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Encyclopedia > University of Tennessee
The University of Tennessee - Knoxville

Motto: Veritatem cognoscetis et veritas te liberabit.
(You will know the truth and the truth will set you free.)
Established: 1794
Type: Public university
Endowment: US$1 Billion[1]
Chancellor: (currently vacant)
President: John D. Petersen
Provost: Robert C. Holub
Faculty: 1,400
Staff: 6,950
Students: 26,400 (2007)
Undergraduates: 20,400
Postgraduates: 6,000
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee, United States
(35°57′6″N 83°55′48″W / 35.95167, -83.93Coordinates: 35°57′6″N 83°55′48″W / 35.95167, -83.93)
Campus: four campuses statewide; Knoxville: Urban; 550 acres[2]
Sports: 20 varsity teams, 25 sport clubs
Colors: Light Orange (PMS 151) and White           
Nickname: Volunteers
Mascot: Smokey IX (Bluetick Coonhound)
Affiliations: Southeastern Conference
[NCAA Division I (FBS)]
Website: UTK.edu
UT logo

Logos are ™ and © The University of Tennessee
Above data obtained through UTK Fast Facts.

The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. The system is headquartered in Knoxville and includes campuses in Memphis, Martin, Tullahoma, and Chattanooga. This work is copyrighted. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Knoxville redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Bluetick Coonhound is a breed of dog. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 458 pixelsFull resolution (1042 × 596 pixel, file size: 28 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) This is a logo of an organization, item, or event, and is protected by copyright and/or trademark. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The University of Tennessee system is the statewide land-grant academic institution within the U.S. state of Tennessee, established by the Morrill Act of 1890. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Knoxville redirects here. ... For other uses, see Memphis (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Arnold Engineering Development Center is a U.S. government facility for aeronautical research and testing. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Additionally, UT-Battelle, a partnership between the university and the Battelle Memorial Institute, manages Oak Ridge National Laboratory. UT-Battelle is a partnership between the University of Tennessee and Battelle that manages and operates the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. ... Headquarters in Columbus The Battelle Memorial Institute is a private not-for-profit applied science and technology development company headquartered in Columbus, Ohio. ... A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ...

Contents

Campus

View of Europa and the Bull at the UT McClung Plaza.
View of Europa and the Bull at the UT McClung Plaza.

The university traces its roots to September 10, 1794, when Blount College was chartered by the legislature of the Southwest Territory, when Knoxville was the territorial capitol. In 1826, what was by then named East Tennessee College[3] moved from Gay Street in downtown Knoxville to a 40 acre (160,000 m²) tract named Barbara Hill (in honor of Governor Blount's daughter). Known to students and alumni today as simply "The Hill," it is only a small part of the Knoxville campus but remains at the heart of UT academic life. Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... Europa and the Bull by Gustave Moreau, circa 1869. ... Italic text:For the English scholar see William Blount, 4th Baron Mountjoy. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


The UT forensic anthropology facility, nicknamed the "Body Farm," is located near the University of Tennessee Medical Center on Alcoa Highway (US 129). Founded by Dr. William M. Bass in 1972,[4] the Body Farm features numerous cadavers posed in various situations on a fenced plot of land. Scientists at the university study how the human body decays in differing circumstances to gain a better understanding of decomposition. Forensic anthropology is the application of the science of physical anthropology and human osteology (the study of the human skeleton) in a legal setting, most often in criminal cases where the victims remains are more or less skeletonized. ... // For the Patricia Cornwell novel, see The Body Farm (novel). ... Tennessee State Route 115 is an east to west highway in the U.S. state of Tennessee that is 49 miles (78 km) long. ... U.S. Highway 129 is a spur of U.S. Highway 29. ... Overview Dr. William M. Bass is a forensic anthropologist renowned for his research on human osteology and human decomposition. ...


Geography of the University of Tennessee campus changed in 1998, when the university changed the name of Yale Avenue to Peyton Manning Pass in honor of the former Volunteer (and now Indianapolis Colts) quarterback. Peyton Manning Pass and Phillip Fulmer Drive meet at the football stadium in what is commonly called a "T" intersection. Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American football quarterback who plays for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League. ... League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1953–present) Western Conference (1953-1969) Coastal Division (1967-1969) American Football Conference (1970-present) AFC East (1970-2001) AFC South (2002-present) Current uniform Team colors Royal Blue, White Mascot Blue Personnel Owner Jim Irsay General Manager Bill Polian Head Coach Tony Dungy... Navy quarterback Aaron Polanco sets up to throw. ... Phillip Fulmer (born September 1, 1950 in Winchester, Tennessee), is the head football coach at the University of Tennessee, where he has been since 1992. ...

Central view of the UT campus.
Central view of the UT campus.

Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ... Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its full use. ...

Organization

All in all, the University of Tennessee's flagship campus in Knoxville hosts ten colleges, the Institute of Agriculture, the Institute for Public Service, and several schools. The UT Health Science Center at Memphis and the UT Space Institute at Tullahoma are specialized campuses but are not separate institutions. The University of Tennessee comprises these five facilities. UTK, UTC and UT Martin form the University of Tennessee system. The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in Memphis is part of the statewide, multi-campus University of Tennessee system, a subdivion of the Knoxville-based University of Tennessee proper. ... The University of Tennessee Space Institute is a campus of the University of Tennessee located near Tullahoma, Tennessee. ... Tullahoma is a city in Coffee County and Franklin County, Tennessee, in the south-central part of the state. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The University of Tennessee system is the statewide land-grant academic institution within the U.S. state of Tennessee, established by the Morrill Act of 1890. ...


The number of programs of study at UT is, as of 2007, 300 for undergraduate students.[2]


Students

Officially, the University of Tennessee's total enrollment in the fall semester of 2005 was 28,552, of which 23,131 were full-time students and 5,421 were part-time. Undergraduates numbered 20,286 students, while graduate students made up the balance of 8,266. UT enrolled 4,183 first-time freshmen.


Regarding enrollment by race, of UT's total enrollment, 23,092 students described themselves as white, with 2,137 Black, 725 Asian, 348 Hispanic, 112 American Indian, and 273 other/not reported. Total minority enrollment was 17.9%. Slightly more women (54.1%) attended UT than men.


By 2004, 1,082 international students had been enrolled for that year. Most of these students came from China, India, and South Korea. Out-of-state U.S. residents accounted for 4,950 of the student body, most of them from Virginia, Georgia, and North Carolina. The remaining 21,732 students already resided in Tennessee, with most previous in-state residents coming from Knox, Shelby, and Davidson counties. South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (ROK; Korean: Daehan Minguk (Hangul: 대한 민국; Hanja: 大韓民國)), is a country in East Asia, covering the southern half of the Korean Peninsula. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Knox County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Shelby County is a county in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Davidson County is a county located in the state of Tennessee. ...

The Hill. The University of Tennessee was established in 1794, making UT one of the oldest institutions of higher education in the region.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

History

Ayres Hall.
Ayres Hall.

At the legislature of the Southwest Territory meeting in the territorial capital, Knoxville, the University of Tennessee was chartered on September 10, 1794 as Blount College. The college struggled for 13 years with a small student body and faculty. In 1807, the school was renamed East Tennessee College; however, when its first president and only faculty member died in 1809, the school was temporarily closed. It reopened in 1820, and in 1840 was elevated to East Tennessee University. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 83 KB) Summary This is a photo of the front of Ayres Hall that I took myself on 09/28/05. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 83 KB) Summary This is a photo of the front of Ayres Hall that I took myself on 09/28/05. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...


In the midst of the Civil War the college was virtually destroyed, as students and faculty left to join both the Union and Confederate forces, their divided loyalties reflecting those of East Tennessee itself. The college buildings were occupied by troops from both sides and were sometimes used as hospitals. Shelling significantly damaged the grounds. The president, who took the college's reins in 1865, was a Union sympathizer, and he managed to secure some $18,500 in restitution funds from the federal government. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total...


Then, following the Civil War, the State of Tennessee made the University the beneficiary of the Morrill Act of 1862, which allocated federal land or its monetary value to the various states for the teaching of "agricultural and mechanical" subjects and to provide military training to students. Thus, the University of Tennessee (its designation after 1879) became a land-grant institution. In 1893, the university admitted women regularly for the first time. The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are pieces of US legislation which allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges, which would be funded by the grant of federally-controlled land to each of the states which had stayed with the United States during the American Civil War. ...


The first African Americans were admitted to the graduate and law schools by order of a federal district court in 1952. The first master's degree was awarded to a black student in 1954, and the first doctoral degree (Ed.D.) in 1959. Black undergraduates were not admitted until 1961; the first black faculty member was appointed in 1964. Integration went fairly smoothly; Black students had more difficulty gaining entry to eating establishments and places of entertainment off campus than they did attending class on campus. Overall, Knoxville and the University had fewer racial troubles in the 1950s and 1960s than did other southern universities. An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


In 1968, the university underwent an administrative reorganization which left the Knoxville campus as the flagship and headquarters of its new "university system," comprising the UT Health Science Center at Memphis, a four-year college at Martin, the formerly private University of Tennessee at Chattanooga (added a year later), the UT Space Institute at Tullahoma, and the Knoxville-based College of Veterinary Medicine, Agriculture Institute, and Public Service Institute. An additional primary campus in Nashville had a brief existence from 1971 to 1979 before it was ordered closed and merged with Tennessee State University. Martin is a city located in Weakley County, Tennessee. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Nashville redirects here. ... Tennessee State University (TSU) is a comprehensive, urban, coeducational land-grant university founded in 1912. ...

Southeastern view of the ziggurat-shaped structure of the John C. Hodges Library.
Southeastern view of the ziggurat-shaped structure of the John C. Hodges Library.

Image File history File links I took this picture and allow its use. ... Image File history File links I took this picture and allow its use. ... Dur-Untash, or Choqa Zanbil, built in 13th century BC by Untash Napirisha and located near Susa, Iran is one of the worlds best-preserved ziggurats. ... Southeasern view of the ziggurat shaped structure. ...

R&D and facilities

The major hub of research at the University of Tennessee is Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), one of the largest government laboratories in the United States. ORNL is a world class supercomputing powerhouse,[5] featuring one of the world's most powerful civilian supercomputers. The University is also connected to the scientific GRID which for example allows physicists to process data from the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. Also at ORNL is the world's most powerful neutron source[6], which images everything from complex proteins to nanoparticles. Other academic centers of research and scholarship associated or affiliated with the university are: The Tennessee High Energy Physics Group is located at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN. It has greatly benefited over the years from its close proximity and special relationship with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ... The Large Hadron Collider (LHC) is a particle accelerator and collider located at CERN, near Geneva, Switzerland (). Currently under construction, the LHC is scheduled to begin operation in May 2008. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ...

A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ... The Howard H. Baker, Jr. ... Southeastern view of the ziggurat shaped structure. ... Clarence T. Jones Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned and operated by University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. ... The Tennessee High Energy Physics Group is located at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, TN. It has greatly benefited over the years from its close proximity and special relationship with Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). ... The University of Tennessee Space Institute is a campus of the University of Tennessee located near Tullahoma, Tennessee. ... April 2005 aerial photo of the SNS site, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is an accelerator-based neutron source being built in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, USA, by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). ... The Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences is one of five Nanoscale Science Research Centers the location is in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ... The National Transportation Research Center is a facility located in Knoxville, Tennessee dedicated to improving transportation systems as regards efficiency, effects on the environment, and safety. ... Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multiprogram science and technology national laboratory managed for the United States Department of Energy by UT-Battelle, LLC. ORNL is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, near Knoxville. ... Y-12 National Security Complex Operated by BWX Technologies Y‑12 for the National Nuclear Security Administration, Y‑12 plays a vital role in the U.S. Department of Energys Nuclear Weapons Complex. ... Located in the heart of the city the American Museum of Science and Energy (AMSE) inspires young and old to explore atomic energy. ... The University of Tennessee Arboretum (250 acres) is a research and educational arboretum operated by the University of Tennessee Agricultural Experiment Station. ...

National rankings

The University of Tennessee is ranked among the top 40 public universities of America.[7][8] Specialty rankings are:

  • 9 UT Health Science Center Department of Ophthalmology by Ophthalmology Times.
  • 2 The supply chain management/logistics programs as published in Supply Chain Management Review, the industry’s most respected executive-oriented publication.
  • 10 The supply chain management/logistics programs in the UT College of Business Administration, according to U.S. News & World Report.
  • 45 UT Master of Fine Arts program by U.S. News & World Report.
  • 3 UT graduate program in printmaking by U.S. News & World Report.
  • 7 The pharmacy program, according to U.S. News & World Report.
  • 6 UT's senior executive MBA program in alumni goal achievement and satisfaction, according to the Financial Times.
  • 89 In the world, UT MBA program, according to the Financial Times Global Business School Rankings.
  • 1 UT MBA program in alumni value (value for the money) three years after graduation, according to Financial Times Global Business School Rankings.
  • 5 UT MBA program overall among U.S. public universities according to Wall Street Journal 2005.
  • 10 UT College of Law, in the National Jurist Best School for the Money ratings, and the clinical training specialty is ranked 19th while the college's overall graduate program is ranked 53rd in the U.S.
  • 10 UT's Nuclear Engineering graduate program, according to U.S. News and World Report.[1]
  • 1 UT's Physician Executive MBA program of the College of Business Administration according to Modern Physician.
  • 2 UT's College of Architecture and Design out of Southern Universities according to Design Intelligence.[citation needed]
  • 35 UT's College of Education, Health and Human Science.
  • The John C. Hodges Library ranks among the top 30 public research libraries of the United States.[9]
  • The Joel A. Katz Law Library in the UT College of Law is ninth best in the nation according to National Jurist magazine.

The University of Tennessee is the only university in the nation to have three presidential papers editing projects. The university has collections of the papers of all three U.S. presidents from Tennessee—Andrew Jackson, James K. Polk, and Andrew Johnson. This article is about the branch of medicine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Nuclear engineering is the practical application of the breakdown of atomic nuclei and/or other sub-atomic physics, based on the principles of nuclear physics. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Southeasern view of the ziggurat shaped structure. ...

UT's College of Law
UT's College of Law

Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its free use File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its free use File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Budget

  • University of Tennessee:
    • Research Budget (2004):
      • Main campus: $109,525,996
      • Institute of Agriculture: $26,987,367
      • Experiment Station: $9,262,186
      • Extension: $14,000,673
      • Veterinary Medicine: $3,724,508
      • Institute for Public Service: $5,882,079
      • Space Institute: $2,552,297
      • Total: $307.9 million (2006)[10]
    • Total Budget: $1.4 Billion (2006)[10]
Ayres Hall as seen from Neyland Stadium.
Ayres Hall as seen from Neyland Stadium.

A combination of federal, state and private funds is providing $300 million for the construction of 13 facilities on ORNLs new main campus. ... Headquarters in Columbus The Battelle Memorial Institute is a private not-for-profit applied science and technology development company headquartered in Columbus, Ohio. ... Image File history File links Im uploading a new picture of the same building to subdue any concerns about copyrights. ... Image File history File links Im uploading a new picture of the same building to subdue any concerns about copyrights. ...

Athletics

Tennessee is unusual among major U.S. universities in having completely separate athletic departments for men's and women's sports. With the merger of the men's and women's athletic programs at the University of Arkansas on January 1, 2008, the only other remaining NCAA Division I school with separate men's and women's programs is the University of Texas at Austin.[13] Men's teams are called the Volunteers and women's teams the Lady Volunteers, but the "Volunteers" is frequently shortened to "Vols." Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the primary institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee system, Tennessees flagship public university. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... University of Texas redirects here. ...


Football

Tennessee competes in the Southeastern Conference's Eastern Division, along with Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, South Carolina, and Vanderbilt, and has longstanding football rivalries with all of them. However, the Vols most intense and bitter rivalry is with Alabama. The teams battle every year in the Third Saturday in October. The Volunteers won the 1998 NCAA Division I-A National Championship in football. The Volunteers are coached by Phillip Fulmer and play at Neyland Stadium, which averages over 105,000 fans per game. Super Bowl champion Peyton Manning is among the numerous NFL athletes to start their careers at the University of Tennessee. Head coach Phillip Fulmer 15th year, 146–44 Home stadium Neyland Stadium Capacity 102,037 Largest Crowd: 108,768 (Sept. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Head coach Urban Meyer 3rd year, 22–4 Home stadium Ben Hill Griffin Stadium Capacity 92,000 aprx. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... The University of South Carolinas 19 varsity sports teams are known as the Gamecocks. ... City Nashville, Tennessee Stadium Dudley Field at Vanderbilt Stadium (grass, capacity 40,000) Head Coach Bobby Johnson League/Conference affiliations Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Association (1895-1921) Southern Conference (1922-1931) Southeastern Conference (1932-present) Eastern Division (1992-present) National Championships (2 disputed) 1906 Billingsley, 1911 Billingsley [1] SIAC Championships (11... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Head coach Nick Saban 1st year, 4–2 (2-1 in the Southeastern Conference) Home stadium Bryant-Denny Stadium Capacity 92,138 - Grass Conference SEC - West First year 1892 Website RollTide. ... The Third Saturday in October is the name of a college football game played each year between the Tennessee Volunteers and the Alabama Crimson Tide. ... Phillip Fulmer (born September 1, 1950 in Winchester, Tennessee), is the head football coach at the University of Tennessee, where he has been since 1992. ... Neyland Stadium is a sports stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Peyton Williams Manning (born March 24, 1976 in New Orleans, Louisiana) is an American football quarterback who plays for the Indianapolis Colts of the National Football League. ...


Basketball

Men's
Main article: Tennessee Volunteers basketball

The men's basketball program is headed by Bruce Pearl. Through his guidance, the men's program has been revitalized and claimed the 2005-2006 SEC East Title and closed the season with a 22-8 record and a NCAA Tournament berth. In 2007, the Vols made the NCAA tourney for the second straight year, making it to the Sweet Sixteen. In 2008 the Vols claimed their first outright SEC regular season championship in 41 years. In men's basketball, the most important rivalries are with Kentucky, Vanderbilt, Florida and cross-state rivals Memphis. Bruce Pearl is an American college basketball coach who currently serves as the head coach of the University of Tennessee mens basketball team. ... This article is about the sport. ... NCAA Tournament Champions 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1978, 1996, 1998 NCAA Tournament Final Four 1942, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1958, 1966, 1975, 1978, 1984, 1993, 1996, 1997, 1998 Conference Tournament Champions 1933, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1942, 1944, 1945, 1946, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1950, 1952, 1984, 1986, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1997... The Vanderbilt Commodores mens basketball team represents Vanderbilt University in the East Division of the Southeastern Conference. ... The Florida Gators basketball team represents the University of Florida in the Southeastern Conferences Eastern division. ... The Memphis Tigers basketball team represents the University of Memphis in NCAA Division I mens college basketball. ...


Women's

Tennessee has the strongest women's basketball team at the college level, having won seven NCAA Division I titles (1987, 1989, 1991, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2007), the most in history. The Lady Volunteers are led by Pat Summitt, the Lady Vols' head basketball coach, is the all-time winningest basketball coach in NCAA history, having won over 900 games as of 2006. Coach Summitt also boasts a 100 percent graduation rate for all players who finish their career at UT. Tennessee and Summitt also have a rivalry with the University of Connecticut in women's basketball. These two schools have consistently fought great games against each other in recent years, occasionally with the national championship on the line. The regular season rivalry games ended in 2007 when Tennessee decided to not sign a contract continuing them. The main women's basketball rivals for Tennessee within the conference are Georgia, Vanderbilt, and LSU. The Lady Vols have now won seven national championships, with the most recent being in 2007 where they defeated Rutgers to win it all again. Tennessee is the only school to make the Sweet Sixteen in all 26 of the women's tournaments. The Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team is one of the most prominent teams in U.S. womens college basketball. ... The Tennessee Lady Volunteers basketball team is one of the most prominent teams in U.S. womens college basketball. ... Pat Summitt (born Patricia Sue Head on June 14, 1952 in Clarksville, Tennessee) is the coach of the Tennessee Lady Vols basketball team. ... A sports rivalry is intense competition between athletic teams or athletes. ... The Connecticut Huskies, also known as the UConn Huskies, are the athletic teams of the University of Connecticut. ... The rivalry between the University of Tennessee Lady Vols and the University of Connecticut (UConn) Huskies is one of the fiercest rivalries in college basketball, and perhaps the only one to reach national consciousness out of the womens game. ... The LSU Lady Tigers basketball team represents Louisiana State University in NCAA Division I womens college basketball. ... The 2007 NCAA Womens Division I Basketball Championships will commence March 17, 2007 and conclude April 3 of that same year. ... The Scarlet Knights are the athletic teams for Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey (also known as Rutgers University). ...


Baseball

The University of Tennessee baseball team has reached the NCAA College World Series four times (1951, 1995, 2001 and 2005). They have produced players such as Todd Helton, Joe Randa, Chris Burke, and the number one overall pick in the 2006 MLB Draft, Luke Hochevar. Todd Lynn Helton[1] (born August 20, 1973 in Knoxville, Tennessee)[2] is a Major League Baseball first baseman who has played for the Colorado Rockies since the 1997 season. ... Joseph Gregory Randa (born December 18, 1969 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... Chris Burke (born August 26, 1965 in Point Lookout, New York) is an American actor with Down syndrome who played Corky Thatcher on the famous series Life Goes On. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... The First-Year Player Draft is Major League Baseballs primary mechanism for assigning amateur baseball players, from high schools, colleges, and other amateur baseball clubs, to its teams. ... Luke Anthony Hochevar (born September 15, 1983, and graduated from Fowler High School (Fowler, Colorado). ...


Softball

In recent years the women's softball team has gained notoriety, reaching the Women's College World Series three consecutive times. They placed third in 2005 and 2006 and second in 2007. Former pitcher Monica Abbott is the all-time career NCAA leader in strikeouts (2,440), shutouts (112), wins (189) and innings pitched (1448.0). The Salinas, California, native won the U.S. Softball National Player of the Year award and the Honda Award for Softball in 2007. She was also honored by the Women's Sports Foundation as its Team Sport Player of the Year over such high-profile candidates as Kristine Lilly of the U.S. women's soccer team and Lauren Jackson of the WNBA. The Womens College World Series (WCWS) refers to the final portion of the NCAA Womens Softball Tournament. ... Monica Cecilia Abbott (born July 28, 1985) is an American athlete who was born in Salinas, California and attended North Salinas High School from 2000 to 2004; her parents are Bruce and Julie Abbott, and her siblings are Jessica (born 1984), Jared (born 1988) and twins Bina and Gina (born... Nickname: Location of Salinas, California Country State County Monterey Government  - Mayor Dennis Donohue Area  - City 19 sq mi (49. ... Established by Billy Jean King, the Womens Sports Foundationis a charitable educational organization dedicated to ensuring equal access to participation and leadership opportunities for all girls and women in sports and fitness. ... Kristine Marie Lilly (born July 22, 1971 in New York City) is an American soccer player, who has been a fixture on the U.S. womens national team since 1987. ... First International Italy 1–0 USA (Jesolo, Italy; 18 August 1985) Largest win USA 12–0 Mexico (Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 18 April 1991) USA 12–0 Martinique (Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 20 April 1991) Worst defeat USA 0–4 Brazil (Hangzhou, China; 27 September 2007) World Cup Appearances 5... Lauren Elizabeth Jackson (born May 11, 1981 in Albury, New South Wales, Australia) is an Australian professional basketball player. ... The Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA) is an organization governing a professional basketball league for women in the United States. ...


Recent National Fastpitch Coaches Association (NFCA) All-Americans from the University of Tennessee include Abbott (2004-07), India Chiles (2007), Lindsay Schutzler (2005-07), Tonya Callahan (2006-07), Kristi Durant (2005-06) and Sarah Fekete (2005-06).


Facilities

UT's best-known athletic facility by far is Neyland Stadium, home to the football team, which seats over 107,000 people and is one of the country's largest facilities of its type. Neyland is currently undergoing a renovation costing over $100 million.[2] The Volunteers and Lady Vols basketball teams play in Thompson-Boling Arena, the largest arena (by capacity) ever built specifically for basketball in the United States. The former home of both basketball teams, Stokely Athletic Center, still stands and is now used by the Lady Vols volleyball program. Neyland Stadium is a sports stadium in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... Thompson-Boling Arena is a 24,535-seat multi-purpose arena on the campus of the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee. ... The Stokely Athletic Center is an on-campus arena located at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville, Tennessee. ...


The Alumni Memorial Gym was another indoor athletic facility. It was built in 1934 during a construction campaign under school president James D. Hoskins, and was replaced by the Stokely Athletics Center in 1967. The facility hosted the Southeastern Conference men's basketball tournament in 1936 and 1937 and again in 1939 and 1940. It is now used as a performing arts center and seats 1,000 spectators. The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ...


Activities

Global Finals

The University of Tennessee is the current holder of the Destination Imagination Global Finals.Destination Imagination is a problem solving competition. Global Finals are held in the last week of May every year. Thousands of people from all over the world come to participate. The Destination ImagiNation logo Destination ImagiNation (DI) is a creativity and problem solving program for kids from elementary age to college age. ...


Clubs and organizations

The University of Tennessee has over 450 registered student organizations. These groups appeal to a multitude of interests and provide a variety of experiences for those interested in service, sports, arts, social activities, government, politics, cultural issues, Greek societies, and much more.[14] A student organization is a voluntary association of students at institutions of secondary and higher education for a specific legal purpose. ...


University students are active in several student media organizations. The Daily Beacon is an editorially independent student newspaper that has been published continuously since 1906. The university operates two radio stations: student-run The Rock (formerly the Torch)[15] (WUTK-FM 90.3 MHz) and National Public Radio affiliate WUOT-FM 91.9 MHz. The university's first radio station was on the AM frequency 850 kHz, a donation from Knoxville radio station WIVK-AM/FM. The Phoenix, a literary art magazine, is published in the fall and spring semesters and showcases student artistic creativity. The Tennessee Journalist (TNJN) is an online news publication of the School of Journalism and Electronic Media and is a collaboration of regular editorial staff and student contributors, many of which receive classroom credit for their work. Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... WUTK-FM (90. ... MegaHertz (MHz) is the name given to one million (106) Hertz, a measure of frequency. ... NPR redirects here. ... An affiliate is a commercial entity with a relationship with a peer or a larger entity. ... WUOT-FM 91. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...


The Daily Beacon

The editorially independent student newspaper of the University publishes 15,000 copies a day, five days a week, and has a staff of over 100 which includes an editorial team of 14, more than 60 staff writers, photographers, copyeditors, and other staff members during the Fall and Spring semesters. The paper publishes twice a week during the summer semester (May through August) and has significantly fewer staff writers during the summer. Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ...


The publication is part of a tradition which goes back in the semi-monthly publication of The University Times-Prospectus in 1871. The Orange and White followed in 1906 as a weekly publication and was later published semi-weekly. The Daily Beacon was established 61 years later under the management of alumnus David Hall (1965) and was published four times per week. Not long after, the paper began publishing issues five times a week. It publishes approximately 180 issues per academic year while classes are in session.


Religious institutions

Numerous religious centers are located on the campus, including the Wesley Foundation (a United Methodist student center), The Baptist Collegiate Ministry, Pope John XXIII (a Catholic student center), and the Christian Student Center. Numerous other Christian clubs also exist on campus, which meet in various locations. Multiple other religions are represented as well. A Wesley Foundation is a campus ministry sponsored in full or in part by the United Methodist Church on a non-church owned and operated campus. ...


Greek life

UT is home to 17 sororities and 30 fraternities. Fifteen of these fraternities currently have on-campus fraternity houses. While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Sororities

As of 2006, UT boasts 13 National Panhellenic Conference (NPC) sororities. Chi Omega first came to UT in 1900 followed in 1902 by Alpha Omicron Pi. Both organizations remain on the campus to this day. Currently the campus claims chapters of the following NPC sororities: The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Alpha Omicron Pi (ΑΟΠ, AOII) is an international womens fraternity that was founded on January 2, 1897 at Barnard College on the campus of Columbia University in New York. ...

Sororities at UT do not have houses, but have space in the Panhellenic Building. The Panhellenic Building houses 14 of the 17 social sororities at UTK. Although the building is not a residence hall facility, each sorority has a suite consisting of a large living room, a kitchen, an office, and a storage area. According to the Tennessee Department of Health, 32% of members have scorching cases of herpes. The Panhellenic Affairs Office is located on the first floor of the building and serves as the center for coordinating all sorority activities. The office staff and student leaders are readily available to provide information concerning Panhellenic Council, any of the individual sororities, or the rush / recruitment registration process. Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Alpha Omicron Pi (ΑΟΠ, AOII) is an international womens fraternity that was founded on January 2, 1897 at Barnard College on the campus of Columbia University in New York. ... Zeta Tau Alpha (ΖΤΑ) is a womens fraternity, founded October 15, 1898 at what used to be State Female Normal School but is now known as Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Sigma Kappa (ΣΚ) is a sorority founded in 1874 at Colby College in Waterville, Maine. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Delta Zeta (ΔΖ) is a college sorority founded on October 24, 1902, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Alpha Epsilon Phi (ΑΕΦ) is a sorority and a member of the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Gamma Delta (ΑΓΔ) Founded in 1904, Alpha Gamma Delta is an international fraternity for women dedicated to academic excellence, leadership development, high ideals and sisterhood. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ...


In addition to NPC sororities, UT also has 3 National Pan Hellenic Council (NHPC) sororities: Alpha Kappa Alpha, Delta Sigma Theta, and Zeta Phi Beta. These sororities are governed by the Black Greek Letter Council. UT also has a chapter of Lambda Theta Alpha of the National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations as well as Gamma Sigma Sigma National Service Sorority. The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ... // Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc. ... Gamma Sigma Sigma (ΓΣΣ) is a national service sorority. ...

Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its free use. ... Image File history File links I took this photo and allow its free use. ... This article is about the mythological creatures. ... This article is about Volos, Greece. ... Southeastern view of the ziggurat shaped structure. ...

Fraternities

North-American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) fraternities at UT have an average size of 56 members. Sixteen campus fraternities have their own houses on campus, most of which are comprised of complete dicks. Notable alumni of the UT fraternal community include: The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...

NIC fraternities Douglas Leon Atkins (Born May 8, 1930, in Humboldt, Tennessee) is a former American Football defensive end who played for the Cleveland Browns, Chicago Bears and the New Orleans Saints. ... Howard Henry Baker, Jr. ... A Senate Majority Leader is a politician within a Senate who leads the majority party, or majority coalition, of sitting senators. ... Joshua B. Bolten, the current White House Chief of Staff. ... For other uses, see Ambassador (disambiguation). ... James L. (Jim) Clayton, Sr. ... Clayton Homes is a manufactured and modular housing company based in Knoxville, Tennessee, U.S.A. It was founded in 1966 by Jim Clayton. ... Charles W. Charlie Ergen (born May 1, 1953) is the co-founder and CEO of EchoStar Communications Corporation, the parent company of Dish Network. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Johnny Majors was a longtime College Football Head Coach and alumnus of the University of Tennessee. ... Allan Wade Houston (born April 20, 1971, in Louisville, Kentucky, U.S.) is a retired American professional basketball shooting guard, formerly the NBAs Detroit Pistons and New York Knicks. ... Van Hilleary (born June 20, 1959) is a Tennessee Republican politician. ... James Denton (born January 20, 1963) is an American film and television actor. ... Bob Corker Robert Phillips Bob Corker, Jr. ... Andrew Lamar Alexander (born July 3, 1940) is the senior United States Senator from Tennessee and a member of the Republican Party. ... The issue of Time Magazine in which Kefauvers victory in the New Hampshire primary was reported. ... James Haslam Sr. ... James Henry Jimmy Quillen (January 11, 1916–November 2, 2003) was a Republican U.S. Representative from Tennessee from 1963 to 1997. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

PFA fraternities Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ... ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) is an American fraternity. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... The Chi Phi (ΧΦ) fraternity is an American college social fraternity founded in 1824 at Princeton University, in 1858 at the University of North Carolina, and in 1860 at Hobart College, making it the oldest social collegiate fraternity in history. ... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... Delta Upsilon (ΔY) is one of the oldest international, all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities and is the first non-secret fraternity ever founded. ... FarmHouse Fraternity is an all-male international social fraternity founded at the University of Missouri in 1905. ... Kappa Alpha Order (commonly known as KA) is a collegiate Order of Knights and American social fraternity. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Phi Kappa Tau (ΦΚΤ) is a U.S. national college fraternity // Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity (commonly called Phi Tau) was founded in the Union Literary Society Hall of Miami Universitys Old Main Building in Oxford, Ohio on March 17, 1906. ... Phi Sigma Kappa (ΦΣK) is a fraternity devoted to three cardinal principles: the promotion of Brotherhood, the stimulation of Scholarship, and the development of Character. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ...

NPHC fraternities, governed by the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) ΘΤ (Theta Tau) Fraternity was founded in 1904 by four engineering students at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. ...

NALFO (National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations) Fraternities Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ...

Other Fraternities Lambda Theta Phi was founded on December 1, 1975 at Kean College in Union, New Jersey. ...

Looking westward at The University Mall.
Looking westward at The University Mall.

Phi Eta Sigma is the oldest and largest freshman honor society founded at the University of Illinois on March 22, 1923, and now has more than three hundred chapters throughout the United States and more than 800,000 members. ... Image File history File links I took this picture and allow its free use. ... Image File history File links I took this picture and allow its free use. ...

Traditions

The University of Tennessee, as the second-oldest institution of higher learning in Tennessee, the 29th oldest in the United States, and the oldest secular college west of the Appalachian Mountains, has accumulated numerous traditions over its long history. Former university historian Milton M. Klein summarizes the history behind many school traditions on his homepage. The Appalachian Mountains are a vast system of mountains in eastern North America. ...


Colors

Charles Moore, president of the university's athletic association, chose orange and white for the school colors on April 12, 1889. His inspiration is said to have come from orange and white daisies which grew on the Hill. To this day there are still orange and white flowers grown outside the University Center. Although students confirmed the colors at a special meeting in 1892, dissatisfaction caused the colors to be dropped. No other acceptable colors were agreed to, however, so the colors were reinstated one day later. Orange and white have remained the university colors since. is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1889 (MDCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Look up Daisy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Pride of the Southland Band

The Pride of the Southland Band (or simply The Pride) is UT's marching band. As one of the oldest institutions at the University, the Band partakes in many of the game day traditions. At every home game, the Pride performs the "March to the Stadium" which includes a parade sequence and climaxes when the Band stops at the bottom of the Hill and performs the "Salute to the Hill," an homage to the history and legacy of the University. The Band is known for its pregame show at the beginning of every home game, which ends with the football team running onto the field through the "Opening of the T". This is one of the most photographed moments in football.[citation needed] Something the Pride does every year is the famous "Circle Drill". It is performed at least twice a year. The Pride of the Southland in the Power T. The Pride of the Southland Marching Band is the official name of the University of Tennessees marching band. ...


Fight song

Although it is the most famous song played by the Pride, "Rocky Top" is not the official fight song for the university. "Rocky Top" was written in only ten minutes by songwriters Felice and Boudleaux Bryant in 1967. The Bryants were working in Gatlinburg on a collection of slow-tempo songs for a project for Archie Campbell and Chet Atkins. Writing the fast-paced "Rocky Top" served as a temporary diversion for them. Known elsewhere in the United States as a bluegrass tune, the song did not become immensely popular until after 1972 when the Pride used it for one of their drills. The football crowd loved the tune and its words; the more the band played it, the more people wanted it. It has now become one of UT's best-known traditions. Its popularity extends beyond the campus of the University of Tennessee; "Rocky Top" became one of the Tennessee state songs in 1982. The popularity of the song among inebriated bar crowds was such in the 1970s that in its national tours the North Carolina old-time string band, The Red Clay Ramblers, for many years performed a satirical tune informally titled, "Play 'Rocky Top' (or I'll Punch Your Lights Out)."[16] Rocky Top is an official state song of the state of Tennessee, as well as a popular fight song for the University of Tennessee Volunteers. ... Boudleaux and Felice Bryant Felice Bryant (August 7, 1925 – April 22, 2003) and Boudleaux Bryant (February 13, 1920 – June 26, 1987) were an American wife and husband country music songwriting team who were also at the forefront of the evolution of pop music. ... Gatlinburg is a city in Sevier County, Tennessee, with a total population of 3,828, as of the 2000 U.S. census. ... Archie Campbell (born November 7, 1914 in Bulls Gap, Tennessee, died August 29, 1987 in Knoxville, Tennessee) was a writer and star of Hee Haw, a popular long-running country-flavored television variety show. ... Chet Atkins Chester Burton Chet Atkins (June 20, 1924 – June 30, 2001) was an influential guitarist and record producer. ...


The official fight song is actually "Down the Field," which is played when the Pride "Opens the T" for the team to run through at the end of their famous Pregame show, as well as when the Vols score a touchdown.


Mascot

Main article: Smokey (mascot)

In 1953 the campus Pep Club sponsored a contest to have a live mascot. The hound was chosen since it is a native breed and its small stature and loud baying represent a unique combination. Announcements recruiting potential mascots in a local newspaper read, "This can't be an ordinary hound. He must be a 'Houn' Dawg' in the best sense of the word." The Rev. William C. "Bill" Brooks entered his prizewinning Bluetick Coonhound "Brooks' Blue Smokey," which won over the other eight contestants. Although he was the last hound to be introduced at the half-time contest, Smokey barked when his name was called. The students cheered and Smokey threw his head back and howled again and UT had its new mascot. The current mascot is Smokey IX. He is looked after by two student trainers from Alpha Gamma Rho, a national agricultural fraternity. The costumed Smokey Mascot. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Image:DianaHound. ... The Bluetick Coonhound is a breed of dog. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ...


Nickname

Tennessee is known as the "Volunteer State" for the overwhelming, unexpected number of Tennesseans who volunteered for duty in the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Texas Revolution (most notably the Battle of the Alamo) and especially the Mexican-American War, as well as an overwhelming number of citizens volunteering for both sides of the Civil War. A UT athletic team was dubbed the Volunteers for the first time in 1902 by the Atlanta Constitution following a football game against the Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets. The Knoxville Journal and Tribune did not use the name until 1905. By the fall of 1905 both the Journal and the then-Sentinel were using the nickname.[17] With the creation of women's athletics later in the 20th century, female athletic teams became known as the Lady Volunteers. All varsity teams continue to use their respective nicknames today, although often shortened by cheering fans to just "Vols" and "Lady Vols." This article is about military actions only. ... This article is about the U.S.–U.K. war. ... Combatants Texas Mexico Commanders Stephen F. Austin Sam Houston Antonio López de Santa Anna Martin Perfecto de Cos Strength c. ... Combatants Republic of Mexico Mexican state of Coahuila y Tejas Commanders Antonio López de Santa Anna Pérez de Lebrón William Travis† Jim Bowie† Davy Crockett† Strength 6,000 in attack (1,800 in assault-see below) 183 to 250 Casualties 650 killed 974 injured 180 killed The... Combatants United States Mexico Commanders Zachary Taylor Winfield Scott Stephen W. Kearney Antonio López de Santa Anna Mariano Arista Pedro de Ampudia José Mariá Flores Strength 78,790 soldiers 25,000–40,000 soldiers Casualties KIA: 1733 Total dead: 13,271 Wounded: 4,152 AWOL: 9,200+ 25,000... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper of Atlanta and metro Atlanta. ... The Georgia Institute of Technology, commonly known as Georgia Tech, is a public, coeducational research university, part of the University System of Georgia, and located in Atlanta, Georgia, USA, with satellite campuses in Savannah, Georgia, Metz, France, Shanghai, China, and Singapore. ... The Yellow Jackets is the name used for all of the intercollegiate athletic teams that play for the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta, Georgia. ... The Knoxville News Sentinel is a newspaper in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA covering general news. ...


Notable people

References

  1. ^ "University Endowment Tops $1 Billion", UTK.edu, 2007-10-08. Retrieved on 2007-10-10. 
  2. ^ a b About the University. UTK.edu. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  3. ^ Klein, Milton M. (1995-09-08). Brief historical sketch of the University of Tennessee. UTK.edu. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  4. ^ Author Interview with Jefferson Bass. HarperCollins.com. Retrieved on 2008-03-07.
  5. ^ (2004) "Leadership-class Computing for Science" (pdf). ORNL Review 37 (2). ISSN 0048-1262. Retrieved on 2005-11-23.
  6. ^ Spallation Neutron Source. SNS.gov. Retrieved on 2005-11-23.
  7. ^ Milligan, Tom. "UT Ranked in Top 40 Public Universities", Tennessee Today, 2005-08-19. Retrieved on 2005-11-23. 
  8. ^ Milligan, Tom. "UT Ranked in Top 40 Public Universities by U.S. News and World Report", Tennessee Today, 2006-08-18. Retrieved on 2006-11-29. 
  9. ^ Purcell, Laura. "UT Libraries Ranks Among Top Libraries in the Nation", UT Library News, 2005-06-13. Retrieved on 2006-11-29. 
  10. ^ a b The University System. Tennessee.edu. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  11. ^ About ORNL: ORNL Fact and Figures. ORNL.gov. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  12. ^ Overview. DOE Oak Ridge Office. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  13. ^ Associated Press. "Arkansas to merge men's, women's athletic programs", ESPN.com, 2007-11-15. Retrieved on 2007-11-20. 
  14. ^ Student Organizations Resource Page. UTK.edu. Retrieved on 2005-11-23.
  15. ^ 90.3 The Rock. WUTKradio.com. Retrieved on 2005-11-23.
  16. ^ Downloads by The Red Clay Ramblers. eFolkMusic.org. Retrieved on 2006-11-29.
  17. ^ Volunteer Nickname. UTK.edu. Retrieved on 2007-08-02.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 281st day of the year (282nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 66th day of the year (67th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ESPN.com is the official website of ESPN and a division of ESPN Inc. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Southeastern view of the ziggurat shaped structure. ... Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is a multiprogram science and technology national laboratory managed for the United States Department of Energy by UT-Battelle, LLC. ORNL is located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, near Knoxville. ... The University of Tennessee Press (or UT Press), founded in 1940, is a university press that is part of the University of Tennessee. ... Rocky Top is an official state song of the state of Tennessee, as well as a popular fight song for the University of Tennessee Volunteers. ... UT-Battelle is a partnership between the University of Tennessee and Battelle that manages and operates the Oak Ridge National Laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy. ... The University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC) in Memphis is part of the statewide, multi-campus University of Tennessee system, a subdivion of the Knoxville-based University of Tennessee proper. ...

External links

Official websites
Media
  • UT Alma Mater and slideshow
The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Athletic teams at The University of Alabama are known as the Crimson Tide. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... (The) LadyBacks refers to any of the womens sports teams that competes officially for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the second largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... Auburn Tigers is the name given to Auburn University athletic teams. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... LSU (Louisiana State University) is a member of the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) and the Southeastern Conference. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles (200 km) northeast of Jackson and 23 miles (37 km) west of Columbus. ... The Mississippi State Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Mississippi State University. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tennessee Today (665 words)
KNOXVILLE -- A team of researchers from around the country, including a University of Tennessee-Oak Ridge National Laboratory joint professor, has found a new process that could significantly alter the way that microchips and solar cells are made.
This level of specific atomic control could be useful in fields like nanotechnology, where the ability to control the growth of structures on an incredibly small level could allow scientists to move past a major stumbling block in the research.
Vanderbilt, the University of Minnesota and ORNL are filing a joint patent on the process and its potential applications.
University of Tennessee - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3537 words)
The University of Tennessee was chartered on September 10, 1794 as Blount College, by an act of the legislature of the Southwest Territory meeting in the territorial capital, Knoxville.
It reopened in 1820, and in 1840 was elevated to East Tennessee University.
Tennessee is known as the "Volunteer State" for the overwhelming, unexpected number of Tennesseans who volunteered for duty in the American Revolutionary War, the War of 1812, the Texas Revolution, and especially the Mexican-American War.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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