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Encyclopedia > University of Trinity College

Coordinates: 43°39′56″N 79°23′45″W / 43.66556, -79.39583 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

           University of Toronto
University of Trinity College
in the University of Toronto

(Trinity College)
Latin: Collegium Sacrosanctæ Trinitatis apud Torontonenses

Motto
Μετ’ Ἀγῶνα Στέφανος
Met’Agona Stephanos
Literal translation: After struggle, a crown.
Non-literal: There lies a reward past this labour.

Established 1851
Faculty Arts and Sciences
  Theology
UofT affiliation Federated in 1904
Religious affiliation Anglican
St. George area Central

Chancellor Bill Graham
Provost Andy Orchard
Registrar Bruce Bowden

Endowment $72.69 million (2007)

Students
Undergraduate 1700
Theology 140

Public transit access
Subway station Museum
Queen's Park
Surface routes 94 Wellesley

Address 6 Hoskin Avenue
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Website www.trinity.utoronto.ca/

The University of Trinity College, referred to locally as Trinity College or colloquially as Trin, is one of the federated colleges making up the modern University of Toronto. The college also houses one of the six Anglican seminaries in Canada, and is a constituent member of the Toronto School of Theology - an ecumenical federation of seven theological schools affiliated with the University of Toronto.[1] Trinity University may refer to: Trinity University of San Antonio, Texas Trinity University of Washington, D.C. (formerly Trinity College) There are also several other educational institutions called Trinity College. ... A number of educational institutions carry the name Trinity College, some independent, others constituent colleges of a larger university. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... William C. (Bill) Graham, PC, QC, LL.D, D.U., B.A.(Hon. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... In education outside the United Kingdom, a registrar or registry is an official in an academic institution (a college, university, or secondary school) who handles student records. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... C$ redirects here. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Museum is a station on the Yonge-University-Spadina line of the subway system in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Queens Park is a station on the Yonge-University-Spadina line of the subway system in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... A federated school, federated college or affiliated school is an educational institution which is independent in some respects, but is ultimately governed by a larger institution. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... Anglican Church of Canada The Anglican Church of Canada (the ACC) is the Canadian branch of the Anglican Communion. ... For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ... The Toronto School of Theology is an ecumenical centre for theological education and is the largest of its kind in Canada. ...


Trinity is one of the smallest of the University of Toronto's seven colleges, with approximately 1840 students, 1700 of whom are undergraduates.[2] Throughout its history, Trinity has maintained high entrance requirements for incoming students, with the incoming class of 2010 fielding an Ontario secondary school academic average of 91 per cent.[3] Of the seven colleges, Trinity has the highest proportion of students who graduate with "Distinction" or with "High Distinction", and the majority of Trinity students go on to pursue professional or graduate degrees.citation Additionally, the college has produced 35 Rhodes Scholars since its inception.[4] The college is also well known for striving to continue an Oxbridge-type atmosphere including mandating the wearing of gowns at dinner and, until 2005, preserving sex segregation in the residences. The college maintains some Anglican traditions, although the majority of students that attend the college are not Anglican and it is comparable to other colleges in its student diversity.[citation needed] This article is about the Canadian province. ... For other uses, see Citation (disambiguation). ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... Academic dress or academical dress (also known in the United States as academic regalia) is traditional clothing worn specifically in academic settings. ... Sex segregation is the separation, or segregation, of people according to sex or gender. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ...


The college has one of the highest per capita endownments in the country when factored in with the University of Toronto's endowment.[5] The combined endowment per student at Trinity, with investments and endowments at the college totaling $64.7 million, is $58,445. [6]

Contents

History

Founding

In 1827, Bishop John Strachan, an Anglican deacon who arrived in Canada in 1799, received a Royal Charter from King George IV to build King's College at York (now Toronto).[7] At the time the British Empire was being reformed along financial and religious lines, and one of the goals of the "new system" was to form churches (by way of land grants) and schools in all of the colonies. However, York was so small at the time that there were no funds available for actually building the college, and the first classes were not held until 1843.[7] John Strachan Dr. John Strachan (April 12, 1778 – November 1, 1867) was an influential figure in Upper Canada and the first Anglican Bishop of Toronto. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... George IV redirects here. ... For a comprehensive list of the territories that formed the British Empire, see Evolution of the British Empire. ...

Trinity College circa 1852, referred to as Old Trin
Trinity College circa 1852, referred to as Old Trin

In 1848, the first local elections were held, and the land grants to the churches reverted to "crown" ownership.[7] Strachan withdrew his support for the school when, in 1849, the school was secularized and became the University of Toronto on January 1, 1850. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the game, see: 1850 (board game) 1850 (MDCCCL) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


This action incensed Strachan, who immediately set about creating a private school based on strong Anglican lines. In 1850, the Cameron property on Queen Street, at the western end of Toronto, was purchased for £2,000, and the school was built on this site, on the west side of Garrison Creek (now buried).[7] On 2 August 1851, the legislature of the Province of Canada passed an act incorporating Trinity College.[8] This was supplanted by a Royal Charter for the University of Trinity College, granted by Queen Victoria in 1852.[7] The construction work was completed quickly, and students arrived in January 1852, including some from the Diocesan Theological Institute in Cobourg, Ontario, which was in effect replaced by the newly formed Faculty of Divinity at Trinity College.[9] The first Provost, George Whitaker, was appointed in 1852, holding office until 1880.[10] In 1884 the college admitted its first woman student; in 1888, St. Hilda's College was created for the women students of Trinity. Garrison Creek was a short creek about 6 kilometres long, that flowed southeast into the west side of Toronto Harbour. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Queen Victoria redirects here. ... The Diocesan Theological Institute was an Anglican seminary founded by John Strachan in Cobourg, Ontario on 10 January 1842. ... Cobourg (2001 population 17,172) is a town some 75 km east of Toronto. ... St. ...


Federation with the University of Toronto

Trinity College main building
Trinity College main building

With Strachan now long dead, efforts began in the 1890s to unite Trinity with the University of Toronto. The matter was hotly contested. However, the college federated with the university in 1904 largely due to the efforts of then provost T. C. S. Macklem. Most of the degrees granted were turned over to the University of Toronto, with the exception of the degree in Divinity. This allowed Trinity to keep its status as a university. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 414 KB) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1200x1600, 414 KB) (All user names refer to en. ...


It was recognised at Trinity that the dawning of the new century brought with it a rising cost of living and advancements in the fields of science and medicine. The financial resources of Trinity were only sufficient to maintain those values dearest to Strachan, those of residence life fashioned after the ancient universities of England and education in theology and the humanities.[11] From the union, Trinity was to gain the financial security of the larger institution and access to a top notch science school, and a decent arts faculty. The University of Toronto was to gain a state of the art faculty of medicine as well as a traditional Oxbridge collegiate community.[11]


Efforts began to move to a location on the main Queen's Park campus. The present site on Hoskin ave. was purchased in 1913, but due to World War I construction was not begun until 1923.[12] Bishop James Fielding Sweeny laid the cornerstone.[13] The new building was opened in 1925, at which point the land and original building were sold to the city, then later torn down in 1950. Only the old gates of the college still stand, at the southern entrance to Trinity Bellwoods Park on Queen Street West. The former women's residence building for St. Hilda's students is now a home for senior citizens and overlooks the northern end of the park from the west side. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Trinity Bellwoods Park is located on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario Canada, bordered by Queen Street West on the south and Dundas Street on the north. ... Queen Street West refers to both a major east-west downtown street and a series of neighbourhoods or commercial districts within the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ...


Recent history

In the latter part of the twentieth century, the place of longstanding institutions and traditions within the college community has changed in the face of both internal and external criticism. By October 1992, Episkopon, present within the college since 1858, was officially dissociated from Trinity.[14] Likewise, in 2004 the college board of trustees voted narrowly in favour of ending Trinity's long practice of same-sex residency, and beginning in 2005 large portions of Trinity's residences became home to both men and women. Episkopon (Greek: Επισκοπων, sometimes spelled Episcopon earlier in its history) is a controversial secret society active at Trinity College in the University of Toronto. ...


Buildings and environs

Quadrangle

The back courtyard of the main Trinity building has long been a centre piece of student life at the college. At the original location of Trinity on Queen’s Street, the area backed on to an open ravine, still present at Trinity Bellwoods Park. Additions to Old Trinity began in 1877, with the erection of Convocation Hall to the north of the main entrance.[15] This, along with the erection of the Chapel in 1883, created east and west wings of the college. Thus in 1903 it was held that Trinity was deserving of a significant expansion to the north, forming a double quadrangle found throughout the constituent Oxbridge colleges.[15] However, after federation with the University of Toronto, it became clear that the relocation of Trinity to the grounds of UofT was a necessary reality, and thus hopes of a double quadrangle soon disappeared.[15] Trinity Bellwoods Park is located on the west side of downtown Toronto, Ontario Canada, bordered by Queen Street West on the south and Dundas Street on the north. ... A Convocation (Latin calling together, translating the Greek ecclesia) is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ...

Trinity quadrangle as it appeared before the 2007-2008 academic year
Trinity quadrangle as it appeared before the 2007-2008 academic year

It would be a half-century for dreams of a Trinity quadrangle to finally manifest themselves, with the construction of Body house and Cosgrave house in the 1950s creating a fully enclosed quadrangle.[citation needed] Today the quadrangle remains a hub of student life in the fall and spring academic sessions.[16] Early in its life, the site was once home to the largest outdoor Shakespeare festival in the country. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


In the summer of 2007, the quadrangle was renovated with money from an anonymous donor.[citation needed] The new design features flagstone paths, replacing the former asphalt paths, as well as the Greek letter Chi (X), also the character for Christ, writ large in intricate flagstones.[citation needed] Look up Χ, χ in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


Chapel

Trinity College Chapel is the gift of the late Gerald Larkin (1885-1961), who headed the Salada Tea Company from 1922 to 1957. He contracted the renowned English architect, Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, who designed the great Gothic Liverpool Cathedral and the ubiquitous red telephone boxes seen throughout the UK.[17] Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, OM, FRIBA (November 9, 1880 – February 8, 1960) was an English architect known for his work on such buildings as Liverpool Cathedral and Battersea Power Station. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... North elevation of Liverpool Anglican Cathedral. ... K2 red telephone boxes behind Enzo Plazzottas bronze, Young Dancer, on Broad Street, Covent Garden, London A K6 red telephone box in Oxford The red telephone box, a public telephone kiosk designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, was a once familiar sight on the streets of the United Kingdom. ...


Built in the modified perpendicular Gothic style, the main chapel extends 100 feet to the reredos and is 47 feet high at the vault bosses.[13] Using only stone, brick and cement, the architects employed Italian stonemasons using ancient building methods; the only steel in the construction is in the hidden girders supporting the slate roof, with the exterior walls being sandstone.


Junior Common Room

The Junior Common Room (commonly referred to as the JCR) is located in the western wing of the main Trinity Building, very near Strachan hall. A large portrait of C. Allan Ashley, a professor of the college, hangs above the fireplace.[13] The room is used by many student organisations, including the Trinity College Literary Institute and the Trinity College James Bond Society.


Strachan Hall

Strachan Hall, referred to as Strachan, forms the bulk of the western wing of the main Trinity building, and serves as the central dining hall for students residing in that building, as well as the venue of all regular formal High Table dinners.[18] The hall was erected in 1941, immediately prior to war-time restrictions on building materials.[12] The construction, like that of the chapel, was financed by Gerald Larkin. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... At Oxford and Cambridge colleges, and more traditional academic institutions, High Table is a table on a raised platform at the end of the dining hall for the use of fellows (members of the Senior Common Room) and their guests. ...


Adorning the walls of the hall are portraits of important figures in the history of the college. The largest portraits, of Bishop Strachan and Provost Whitaker, Trinity's first provost, hang from the north wall.[13] On the front wall of the hall, prominent behind the High Table, hangs a large mediaeval tapestry. The tapestry is believed to have been woven in Flanders in the fourteenth century and is meant to depict the coming of the Queen of Sheba to the court of King Solomon.[13] The Queen of Sheba, (Hebrew מלכת שבא , Arabic ملكة سبأ , Geez: ንግሥተ ሳባ Nigista Saba), referred to in the Hebrew scriputures (Old Testament), Bible books of 1 Kings and 2 Chronicles, the New Testament, the Quran, and Ethiopian history, was the ruler of Sheba, an ancient kingdom mentioned in the Jewish scriptures (Old Testament). ... It has been suggested that Sulayman be merged into this article or section. ...


Before formal Hall each evening (Monday through Thursday), one of the Student Heads or another upper year (in order of precedence determined by seniority) is responsible for saying the Latin grace: Formal Hall or Formal Meal is the traditional meal held at some of the older universities in the United Kingdom at which students dress in formal attire and often gowns to dine. ... Grace is a name for any of a number of short prayers said before a meal, thanking God for it and asking for His blessing on it, in folk practices of Christianity and other religions. ...

Quae hodie sumpturi sumus, benedicat Deus, per Jesum Christum Dominum Nostrum. Amen.

May God bless what we are about to receive this day, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Students departing from the annual Christmas dinner in Strachan Hall
Students departing from the annual Christmas dinner in Strachan Hall

Formal hall is also marked by the enforcement of a number of regulations known as “Strachan hall etiquette”. The most evident of these is the dress code, of which Trinity’s distinctive academic gowns are the essential element for all men and women of college. In addition to the wearing of the gown, men are required to wear a jacket, collared shirt, long pants and a tie, as well as close-toed shoes. If a man of college has had the honour of being poored out, he is then permitted to wear his tie tied on the remains of his gown. For women of college, the dress code consists of a similar prohibition on open-toed shoes as well as a prohibition on short skirts. Although the dress code may look like an unnecessary burden to the casual observer, many students feel that it and other formalities lend a special atmosphere to the dinners that is not found in the rest of the university.[19] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 842 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Trinity... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 842 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Trinity... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...


This dress code and other points of etiquette are enforced by the second year students, led by the male and female heads of second year. The second year students act as “deputies of the hall” and are in charge of enforcing the dress code as well as maintaining discipline during the meal. Any student in violation of the dress code will not be allowed to enter the hall until they are dressed appropriately; this regulation is relaxed for non-resident students. The second year students also have the authority to physically eject any student who causes a ruckus during the meal.


In parody of the college’s Oxbridge traditions, the first year students will occasionally disrupt the formality of the meal by hurling buns at their fellow undergraduates. When this occurs, it is the job of the second years to eject all offending first years, or occasionally fellow upper years, from the hall. This is generally done with much struggle, however with little injury to any of the parties concerned. As the artillery is traditionally limited to simple bread rolls, no significant damage results from these incidents. Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... Breads are a group of staple foods prepared by baking, steaming, or frying dough consisting minimally of flour and water. ...


St. Hilda’s College

The University of Trinity College admitted its first women students in 1884. In 1888, it was decided that a distinct college was required for the women of Trinity. St. Hilda's College was initially opened in a building at 48 Euclid Avenue, Toronto, with two resident students.[20] The college was moved to a building on Shaw Street in 1889, then to a set of two larger houses on the same street in 1892, and in 1903 to a larger, purpose-built building on the main Trinity College grounds. In 1925, when Trinity College moved from its original location on Queen Street to the main University of Toronto campus, St. Hilda's College was moved to 99 St. George Street. The final move took place in 1938, when the current St. Hilda's building on Devonshire Place was opened. In 2005, the administration of Trinity College elected to end the practice of same-sex residency; as a result, St. Hilda's College now houses both men and women.


Academics

Profile

Munk Centre for International Studies (north wing)
Munk Centre for International Studies (north wing)

Trinity's student body consists of approximately 1700 undergraduate students, with a first-year enrollment limited to 400 Arts & Science students, and 140 Divinity students.[21] Students are admitted to Trinity in line with the common framework (with the exception of the Faculty of Divinity)[citation needed] of the University of Toronto Colleges adhere to, which lays down the principles and procedures for admission to the University of Toronto, which they all observe. Trinity maintains a tradition of academic success, with thirty-five of its graduates having been awarded Rhodes Scholarships.[22] In recent years, over one half of entering undergraduate students have fielded an Ontario academic average of 90 per cent or greater.[22] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 438 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Trinity... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 438 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Trinity...


The college has two active academic faculties, that of Arts and that of Divinity. Trinity maintains its university status by maintaining a doctoral program in the latter faculty.


Undergraduate

The Faculty of Arts offers undergraduate major programs in Immunology, International Relations (IR), and Ethics, Society, and Law to students at U of T. Associated with the latter two is an academic program called Trinity One. Admission to the Trinity One program is separate from that of the college itself, with enrollment limited to 25 students per stream.[23] At least one prominent professor teaches in each stream; for example, Robert Bothwell in the International Relations stream Mark Kingwell in Ethics, Society, and Law. Noted author Margaret MacMillan taught in the International Relations stream for the first two years of the program, prior to her departure for Oxford.[23] Immunology is a broad branch of biomedical science that covers the study of all aspects of the immune system in all organisms. ... Foreign affairs redirects here. ... Robert Bothwell is a professor of Canadian history, and the foremost scholar on Canadian Cold War participation, as well as a much published author. ... Mark Kingwell (born 1963) is a professor of philosophy at the University of Toronto and a Senior Fellow of Massey College. ... Margaret Olwen MacMillan OC (born 1943 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a historian and professor at the University of Toronto and is also Provost of Trinity College. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


The International Relations program benefits from the presence of the Munk Centre for International Studies (seen above), which is the centre of much post-graduate research, with a specialization in issues pertaining to the G8. Janice Stein, a prominent Canadian academic, is the current Director of the centre. Devonshire House, home to the Munk Centre The Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto is devoted to the study of numerous issues of international significance. ... Group of Eight redirects here. ... Janice Gross Stein, FRSC is a widely regarded intellectual and professor who currently is director of the Munk Centre for International Studies as well as a professor of conflict management and negotiation at the department of political science at the University of Toronto. ...


Divinity

Beginning in 1837, representatives of the United Church of England and Ireland in Upper Canada met with the Society for the Propagation for the Gospel to solicit support for fellowships to enable the education of local clergy.[citation needed] With a guarantee of support, in 1841 Bishop John Strachan requested his Chaplains, the Reverend Henry James Grasett and the Reverend Henry Scadding of St. James' Cathedral and the Reverend Alexander Neil Bethune, then Rector of Cobourg, to prepare a plan for a systematic course in Theology for those to be admitted to Holy Orders.[citation needed] The three chaplains recommended that all candidates, including those being prepared by the Reverend Featherstone Lake Osler in Tecumseth, should be sent to Cobourg to be instructed by Bethune. John Strachan Dr. John Strachan (April 12, 1778 – November 1, 1867) was an influential figure in Upper Canada and the first Anglican Bishop of Toronto. ...


On January 10, 1842 the first lecture was given at the Diocesan Theological Institution at Cobourg, with two students being present. Eight students were enrolled by the start of the next term and thirteen by midsummer.[citation needed] By January 1852, when the work was transferred to Toronto to become the Faculty of Divinity in the new Trinity College, forty-six of the Cobourg Institution's students had been admitted to Holy Orders.[citation needed] The Debating Society, the precursor of the Trinity College Literary Institute, and other student traditions were founded in Cobourg and brought to Toronto by the continuing students. is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1842 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


Today, the Faculty of Divinity is a graduate faculty and a member of the Toronto School of Theology. As such, students enrolled in the faculty may take courses at any of the other constituent theological colleges. At the basic degree level, Trinity offers several Master of Divinity programs - a basic program, a "collaborative learning" model with self-directed study components, and an honours programme, which includes a thesis. For students not seeking Holy Orders, a Master of Theological Studies is offered. At the advanced degree level, students may pursue the Master of Arts in Theology, the Master of Theology, the Doctor of Theology and the Doctor of Ministry. A PhD in Theology can be earned through the University of St. Michael's College. Applicants to the ThM must hold an MDiv. Students can also enroll jointly in the MDiv and MA. The Toronto School of Theology is an ecumenical centre for theological education and is the largest of its kind in Canada. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Catholic deacon... The Master of Theological Studies (MTS) is a two-year graduate degree offered by many theological schools. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A Masters degree which is typically earned after one has already completed a Master of Divinity or a Master of Theological Studies. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Doctor of Ministry degree is a professional doctorate in some area of applied theology, such as missions, evangelism, church growth, homiletics, or spiritual formation. ... PhD usually refers to the academic title Doctor of Philosophy PhD can also refer to the manga Phantasy Degree This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... The Brennan Hall complex at St. ...


Student life

Literary Institute

Attendance at a regular debate of the Trinity College Literary Institute
Attendance at a regular debate of the Trinity College Literary Institute

The Trinity College Literary Institute (TCLI or, more commonly, "the Lit") predates Trinity itself, and plays a central role in undergraduate student life at the College. The Institute moved to Trinity from the Diocesan Theological Institute, another school founded by John Strachan. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 1. ...


The Lit holds weekly debates in the Junior Common Room (JCR) that satirize the Parliamentary system, while also actively maintaining a committee for formal debate. The term Junior Combination Room or Junior Common Room (JCR) is used in many British universities (as well as at Harvard College in the United States) to refer to the collective of students (similar to a students union) at a constituent part of a university, typically a college or a... States currently utilizing parliamentary systems are denoted in red and orange—the former being constitutional monarchies where authority is vested in a parliament, the latter being parliamentary republics whose parliaments are effectively supreme over a separate head of state. ...


Anyone attending a Lit expecting to hear a formal debate relevant to current events would be disappointed; most Lit debates are on humorous topics and involve many references to popular culture. Many debates are themed to holidays or Trinity social events (ie, "The Thanksgiving Debate" or "The Saints Debate", in reference to an annual formal dance at Trinity) The Lit does on occasion hold "serious" debates, which are, as their name implies, themed towards socially relevant topics of a more solemn nature.


The Lit also maintains a Competitive Debating committee, that provides training in formal debate technique, holds "serious" in-house debate rounds weekly, and sends teams to many tournaments throughout the Canadian University Society for Intercollegiate Debate (CUSID) circuit. Some students also choose to participate in the University of Toronto Hart House Debates Club. Throughout its history, Trinity College has fielded some of the top-ranked teams in CUSID.[citation needed] The Canadian University Society for Intercollegiate Debate (CUSID) is the national organization which governs and represents university debating in Canada. ...


Student publications

Trinity maintains several student-produced publications. The Salterrae (Latin: Salt of the Earth), is the official newspaper of Trinity College. The present incarnation paper began as Trinlight in 1981, and is currently in its eighteenth volume. The college also publishes an undergraduate yearbook, known as Stephanos (Greek: Στεφανος, meaning 'crown'), as well as a bi-annual journal, the Trinity University Review (established in 1880 as Rouge et Noir), featuring a collection of student short stories, photographs, and poetry.[18] For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ... Stephen is a male first name. ...


Trinity College Dramatic Society

A Trinity College Dramatic Club was first formed in 1892 at the University of Trinity College, apparently under the auspices of Lally McCarthy who graduated that year. The Dramatic Club produced plays in Toronto and toured Guelph, Woodstock, Brantford, and Hamilton in 1894, which caused the club to bankrupt itself later that year. The club re-emerged as the Dramatic Society, producing “Two Modern English Plays” in 1919, but its “Annual Productions” did not begin until 1921. It was in that year that the Dramatic Society was first able to use Hart House as a performance venue.


Since 1927, the Dramatic Society (or TCDS) has usually produced at least one full-length production a year. In some years an additional two or three short plays have also been produced. The main role of the Dramatic Society has been to support and run productions at the college; it has also been responsible for Trinity’s involvement in the University of Toronto's annual Hart House Drama Festival.


Currently, the primary venue for the Trinity College Dramatic Society’s productions is the George Ignatieff Theatre in the Trinity College campus. TCDS plays have also been staged in Seeley Hall, Cartwright Hall in St. Hilda’s, Hart House Theatre, and the Trinity quadrangle.


Episkopon

Main article: Episkopon

Episkopon (Greek: Επισκοπῶν, meaning 'overseer') is a highly controversial secret society that was founded at Trinity College in 1858.[12] In 1992, Episkopon dissociated itself from the college following allegations of racism and homophobia.[24] Despite official policies prohibiting Episkopon from engaging in any activities on college property, the society continues to play a significant role in undergraduate life at Trinity.[25] Episkopon (Greek: Επισκοπων, sometimes spelled Episcopon earlier in its history) is a controversial secret society active at Trinity College in the University of Toronto. ...


Alumni

The atmosphere of rich traditions and the close knit community of Trinity College have traditionally shaped its students to become extremely successful in Canadian society. Trinity has graduated numerous notable academics including Michael Ignatieff and former Trinity provost Margaret MacMillan, numerous politicians including the aforementioned Michael Ignatieff, his father George Ignatieff, former leader of the opposition and interim leader of the Liberal Party of Canada, now Trinity Chancellor Bill Graham, former leader of the New Democratic Party Ed Broadbent, and former Governor General Adrienne Clarkson as well as numerous notable diplomats including former Trinity Chancellor and Canadian Ambassador to the United States Michael Wilson. To the field of business, Trinity has contributed Ted Rogers, president and CEO of Rogers Communications, and Jim Balsillie, co-CEO of Research In Motion. To the arts, Trinity has contributed poets Archibald Lampman and Dorothy Livesay. Numerous high ranking officials in the Anglican Church are also former Trinity students, including Andrew Hutchison, retired Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada.[26] This List of University of Trinity College people includes alumni, faculty, presidents, and major philanthropists of the University of Trinity College. ... Michael Grant Ignatieff, M.P., Ph. ... Margaret Olwen MacMillan OC (born 1943 in Toronto, Ontario, Canada) is a historian and professor at the University of Toronto and is also Provost of Trinity College. ... George Ignatieff George Ignatieff, CC, MA, DCL (December 16, 1913 - August 10, 1989) was a Canadian diplomat and was the recipient of the 1984 Pearson Medal of Peace for his work in international service. ... The Liberal Party of Canada (French: ), colloquially known as the Grits (originally Clear Grits), is a Canadian federal political party. ... William C. (Bill) Graham, PC, QC, LL.D, D.U., B.A.(Hon. ... This article is about the Canadian political party. ... John Edward Ed Broadbent, PC, CC, Ph. ... A Governor-General is most generally a governor of high rank, or a principal governor ranking above ordinary governors. ... Adrienne Louise Clarkson (née Poy) (Chinese: ; Pinyin: , Hakka: Ńg Pên-kî, Cantonese: Ng5 Bing1 zi1), PC, CC, CMM, COM, CD, LL.D (honoris causa) (born February 10, 1939) is an accomplished Canadian journalist and stateswoman. ... Hon. ... Edward S. “Ted” Rogers (1934-) is the CEO of Rogers Communications Inc. ... James L. (Jim) Balsillie, B.Comm, MBA, LL.D, FCA was born on February 3, 1961 in Seaforth, Ontario, but raised in Peterborough, Ontario where his family relocated in 1966. ... Research In Motion Limited (RIM) (TSX: RIM, NASDAQ: RIMM) is a Canadian wireless device company. ... Archibald Lampman Source: Topley Studio / Library and Archives Canada / PA-027190 Archibald Lampman, FRSC (17 November 1861 – 10 February 1899) was a Canadian poet. ... Dorothy Kathleen May Livesay, OC , OBC , M.Ed , D.Litt , FRSC (October 12, 1909 - December 29, 1996) was a Canadian poet. ... The Most Reverend Andrew S. Hutchison is the primate of the Anglican Church of Canada. ... The Primate of the Anglican Church of Canada is elected by the bishops, clergy and laity of the Church from among a list of five bishops nominated by the House of Bishops. ...


Film and fiction

The front cover of the first edition of Davies’ novel The Rebel Angels
The front cover of the first edition of Davies’ novel The Rebel Angels

Trinity College is believed by many to be the setting of Robertson Davies’ novel The Rebel Angels. It is said that Davies based the College of St. John and the Holy Ghost (or "Spook" as its often called in the novel) on Trinity.[27] Evidence for this connection includes the superficial similarities between the fictional and the real life college; the fact that Davies taught at Trinity College for 20 years and lived across the street from Trinity while master of Massey College; and perhaps most convincingly that a picture of Trinity's central tower is prominently featured on the cover of the novel's first edition (seen right). Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... William Robertson Davies, CC, FRSC, FRSL (born August 28, 1913, at Thamesville, Ontario, and died December 2, 1995 at Orangeville, Ontario) was a Canadian novelist, playwright, critic, journalist, and professor. ... The Rebel Angels is one of Canadian author Robertson Davies most noted novels, after his Deptford Trilogy. ... Massey College is an elite graduate residential college affiliated with but independent from the University of Toronto. ...


The Trinity College campus has served as the filming set for scenes in many movies and television series, including Searching for Bobby Fischer, Tommy Boy, Moonlight and Valentino, Class of '96, TekWar, and Ararat. Searching for Bobby Fischer is an acclaimed film of 1993 based on the life of Joshua Waitzkin. ... For the record company, see Tommy Boy Records. ... Class of 96 was a short-lived FOX drama series which aired in 1993. ... TekWar is the title of a series of science fiction novels by William Shatner which gave rise to a TV series and short series of TV movies in which Shatner also appeared. ... Ararat is a 2002 film directed, written, and co-produced by Atom Egoyan about the Armenian Genocide, an event that is denied by the government of Turkey. ...


See also

The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Dean of Divinity - Trinity College in the University of Toronto
  2. ^ Students & Applicants - Trinity College in the University of Toronto
  3. ^ http://www.trinity.utoronto.ca/UserFiles/Document/Prov_corp_apr07(3).pdf/
  4. ^ About Trinity College
  5. ^ Facts and Figures 2005, Trinity College, University of Toronto [Accessed 10 June 2007]
  6. ^ Audited Financial Statements 2006, Trinity College, University of Toronto [Accessed 2 June 2007]
  7. ^ a b c d e Reed, T.A. (Ed.) (1952). A History of the University of Trinity College, Toronto, 1852–1952. University of Toronto Press. 
  8. ^ An Act to incorporate Trinity College, Legislative Assembly of the Province of Canada, No. 220. 3d Session, 3d Parliament, 13 & 14 Victoria, 1850.
  9. ^ Westfall, William (2002). The Founding Moment: Church, Society, and the Construction of Trinity College. McGill-Queen's University Press. ISBN 0-7735-2447-9. 
  10. ^ Whitaker, George, Church of England clergyman and educator at Dictionary of Canadian Biography online (accessed 16 October 2007)
  11. ^ a b Macklem, T. C. Street (1906). in W. J. Alexander: The University of Toronto and its Colleges, 1827-1906. University of Toronto Press. 
  12. ^ a b c Trinity Review (1952). in Watson, Andrew: Trinity, 1852-1952. University of Toronto Press. 
  13. ^ a b c d e Office of Convocation (2001). Trinity College : a walking guide. Trinity College. 
  14. ^ "TORONTO LIVE Links to Episkopon cut" (1992-10-06). The Globe and Mail: A16. 
  15. ^ a b c Kenrick, Charles (1903). Picturesque Trinity. George N. Morang & Company. 
  16. ^ http://www.salterrae.ca/archive/2005/8/article2.php
  17. ^ History of the Red Phone Box - The Phone Box - Icons of England
  18. ^ a b Trinlife 2004 Jenn Hood and Graeme Schnarr. Retrieved on 4-1-2007.
  19. ^ Trinlife 2007 Casey Gorman and Josh Chung. Retrieved on 9-27-2007.
  20. ^ Sutton, Barbara (Ed.) (1988). Sanctam Hildam Canimus: A Collection of Reminiscences. University of Toronto Press, xi. 
  21. ^ Students & Applicants. Students & Applicants. Retrieved on 3-22-2007.
  22. ^ a b Rhodes Scholars - Trinity College at the University of Toronto
  23. ^ a b Trinity One - Trinity College in the University of Toronto
  24. ^ Mitchell, Alanna (1992-09-05). "Is the student society at venerable Trinity College guilty of offensive human-rights abuses? Or is this another sanctimonious outcry from the prissy ranks of the politically correct?". The Globe and Mail: D1. 
  25. ^ Talaga, Tanya (1999-03-27). "Secret student group divides U of T's Trinity College; Once banned from campus, society returns". The Toronto Star: 1. 
  26. ^ Distinguished Graduates - Trinity College in the University of Toronto
  27. ^ Hill, Declan. "The Tempest at Trinity". Ideas, 1993. Toronto: CBC Radio

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References

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
§5. Edinburgh University, Trinity College, Dublin, and Gresham College. XIX. English Universities, Schools and ... (595 words)
Edinburgh University, Trinity College, Dublin, and Gresham College.
The college was, of course, part and parcel of the English occupation.
It is significant that, in both universities, the art of printing ceased at some date between 1520–30, to be restored at Cambridge, in 1582, when Thomas was recognised as printer to the university, and at Oxford, in 1585, when Barnes set up a press.
University of Trinity College (979 words)
Church of England university founded in Toronto in 1851 (it received its royal charter in 1852) by the first bishop of Toronto, John Strachan, after King's College, precursor of the University of Toronto, became secular in 1850.
Trinity Provost C.W.E. Body's hurried trip to England failed to counter the criticism, and early in 1891 the university decided to discontinue the examinations in London and New York.
When Trinity became a federated college of the University of Toronto on 1 Oct 1904, thereby surrendering its degree-granting powers in all faculties except Divinity, its Faculty of Music came to an end after having granted 161 B MUS degrees (including one honorary) and 34 D MUS degrees (including six honorary).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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