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Encyclopedia > University of Utah

University of Utah Image File history File links Mergefrom. ... University of Utah Student Magazine: THERE IS A WRONG LINK HERE (FROM RICHARD WATSON GILDER). THIS IS *NOT* THE MAGAZINE THAT USED TO BE CALLED SCRIBNERS MONTHLY. The sole student run magazine at the University of Utah. ...

Established February 28, 1850
Type Public university
Endowment $509,095,000[1]
President Michael K. Young
Staff 13,760
Undergraduates 22,661
Postgraduates 6,531
Location Salt Lake City, UT, USA
Campus Urban
Team Name Utes
Colors Crimson and White           
Mascot Swoop
Website www.utah.edu

The University of Utah (also The U or the U of U or the UU), located in Salt Lake City, is the flagship public research university in the state of Utah, and one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education. As of Fall Semester, 2007, the university currently enrolls 21,421 undergraduate and 6,604 graduate students and has 1,419 regular faculty members. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Michael K. Young is President of the University of Utah. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Utah Utes are the athletics teams of the University of Utah. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Crimson is a strong, bright deep red color combined with some blue, resulting in a slight degree of purple. ... Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Look up Swoop in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The U is a nickname used for several universities and their sports teams, especially by the local community, and for those with prominent letter U logos. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Utah State Board of Regents was formed in 1969 as a governing body for the Utah System of Higher Education. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ...


The state-owned University is referred to colloquially as "the U." The university has a ferocious athletic and (some might say) cultural rivalry with its neighbor to the south, Brigham Young University (aka "the Y"), which is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (members of which are commonly known as Mormons). The U is a nickname used for several universities and their sports teams, especially by the local community, and for those with prominent letter U logos. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... Brigham Young University, often referred to as BYU (or in colloquial speech simply the Y), is the flagship university of the The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormon). ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ...


Of the more than 3,500 colleges and universities in the United States, the University of Utah is one of only 88 which are classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as Research I universities — those which offer a full range of undergraduate programs, are committed to graduate education, and give research high priority. Carnagie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 and chartered in 1906 by an Act of Congress. ... Research I university was a category formerly used by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education to indicate those universities in the United States which received the highest amounts of Federal science research funding. ...

Contents

Campus History

Originally established February 28, 1850 by Latter-day Saint leader Brigham Young; it was initially named "University of Deseret." The school closed two years later for financial reasons. It reopened as a commercial school in 1867 in the old Council House in what is now downtown Salt Lake City under the direction of David O. Calder, a prominent Salt Lake City businessman and associate of Mormon leader Brigham Young. The University was renamed University of Utah in 1894 and classes were first held on the present campus approximately two miles directly east of downtown Salt Lake City in 1900. February 28 is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... The University of Deseret was the original name of the University of Utah in the United States. ... Year 1867 (MDCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Brigham Young (June 1, 1801 – August 29, 1877) was a leader in the Latter Day Saint movement and was the president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints from 1847 until his death. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Ğ: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ...


Portions of the present campus are located on the grounds of the former Fort Douglas, previously Camp Douglas. Camp Douglas was established in 1862 in order to protect the Overland Trail and was garrisoned by the Third California Infantry of volunteers. Regular army troops replaced the volunteers in 1866 and in 1875 the camp was rebuilt with more substantial buildings and renamed Fort Douglas. The fort was a base for Indian campaigns during the 1870s, and was later used as an internment camp during both the First and Second World Wars. The Fort was officially closed on October 26, 1991. Fort Douglas is a fort in Utah, established in 1862 for the purpose of protecting the Overland Mail Route and telegraph lines from attacks from hostile Indians. ... This article is about 1862 . ... Overland Route or Overland Trail refers to the following travel routes: The Overland Trail (United States), the roughly parallel routes of the Overland Stage Line and First Transcontinental Railroad The Overland Route (Australia), a shipping route via the Suez Canal This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated... 1866 (MDCCCLXVI) is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... A concentration camp is a large detention centre created for political opponents, aliens, specific ethnic or religious groups, civilians of a critical war-zone, or other groups of people, often during a war. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ...


Programs

The university offers 76 undergraduate majors, over 55 minors and certificates and 96 major fields of studies at the graduate level. It draws its 28,000-plus student population from all 50 states and 111 foreign countries. The university, one of the state’s largest employers, has the only medical, social work, and architecture schools in a multi-state area.


The university's School of Computing has made several important contributions to the field. The University of Utah was one of the original four nodes of ARPANET, the world's first packet-switching computer network and embryo of the current world-wide Internet. In late 1969, the U's computer graphics department was linked into the node at Stanford Research Institute in Menlo Park, CA to complete the initial 4-node network [1]. ARPANET logical map, March 1977. ... Packet switching, in computer networking and telecommunications, is the now-dominant communications paradigm in which packets (units of information carriage) are routed between nodes over data links shared with other traffic. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... This article is about the scientific discipline of computer graphics. ... SRI International is one of the worlds largest contract research institutions. ... Cafe Borrone, adjacent to Keplers Bookstore in the Menlo Center, is a popular lunch spot in downtown Menlo Park. ...


The U's Center for High Performance Computing links the U to major aerospace industries, high-tech manufacturers and research companies. The Department of Computer Science is ranked in the top 20 computer science research departments in the nation. The U was named one of five finalists in the science category of the 1998 Computerworld Smithsonian Awards.

The Park Building, on President's Circle, is the center of university administration
The Park Building, on President's Circle, is the center of university administration
Kingsbury Hall is a major venue for the performing arts
The University of Utah central campus.
The University of Utah central campus.
The "U" above the University of Utah.
The "U" above the University of Utah.

Other accomplishments include the first method for representing surface textures in graphical images, the Gouraud smooth shading model for computer graphics, invention of magnetic ink printing technology, the Johnson counter logic circuit, development of the oldest algebraic mathematics package (REDUCE) still in use, and the Phong lighting model for shading with highlights. The school has pioneered work in asynchronous circuits, computer animation, computer art, digital music recording (for which university alumni were awarded Academy Awards), graphical user interfaces, and stack machine architectures. Notable alumni include Henri Gouraud, James Blinn, Nolan Bushnell, Ed Catmull, Jim Clark, Alan Kay, Shane Robison and John Warnock. Companies founded by faculty and alumni include Adobe Systems, Ashlar, Atari, CAE Systems, Centillium Technology, Cirrus Logic, WordPerfect, Evans and Sutherland, Myricom, NeoMagic, Netscape Communications Corporation, Pixar, Pixal Plane, PlanetWeb, and Silicon Graphics. Image File history File linksMetadata University_of_Utah. ... Image File history File linksMetadata University_of_Utah. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kingsbury_Hall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Kingsbury_Hall. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 487 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Central Univeristy of Utah campus by David Jolley 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 487 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Central Univeristy of Utah campus by David Jolley 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Gouraud shaded sphere - note the inaccuracies towards the edges of the polygons. ... This article is about the scientific discipline of computer graphics. ... A logic gate is an arrangement of electronically-controlled switches used to calculate operations in Boolean algebra. ... Reduction or reducing has several meanings: In mathematics, reduction is the process of manipulating a series of equations or matrices into a desired simpler format. ... It has been suggested that Phong reflection model be merged into this article or section. ... Henri Gouraud (born ~1944) is a French computer scientist. ... Jim Blinn James Blinn is a computer graphics researcher and pioneer. ... Nolan K. Bushnell (born February 5, 1943) is an American electrical engineer and entrepreneur who founded both Atari and the Chuck E. Cheeses Pizza-Time Theaters chain. ... Edwin Catmull after receiving a medal at SIGGRAPH 2001. ... Dr. James H. Clark (born 1944) is a prolific entrepreneur and former computer scientist. ... Alan Curtis Kay (born May 17, 1940) is an American computer scientist, known for his early pioneering work on object-oriented programming and windowing graphical user interface design. ... John Warnock John Warnock (b. ... Adobe Systems (pronounced a-DOE-bee IPA: ) (NASDAQ: ADBE) (LSE: ABS) is an American computer software company headquartered in San Jose, California, USA. Adobe was founded in December 1982[1] by John Warnock and Charles Geschke, who established the company after leaving Xerox PARC in order to develop and sell... Ashlar is dressed stone work of any type of stone. ... This article is about a corporate game company. ... Cirrus Logic NASDAQ: CRUS is a fabless semiconductor supplier specializing in analog, mixed-signal, and DSP chips. ... WordPerfect is a proprietary word processing application. ... Evans & Sutherland is a computer firm involved in the computer graphics field. ... NeoMagic Corporation NASDAQ: NSDC is a fabless semiconductor company and supplier of low-power audio and video integrated circuits for mobile use. ... Netscape Communications Corporation was the publisher of the Netscape Navigator web browser as well as many other internet and intranet client and server software products. ... Pixars studio lot in Emeryville Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California (USA) notable for its seven Academy Awards. ... Silicon Graphics, Inc. ...


The University of Utah's School of Medicine is respected as one of the region's finest, with several notable achievements, and the University of Utah Hospitals & Clinics has consistently had some of its programs ranked by U.S. News & World Report. In 1970, the school established the first Cerebrovascular Disease Unit west of the Mississippi River. In 1982, Barney Clark received the world's first permanently implanted artificial heart, the Jarvik-7, during an operation performed by William C. Devries, M.D. Clark survived 112 days with the device. The campus houses both the Huntsman Cancer Institute, and the Moran Eye Center, an ophthalmic clinical care and research facility. Areas for which the school is often praised include cardiology, geriatrics, gynecology, rheumatology, pulmonology, oncology, orthopedics, and ophthalmology. Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cerebrovascular disease is damage to the blood vessels in the brain, resulting in a stroke. ... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Jarvik-7. ... An artificial heart is a device that is implanted into the body to replace the original biological heart. ... The Huntsman Cancer Institute is a research center in the University of Utah designed to research, learn about, treat, and prevent cancer. ... Cardiology is the branch of medicine pertaining to the heart. ... Geriatrics is the branch of medicine that focuses on health promotion and the prevention and treatment of disease and disability in later life. ... The shamefulness associated with the examination of female genitalia has long inhibited the science of gynaecology. ... Rheumatology, a subspecialty of internal medicine, is devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic diseases. ... In medicine, pulmonology (aka pneumology) is the specialty that deals with diseases of the lungs and the respiratory tract. ... See cancer for the biology of the disease, as well as a list of malignant diseases. ... Orthopedic surgery or orthopedics (BE: orthopaedics) is the branch of surgery concerned with acute, chronic, traumatic and recurrent injuries and other disorders of the locomotor system, its musclular and bone parts. ... This article is about the branch of medicine. ...


The University of Utah's Political Science department hosts one of nation's leading schools of politics and government. Aside from regular course work, the college provides its students the opportunity to volunteer as interns in state and federal government offices. The college is often visited by local and national leaders. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ...


The University is well known in the field of biology for its unique contributions to the study of genetics. This is due in part to long-term genealogy efforts of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (also known as the LDS or Mormon church) which is headquartered about four miles from the University. Those who keep genealogic records are an asset to researchers who are able to use family records to trace genetic disorders through several generations. Additionally, the relative homogeneity of Utah's population makes it an ideal laboratory for studies of population genetics.[2] The population tends to volunteer for genetic testing in high numbers. The University is home to the Genetic Science Learning Center, a unique resource which educates the public about genetics through its website. In addition, University of Utah faculty member Mario Capecchi has made significant contributions to the field by developing a gene knockout technique that functions even in higher organisms. Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Genealogy (from Greek: γενεα, genea, family; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... This article is about the history and use of the word Mormon. For information about the religious beliefs and culture of Mormons, see Mormonism. ... Mario Renato Capecchi (born 6 October 1937) is an Italian-born American molecular geneticist and a co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ...


The university is home to the S.J. Quinney School of Law, until the 1970s the only law school in the state. Its alumni and faculty include distinguished scholars and judges. Currently former professor Judge Michael McConnel of the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals and Judge Paul Cassell serve on the federal court.


In 1989, the university was the focus of a short-lived but intense controversy in the scientific community when then-chair of chemistry Stanley Pons and visiting professor Martin Fleischmann claimed to have discovered a chemical reaction process known as "cold fusion". Their work has since been discredited by the nuclear physics community. Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Stanley Pons was a chemist at University of Utah who, while working with Martin Fleischmann of the University of Southampton, announced the discovery of cold fusion on March 23, 1989. ... Martin Fleischmann (1927-) is a chemist at the University of Southampton who, while working with Stanley Pons of University of Utah, announced the discovery of cold fusion on March 23, 1989. ... This article is about the nuclear reaction. ... Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ...


Olympics

In 2002, the University hosted the Olympic Village as well as Winter Olympic events, including the opening and closing ceremonies. Prior to the events, the University received a facelift that included extensive renovations to Rice-Eccles Stadium, a light rail track leading to downtown Salt Lake City and an array of new student housing and a 134 room campus hotel and conference center (used by the Olympic athletes) at nearby Fort Douglas. Also see: 2002 (number). ... The 2002 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XIX Olympic Winter Games, were held in 2002 in Salt Lake City, Utah, United States. ... Rice-Eccles Stadium is the football stadium for the University of Utah Utes, located on the universitys campus in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ... Fort Douglas is a fort in Utah, established in 1862 for the purpose of protecting the Overland Mail Route and telegraph lines from attacks from hostile Indians. ...


Athletics

Main article: Utah Utes
University of Utah logo
Rice-Eccles Stadium
Rice-Eccles Stadium

The school's sports teams are called the Utes. There are many "nicknames" for the teams too, as, for instance, the basketball team known as the "Runnin' Utes"; in former days, the football team was known as "Runnin' Redskins", and the gymnastics team is known as "the Red Rocks". Utah participates in the NCAA's Division I (Division I-A for football) as part of the Mountain West Conference. The focus each football season is to beat their chief rival, the BYU Cougars, in the last game of the regular season in a contest which for one week seems to divide the entire state. This traditional season finale has been called "The Holy War" by national broadcasting commentators and is one of the fierciest, most bitter rivalries in all college football. The Utah Utes are the athletics teams of the University of Utah. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 374 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Rice Eccles Stadium at the University of Utah 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1280 × 960 pixel, file size: 374 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Rice Eccles Stadium at the University of Utah 2007. ... The Utes (; yoots) are an ethnically related group of American Indians now living primarily in Utah and Colorado. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... Few rivalries in collegiate athletics can match the passion and intensity of the rivalry between the University of Utah and Brigham Young University (BYU). Through the years, the enmity between these two schools has become so deep that fans of either side are rarely willing to concede even the slightest... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... Few rivalries in collegiate athletics can match the passion and intensity of the rivalry between the University of Utah and Brigham Young University (BYU). Through the years, the enmity between these two schools has become so deep that fans of either side are rarely willing to concede even the slightest...


In 2002, U.S.News & World Report named Utah to its Honor Roll of College Sports: one of only 20 schools in the whole nation to receive such mention.


The men's basketball team won the NCAA title in 1944 and the NIT crown in 1947. Arnie Ferrin, the only four-time All-American in Utah basketball history, played for both the 1944 and 1947 teams. He also went on to help the Minneapolis Lakers win NBA Championships in 1949 and 1951. Wat Misaka, the first person of Asian descent to play in the NBA, also played for Utah during this era. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The 1944 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 8 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The National Invitation Tournament (NIT) is a mens college basketball tournament operated by the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... C. Arnold Ferrin Jr. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association team based in Los Angeles, California. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Wataru Wat Misaka (三阪亙; Misaka Wataru), born December 21, 1923 in Ogden, Utah, was the first person of Asian descent to play in the American National Basketball Association. ...


Utah basketball rose again to national prominence under the leadership of head coach Rick Majerus, who with the versatile playing of guard Andre Miller, combo forward Hanno Möttölä and post player Michael Doleac, took Utah to the NCAA Final Four in 1998. Then, after eliminating North Carolina to advance to the final round, Utah lost the championship game to Kentucky, 78-69. Rick Majerus (born February 17, 1948 in Sheboygan, Wisconsin) is a former American mens basketball coach, most notably at the University of Utah. ... Andre Lloyd Miller (born March 19, 1976 in Los Angeles, California) is an American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers of the NBA. Miller played collegiately at the University of Utah for four years. ... Hanno Möttölä (born September 9, 1976 in Helsinki, Finland) is a professional basketball player at the power forward position, who previously played for the Atlanta Hawks in the NBA. Möttölä was the first player from Finland to play in the NBA. Hanno attended the University of... Michael Scott Doleac (born June 15, 1977 in San Antonio, Texas, USA) is an American professional basketball player currently with the Miami Heat of the NBA. Doleac was selected 12th overall in the 1998 NBA Draft by the Orlando Magic. ... The 1998 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ...


The women's gymnastic team, the Red Rocks, has won the National Gymnastics Championship title 10 times, more than any other university. In 2006, they finished 2nd. In the years when Utah does not place first, they are almost always #2 or #3. The 10-time national champion Utah gymnastics team has qualified for a record 31st-consecutive national championship. Utah is the only program to qualify for all 25 NCAA Championships. The Utes won the 2006 women's gymnastics attendance title, averaging 12,747 spectators to their six regular season home meets. It marked the second-highest attendance average in Utah and NCAA gymnastics history. Utah has won 22 of the last 25 gymnastics attendance titles. This is also one of the highest attendance averages for any women's college sport in the nation.


Utah is home to 11 crowned NCAA National Skiing Championship teams, 64 individual NCAA titles, 21 Olympic athletes and 294 All-Americans ... a display of one of the most successful skiing programs within the college racing circuit.


Of more recent note was the 2004-2005 Utah football team. Coached by Urban Meyer and quarterbacked by Alex Smith, the Utes went 11-0 during the regular season and became the first team from a non-BCS (Bowl Championship Series) league to go to a BCS Bowl Game, finishing the regular season #6 in the BCS rankings. The Utes defeated Pittsburgh 35 - 7 in the Fiesta Bowl on January 1, 2005 and ended its perfect 12-0 season ranked fourth in AP polling. Because they do not play in a BCS conference, they were denied an opportunity to play for the NCAA championship, despite their perfect record. Since the creation of the BCS and the National Championship Game, they are the third undefeated team to be denied a chance to play for the title, joining Tulane in 1998 and Marshall in 1999. Complicating the issue in 2005 was the fact that Auburn and Boise State also finished the season undefeated, the first time that five Division I-A teams finished the regular season without a loss. Urban F. Meyer (born July 10, 1964 in Ashtabula, Ohio) is currently the head football coach at the University of Florida. ... For other persons named Alex Smith, see Alex Smith (disambiguation). ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner being the BCS national champion. ... The University of Pittsburgh, commonly referred to as Pitt, is a state-related, doctoral/research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Marshall University is a public university based in Huntington, West Virginia. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... Boise State University is a state university located near downtown Boise, the capital city of Idaho. ...


In 2005, Utah became the first school to produce #1 overall draft picks in both the NFL and NBA Drafts for the same year. Alex Smith was picked first overall by the San Francisco 49ers in April, 2005, followed by Andrew Bogut, who was taken first overall in the 2005 NBA Draft by the Milwaukee Bucks. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The NBA Draft is an annual North American event in which the National Basketball Associations (NBA) thirty teams (29 in the United States and one in Canada) can select players who wish to join the league. ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... Andrew Michael Bogut (born November 28, 1984) is an Australian professional basketball player. ... The 2005 NBA Draft logo The 2005 NBA Draft took place on June 28, 2005 in the Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Broadcasting

The University of Utah has several public broadcasting affiliations. They include:

  1. KUED, TV Channel 7 (digital 42), the state's main PBS member station and award-winning producer of local documentaries;
  2. KUER-FM, FM 90.1, an NPR member station.
  3. KUEN, TV Channel 9 (digital 36), a resource for teachers and lifelong learners is operated from the U. campus by the Utah Education Network, a statewide consortium of public and higher education.
  4. K-UTE, Student campus radio (see website)

KUED is one of two PBS affiliates serving the Salt Lake City, Utah television market. ... Not to be confused with Public Broadcasting Services in Malta. ... KUER-FM 90 is a publicly broadcast radio station licensed to the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... FM radio is a broadcast technology invented by Edwin Howard Armstrong that uses frequency modulation to provide high-fidelity sound over broadcast radio. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... KUEN is the call letters for UEN-TV, an educational television network serving the state of Utah. ... The Utah Education Network (UEN) is a not-for-profit consortium of higher and public education, libraries, state government and business. ...

The Daily Utah Chronicle

The Daily Utah Chronicle is the U's independent, student-run paper, which has published regularly since 1890. It publishes daily on most school days during fall and spring semesters, and tri-weekly during summer semester. "The Chrony" typically runs between eight and 12 pages, with longer editions for weekend game-guide editions. The paper is a broadsheet and usually features full-color printing on the front by arrangement to use Newspaper Agency Corporation printing facilities, a deal brokered by The Salt Lake Tribune and intended to inspire journalism mentoring. The Newspaper Agency Corporation (or NAC) is a printing, delivery and advertising company jointly owned by the Deseret Morning News and The Salt Lake Tribune, the two major daily newspapers in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Marquis of the Salt Lake Tribune on the Tribune Building in Downtown Salt Lake City The Salt Lake Tribune (ISSN 0746-3502) is Salt Lake City, Utahs largest-circulated local daily newspaper. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and more broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ...


The Daily Utah Chronicle was recently selected as the top newspaper in its region by the Society of Professional Journalists.


Alumni of the Chronicle staff have gone on to work in all forms of media at all levels both regionally and nationally.


The Pride of Utah

The University of Utah Marching Band began in the 1940s as a military band that performed for university events and ceremonies. In 1948, University President A. Ray Olpin recruited Ron Gregory from Ohio State University to form a marching band fashioned after the great collegiate bands of the Midwest.


But in the turbulent '60s, support for the band dwindled and in 1969, the Associated Students for the University of Utah (ASUU) discontinued its funding.


The band was revived in 1976 after a fund raising effort under the direction of Gregg I. Hanson. Mr. Hanson served as director of bands with Rick Clary directing the marching band until 1990 when Mr. Hanson accepted the director of bands position at the University of Arizona. The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. ...


In 1991, the University of Utah recruited Dr. Barry Kopetz of the University of Minnesota as the director of bands with his graduate assistant, Scott Hagen, serving as marching band director. Mr. Hagen became the director of bands in 2001, where he currently serves. The marching band is under the direction of Eric Peterson. This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ...


The "Pride of Utah" Marching Utes have performed at all home football and basketball games, along with home gymnastics meets. They've also performed at numerous NFL and college bowl games, including the 2004 BCS Tostitos Fiesta Bowl. Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner being the BCS national champion. ... A ready-to-eat nacho tray of Tostitos. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ...


Notable Faculty

Mario Renato Capecchi (born 6 October 1937) is an Italian-born American molecular geneticist and a co-winner of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... The Nobel Prizes (pronounced no-BELL or no-bell) are awarded annually to people who have done outstanding research, invented groundbreaking techniques or equipment, or made outstanding contributions to society. ... Maud May Babcock (1867 - 1954) moved from New York to become the first female member of the University of Utahs faculty in 1892, where she taught for 46 years. ...

Notable alumni

Notes This article does not cite any references or sources. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... Michael Moschello Anderson (born September 21, 1973 in Winnsboro, South Carolina) is an American Football running back who currently plays for the Denver Broncos of the NFL. In 2000 Anderson was chosen as the NFL Offensive Rookie of the Year by the Associated Press. ... City Baltimore, Maryland Team colors Purple, Black, and Gold Head Coach Brian Billick Owner Steve Bisciotti General manager Ozzie Newsome Mascot The Ravens: Edgar, Allan, & Poe League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1996–present) American Football Conference (1996-present) AFC Central (1996-2001) AFC North (2002-present) Team history Baltimore... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... Since 1967 The Associated Press has given two annual Rookie of the Year Awards to NFL American football players: one for an offensive player and one for a defensive player. ... Ross C. Rocky Anderson (born September 9, 1951) is the current mayor of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ... Robert Foster Bob Bennett (born September 18, 1933) is a Republican United States Senator from Utah. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Fawn McKay Brodie (September 15, 1915 – January 10, 1981) was a teacher and biographer. ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Vern L. Bullough is an American historian and sexologist. ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Sexology is the systematic study of human sexuality. ... Edwin Catmull after receiving a medal at SIGGRAPH 2001. ... Pixars studio lot in Emeryville Pixar Animation Studios is an American computer animation studio based in Emeryville, California (USA) notable for its seven Academy Awards. ... Some people with the name Tom Chambers include the following: Tom Chambers, the former professional NBA basketball player from Utah Tom R. Chambers, a portraiture and visual artist Tom Chambers, a Virginia-based photographer Tom Chambers, a San Diego journalist Tom Chambers, an English actor Tom Chambers, a Washington State... “NBA” redirects here. ... Dave Checketts (born c. ... Dr. James H. Clark (born 1944) is a prolific entrepreneur and former computer scientist. ... Silicon Graphics, Inc. ... Stephen Covey is the author of the bestselling book, The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People, as well as other books. ... Michael Scott Doleac (born June 15, 1977 in San Antonio, Texas, USA) is an American professional basketball player currently with the Miami Heat of the NBA. Doleac was selected 12th overall in the 1998 NBA Draft by the Orlando Magic. ... Andre Dyson (born May 25, 1979 in Las Vegas, Nevada) is an American football cornerback for the Seattle Seahawks of the NFL. He was originally a second round pick by the Tennessee Titans out of the University of Utah. ... In American football and Canadian football, defensive backs are the players on the defensive team who take positions somewhat back from the line of scrimmage; they are distinguished from the defensive line players, who take positions directly behind the line of scrimmage. ... Kevin Tyree Dyson (born June 23, 1975 in Logan, Utah) is an NFL wide receiver most recently with the Washington Redskins and is also known as The Music City Miracle Man. ... The wide receiver (WR) position in American and Canadian football is the pass-catching specialist. ... Luther Ellis (born May 22, 1973) was an American football player. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... A defensive lineman is any of the down positions on the defensive side of American football. ... C. Arnold Ferrin Jr. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... Chris Fuamatu-Maafala (born March 7, 1977 in Honolulu, Hawaii) is an American football running back who most recently played for the Jacksonville Jaguars of the NFL. He was selected with the 25th pick of the sixth round of the 1998 NFL Draft by the Pittsburgh Steelers out of... P.J. Daniels was a star running back for Georgia Tech from 2002-2005. ... Edwin Jacob Garn (born October 12, 1932) served as a U.S. Senator representing Utah from 1974 to 1993. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... Jordan Alan Gross (born July 20, 1980, is an American football player who currently plays as an offensive lineman for the Carolina Panthers of the NFL. He attended the University of Utah. ... City Charlotte, North Carolina Other nicknames The Cardiac Cats Team colors Black, Carolina Blue, and Silver Head Coach John Fox Owner Jerry Richardson General manager Marty Hurney Mascot Sir Purr League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002... An offensive lineman (football) is one of a group of positions in American football. ... Gordon Bitner Hinckley (born June 23, 1910) has been the 15th President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints since March 12, 1995. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... Joseph Kearns (born February 12, 1907; died February 17, 1962) was an American actor, who is best remembered for his role as Mr. ... This article is about Mills Lane, the referee. ... Harold Bingham Lee (March 28, 1899 – December 26, 1973) was born in Clifton, Idaho but spent the great bulk of his life in Utah where he rose to head The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... John Willard Marriott (September 17, 1900 - August 13, 1985) was an American entrepreneur and businessman. ... Marriott International, Inc. ... David Oman McKay (September 8, 1873 – January 18, 1970) was the ninth President of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church; see also Mormon), serving from 1951 until his death in 1970. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Nolan K. Bushnell (born February 5, 1943) is an American electrical engineer and entrepreneur who founded both Atari and the Chuck E. Cheeses Pizza-Time Theaters chain. ... This article is about a corporate game company. ... The current logo for Chuck E. Cheese Pizza. ... Andre Lloyd Miller (born March 19, 1976 in Los Angeles, California) is an American professional basketball player for the Philadelphia 76ers of the NBA. Miller played collegiately at the University of Utah for four years. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... Bronzell Miller (born October 12, 1971 in Seattle, Washington) is an entertainer and former professional American football player. ... Frank Edward Moss (September 23, 1911 – January 29, 2003) was a moderate Democratic United States Senator from Utah. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... David Neeleman (2006) David G. Neeleman (born October 16, 1959) is the founder and former CEO of JetBlue Airways. ... jetBlue Airways (NASDAQ: JBLU) is an American low-cost airline. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Bui Tuong Phong (Vietnamese: Bùi Tường Phong, 1942–1975) was a Vietnamese-born computer graphics researcher and pioneer. ... In 3D computer graphics, the Phong reflection model is an illumination and shading model for assigning shades to points on a modeled surface. ... It has been suggested that Phong reflection model be merged into this article or section. ... He is one of the inventors of the Atomic Force Microscope. ... Topographic scan of a glass surface The atomic force microscope (AFM) is a very high-resolution type of scanning probe microscope, with demonstrated resolution of fractions of a nanometer, more than 1000 times better than the optical diffraction limit. ... Cecil O. Samuelson (born August 1, 1941) has been the 12th president of Brigham Young University since May 1, 2003. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... A Latter-day Saint is a member of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS Church). ... In The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, a general authority is a member of a select body of approximately 100 men with administrative and ecclesiastical authority in the church. ... Christopher Bob Shelton (born June 26, 1980 in Salt Lake City, Utah), is a Major League Baseball first baseman who plays for the Toledo Mudhens. ... For other persons named Alex Smith, see Alex Smith (disambiguation). ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager Lal Heneghan Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... The 2005 National Football League Draft , took place on April 23 and April 24, 2005[1] at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center in New York City, New York. ... The Sacramento Monarchs is a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Sacramento, California. ... “Mountain West” redirects here. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... George Albert Smith (April 4, 1870 – April 4, 1951) was an influential religious leader and the eighth president of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. ... In the Latter Day Saint movement, the President of the Church is generally considered to be the highest office of the church. ... For other uses, see Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (disambiguation). ... Stevonne L. Smith (born May 12, 1979 in Lynwood, California) is an American football wide receiver who currently plays for the Carolina Panthers of the National Football League. ... City Charlotte, North Carolina Other nicknames The Cardiac Cats Team colors Black, Carolina Blue, and Silver Head Coach John Fox Owner Jerry Richardson General manager Marty Hurney Mascot Sir Purr League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1995–present) National Football Conference (1995-present) NFC West (1995-2001) NFC South (2002... The wide receiver (WR) position in American and Canadian football is the pass-catching specialist. ... Dr. David N. Sundwall is a primary care physician and is the Executive Director of the Utah Department of Health. ... Surgeon General can have several different meanings. ... Wallace Earle Stegner (February 18, 1909—April 13, 1993) was an American historian, novelist, short story writer, and environmentalist. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... LeConte Stewart (born 1891 in Glenwood, Utah; died 1990 in Kaysville, Utah) was a Mormon artist primarily known for his landscapes of rural Utah. ... Shona Thorburn (born August 7, 1982) is a professional basketball player in the WNBA, currently playing for the Minnesota Lynx. ... The Minnesota Lynx are a Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) team based in Minneapolis, Minnesota and play their home games at the Target Center. ... WNBA may also refer to WNBA-AM, a radio station in Illinois. ... Bob Trumpy(Born in 1945) is a former professional American Football tight end who played for the Cincinnati Bengals from 1968 to 1977. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The tight end (TE) is a position in American football on the offensive team. ... Broadcast/cable networks of selected major sports and sporting events: // United States Major League Baseball ESPN: Sunday and Monday night game, Wednesday tripleheader; additional games during the season, such as on holidays and Opening Day; Division Series games (deal reduces to 3 games/week and no playoffs after 2006 season... A color commentator (colour commentator in Canada), sometimes known as a color analyst, is a member of the broadcasting team for a sporting event who assists the play-by-play announcer by filling in any time when play is not in progress. ... For the American football player, see Keith Van Horne. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... John Warnock John Warnock (b. ... Robison Wells (b. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Terry Tempest Williams is the Annie Clark Tanner Scholar in the Environmental Humanities Program at the University of Utah. ... Bold textHello ... William Scott Mitchell (born January 2, 1968 in Salt Lake City, Utah) was a professional football player who was selected by the Miami Dolphins in the 4th round of the 1990 NFL Draft. ... Daniel Constantine Marino, Jr. ... City Miami Gardens, Florida Other nicknames The Fins Team colors Aqua, Coral, White and Navy Head Coach liljimjim Owner Wayne Huizenga General manager Randy Mueller Mascot T.D. League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1966-1969) Eastern Division (1966-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American Football Conference (1970-present... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alan Curtis Kay (born May 17, 1940) is an American computer scientist, known for his early pioneering work on object-oriented programming and windowing graphical user interface design. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... Shelby Steele (born 1946, Chicago) is an American author, columnist, documentary film maker, and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford University, specialising in the study of race relations, multiculturalism and affirmative action. ... Wilbert L. Gore (Bill Gore) (1912 - 1986) was a chemical engineer and the main inventor of Gore-Tex. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... George Seifert (born January 22, 1940 in San Francisco, California) is a former NFL head coach of the San Francisco 49ers and the Carolina Panthers. ... Ralph Vinton Lyon Hartley (November 30, 1888 - May 1, 1970) was an electronics researcher. ... Not to be confused with information technology, information science, or informatics. ... Shannon is a name originated in Ireland and is directly linked to the countrys longest river. ... Richard Wesley Hamming (February 11, 1915 – January 7, 1998) was a mathematician whose work had many implications for computer science and telecommunications. ... In mathematics, the Hartley transform is an integral transform closely related to the Fourier transform, but which transforms real-valued functions to real-valued functions. ... Schematic diagram The Hartley oscillator is an LC electronic oscillator that derives its feedback from a tapped coil in parallel with a capacitor (the tank circuit). ... Alan Ashton, Co-Founder, WordPerfect Corporation; Professor, Brigham Young University. ... WordPerfect is a proprietary word processing application. ... Robert Koffler Jarvik (born 11 May 1946) is an American scientist and physician known for his role in developing the Jarvik-7 artificial heart. ... John Willard Marriott (September 17, 1900 - August 13, 1985) was an American entrepreneur and businessman. ...

Andrew Michael Bogut (born November 28, 1984) is an Australian professional basketball player. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The 2005 NBA Draft logo The 2005 NBA Draft took place on June 28, 2005 in the Theatre at Madison Square Garden in New York City. ... Theodore Robert Ted Bundy (November 24, 1946 – January 24, 1989) is one of the most infamous serial killers in U.S. history. ... Karl Christian Rove (born December 25, 1950) is Deputy Chief of Staff to President George W. Bush until the end of August 2007. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... George Ouzounian, (b. ... The Best Page in the Universe is a personal satirical humor website created by self-proclaimed pirate George Ouzounian, better known as Maddox, from Salt Lake City, Utah. ...

References

  1. ^ 2006 NACUBO Endowment Study (PDF). National Association of College and University Business Officers.
  2. ^ Sussingham, Robin; Stephanie Watson, Jennifer Logan (2006). Utah: A Gold Mine for Genetic Research. The University of Utah. Retrieved on 2006-03-09.
  3. ^ http://web.utah.edu/unews/releases/olympic%20story%20ideas/famousalumni.html
  4. ^ http://web.utah.edu/unews/releases/olympic%20story%20ideas/famousalumni.html
  5. ^ http://web.utah.edu/unews/releases/olympic%20story%20ideas/famousalumni.html

Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • Official university site

UofU's Academic Programs

Additional UofU Resources

  • University Guest House & Conference Center
  • The Daily Utah Chronicle
  • Official Utah athletics site
  • K-UTE student radio
  • OneLove Ski & Snowboard Club
  • The Utah Traffic Lab
  • Marching Utes Website
  • Utah Digital Newspapers Program
  • Digital Collections at the Marriott Library
  • MesoWest: Weather Information
  • University Campus Store
  • Health Sciences Store
  • Office of Information Technology
  • Utah Winter Business Economics Conference

Coordinates: 40°45′54.00″N, 111°51′00.08″W “Mountain West” redirects here. ... The United States Air Force Academy (USAFA or Air Force),[1] located immediately north of Colorado Springs in El Paso County, Colorado, United States, is an institution for the undergraduate education of officers for the United States Air Force. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... Colorado State University is a public institution of higher learning located in Fort Collins, Colorado in the United States. ... The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public university in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ... San Diego State University (SDSU), founded in 1897 as San Diego Normal School, is the largest and oldest higher education facility in the greater San Diego area (generally the City and County of San Diego), and is part of the California State University system. ... The SDSU Aztecs are the collegiate athletics and sports teams for San Diego State University (SDSU). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Texas Christian University features 18 varsity sports teams. ... “UNLV” redirects here. ... The Utah Utes are the athletics teams of the University of Utah. ... The University of Wyoming is a land-grant university located in Laramie, Wyoming, situated on Wyomings high Laramie Plains, at an elevation of 7,200 feet (2194 m), between the the Laramie and Snowy Range mountains. ... Wyoming Cowboys is the name given to the sports teams of the University of Wyoming. ... mtn. ... See Utah state entry. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... , Brigham Young University Brigham Young University (BYU), located in Provo, Utah, is the flagship university of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS or Mormon Church). ... CEU Prehistoric Museum (©2001 SW Clyde, courtesy of byways. ... Dixie State College of Utah (also Dixie College or the Dixie State; started by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints on September 19, 1911 under the name St. ... LDS Business College (LDSBC) is a two-year college in Salt Lake City, Utah, focused on training students in business and industry. ... Salt Lake Community College, often abbreviated SLCC and referred to locally as Slick, is the largest two-year community college in Utah. ... Snow College is a rural, two-year state college located in Ephraim, Utah. ... Southern Utah University, or SUU, is located in Cedar City, Utah. ... Stevens-Henager College was founded in 1891 as a business college. ... Utah State University (USU) is a land-grant university whose main campus is located in Logan, Utah. ... A Panoramic view of the UVSC campus Utah Valley State College or UVSC, is a publicly-funded college located in Orem, Utah. ... Weber State University is a public university located in the city of Ogden in Weber County, Utah, USA. There is also a Davis County satellite campus located in Layton. ... Westminster College, Salt Lake City, or simply Westminster College is a four year accredited liberal arts college located in Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. It also offers four graduate programs. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... Salt Lake City, Utah is the most ethnically, politically, and religiously diverse city in the state of Utah. ... A person who lives in or comes from Salt Lake City, Utah is known as a Salt Laker. ... Salt Lake City Temple under construction // Prehistory Originally, the Salt Lake Valley was inhabited by the Shoshone, Paiute, Goshute and Ute Native American tribes. ... The Salt Lake City Pubic Library is a system of free public libraries in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... This is a list of mayors of Salt Lake City, Utah, USA. Salt Lake City was incorporated on January 6, 1851. ... Salt Lake City is the capital and the most populous city of the U.S. state of Utah. ... Map of the Avenues. ... View of the Utah State Capitol building looking south down State Street. ... Central City is the main core of residential and commercial areas in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Downtown Salt Lake City is the oldest district in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... The East Bench of Salt Lake City, Utah is a relatively affluent, and primarily residential, section of Salt Lake City that lies at the base of the Wasatch Range and extends west to approximately 1300 East. ... Federal Heights is a neighborhood in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Glendale is a neighborhood on the west side of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Rose Park is a neighborhood on the west side of Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Sugar House area Obelisk at 2100 South 1100 East in Sugar House Sugar House (also sometimes seen as Sugarhouse) is one of Salt Lake City, Utahs oldest neighborhoods. ... The Utah Jazz is a professional basketball team based in Salt Lake City, Utah. ... Year founded 2004 League Major League Soccer Nickname RSL, Real, Red & Blue Army Stadium Rice-Eccles Stadium Salt Lake City, UT Coach Jason Kreis, 2007— Owner SCP Worldwide First Game MetroStars 0–0 Real Salt Lake (Giants Stadium; April 2, 2005) Largest Win Real Salt Lake 3–0 FC Dallas... Class-Level Triple-A Minor League affiliations Pacific Coast League (1994-Present) Pacific Conference - North Division Major League affiliation Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2001-Present) Minnesota Twins (1994-2000) Name Salt Lake Bees (2006-Present) Salt Lake Stingers (2002-2005) Salt Lake Buzz (1994-2001) Ballpark Franklin Covey Field... The Utah Grizzlies are an ice hockey team in the ECHL. They play in West Valley City, Utah, USA at the E Center. ... The Utah Utes are the athletics teams of the University of Utah. ... Conference American Division Western Year founded 2006 Home arena EnergySolutions Arena City, State Salt Lake City, Utah Head Coach Danny White ArenaBowl championships none Conference titles none Division titles none Wild Card berths 2: 2006 & 2007 The Utah Blaze is an Arena Football League team based in Salt Lake City... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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University of Utah - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2217 words)
The state-owned University is referred to colloquially as "the U," and shares a ferocious athletic and (some might say) cultural rivalry with its neighbor to the south, Brigham Young University (aka "the Y"), which is owned by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (commonly known as the LDS Church).
The University of Utah is the flagship public research institution in the state of Utah, and is one of 10 institutions that make up the Utah System of Higher Education.
Utah basketball rose again to national prominence under the leadership of head coach Rick Majerus, who with the versatile playing of guard Andre Miller, combo forward Hanno Möttölä and post player Michael Doleac, took Utah to the NCAA Final Four in 1998.
Replace with your title (305 words)
The university provides instruction and research in about 65 subjects at the undergraduate level as well as over 50 teaching majors and minors, graduate study is offered in nearly 100 disciplines.
The University of Utah includes one of the region's foremost research libraries and independent specialized libraries for law and the health sciences.
Utah is the west at its best: Four distinct seasons, ready access to all outdoor activity including superb skiing at eight world-famous resorts just minutes from the campus.
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