FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of Texas at El Paso

The University of Texas at El Paso Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... Shortcut: WP:WIN Wikipedia is an online encyclopedia and, as a means to that end, also an online community. ...

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Established 1914
Type Public
Endowment $132 million[1]
President Dr. Diana Natalicio
Faculty 1,083[3]
Staff 1,597[4]
Students 20,154[2]
Undergraduates 17,261
Postgraduates 3,281
Location El Paso, Texas, USA
Campus Urban, 366 acres (1.5 km²)
Athletics 14 varsity teams
Colors Orange, Blue, White, and Silver                     
Nickname Miners UTEP Athletics Logo
Mascot Paydirt Pete
Website UTEP.edu UTEPAthletics.com
Official UTEP Logo

The University of Texas at El Paso, popularly known as UTEP, is a public, coeducational university, and it is a member of the University of Texas System. The school is located on the northern bank of the Rio Grande, in El Paso, Texas, and is the largest university in the nation with a majority Mexican-American student population. Founded in 1914 as The Texas State School of Mines and Metallurgy, a mineshaft still exists on the mountainous, desert campus. It is composed of buildings of Bhutanese architecture, with massive sloping walls and overhanging roofs. In the mid-1950s, UTEP, then called Texas Western College, became the first college in a Southern state to integrate its intercollegiate athletic teams. Although the campus population was less than 1% African-American, in 1966, basketball coach Don Haskins and his Texas Western team thrilled portions of the nation by winning the NCAA Men's Basketball Championship with an all-black starting lineup, thus breaking an unspoken barrier and transforming the history of college basketball. By 1967, the Board of Regents authorized that the name of the college be changed from Texas Western College to its present name. Currently there are some 19,842 students enrolled at UTEP. About 73 percent of UTEP's student population is Hispanic. UTEP is the country’s only doctoral research intensive university with a student body that’s predominantly Mexican American. The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... El Paso redirects here. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... See also Orange (disambiguation) for other meanings of the word. ... Blue (from Old High German blao shining) is one of the three primary additive colors; blue light has the shortest wavelength (about 470 nm) of the three primary colors. ... Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... Silver is the metallic shade of the color gray closest to that of polished silver. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine This article is about mineral extraction. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... . ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 779 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1145 × 881 pixel, file size: 94 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Official logo of The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP), obtained from UTEPs own research website: http://research. ... For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities and six are health institutions. ... For other uses, see Rio Grande (disambiguation). ... El Paso redirects here. ... Mexican Americans are citizens of the United States of Mexican ancestry. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the act of abandoning or withdrawing support from an entity, see desertion. ... Dzong architecture is a distinctive type of fortress architecture found in the former and present Buddhist kingdoms of the Himalayas, most notably Bhutan. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... See also: 1965 in sports, other events of 1966, 1967 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Auto Racing Stock car racing: Richard Petty won the Daytona 500 NASCAR Championship - David Pearson Indianapolis 500 - Graham Hill USAC Racing - Mario Andretti won the season championship Formula One Championship - Jack... This article is about the sport. ... Donald L. Don Haskins (born March 16, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma, United States) is a former collegiate basketball coach and player. ... // Final four redirects here. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... The ethnonym Mexican-American describes United States citizens of Mexican ancestry (14 million in 2003) and Mexican citizens who reside in the US (10 million in 2003). ...


The historic 1966 Texas Western College win over The University of Kentucky for the NCAA basketball championship was depicted in the Disney/Jerry Bruckheimer movie Glory Road, which was released on January 13, 2006 and in the national bestselling 2005 book "Glory Road" written by Don Haskins and Dan Wetzel. Glory Road lies between the two basketball arenas on the campus, stretching from Mesa Street to Sun Bowl Drive. The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Disney may refer to: The Walt Disney Company and its divisions, including Walt Disney Pictures. ... Jerome Leon Bruckheimer (born September 21, 1945) is a film and television producer in the genre of action, drama, and science fiction. ... For other uses see film (disambiguation) Film refers to the celluliod media on which movies are printed Film — also called movies, the cinema, the silver screen, moving pictures, photoplays, picture shows, flicks, or motion pictures, — is a field that encompasses motion pictures as an art form or as... Glory Road is a 2006 film released on January 13, 2006. ... January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Donald L. Don Haskins (born March 16, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma, United States) is a former collegiate basketball coach and player. ... Dan Wetzel is an author, screenwriter, and national sports columist for Yahoo. ...


Today, the institution is devoted to the ideals of access and excellence, educating the population at a sprawling campus in the westernmost part of the State of Texas along the borders with Mexico and the State of New Mexico. Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Capital Santa Fe Largest city Albuquerque Area  Ranked 5th  - Total 121,665 sq mi (315,194 km²)  - Width 342 miles (550 km)  - Length 370 miles (595 km)  - % water 0. ...

Contents

History

  • The school officially opened its doors on September 23, 1914 with an initial enrollment of 27 students.
  • By 1916, the school's enrollment had grown to 39 students and for the first time women were allowed to enroll.
  • In 1919, the school's name was changed to U.T. Department of Mines and Metallurgy.
  • In 1920, the school's name changed again to the Texas College of Mines and Metallurgy, or TCM.
  • In 1949, the school's name was changed again to Texas Western College of the University of Texas (TWC) also on September 10th of the same year the Gamma-Gamma chapter of Tau Kappa Epsilon Fraternity was installed
  • In 1967, TWC changed its name to The University of Texas at El Paso.
  • On November 22, 1967, The National Fraternity of Alpha Kappa Lambda granted a charter at the University of Texas at El Paso, known as Alpha Rho.
  • In 1975, the UTEP men's Track and Field team struck gold again and won both the NCAA Men's Outdoor and Indoor National Championships.
  • In 1976, the Engineering-Science Complex was completed and the College of Nursing was also created.
  • In 1984, the six-story University Library opened its doors to the public.
  • In 1988 Diana Natalicio became UTEP's first woman president.
  • In 1999, the legendary Don Haskins retired from coaching. Also in 1999, UTEP's MBA online degree program was launched.
  • In 2002, the $11 million Larry K. Durham Sports Center opens for the first time and the Sam Donaldson Center for Communication Studies is established.
  • 2003 was a busy year for UTEP, the school hired former Washington State University head coach Mike Price to bring new life to the UTEP football team, $44 million in construction projects began for Academic Services and Biosciences buildings and an addition to the Engineering-Science Complex, construction also began on the $1.8 million Helen of Troy Softball Complex, and the International business doctorate, the Civil engineering doctorate, and the Composition and Rhetoric doctorate programs were approved.
  • In 2004, UTEP celebrated its 90th anniversary and in the 2004-2005 athletic year, UTEP enjoyed great success in both football and men's basketball, the Miner football team, under Price, went on to play the Buffaloes of the University of Colorado in the EV1.net Houston Bowl, and the Men's basketball team under new coach Doc Sadler went on to play in the school's 15th NCAA Men's Basketball Tournament appearance.

Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image of a woman on the Pioneer plaque sent to outer space. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine This article is about mineral extraction. ... Elephant-shaped bluff west of South Franklin peak, looking south on Transmountain Road, El Paso, Texas The Franklin Mountains of Texas are a small range (23 miles long, 3 miles wide) that extend from El Paso, Texas north into New Mexico. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... Chuquicamata, the second largest open pit copper mine in the world, Chile. ... Georg Agricola, author of De re metallica, an important early book on metal extraction Metallurgy is a domain of materials science that studies the physical and chemical behavior of metallic elements, their intermetallic compounds, and their mixtures, which are called alloys. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sun Bowl Stadium is an on-campus football stadium at the University of Texas at El Paso. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ... Donald L. Don Haskins (born March 16, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma, United States) is a former collegiate basketball coach and player. ... History studies time in human terms. ... This article is about the sport. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... College Park is the name of some places in the United States of America: College Park, Georgia College Park, Maryland This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Glory Road is a 2006 film released on January 13, 2006. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Robert (Bob) Beamon (born August 29, 1946) is a former American track and field athlete, best known for his long-standing world record in the long jump. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Nickname: Motto: Ciudad en movimiento Location of Mexico City in south central Mexico Coordinates: , Country Federal entity Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded c. ... Also: 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... NCAA Team Champions for Mens Cross Country Division One 1938 Indiana 1939 Michigan St. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... Geological engineering is the engineering science of applying engineering principals to geologic materials as part of the engineering design of facilties including roads, tunnels, and mines especially as related to minerals and mineral products. ... NCAA Champions for Mens Indoor Track and Field Division One 1965 Missouri 1966 Kansas 1967 Southern California 1968 Villanova 1969 Kansas 1970 Kansas 1971 Villanova 1972 Southern California 1973 Manhattan 1974 UTEP 1975 UTEP 1976 UTEP 1977 Washington St. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... NCAA Team Championships for Mens Outdoor Track and Field Division One 1921 Illinois 1922 California 1923 Michigan 1925 *Stanford 1926 *Southern California 1927 *Illinois 1928 Stanford 1929 Ohio St 1930 Southern California 1931 Southern California 1932 Indiana 1933 LSU 1934 Stanford 1935 Southern California 1936 Southern California 1937 Southern... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... Don Haskins Center is a 12,000-seat multi-purpose arena in El Paso, Texas. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Sun Bowl Stadium is an on-campus football stadium at the University of Texas at El Paso. ... Seating capacity refers to the number of people who can be seated in a specific space, either in terms of the space available, or in terms of limitations set by law. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Computer engineering (also called electronic and computer engineering) is a discipline that combines elements of both electrical engineering and computer science. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; λόγος, logos, knowledge) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... This article is about the year. ... History studies time in human terms. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Donald L. Don Haskins (born March 16, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma, United States) is a former collegiate basketball coach and player. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Don Haskins Center is a 12,000-seat multi-purpose arena in El Paso, Texas. ... This article is about the year. ... Donald L. Don Haskins (born March 16, 1930 in Enid, Oklahoma, United States) is a former collegiate basketball coach and player. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education is a report classifying all accredited degree_granting colleges and United States. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Samuel Andrew Donaldson (born March 11, 1934 in El Paso, Texas) was a news anchor for ABC News, known for his persistence in questioning senior government officials up to and including the President of the United States. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ... Mike Price (born 1946) is an American football coach, currently the head coach at the University of Texas-El Paso (UTEP). ... International Business is a field of business that looks into all aspects of multinational corporations (MNCs)or multinational enterprises (MNEs). ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... The term Composition, in written language, refers to the process and study of creating written works or pieces of literature. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of oral or written language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[2]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... The Houston Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually in Houston, Texas, since 2000. ... 2005 Final Four, Edward Jones Dome The 2005 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... The Western Athletic Conference (commonly referred to as the WAC, pronounced whack) was formed on July 27, 1962, making it the sixth oldest of the 11 college athletic conferences currently participating in the NCAAs Division I Football Bowl Subdivision (FBS; formerly Division I-A). ...

Academics

The University of Texas at El Paso is subdivided into several colleges, each of which offers a variety of degree programs including undergraduate, graduate and some post-graduate:

  • College of Business Administration

UTEP offers 81 bachelor's degrees, more than 70 master's-level degrees and programs and 14 doctoral degrees. The university ranks second in federal research spending among UT System academic institutions, and in fiscal year 2006 reported $45.7 million in total research spending.


Hispanic Business magazine has twice ranked UTEP as the number one graduate engineering school for hispanics. The National Action Council for Minorities in Engineering has called the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) "a model for other engineering institutions who say that today's minority young people from low-income families can't succeed in a rigorous math- or science-based discipline." Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Hispanic, as used in the United States, is one of several terms used to categorize US citizens, permanent residents and temporary immigrants, whose background hail either from the Spanish-speaking countries of Latin America or relating to a Spanish-speaking culture. ...


The National Science Foundation has designated UTEP as a Model Institution for excellence, one of only six in the country. UTEP is one of only 11 universities nationwide to receive a $5 million Teachers for a New Era (TNE) research grant from the Carnegie Corporation. The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... The Carnegie Corporation was founded by the will of Andrew Carnegie in 1911 to promote the advancement and diffusion of knowledge and understanding. ...


Campus Architecture

UTEP's campus is modeled after Bhutanese monasteries, or Dzong architecture. Below are a few examples. Dzong architecture is a distinctive type of fortress architecture found in the former and present Buddhist kingdoms of the Himalayas, most notably Bhutan. ...

Miner Metro

The Miner Metro is the form of transportation for students around campus.

A Miner Metro pickup area.
A Miner Metro pickup area.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

School Colors and Logo

The school's colors were originally made orange and white. However, in the early 1980s, Columbia blue was added so now the official colors are orange, blue, and white. When the new UTEP athletic department logo was introduced in the fall of 1999, a darker hue of blue was incorporated into the logo, as well as a silver accent to go with the customary orange.

UTEP Miners logo
UTEP Miners logo

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Pickaxe Hand Symbol

This hand symbol represents the traditional tool used by Miners, the pickaxe. This is the universal way UTEP Students, UTEP Alumni, and fans of UTEP athletics salute each other. This is also the gesture fans of the UTEP Miners hold up when UTEP players are shooting free throws at basketball games, or anytime UTEP kicks off at a football game. Pickaxe on the ground Pickhandle redirects here. ...

A graphic showing the Miner Pickaxe hand symbol.
A graphic showing the Miner Pickaxe hand symbol.


Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

School songs

"The Eyes of Texas" was adopted by the 1920 student body when the song had been "declared the school anthem for the University of Texas at Austin [1] [2]." UT Students and Football players singing The Eyes of Texas after a win versus Nebraska For the long-running Texas travel program of the same name, see The Eyes of Texas (TV Series). ...


UTEP's fight song, "Miners Fight" was also an offshoot from the Austin campus. However, in the late 1980s and with Marty Robbins' blessing, the UTEP Music Department wrote a new song to the melody "El Paso."


Lyrics

"UTEP Fight Song"

Out in the west Texas town of El Paso,
Home of the River they call Rio Grande.
Down on the border the town of El Paso,
Home of the Miners the best in the land.
Fighting to win, the Miners of UTEP,
Long live the College of Mines, GO COLLEGE OF MINES!
Loyal forever, we're standing together,
Onward to victory Orange and Blue, WE WILL BE TRUE!
(Repeat)


"Miners Fight"

Miners Fight! Miners Fight!
And it's goodbye to(opponent).
Miners Fight! Miners Fight!
For we'll put over one more win.
Miners Fight! Miners Fight!
For it's Miners that we love best.
Hail! Hail! the gangs all here,
And it's goodbye to all the rest!
(repeat)


"The Shadows on the Mountains" (UTEP's Band Hymn)

The shadows on the mountains fall,
across the desert sands.
We lift our voices to our home
Along the Rio Grande
With brothers standing ever near
And sisters by our side
Oh Alma Mater always true
Our hearts with thee abide


Nickname

It is presumed that the nickname "Miners" came from the fact that the school was founded as the "State School of Mines and Metallurgy." In doing research on this project, early mention of "Ore Diggers" and "Muckers" for the nickname was found, but nothing to determine if the name "Miners" was voted upon by the student body, or if a faculty member, John W. (Cap) Kidd, chose the name. Kidd was a big booster of athletics, especially football, and in 1915, when funds were rather lean at the school, Kidd donated $800 to equip the football team. He also assisted with coaching, although he was not the head coach. The present track facility on campus bears Cap Kidd's name. The El Chino Mine located near Silver City, New Mexico is an open-pit copper mine This article is about mineral extraction. ...


Notable Athletic Achievements

UTEP's sports programs have won a total of 21 NCAA Division I national championships.[5] UTEP is currently tied for 10th overall among schools in Men's Sports Division I championships.

The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... NCAA Team Champions for Mens Cross Country Division One 1938 Indiana 1939 Michigan St. ... NCAA Champions for Mens Indoor Track and Field Division One 1965 Missouri 1966 Kansas 1967 Southern California 1968 Villanova 1969 Kansas 1970 Kansas 1971 Villanova 1972 Southern California 1973 Manhattan 1974 UTEP 1975 UTEP 1976 UTEP 1977 Washington St. ... NCAA Team Championships for Mens Outdoor Track and Field Division One 1921 Illinois 1922 California 1923 Michigan 1925 *Stanford 1926 *Southern California 1927 *Illinois 1928 Stanford 1929 Ohio St 1930 Southern California 1931 Southern California 1932 Indiana 1933 LSU 1934 Stanford 1935 Southern California 1936 Southern California 1937 Southern...

Mascot - Paydirt Pete

UTEP's latest version of Paydirt Pete, taken at a Men's Basketball pre-game.
UTEP's latest version of Paydirt Pete, taken at a Men's Basketball pre-game.

The Miners have had nearly as many mascots for its athletic teams as the school has had names. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 378 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (670 × 1062 pixel, file size: 696 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this image myself. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 378 × 599 pixel Image in higher resolution (670 × 1062 pixel, file size: 696 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this image myself. ... . ...


Probably the first so-called mascot was a student dressed as a prospector leading a burro named Clyde. Some years after Clyde began making appearances at football games, then-president Dr. Joseph Ray became disenchanted with the animal's appearance. This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Binomial name Equus asinus Linnaeus, 1758 The donkey, a. ...

UTEP's older version of Paydirt Pete, as seen from the UTEP locker room in Sun Bowl Stadium
UTEP's older version of Paydirt Pete, as seen from the UTEP locker room in Sun Bowl Stadium

In a letter to the dean of students, Dr. Ray demanded that something be done about that "sorry-looking, pot-bellied creature, not fit to represent the Miners." Clyde was surveyed out in 1966 and replaced by Henry, another burro. Clyde was taken to a tailgate, and enjoyed by all who wanted to enjoy a juicy piece of UTEP history. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Sun Bowl Stadium is an on-campus football stadium at the University of Texas at El Paso. ...


The name Paydirt Pete originated from a 1974 contest to give a name to the mascot. The name Paydirt Pete was selected from over 500 entries. The first animated Paydirt Pete was given a face in 1974. It was recreated in 1980. This was a lovable little ol' Miner which probably led to his being dubbed "Sweet Pete." The name actually orginated from the contest winners vision of attending a university with an openly gay mascott. At any rate, ol' Sweet Pete was not a very popular mascot and, like Clyde, he made a quick exit in order for the present Paydirt Pete to arrive on the scene.


This Paydirt Pete is meaner looking, has a major-league swagger and has become something of a goodwill ambassador for the school, as well as appearing at UTEP sporting events. This Pete stuck until the late 1990s and was built and designed by El Pasoan Richard Glass. Sometime after Pete made his appearance, he decided to kick the smoking habit and the cigar, which jutted to one side of his mouth, was removed. The next rendition of Paydirt Pete was introduced in the fall of 1999, along with a brand-new UTEP athletic department logo, when again complaints surfaced similar to those against "Sweet Pete". In the spring of 2005, the current rendition of Paydirt Pete was unveiled at a home basketball game.


UTEP Miners UTEP Miners athletics programs include the extramural and intramural sports teams of University of Texas at El Paso. ...


Traveling Trophies

UTEP Football Coach Mike Price celebrates with the Miner Football Team after their victory over NMSU in 2004, Coach Price is holding the Silver Spade and Brass Spittoon Trophies.
UTEP Football Coach Mike Price celebrates with the Miner Football Team after their victory over NMSU in 2004, Coach Price is holding the Silver Spade and Brass Spittoon Trophies.

The winner of the UTEP vs New Mexico State University football game receives a pair of traveling trophies; The Silver Spade and The Brass Spittoon. The first spade used for this purpose was an old prospector's shovel dug up from an abandoned mine in the Organ Mountains near Las Cruces, New Mexico in 1947. This was the symbol of victory, and the spade was given to the winner of the football game between the Miners and Aggies each year. Image File history File links Coach_Price_Silver_Spade_and_Brass_Spittoon. ... Image File history File links Coach_Price_Silver_Spade_and_Brass_Spittoon. ... New Mexico State University, or NMSU, is a land-grant university that has its main campus in Las Cruces, New Mexico. ... The Organ Mountains, looking east. ... Las Cruces is a city in Doña Ana County, New Mexico, United States. ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Victory in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The idea of the present Silver Spade was from UTEP student Don Henderson, the student association president and now a very successful El Paso businessman and former mayor of the city. In 1955 Henderson secured the present spade and each year the score of the game is engraved on the blade. El Paso redirects here. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


Perhaps the idea behind the spade is the fact that at the time the prospector's spade was uncovered, both schools' major field of study had use for the tool, mining and metallurgy for the College of Mines and agriculture at then New Mexico A&M. The Brass Spittoon, officially known as the Mayor's Cup, came into existence in 1982 when the mayors of the two cities; Jonathan Rogers of El Paso, and David Steinberg of Las Cruces decided to present another traveling trophy to the winner of the UTEP vs New Mexico State University game. This game is more commonly known as "The Battle of I-10". Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... El Paso redirects here. ... Las Cruces is a city in Doña Ana County, New Mexico, United States. ... New Mexico State University, or NMSU, is a land-grant university that has its main campus in Las Cruces, New Mexico. ... The battle of I-10 is a college rivalry between The University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) and New Mexico State (NMSU). ...


Sports Venues

UTEP owns the two largest stadiums in El Paso:

Sun Bowl Stadium is an on-campus football stadium at the University of Texas at El Paso. ... The Brut Sun Bowl is an annual college football game that is played usually at the end of December in El Paso, Texas. ... Sun Bowl Stadium is an on-campus football stadium at the University of Texas at El Paso. ... The Texas vs. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... Don Haskins Center is a 12,000-seat multi-purpose arena in El Paso, Texas. ... University Field is the on-campus soccer stadium at the University of Texas at El Paso. ...

Notable people

Faculty

Mount Cristo Rey, Sunland Park, New Mexico, across the Rio Grande from El Paso, Texas. ... Image:Steven best. ... Beagles stolen by British ALF activists from a testing laboratory owned by the Boots Group. ...

Alumni

John Daniel Danny Olivas (born May 25, 1965 in North Hollywood, California) is an American engineer and a NASA astronaut. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... STS-117 is the current Space Shuttle mission being flown by Space Shuttle Atlantis, which launched from pad 39A of the Kennedy Space Center on June 8, 2007. ... Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-104) is one of the fleet of space shuttles belonging to the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Seth Joyner is a former American Football linebacker who played for the Philadelphia Eagles (1986-1993), Arizona Cardinals (1994-1996), Green Bay Packers (1997), and the Denver Broncos (1998). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... This is a list of Super Bowl champions, that is, all the franchises that have won the championship game of the National Football League. ... Samuel Andrew Donaldson (born March 11, 1934 in El Paso, Texas) was a news anchor for ABC News, known for his persistence in questioning senior government officials up to and including the President of the United States. ... The American Broadcasting Company (ABC) operates television and radio networks in the United States and is also shown on basic cable in Canada. ... Antonio Lee Davis (born October 31, 1968 in Oakland, California) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) player. ... The National Basketball Association staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... Microsoft staff photo from December 7, 1978. ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... Nolan Richardson (b. ... College basketball most often refers to the American basketball competitive governance structure established by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... The head coach in sports coaching is the coach who is in charge of the other coaches. ... Nathaniel (Nate) Tiny Archibald (born September 2, 1948 in New York City) is a former professional basketball player. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... “NBA” redirects here. ... Timothy Duane (Tim) Hardaway (born September 1, 1966 in Chicago, Illinois) is a retired American basketball point guard who played in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and who in his prime was one of the leagues best at his position. ... The National Basketball Association staged its first All-Star Game in the Boston Garden on March 2, 1951. ... The 2000 Summer Olympics or the Millennium Games/Games of the New Millennium, officially known as the Games of the XXVII Olympiad, were the Summer Olympic Games held in 2000 in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Final results for the Basketball competition at the 2000 Summer Olympics. ... SPC Shoshana Johnson receives a hug after landing in Kuwait City. ... The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Geneva Convention definition A prisoner of war (POW) is a soldier, sailor, airman, or marine who is imprisoned by an enemy power during or immediately after an armed conflict. ... Ana Alicia (born Ana Alicia Ortiz) is a Mexican-born actress, best known for her role as scheming heiress Melissa Agretti, on the long-running primetime soap opera Falcon Crest. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... Robert (Bob) Beamon (born August 29, 1946) is a former American track and field athlete, best known for his long-standing world record in the long jump. ... This article is becoming very long. ... A world record is the best performance in a certain discipline, usually a sports event. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... A civil engineer is a person who practices civil engineering. ... Image:Steven best. ... MGM Television Entertainment logo MGM Television (first known as Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Television, and later MGM/UA Television) is an American television production/distribution company that was launched in 1955 and a subsidiary of Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer Studios, Inc. ... The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas (also known as “Southwestern”) is one of the leading medical research facilities in the United States. ... “Dallas” redirects here. ... Greg Foster (born: April 4, 1958) in Chicago, Illinois, United States of America was a hurdling athlete. ... The Los Angeles Lakers are a National Basketball Association (NBA) team based in Los Angeles, California. ... Hector Manuel Guerrero Llanes (born October 11, 1954) is a Mexican-American professional wrestler, better known simply by his paternal name, Hector Guerrero. ... ... World Wrestling Entertainment, Inc. ... National Wrestling Alliance logo The National Wrestling Alliance (NWA) is the largest governing body for a group of independent professional wrestling promotions and sanctions various NWA championships. ... Jack Handey (born 25 February 1949) is an American humorist. ... This article is about the American television series. ... J.P. Hayes John Patrick J.P. Hayes (born August 2, 1965) is an American golfer born in Appleton, Wisconsin. ... In golf the distinction between amateurs and professionals is rigorously maintained. ... National Football League referee Ed Hochuli signals a touchdown during the January 22, 2006 NFC Championship Game between the Carolina Panthers and the Seattle Seahawks. ... NFL redirects here. ... A referee is a person who has authority to make decisions about play in many sports. ... Suzanna Gratia Hupp (born 1959) is an outgoing Republican member of the Texas House of Representatives, who represented traditionally Democratic District 54 (Bell, Burnet, and Lampasas counties) for ten years from 1997-2007. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Lampasas County is a county located in the state of Texas. ... The Bill of Rights in the National Archives Amendment II (the Second Amendment) of the United States Constitution, which is part of the Bill of Rights, declares a well regulated militia as being necessary to the security of a free State, and prohibits Congress or any other government agency from... The very first New York Titan, Don Maynard (born 1935) of Texas Western College (now University of Texas at El Paso) was an example of the lack of player-evaluation skills of NFL teams in the 1960s. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... The word deaf can have very different meanings depending on the background of the person speaking or the context in which the word is used. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Chris Jacke (born March 12, 1966, in Richmond, Virginia) was a professional American Football Placekicker most known for playing for the Green Bay Packers. ...

See also

  • The Prospector (school newspaper)

References

  1. ^ http://www.usnews.com/usnews/edu/college/directory/brief/drglance_3661_brief.php
  2. ^ http://www.utep.edu/aboututep/campusfacts.aspx
  3. ^ http://www.utep.edu/aboututep/campusfacts.aspx
  4. ^ http://www.utep.edu/aboututep/campusfacts.aspx
  5. ^ http://www.ncaa.org/champadmin/champs_listing1.html

External links

  • Thematic Mapper infrared image of 3 states and two nations. The red region follows the Rio Grande

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Texas at El Paso Official Athletic Site (317 words)
The UTEP men's cross country team has been selected as the Conference USA preseason favorite to win the 2007 cross country title in October, as voted on by the league's hea...
UTEP (5-7 in 2006) hosts New Mexico (6-7 a year ago) in the season opener for both schools on Saturday in the Sun Bowl.
The UTEP volleyball team swept Marist and Texas Southern 3-0 on the first day of the Sun Bowl Volleyball Invitational at Memorial Gym to open the 2007 campaign 2-0.
El Paso, Texas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3897 words)
El Paso is the county seat of El Paso County in the U.S. state of Texas.
El Paso is very sensitive to changes in the Mexican economy and the regulation of cross border traffic; the Mexican peso devaluation of late 1994 and the temporary closing of the ports of entry and subsequent stringent controls of cross border traffic after the September 11, 2001 Terrorist Attack were felt strongly in El Paso.
El Paso is, as of 2006, the 2nd largest U.S. city by population (behind Austin, Texas) not to have a team in one of the big four professional leagues (NHL, NBA, NFL, MLB).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m