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Encyclopedia > University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

This work is copyrighted. ...

Motto Faciemus (We shall achieve)
Established 1886, 1969
Type State-funded
President John Petersen
Staff 347
Undergraduates 9,002
Postgraduates 1,284 (graduate, pre-professional, doctoral)
Location Chattanooga, TN, USA
Campus Urban, 83 acres (336,000 m²)
Athletics Southern Conference, NCAA Division I
Mascot Mocs
Website http://www.utc.edu
1. Possibly a reference to Acts 2:37

University of Tennessee at Chattanooga is a university located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. The university, often referred to as UTC or simply "Chattanooga" (especially in reference to collegiate athletics), is one of three universities and two other affiliated institutions in the University of Tennessee System. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Chattanooga is a city located in United States of America. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. SoCon football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as I-AA). ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This work is copyrighted. ... A website (alternatively, Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible via HTTP, a... The Acts of the Apostles is a book of the Bible, which now stands fifth in the New Testament. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Largest metro area Nashville Area  Ranked 36th  - Total 42,169 sq mi (109,247 km²)  - Width 120 miles (195 km)  - Length 440 miles (710 km)  - % water 2. ... The University of Tennessee system is the statewide land-grant academic institution within the U.S. state of Tennessee, established by the Morrill Act of 1890. ...


UTC was founded in 1886 as then-private Chattanooga University (later known as Grant College). In 1907, the university changed its name to the University of Chattanooga. In 1969, the university merged with Chattanooga City College to form the modern UTC campus as part of the University of Tennessee System. Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Ulysses S. Grant[2] (born Hiram Ulysses Grant, April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was an American general and the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ...

Contents

Administration

Chattanooga uses the semester system, with five optional "mini-terms" in the summer. The leadership of the campus rests upon the chancellor, who answers to the University President. The current chancellor is Dr. Roger Brown. The Current SGA President is Bill Staley. An academic term is the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... Summer is one of the four seasons of the year. ... For other uses, see Chancellor (disambiguation). ... The University of Tennessee system is the statewide land-grant academic institution within the U.S. state of Tennessee, established by the Morrill Act of 1890. ...


List of past leaders of University of Tennessee at Chattanooga The following people have the post of President or Chancellor at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. ...


Academics

Chattanooga is best known for its Engineering, Nursing, English, Chemistry and Education departments. The university offers 43 undergraduate majors and 39 undergraduate minors. Chattanooga also offers 21 graduate programs, including Ph.D. programs in Education, Computational Engineering and Physical Therapy. In an effort to expand the horizons of its students body, Chattanooga recently began exchange with Kangnung National University of Kangnung, South Korea [1] Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology, syntax, morphology, semantics... It has been suggested that the central science be merged into this article or section. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Physical therapy (or physiotherapy[1]) is the provision of services to people and populations to develop, maintain and restore maximum movement and functional ability throughout the lifespan. ...


Publications

  • University Echo – Student newspaper
  • Sequoya Review – Literary magazine

Research

  • SimCenter – Chattanooga's computational engineering and simulation center, considered to be one of the finest in the nation. As of July 2006, the Simcenter is home to the world's 121st most powerful supercomputer, as listed on Top500.org.

About the campus

The University is served by CARTA bus routes 4, 7, 10, 14, 19, and 28. Route 14 only operates on weekdays during fall and spring terms, when the University is session. The route runs within and without the Chattanooga campus on McCallie, Houston, Vine, Douglas, Fifth, and Palmetto Streets. A recent extension serves Third, O'Neal and Central Streets, as well as Erlanger Hospital, and a large parking lot at Engel Stadium. All students showing valid University identification cards (aka MocsCards) ride for free on all CARTA routes, year-round. ... A Go North East bus parked in a lay-by in Tyne and Wear, England. ... Engel Stadium is a baseball field located in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ...


The campus also operates its own in-house television station and runs an independent radio station, WUTC. WUTC FM is a public radio station in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ...


Student residences

Prospective resident students can choose from four different dormitory complexes, each with different room configurations to choose from. A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...

  • Vine Street Dorms. Constructed in the late 1930s, and demolished in 2005, this dorm occupied part of North Stadium Hall, which actually formed the grandstands for the old Chamberlain Field football stadium. Age and structural integrity concerns prompted the closure of the facility in the early 2000s. The entire building was demolished in March, 2005. The current UTC football team plays at 22.001 seat Max Finley Stadium, located in downtown Chattanooga and considered by many the finest 1-AA football facility in the nation. This building was permanently closed in 2001.
  • Pfeiffer-Stagmaier Hall. This L-shaped building was constructed in two phases. The first part (Pfeiffer Hall) was completed in 1947 and named for Annie Merner Pfeiffer, a generous benefactor. In 1968, a wing was added on to Pfeiffer Hall and was known as Stagmaier Hall, which was named for Linda Stagmaier, the wife of a University official. Collectively the two attached buildings were officially called "Pfeiffer-Stagmaier Hall". To students, however, the complex was known as "P-Stag" or "the Stag." In this complex, students were housed by pairs in rooms with a bedroom and a study room. In Stagmaier Hall, two rooms shared a bathroom, while the Pfeiffer section had two students to a room with community bath. Both sections featured a full community kitchen on each floor. Pfeiffer was originally all female, while Stagmaier was male, however, once Pfeiffer closed, the complex was co-ed by floor, with males on the ground and first floors, and females on the second and third floors. Several offices have been located in Pfeiffer hall, but as of April 2006, both buildings are empty.
  • Boling Apartments. Named for Dr. Edward J. Boiling, former UT System president and completed in 1977. Each apartment houses two to four students in private bedrooms with a shared bathroom, kitchen and living room. The complex was called Village Apartments until the early 1990s.
  • Lockmiller Apartments. A series of apartment buildings completed in 1982, this dormitory was named for Dr. David A. Lockmiller, former president of the University of Chattanooga. The complex is co-ed by section, and most units house four students in two bedrooms, with a living room, bathroom, and kitchenettes. Lockmiller has undergone partial renovations, with some rooms now having a full stove and hardwood floors.
  • Johnson Village Apartments. A four-floor apartment complex composed of two, L-shaped buildings surrounding a courtyard. Most apartments are four-bedroom (with a few three-bedroom apartments) with a shared bathroom, furnished kitchen, and living room. Each apartment features its own small patio or balcony (depending on floor).
  • UTC Place - Since 2001, five buildings in a series of apartment-style dorms have been built on the south side of the campus. Operated under contract by Place Properties of Atlanta, Georgia, UTC Place (or simply "Place") was designed to offer students more upscale living arrangements. It has its own gated parking lot and convienence store. In Spring 2006, UTC Place Apartments were christened as the "Scott L. Probasco" South Campus, named for Scotty Probasco.

Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... The 2000s are the current decade, spanning from 2000 to 2009. ... Demolition of the Old Myer Building, Perth, Western Australia. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Many shapes have metaphorical names, i. ... 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1947 calendar). ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Tennessee system is the statewide land-grant academic institution within the U.S. state of Tennessee, established by the Morrill Act of 1890. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ... For the band, see 1990s (band). ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Hotlanta redirects here. ...

Academic buildings

Note: Dates of construction given when known

Race Hall
Race Hall
  • Administration Building (or more simply "Admin") - Houses the mailroom, parking services, motor pool and University Police Department.
  • Bretske Hall - Formerly the university cafeteria, now home to the Geology Department.
  • Brock Hall - Foreign Languages, Geography, Anthropology, History, Sociology Departments.
  • Challenger Center [2] - The widow of Dick Scobee, a Challenger astronaut, resides near Chattanooga. She donated the building in her husband's memory.
  • Cadek Hall (pronounced "chaddek") - Home to the Cadek Conservatory and WUTC radio.
  • Davenport Hall - Criminal Justice Department.
  • Engineering, Mathematics and Computer Science Building (EMCS) - (2003)
  • Fletcher Hall - (1939) Bursar's office, Business Administration and Political Science departments. From 1939 to 1974, Fletcher housed both the local public library and the university library.
  • Founders' Hall - (1916) Chancellor's offices
  • Frist Hall - Disabled Student Services, Communication Department. Once part of the Chattanooga Metro Hospital Complex.
  • Grote Hall (pronounced "GRO-tee") - (1968) Chemistry and Physics
  • Guerry Hall - Houses the Admissions Department, Financial Aid, University Honors Program (UHON) and the UHON Reading Room. The lower level is occupied by Campus Crossraods, a cafeteria featuring a breakfast foods diner, Edy's Ice Cream, and Subway.
  • Holt Hall - English, Philosophy, Religion, and some Sciences.
  • Hooper-Race Hall - (1916) Records and Registration, Human Resources. Though technically one structure, offices in this building are referred to as either "Hooper" or "Race" depending on their location within the building. Facing the building from McCallie Avenue, Hooper is on the right and Race is on the left. Hooper-Race is part of a complex of two other halls: Patten Chapel and Founders' Hall. Currently, Hooper Hall is closed for a lead and asbestos abatement project.
  • Hunter Hall Education Dept.
  • Lupton Library - (1974) see below.
  • MacKenzie Arena - (1982) aka the Roundhouse, due to its circular shape and the city's association with the railroad industry.
  • Maclellan Gym and Natatorium - (Gym opened 1961; natatorium opened 1968)
  • Metropolitan Hall - Campus Clinic, Nursing and Economics Departments, referred to as the "Metro Building". Formerly housed the Chattanooga Metropolitan Hospital.
  • Old Math Building - Demolished in the late 1990s.
  • President's House - Development (fundraising) Department
  • Patten House - (1893) Located in the Fort Wood National Historic District.
  • Dorothy Patten Fine Arts Center - (1980) Houses the Dorothy Hackett Ward theatre, the Roland W. Hayes Concert Hall, and the George Ayers Cress Art Gallery, referred to as the "FAC" ("fack").
  • Siskin Hall (1950s) - Formerly home to various "extension programs" (international education, continuing education) and a computer lab, this building is currently being demolished to make way for the yet-unnamed "Wellness Center". (see below)
  • Student Wellness Center - expected to be completed by Fall 2008, this building will house several facilities for student recreation and wellness, including an exercise floor with free weights, aerobics, exercise machines, a climbing wall, etc., a full size gymnasium with basketball court and 1/8 mile track, and a recreational pool.
  • University Center - The hub of social life on campus, referred to as the "UC" ("you-see"). The first floor features a student computer lab, a recreation and game room, and several offices. The second floor features the main campus cafeteria, comprised of several themed eateries such as pasta and pizza, grilled foods, and home-cooking, as well as two national food court staples, Quiznos Sub and Chick-fil-A. This floor also features a large, open seating area for student dining, a convenience store and coffee retailer, a Barnes & Noble student bookstore, and several offices, classrooms, and auditoriums.
  • University Hall - (1886) "Old Main." Demolished in 1917

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 543 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 543 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to en. ... A car of the Devon and Cornwall Constabulary, England Police forces are government organisations charged with the responsibility of maintaining law and order. ... Space Shuttle Challenger (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-099) was NASAs second Space Shuttle orbiter to be put into service. ... Francis Richard Dick Scobee (May 19, 1939 - January 28, 1986) was an American astronaut who died commanding the Space Shuttle Challenger, which suffered catastrophic booster failure during launch of the STS-51-L mission. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... WUTC FM is a public radio station in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... Dr. Irvine Walter Grote (1899 – 1972) was an American chemist and scholar. ... The first few hydrogen atom electron orbitals shown as cross-sections with color-coded probability density Physics (Greek: (phúsis), nature and (phusiké), knowledge of nature) is the branch of science concerned with the discovery and characterization of universal laws which govern matter, energy, space, and time. ... Breyers Ice Cream is a brand of ice cream owned by Unilever (part of their United States Good Humor-Breyers unit). ... Subway is the name of a multinational restaurant franchise that mainly sells sandwiches and salads. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... For Pb as an abbreviation, see PB. General Name, Symbol, Number lead, Pb, 82 Chemical series Post-transition metals or poor metals Group, Period, Block 14, 6, p Appearance bluish gray Standard atomic weight 207. ... Fibrous asbestos on muscovite Asbestos Asbestos Asbestos (a misapplication of Latin: asbestos quicklime from Greek : a, not and sbestos, extinguishable) describes any of a group of minerals that can be fibrous, many of which are metamorphic and are hydrous magnesium silicates. ... George Thomas Hunter (1886 – 1950) was a businessman and philanthropist in Chattanooga, Tennessee who inherited and ran the Coca-Cola Bottling empire from his uncle Benjamin Thomas. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. ... A natatorium is, stricta sensu, a structurally separate building containing a swimming pool. ... The Fort Wood National Historic District is an historic neighborhood in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... Roland Hayes (1887–1976) is considered the first African American male concert artist to receive wide international acclaim as well as at home. ... Quiznos Sub is a fast-food sandwich franchise that specializes in toasted submarine sandwiches. ... Chick-fil-A (IPA pronunciation: ) is a fast-food restaurant chain headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, that specializes in chicken entrees. ... A typical Barnes & Noble bookstore. ...

Library

The Lupton Memorial Library, named for T. Cartter and Margaret Rawlings Lupton was constructed in 1974, replacing the aging and inadequate John Storrs Fletcher Library (which has since been restored and renamed Fletcher Hall). As of 2005, the library's collection includes nearly 2 million items. The library is also home to the Fellowship of Southern Writers Archives. Cartter Lupton (1899 - 1977) was an American businessman and Coca-Cola Bottling Company magnate who lived in Chattanooga, Tennessee and founded the Lyndhurst Foundation (formerly The Memorial Welfare Foundation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Fellowship of Southern Writers is a literary organization headquartered at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. ...


Other places in or near campus

  • Pedestrian Malls - The campus features a central pedestrian mall system from which most academic and administrative buildings can be reached. It consists of sections of Oak Street, Cardiac Hill (formerly part of Baldwin Street), and Vine Street, all blocked to vehicle traffic. Landscaping projects are currently underway on Vine Street to increase the visual appeal of the high-traffic walkway that connects the Maclellan Gym to the University Center, Lupton Library, and several academic buildings.
  • The Greenway – a walking path that mirrors a former right-of-way for the now-defunct Southern Railway, which bisected the eastern half of campus until the late 1970s. Dedication occurred in August 2005.
  • Fort Wood - The Fort Wood National Historic District was once home to a Civil War bastion and is now home to numerous apartment buildings, housing mostly UTC students.
  • University Pizza and Deli - A small deli at the corner of Vine and Houston Streets that caters to UTC students. On the same block is an independent textbook and supply store (Chattanooga Books) and a coffee shop/deli called Coffee Crafters.

A right-of-way (plural: rights-of-way) is an easement or strip of land granted to a railroad company upon which to build a railroad. ... The Southern Railway (AAR reporting mark SOU) was the product of nearly 150 predecessor lines that were combined, reorganized and recombined beginning in the 1830s, formally becoming the Southern Railway in 1894. ... The Fort Wood National Historic District is an historic neighborhood in Chattanooga, Tennessee. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the northern states, popularly referred to as the U.S., the Union, the North, or the Yankees; and the seceding southern states, commonly referred to as the Confederate States of America, the CSA, the Confederacy...

Notable events

  • Oak Street Roast – a free barbecue cookout to celebrate the beginning of the academic year. Held in late August
  • Phi Mu Alpha All-Sing – an intramural music and talent competition, usually held in fall semester.
  • UHON Date Auction – One of the best known social activities held by the University Honors Program (UHON), with proceeds benefiting local charities.
  • Sigma Chi Derby Days, a community service event benefiting Chattanooga's T.C. Thompson’s Children’s Hospital. The first Derby Days at The University of Chattanooga was held in 1950 on Chamberlain Field and is one of the oldest annual events on the Chattanooga campus.
  • UTC Student Golf Cart Parade, held during Homecoming week. Golf carts are decorated by various campus organizations and driven through campus streets as part of the Homecoming contests and festivities.
  • Delta Sigma Theta Step Show, possibly the biggest event of the year with many sororities and fraternities trying to take home the winning title announced during the Homecoming Football game.

A barbecue in a public park in Australia A barbecue on a trailer at a block party in Kansas City Pans on the top shelf hold hamburgers and hot dogs that were grilled earlier when the coals were hot. ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ...

Greek life

Sororities:


Fraternities: Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, formed in January 15, 1908 at Howard University, became Americas first Greek-letter organization established by Black college women, and remains a predominately African-American sorority. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference[1]. Chi Omega boasts over 171 active collegiate chapters and hundreds of alumnae chapters. ... Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, (ΔΣΘ) Incorporated is a non-profit Greek letter organization of college educated women committed to constructive development of its members and to public service with a primary focus on the Black community. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... ΛΧΑ (Lambda Chi Alpha), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters (called Zetas) at more than 300 universities. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... Omega Phi Alpha (OPA, O-Phi-A, or ΩΦΑ) is an American national service sorority. ...

Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently over 200 chapters and colonies in North America. ... The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) Fraternity was founded on Friday, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three students. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... The ΦΜΑ Sinfonia (usually referred to as Sinfonia rather than ΦΜΑ) is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ...

Distinguished Alumni, Students, and Faculty

Hugh Beaumont, American actor, director, and Methodist minister, 1909-1982 Eugene Hugh Beaumont (February 16, 1909 - May 14, 1982) was an American actor, television director, and Methodist minister. ... Hugh Beaumont Ward Cleaver is a fictional character played by actor Hugh Beaumont on the Leave It to Beaver situation comedy which ran on CBS from October 4, 1957 to 1958 and then on ABC from 1958 to June 20, 1963. ... For other uses, see Leave It to Beaver (disambiguation). ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The United States Army is the largest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the 1968 Gregorian calendar. ... North Callahan (August 7, 1908-December 28, 2004) was an American historian and scholar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Dr. Irvine Walter Grote (1899 – 1972) was an American chemist and scholar. ... Rolaids is a brand of antacid produced by Pfizer. ... Aspirin or acetylsalicylic acid is a drug in the family of salicylates, often used as an analgesic (against minor pains and aches), antipyretic (against fever), and anti-inflammatory. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... Dennis Haskins (born November 18, 1950, in Chattanooga, Tennessee, USA) is an American actor best known for his role as principal Richard Belding in the teen sitcom Saved by the Bell, which ran from 1989 to 1993 on NBC. Before his foray into acting, Haskins briefly worked as a concert... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... There are several publicly funded health services in various countries called Medicare: Medicare (Canada) is a comprehensive, universal (for all the citizens and permanent residents in the country) public health financing system. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Terrell Eldorado Owens (born December 7, 1973, in Alexander City, Alabama), is an American football wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Gerald Bernard Wilkins (born November 9, 1963 in Atlanta, Georgia) is a 66 shooting guard/small forward, who played collegiately at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, and later in the NBA. Gerald is the younger brother of former Atlanta Hawks superstar Dominique Wilkins and father of current Seattle... Year 1984 (MCMLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1984 Gregorian calendar). ... Pistol Pez Whatley Pez Whatley (born Peter Whatley January 10, 1951 - January 18, 2005 was a professional wrestler in the 1980s. ... Leslie Allen Jordan (according to his biography born April 29, 1955) is an Emmy Award-winning American actor. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... Gavin Maloof is the boss of Sacramento Kings. ... Thomas Jefferson Drake (April 18, 1797 – April 20, 1875) was a politician from the U.S. state of Michigan. ... The Chattanooga Times Free Press is a local Newspaper located in Chattanooga,TN. The Newspaper is known for its Liberal and Conservative views in the editorial section. ... The University of the South The University of the South is located in Sewanee, Tennessee, and is a private, coeducational liberal arts college. ...

Athletics

Chattanooga's colors are blue and gold; their men's teams and athletes are nicknamed Mocs, and women's teams and athletes are Lady Mocs. Chattanooga athletics teams compete in NCAA Division I (FCS for football) in the Southern Conference. YOU SUCK!!!!! ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... A college football game between Colorado State and Air Force. ... The Southern Conference (or SoCon) is a college athletic conference affiliated with the NCAAs Division I. SoCon football teams compete in the Division I Football Championship Subdivision (formerly known as I-AA). ...


Chattanooga's men's basketball program has dominated the Southern Conference for the last 25 years, claiming more league championships than any other team. In 1997, the Mocs made a run to the Sweet 16 as a #14 seed, beating Georgia and Illinois before falling to Providence. Before making the move to Division I, Chattanooga won the Division II national championship in 1977.


Chattanooga is home to the only NCAA Division I wrestling program in the state of Tennessee, in the past years the Chattanooga Mat Mocs have become one of the nations premier wrestling programs.


The Chattanooga Lady Mocs basketball and softball teams have also been dominant forces in the Southern Conference in the last 5-10 years. The Lady Mocs squads are considered conference favorites year in and year out. The Lady Moc basketball team has won the Southern Conference Regular Season Championship eight (8) years in a row.


The Chattanooga Marching Mocs can be seen and heard at many athletic contests, as well as at exhibition performances in the Southeast. The Marching Mocs are known for bringing a new style wherever they go, often impressing opposing fans with their combination of support for the Athletic Department and entertainment of the audiences. The UTC Pep Band, which plays at men's and women's basketball, soccer, and softball games, is nicknamed "The World's Most Dangerous Pep Band." The Chattanooga Band Program is overall regarded as the top band program in the Southern Conference, and one of the elite programs of the southeast.


Among the more notable professional players to have played at Chattanooga is Terrell Owens. Terrell Eldorado Owens (born December 7, 1973, in Alexander City, Alabama), is an American football wide receiver for the Dallas Cowboys. ...


University Mascot

The school's athletic teams are called the Mocs. This work is copyrighted. ...


The teams were nicknamed Moccasins until 1996. The mascot has taken on three distinct forms, with a water moccasin being the mascot in the 1920s, and then a moccasin shoe (known as "The Shoe") was actually used as the school's mascot at times in the 1960s and '70s. From the 1970s until 1996, the mascot was Chief Moccanooga, an exaggerated Cherokee tribesman. Binomial name Agkistrodon piscivorous (Lacépède, 1789) The Cottonmouth, or water moccasin (Agkistrodon piscivorous), is a venomous snake closely related to the copperhead. ... The word moccasin was first introduced into English in 1612, from a Virginia Algonquian language, most likely Powhatan (makasin ‘shoe’), though similar words exist in Narragansett (mokussin), Micmac (m’kusun), and Ojibwa (makasin). ... Chief Moccanooga, the politically incorrect athletic mascot for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, was a common sight at UTC sporting events up until 1996, when the University decided to remove the potentially offensive (but well-loved) figure and replace him with a mockingbird, all in line with the nickname... For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ...


In 1996, due in large part to concerns over ethnic sensitivity raised by a lone activist,[1] the Moccasins name was dropped, and the Mocs nickname adopted. A new mascot, "Scrappy," an anthropomorphized mockingbird dressed as a railroad engineer, was adopted at the same time. The school's main athletic logo features Scrappy riding a train (a reference to Chattanooga's history as a major railroad hub and to the song "Chattanooga Choo Choo"). The mascot takes its name from former football coach A.C. "Scrappy" Moore. The Mocs basketball program has also always enjoyed the support of the Moc Maniac, who works the loudspeaker at home games and travels with the team to post-season tournaments. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Genera Melanotis Mimus Nesomimus Mockingbirds are a group of New World passerine birds from the Mimidae family. ... This is the top-level page of WikiProject trains Rail tracks Rail transport refers to the land transport of passengers and goods along railways or railroads. ... Chattanooga Choo Choo was a Glenn Miller big-band/swing song featured in the 1941 movie Sun Valley Serenade, which starred amongst others Milton Berle and Joan Davis. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Andrew Cecil Scrappy Moore (1903 - May 31, 1971) was head football coach of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga from 1934 until his retirement in 1967. ...


References

  1. ^ Reprint of a LA Times story By George Dohrmann from Wednesday, March 19, 1997, with added note

External links

  • Official University website
  • UTC Campus Maps
  • Official Chattanooga athletics site
  • UTC Atletics Hall of Fame
  • Chattanooga Marching Mocs
  • UTC Center for Excellence in Computer Applications
  • Popular Fan Web Site and Message Board for Athletics
  • UTC Echo
  • Maps and aerial photos Coordinates: 35.0458° -85.2999°
    • Street map from Google Maps, or Yahoo! Maps, or Windows Live Local
    • Satellite image from Google Maps, Windows Live Local, WikiMapia
    • Topographic map from TopoZone
    • Aerial image or topographic map from TerraServer-USA

  Results from FactBites:
 
UTM.edu - The University of Tennessee at Martin (82 words)
UTM.edu - The University of Tennessee at Martin
University of Tennessee at Martin Martin, TN 38238
Copyright 2007 The University of Tennessee at Martin UT Martin is part of the University of Tennessee System contact webmaster@utm.edu
University of Tennessee at Chattanooga: Information from Answers.com (2200 words)
The university, often referred to as UTC or simply "Chattanooga" (especially in reference to collegiate athletics), is one of three universities and two other affiliated institutions in the University of Tennessee System.
UTC was founded in 1886 as then-private Chattanooga University (later known as Grant College).
The University is served by CARTA bus routes 4, 10, 14, 19, and 28.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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