown University (1764), Dartmouth College (1769), Harvard College (1636), and Yale University (1701). Ira Allen founded the University the year Vermont achieved statehood and ceased being the Vermont Republic. In 1865, the university merged with Vermont Agricultural College (chartered November 22, 1864, after the passage of the Land-Grant College Act). Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Daniel Mark Fogel is currently the President of the University of Vermont, located in Burlington, Vermont. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Motto: (Out Of Many, One) (traditional) In God We Trust (1956 to date) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington D.C. Largest city New York City None at federal level (English de facto) Government Federal constitutional republic  - President George Walker Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence from... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Burlington is the largest city in the U.S. state of Vermont and is the shire town of Chittenden County, Vermont. ... Categories: People stubs ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts Legislature. ... Yale redirects here. ... Flag of Vermont Republic The Vermont Republic was an independent republic that existed from 1777 until it became the state of Vermont—the 14th state of the United States of America—in 1791. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ...


Estimated cost for a full time student for the 2007-08 school year is $22,490 for Vermont residents, and $38,604 for non-residents.[2]

Contents

The Williams Science Hall at the University of Vermont, c. 1902. Today Williams Hall houses the departments of Fine Arts and Anthropology.
The Williams Science Hall at the University of Vermont, c. 1902. Today Williams Hall houses the departments of Fine Arts and Anthropology.

The University of Vermont's 451-acre campus is located on a hilltop overlooking the city of Burlington, Lake Champlain, Vermont's Green Mountains to the east and New York's Adirondack Mountains to the west. The largest hospital complex in Vermont, Fletcher Allen Health Care, has its primary facility adjacent to the UVM campus and, along with Maine Medical Center, is affiliated with the UVM College of Medicine. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1681 KB) Description: Photograph of UVMs Williams Hall building Source: Photograph taken and uploaded by Jared C. Benedict on 01 January 2005. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1681 KB) Description: Photograph of UVMs Williams Hall building Source: Photograph taken and uploaded by Jared C. Benedict on 01 January 2005. ... Fletcher Allen Health Care is a tertiary referral hospital for Vermont and northern New York State, a Level I Trauma Center, and a teaching hospital in alliance with the University of Vermont College of Medicine. ... The Maine Medical Center of Portland, Maine is the largest hospital in northern New England. ...


Academics

Old Mill, the first building of the university
Old Mill, the first building of the university

The University of Vermont comprises seven undergraduate schools and colleges, an honors college, a graduate college, and a college of medicine. Each school and college offers degrees in a variety of majors or concentrations, most through the masters or doctoral level. Core requirements vary according to major. The Honors College does not offer its own degrees; students in the Honors College concurrently enroll in one of the university's seven undergraduate colleges or schools. Image File history File links Question_book-3. ... Image File history File links Emblem-important. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ... Shortcut: WP:CSD Current list: Category:Candidates for speedy deletion There are a few, limited, cases where admins can delete Wikipedia pages on sight. Non-admins can ask for an admin to delete such a page, either by listing it on speedy deletions, or by adding either a {{delete}} or... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1. ...


Bachelors, masters, and doctoral programs are offered through the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, the College of Arts and Sciences, the College of Education and Social Services, the College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences, the College of Medicine, the College of Nursing and Health Sciences, the Graduate College, the School of Business Administration, and The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources. This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Mathematics Bogomolny, Alexander: Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources (RSENR) is the University of Vermonts natural resources college. ...


The university's Division of Continuing Education offers an array of certificates and specialized programs in partnership with various departments at the university. One may also find non-credit courses, opportunities for specialized training programs for businesses and online courses listed on the Continuing Education website [1]


College of Agriculture and Life Sciences

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences (CALS) program focuses on life sciences that make a difference in people's lives, from improving the safety and quality of the nation's food supply to studying DNA as part of AIDS and cancer research to stewarding the environment. Students can explore the majors of CALS as they pertain to their interests. The four primary majors include “Communities, People, and Food,” “Microbes and Molecules,” “Animals,” and “Plants.” There are a variety of choices within each of these areas of study. UVM’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences also offers graduate programs with M.S., M.S.T., M.A.T., M.P.A, and PhD degrees. CALS is also home to the Center for Rural Studies.


College of Education and Social Services

UVM's College of Education and Social Services offers a full range of teacher education, early childhood development and social work studies. The college aims to assist students in becoming professionals who serve the education, social development, and human service needs of institutions, young people, families, and communities in Vermont, the nation and globally.


The College comprises the Department of Integrated Professional Services, Department of Education, Department of Social Work, and the Center for Disability and Community Inclusion. The college offers a broad range of programs ranging from early childhood to higher education, the individual to the family, and cognitive development to physical development.


Graduate students can pursue a post-baccalaureate certificate, a certificate of advance study, masters degrees in education, science, and social work, or a doctoral degree in education.


College of Engineering and Mathematics

Within UVM's College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences (CEMS), the phrase "in service to humanity" is an organizing principle for all programs of study, which include engineering, computer science and mathematics. A sense of social relevance and social responsibility is pervasive throughout the College.


CEMS offers distinctive undergraduate and graduate programs of national stature in engineering, computer science and mathematics, emphasizing unity of knowledge in a liberal education context, and preparing graduates for leadership roles in society as well as in their chosen profession.


The College is a treasured resource for the state of Vermont and is marked by faculty excellence and innovation in both education and scholarship, and by creative students disciplined in academic rigor, continuous self-discovery, effective communication, critical thinking and socially responsible decision making in order to build a sustainable future as members of the global community.


College of Medicine

In 1804, John Pomeroy began teaching students in his house in Burlington, as the first medical department at a State College or University. In 1822, the College of Medicine was established as the seventh medical college in the United States. Its founders were Pomeroy and the pioneering medical educator Nathan Smith. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. Medical education in the United States includes educational activities involved in the education and training of medical doctors in the United States, from entry-level training through to continuing education of qualified specialists. ... quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... Medical school generally refers to a tertiary educational institution (or part of such an institution) which is involved in the education of future medical practitioners (medical doctors). ... Nathan Smith (1762 - 1829) was one of New England’s best-known and respected physicians. ...


UVM enrolls around 100 medical students in each class. There are approximately 400 medical students total. Fletcher Allen Health Care is the primary clinical resource. Additional training takes place at Maine Medical Center in Portland, Maine and Champlain Valley Physicians Hospital in Plattsburgh, New York. Fletcher Allen Health Care is a tertiary referral hospital for Vermont and northern New York State, a Level I Trauma Center, and a teaching hospital in alliance with the University of Vermont College of Medicine. ... The Maine Medical Center of Portland, Maine is the largest hospital in northern New England. ... Nickname: Motto: Resurgam (Latin for I will rise again) Coordinates: , Country State County Cumberland Settled 1632 Incorporated 1786 Government  - Mayor Nicholas M. Mavodones, Jr Area  - City  52. ... Nickname: Location of Plattsburgh within the state of New York Coordinates: , County Clinton County, New York Government  - Mayor Donald Kasprzak Area  - City 17 km²  (6. ... This article is about the state. ...


The UVM College of Medicine ranked 7th for overall quality in primary care training among the country’s top 125 medical schools according to U.S. News & World Report’s 2008 graduate school rankings. [2] Primary care may be provided in community health centres. ... Medical school generally refers to a tertiary educational institution (or part of such an institution) which is involved in the education of future medical practitioners (medical doctors). ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


College of Nursing and Health Sciences

The College of Nursing and Health Sciences' (CNHS) intimate size combined with the setting of a major research university adjacent to a regional medical center creates an ideal academic environment for health sciences. Hands-on learning in the many facilities fulfills every student's desire for clinical training. Students from the various departments and programs graduate as qualified agents of health and change for any healthcare system.


The College of Nursing and Health Sciences at UVM contains three distinct departments, each offering its own unique contribution to the health field. The departments include “Nursing,” the “Medical Laboratory and Radiation Sciences,” and “Rehabilitation and Movement.” All of these departments offer multiple majors for those interested in health and healthcare.


Honors College

The Honors College offers an intensely focused, academically challenging environment for some of the university's most outstanding undergraduate students. With an honors residence hall in the heart of campus, the college provides students with an intellectually stimulating climate in which to pursue their studies. This residence hall is LEED certified, making it not only healthy to live in, but environmentally friendly.


The college sponsors numerous opportunities for students to participate in co-curricular programs and extra-curricular activities — special symposia, dinners with visiting scholars, trips to museums and theaters in Montreal and Boston, as well as weekly social events. Students also benefit from special privileges, including early course registration, an extended borrowing period at university libraries and discounted tickets to performing arts events through the Lane Series.


Accomplished faculty from throughout the university participate in the Honors College as lecturers in a first-year ethics course and advanced seminars, participants in reading groups, speakers at the Plenary Lecture Series, and mentors to honors students conducting research.


Through a required ethics course, small seminars, informal gatherings, and special research projects, students work alongside scholars from a broad section of the university's academic disciplines in the humanities, the sciences, engineering, nursing, medicine, education, business and more.


The Honors College is led by Dr. S. Abu Turab Rizvi (Dean/Associate Professor of Economics) and Dr. Kelvin Chu (Associate Dean/Associate Professor of Physics)


Rubenstein School of Environmental and Natural Resources

The Rubenstein School of Environment and Natural Resources seeks to cultivate an appreciation and enhanced understanding of ecological and social processes and values aimed at maintaining the integrity of natural systems and achieving a sustainable human community in harmony with the natural environment. We pursue this goal by generating and broadly disseminating knowledge and by challenging students, colleagues, and citizens to acquire knowledge, skills, and values to become innovative, environmentally responsible, and accountable leaders. Excitement for discovery and a commitment to life-long learning are central. Our emphasis on the integration of natural science and cultural perspectives reflects the interdisciplinary context in which ecosystem management, resource planning, and environmental concerns must be addressed.


Formerly named the School of Natural Resources, the school is lead by Dr. Donald H. DeHayes (Dean/Professor of Forest Genetics) and Dr. Deane Wang (Associate Dean/Associate Professor or Ecosystem and Landscape Ecology). Notable faculty members include Dr. Lawrence K. Forcier, Dr. Saleem Ali, Dr. Robert Costanza, Dr. Robert E. Manning, Dr. J. Ellen Marsden, Dr. John H. Todd, and Dr. Mary C Watzin amongst many. Saleem H. Ali is a Pakistani-American scholar who is Associate Professor of Environmental Studies at the University of Vermonts Rubenstein School of Natural Resources, and on the adjunct faculty of Brown University’s Watson Institute for International Studies. ...


In 2007, the university won a $6.7 million grant to research the pollution problems of Lake Champlain.[3] Landsat photo Lake Champlain (French: lac Champlain) is a large lake in North America, mostly within the borders of the United States (states of Vermont and New York) but partially situated across the US-Canada border in the province of Quebec. ...


History

From the 1890's through 1969, UVM was host to the then famous "Kake Walk."[3] While the 80 plus year event is controversial, it is a part of the university's history and marks one of the early opportunities that students united and brought about change.[4] A further example of the University of Vermont's progressive students making progress happen was the 1988 student takeover of the Waterman building. [5] This original takeover of the Waterman building did not produce results and the students proceeded to take over the Presidents office. Arbitration affected some of the racial and diversity issues the students brought to the forefront. A lack of follow-through brough the more (in)famous Waterman Building Takeover of 1991 which lasted 3 weeks, and brought a longer list of demands including the removal of Ira Allens statue, which, became a key issue that drew general student support away from the protesting students.[6]


The college offices at 438 College Street were listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975.[4] A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


2,494 students graduated in 2007:[5]

  • Undergraduate - 9,919
  • Masters - 401
  • Doctorates - 57
  • Medical - 97

Total enrollment = 11,597


The University adopted a $251 million budget for the 2007-08 academic year[6] or $21,643 per enrollee.


The university, as an eligible non-profit organization, pays no local real estate taxes but receives all the normal city services. In 2007, the college agreed to raise it's annual payment from $456,006 to $912,011 in 2010 plus a "public works" supplement rising from $180,040 to $191,004 over the same time frame.[7]


Athletics

The school's sports teams are called the Catamounts, any of various feline animals such as a mountain lion, cougar or puma. UVM is one of only two schools in the United States with this mascot, the other being Western Carolina University in North Carolina. The school colors are green and gold. Soccer, lacrosse, hockey and basketball are the school's primary spectator sports. Field play takes place at the school's Centennial Field. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Binomial name Felis concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Felis concolor) is a type of big cat found in North, Central and South America. ... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ... For other uses, see Cougar (disambiguation) or Puma (disambiguation). ... Species P. concolor P. yagouaroundi Puma is a Felidae genus that contains the Cougar (also known as the Puma, among other names) and the Jaguarundi. ... Western Carolina University is one of the sixteen public universities that make up the University of North Carolina System. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Centennial Field is a stadium in Burlington, Vermont. ...


UVM's varsity teams participate in the NCAA's Division I America East Conference and the Hockey East. The University of Vermont discontinued participating in football in 1974[8] The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The America East Conference is a college athletic conference whose members are located mainly in the northeastern United States. ... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... A college football game between Colorado State University and the Air Force Academy. ...


The men's basketball team defeated Syracuse University in the first round of the 2005 NCAA Tournament, earning their first victory in three consecutive trips to the event. Although the Catamounts won the America East Conference (2007) and made their fifth straight championship game appearance, they lost to Albany in the conference tournament and settled for a bid in the 2007 NIT. Syracuse University Logo. ... 2005 Final Four, Edward Jones Dome The 2005 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... A fictious animal that is the mascot of Western Carolina University and the University of Vermont. ... NIT or Nit or nit can refer to:- A common name for various types of lice eggs. ...


The UVM ski teams have won five national championships.[9]. The team has also produced 51 individual national champions including cross-country relay teams, Jamie Kingsbury and Greg Hardy swept the Giant Slalom most recently in 2005 [10]. The team has produced 278 All-Americans and 66 US Ski Team members. [11]. The Giant Slalom is an alpine skiing discipline. ...


There are several club sports teams. The UVM crew team competes in the Head of the Charles Regatta and Dad Vail Regatta. The Cycling Team competes against other collegiate varsity teams. The UVM sailing team was competitively ranked 15th in the nation in 2007.[12][13] Kennedy School womens team outside the Weld Boathouse preparing to row the Head of the Charles in 1996, though that year the race was cancelled due to bad weather. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


In 2007, a club football team began participating in the NIFL (North-east Independent Football League) Semi Pro Football League.[citation needed]


Arts

UVM's Lane Performing Arts Series and Music Department sponsor instrumental and choral performances featuring national and international performers throughout the year. The Robert Hull Fleming Museum hosts traveling exhibits and displays of the museum's extensive fine art and ethnographic collections. The Royall Tyler Theatre presents mainstage productions of varied themes, often featuring Equity actors along with student talent. In 1974 Professor William Metcalfe cofounded the Vermont Mozart Festival with Melvin Kaplan. Though the Festival was incorporated as a separate non-profit organization in 1976, its ties to Metcalfe and UVM have remained. The Actors Equity Association (commonly simply Equity) is the trade union of American theatrical performers and stage managers. ... The Vermont Mozart Festival is a popular series of indoor and outdoor concerts presented annually at sites throughout the state of Vermont. ... Melvin (Mel) Kaplan is a renowned American oboist, concert manager, and teacher at the Juilliard School for 25 years. ...


Student life

Concerts

The University’s Concert Bureau (a.k.a. SA Concerts) is responsible for bringing quality live musical entertainment for the entire UVM community. SA Concerts features acts from across the country as well as local bands. The SA funded club comprises an elected bureau of students who learn about the various aspects of the music industry by putting on shows and working with local sound and production professionals. Students are in charge of choosing and booking bands and are responsible for all production aspects on the day of show.


UVM’s Concert Bureau was established in 1971 and has brought in artists such as R.E.M., Phish (whose members attended UVM in the 1980s), Red Hot Chili Peppers, Sting, Lou Reed, Primus, String Cheese Incident, James Brown, Bob Dylan, the Allman Brothers Band, Death Cab for Cutie, Jurassic 5, the Disco Biscuits, The Grateful Dead, Guster, and the The Flaming Lips. R.E.M. is an American rock band formed in Athens, Georgia in 1980 by Bill Berry (drums), Peter Buck (guitar), Mike Mills (bass guitar), and Michael Stipe (vocals). ... This article is about the band. ... The 1980s refers to the years from 1980 to 1989. ... Red Hot Chili Peppers are an American alternative rock band formed in Los Angeles, California in 1983. ... This article is about the musician. ... Lou Reed, born Lewis Allen Reed[1] March 2, 1942, is an American rock singer-songwriter and guitarist. ... For other uses, see Primus. ... Back: Jason Hann, Michael Travis, Billy Nershi, Kieth Moseley Front: Kyle Hollingsworth, Michael Kang The String Cheese Incident, one of the bands involved in the jam movement of the mid-to-late 1990s, formed in Crested Butte, Colorado in 1993, originally playing local gigs at ski resorts in exchange for... For other persons named James Brown, see James Brown (disambiguation). ... This article is about the recording artist. ... The original Allman Brothers Band The Allman Brothers Band is a pioneering and innovative Southern rock group from Macon, Georgia originally popular in the 1970s, described by Rolling Stones George Kimball in 1971 as the best . ... Death Cab for Cutie is an American band formed in Bellingham, Washington in 1997. ... Jurassic 5 was a six- and then later five-piece hip hop group formed in 1994. ... The Disco Biscuits are a trance fusion jam band from Philadelphia. ... Jerry Garcia later in life The Grateful Dead was an American rock band, which was formed in 1965 in San Francisco from the remnants of another band, Mother McCrees Uptown Jug Champions. ... Guster is an alternative rock band that is known for its live performances, unique sound, humor, and cult following formed by Adam Gardner, Ryan Miller, and Brian Rosenworcelin 1991 while attending Tufts University in Boston. ... The Flaming Lips (formed in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma in 1983) are an American alternative rock band. ...


Since 2001, SA Concerts has organized an annual festival known as SpringFest, held on the last Saturday of April. SpringFest headliners have included Vida Blue, The Roots, Cake, Keller Williams, Gov't Mule, and co-headliners Robert Randolph & the Family Band, Soulive, Toots and the Maytals and Ziggy Marley Vida Blue is a jazz trio fronted by Page McConnell of Phish and includes Oteil Burbridge of The Allman Brothers Band and Russell Batiste of The Meters. ... The Roots, also variously known as The Legendary Roots Crew, The Fifth Dynasty, The Square Roots and The Foundation, are an influential, Grammy-winning hip-hop band based out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, famed for a heavily jazzy sound and live instrumentation. ... Cake (often written as CAKE) is a band from Sacramento, California, formed in 1991. ... Keller Williams (also known as K-Dub) (Born February 4, 1970) is a musician from Fredericksburg, Virginia who began performing in the early 1990’s. ... Govt Mule is a southern rock/jam band formed in 1994 as an Allman Brothers Band side project, but has taken on a life of its own. ... Robert Randolph & the Family Band is a multicultural American funk and soul band composed of Robert Randolph, Marcus Randolph (drums), Danyel Morgan (bass) and Jason Crosby (organ). ... Soulive is a jazz trio that originated in Woodstock, New York, and is known for its ripping solos and catchy, upbeat songs. ... Frederick Toots Hibbert and the Maytals are considered legends of reggae and ska music. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Student Activism

Currently two campus clubs, the Students for Peace and Global Justice[14] (SFPGJ) and the Student Labor Action Project[15] (SLAP), are pursuing social justice issues including livable wages for campus workers. Living wage refers to the minimum hourly wage necessary for a person to achieve a basic standard of living. ...


The Vermont Student Environmental Program[16] (VSTEP) is another organization that is working to promote reducing, reusing, and recycling of the waste produced at UVM. Precycling is the practice of reducing waste by attempting to avoid bringing into the home or business items which will generate waste. ... Reuse is using an item more than once. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Waste inside a wheelie bin Waste in a bin bag Waste, rubbish, trash, garbage, or junk is unwanted or undesired material. ...


In 2007, the college was ranked third in the nation for student use of marijuana.[17]


Naked Bike Ride

There is a Naked Bike Ride after the last day of classes each semester. This is not against the law in Vermont, as long as you do not undress in public.[18][19][20] The 2005 Solstice Cyclists in Seattle June 18, 2005. ...


Publications

The Vermont Cynic is the student newspaper of the University of Vermont. ... Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ... Screenshot of The Water Tower News Website (http://thewatertowernews. ... Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ...

Greek life

Official University Web Site on Greek Life


Fraternities:

Sororities: Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Founded on March 4, 1827 on the campus of Union College in Schenectady, New York, USA, the Sigma Phi Society is the second oldest Greek social fraternal organization in the United States. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ...

Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ...

Notable alumni and graduates

Notable graduates

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Jack Arute is an auto racing pit reporter and college football sideline reporter for ABC Sports. ... Edmund Hatch Bennett (April 6, 1824 - January 2, 1898) was born in Manchester, Vermont, and served as a lawyer, judge, mayor, and Dean of Boston University School of Law. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Pedro Albizu Campos Pedro Albizu Campos (September 12, 1891 – April 21, 1965) born in Tenerías Village in Ponce, Puerto Rico was the son of Alejandro Albizu and Juana Campos. ... The Puerto Rican Nationalist Party was first organized on September 17, 1922. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... Ray Williston Collins (February 11, 1887 - January 9, 1970) was a starting pitcher in Major League Baseball who played his entire career for the Boston Red Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In the baseball game, the coach is a member of the team at bat stationed near first or third base to signal and direct the runners and batters. ... Taylor Coppenrath (born November 8, 1981) is a professional basketball player currently playing for Pallacanestro Biella in italian Serie A. He was raised in West Barnet, Vermont. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Brian Dubie (born March 9, 1959) is the 85th Lieutenant Governor of Vermont. ... William Lawrence Larry Gardner (May 13, 1886 - March 11, 1976) was a third baseman in Major League Baseball. ... White House portrait Grace Anna Goodhue Coolidge (January 3, 1879 - July 8, 1957) was wife of Calvin Coolidge and First Lady of the United States from 1923 to 1929. ... John Calvin Coolidge, Jr. ... Mike Gordon (born June 3, 1965 in Sudbury, Massachusetts) is a bass player and vocalist most noted for his work with the rock band Phish. ... Jeff Holdsworth in December 2003 onstage with Phish for the first time in 17 years Jeff Holdsworth was a founding member of the legendary band Phish. ... Trey Anastasio (born Ernest Joseph Anastasio III on September 30th, 1964)[1][2][3] is an American guitarist, composer, and vocalist most noted for his work with the rock band Phish. ... This article is about the band. ... John Clark LeClair (born July 5, 1969 in St. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... The Montreal Canadiens (French: ) are a professional mens ice hockey team based in Montreal, Quebec, Canada. ... The Pittsburgh Penguins are a professional ice hockey team based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. ... Erik Liljegren is a New York based correspondent for FOX News Channel. ... “Fox News” redirects here. ... Kirk McCaskill in his California Angels uniform. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Eric Perrin, center for the Tampa Bay Lightning, was born November 1, 1975, played college hockey at the University of Vermont, and went undrafted by the NHL. After spending several years playing minor league hockey, including a stint in Finland, Perrin was playing for the Hershey Bears when he was... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Tampa Bay Lightning are a professional ice hockey team based in Tampa, Florida. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... Susan Powers Susan Powers is a self-taught American artist who began painting in 1979, encouraged by a friend and fellow painter who had seen her expressive pencil drawings. ... Edna Annie Proulx (pronounced ) (born August 22, 1935) is an American journalist and author. ... The Shipping News is a Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by E. Annie Proulx which was published in 1993, and a film of the same name, released in 2001, set on the Canadian island of Newfoundland. ... This article is about the motion picture. ... Henry Jarvis Raymond (24th January 1820 - 1869) was an American journalist born near the village of Lima, Livingston County, New York. ... Sothebys (NYSE: BID) is the worlds second oldest international auction house in continuous operation. ... Martin St. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Frozen Four is the trademarked name of the final two rounds of the NCAA Division I championship of ice hockey in the USA. Schools advance in a single-elimination tournament from four regional sites to a single site, where the national semifinals and final game are played. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Hart Memorial Trophy is presented annually to the most valuable ice hockey player in the National Hockey League during the regular season. ... The Art Ross Trophy on display at the 2006 NHL Entry Draft. ... The Stanley Cup The Stanley Cup (French: ) is the championship trophy of the National Hockey League (NHL), the major professional ice hockey league in Canada and the United States. ... The Tampa Bay Lightning are a professional ice hockey team based in Tampa, Florida. ... The Semi-Final of World Cup 2006 between Germany and Spain The Hockey World Cup, sometimes called the Hockey World Championships, is an international field hockey competition organised by the International Hockey Federation (FIH). ... Gail Sheehy is an American writer and lecturer, most notable for her books on life and the life cycle. ... Kerr Van Cleve Smith (born March 9, 1972) is an American actor best known for playing the gay high school student Jack McPhee on the television drama Dawsons Creek. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Dawsons Creek Dawsons Creek is an American primetime television drama which aired from January 20, 1998, to May 14, 2003, on The WB Television Network. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... John Gregory Smith (July 22, 1818 - November 6, 1891), railroad tycoon, politician, war-time governor of Vermont Smith was born in St. ... ||center]] Position Goaltender Catches Left Nickname(s) Timmah, Tank Height Weight 5 ft 11 in (1. ... The Boston Bruins are a professional ice hockey team based in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Jody Williams (born October 9, 1950 in Putney, Vermont) is an American teacher and aid worker who received the 1997 Nobel Peace Prize jointly with the campaign she led, the International Campaign to Ban Landmines (ICBL). ... Urban Andrain Woodbury (July 11, 1838 - April 15, 1915) was an American Civil War veteran, an entrepreneur and a U.S. politician of the Republican Party. ...

Notable attendees

  • Ben Affleck attended UVM for two semesters before transferring to Occidental College.
  • Howard Dean, (though not an alumnus of UVM's undergraduate college, attended a residency program through the UVM College of Medicine) later Governor of Vermont, and currently Chair of the Democratic National Committee.
  • Shayne Culpepper is a track and field olympian. She ran on the track and cross-country teams one year before transferring to Boulder, CO.
  • William A. Wheeler, 19th Vice President of the USA, under Rutherford B. Hayes, from 1877-1881. Also served in the US House of Representatives, from New York.
  • Torrey Mitchell ice hockey centre for the San Jose Sharks attended UVM for three years before deciding to play professional hockey.

Benjamin Géza Affleck (born August 15, 1972) is an American Golden Globe Award-nominated film actor, director, an Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-winning screenwriter. ... Occidental College, located in Los Angeles, California, is a small private coeducational liberal arts college. ... Howard Brush Dean III (born November 17, 1948) is an American politician and physician from the U.S. state of Vermont, and currently the chairman of the Democratic National Committee, the central organ of the Democratic Party at the national level. ... Shayne Culpepper née Wille (born: December 3, 1973 in Atlanta USA) is a middle distance athlete. ... William Almon Wheeler (June 30, 1819 – June 4, 1887) was a Representative from New York and the nineteenth Vice President of the United States. ... Rutherford Birchard Hayes (October 4, 1822 – January 17, 1893) was an American politician, lawyer, military leader and the nineteenth President of the United States (1877–1881). ... Torrey Mitchell (born January 30, 1985 in Greenfield Park, Quebec) is an ice hockey centre for the San Jose Sharks of the National Hockey League. ... The San Jose Sharks are a professional ice hockey team based in San Jose, California, United States. ...

Media

In April 2005, a special screening of the Family Guy episode North by North Quahog, the first new episode in three years, was held here. Family Guy is an Emmy Award-winning American animated television series about a dysfunctional family in the fictional town of Quahog, Rhode Island. ... North by North Quahog is the first episode of Season 4 of Family Guy. ...


Footnotes

  1. ^ a b http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/college/directory/brief/drglance_3696_brief.php retrieved July 21, 2007
  2. ^ http://www.uvm.edu/admissions/undergraduate/financing/?Page=costs.html retrieved July 21, 2007
  3. ^ (September 28, 2007) UVM wins $6.7M lake-research grant. Burlington Free Press. 
  4. ^ Johnson, Tim (July 24, 2007). UVM praised for restoration. Burlington Free Press. 
  5. ^ Barsch, Sky (May 21, 2007). 2,494 graduate at UVM. Burlington Free Press. 
  6. ^ http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20070520/NEWS02/705200302/1007 retrieved May 22, 2007
  7. ^ Johnson, Tim (September 29, 2007). City, UVM sign fees deal. Burlington Free Press. 
  8. ^ A popular T-shirt on campus notes that UVM Football has remained undefeated since this date.
  9. ^ http://www.ncaasports.com/skiing/history
  10. ^ http://ncaasports.com/skiing/history/nc-ind
  11. ^ http://www.uvm.edu/athletics/skiing/?Page=skihistoryandrecords.html
  12. ^ UVM Sailing Team Website
  13. ^ Sailing Collegiate National Top 20
  14. ^ Students for Peace & Global Justice
  15. ^ Student Labor Action Project
  16. ^ Vermont Student Environmental Program
  17. ^ Johnson, Tim (September 3, 2007). Princeton Review: UVM is No. 3 in use of marijuana. Burlington Free Press. 
  18. ^ http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=naked+bike+ride retrieved June 19, 2007
  19. ^ http://www.worldnakedbikerideburlington.com/
  20. ^ http://www.boston.com/news/local/vermont/articles/2006/08/23/law_of_nature_prevails_in_vermont/ Nudity is legal in most parts of Vermont
  21. ^ View
  22. ^ UVM's University Communications Department
  23. ^ Vermont Quarterly magazine, a quarterly publication of the UVM Office of Alumni
  24. ^ Pi Kappa Alpha Official website
  25. ^ Phi Delta Theta Official website
  26. ^ http://www.rutlandherald.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20051214/NEWS/512140355/1007

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
  • Academics
    • Official UVM website
    • UVM's Faculty Senate
    • UVM’s College of Agriculture and Life Sciences
    • UVM’s College of Arts and Sciences
    • UVM’s College of Education and Social Services
    • UVM’s College of Engineering and Mathematics
    • UVM’s College of Medicine
    • College of Medicine
    • UVM’s College of Nursing and Health Sciences
    • UVM’s Honors College
    • Summer University at UVM
    • UVM Department of Chemistry
  • Athletics

  Results from FactBites:
 
CampusChamps.com - University of Vermont Athletics (498 words)
The mission of the university is to “create, interpret, and share knowledge, to prepare students to lead productive, responsible, and creative lives, and to promote the application of relevant knowledge to benefit the State of Vermont and society as a whole.” Today UVM has an alumni base of more than 84,000 former students.
University of Vermont men’s lacrosse goalie Michael Gabel finished as the nation’s leader in save percentage and was second in goals-against-average.
University of Vermont junior captain Kristal Kostiew broke the school record in the shot put, finishing third in the event at the ECAC Women’s Outdoor Track and Field Championship.
University of Vermont (129 words)
Chartered in 1791, the same year that Vermont became the 14th state, the University of Vermont was established as the fifth college in New England (after Harvard, Yale, Dartmouth and Brown).
Although it began as a private university, UVM attained quasi-public status with the passage of the Morrill Land-Grant College Act in 1862 and the addition of the State Agricultural College.
Today, the university blends the traditions of both a private and public university, drawing 21 percent of its general fund (and about 10 percent of its current operating budget) from the state of Vermont.
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