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Encyclopedia > University of St Andrews

University of St Andrews

Latin: Universitas Sancti Andreae

Motto AIEN ARISTEUEIN (Greek: Ever To Be The Best)
Established 1410-1413
Type Public university
Endowment £235 million[1]
Rector Simon Pepper
Chancellor Sir Menzies Campbell
Principal Dr Brian Lang
Staff 1,804 (all)[2]
817 (academic)[3]
Students 8,645 [4]
Undergraduates 6,760 [4]
Postgraduates 1,885 [4]
Location St Andrews, Fife, Scotland
Colours University of St Andrews
                                 

St Mary's College
Coat of arms of University of St Andrews This work is copyrighted. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Simon Pepper, OBE, was Director of the World Wildlife Fund (Scotland) from 1985-2005, and is the incoming Lord Rector of St Andrews University. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Sir Walter Menzies Campbell, CBE, QC (born 22 May 1941, Glasgow), commonly known as Ming Campbell, is a British politician. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... Brian Lang, FRSE, is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of St Andrews. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Named after Saint Andrew the Apostle, the Royal Burgh of St Andrews (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a town on the east coast of Fife, Scotland, and the home of golf. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots3 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  -  First Minister Jack McConnell... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... St Marys College The College of St Mary of the University of St Andrews, in full, the New College of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded in 1539 by Archbishop James Beaton, uncle of Cardinal David Beaton. ...

                                       

Bute Medical School
The Bute Medical School is the school of medicine at the University of St Andrews in Fife, Scotland. ...

                                 

St Leonard's College[5][6]
The United College (in full, United College of St Salvator and St Leonard) is one of the two colleges of the University of St Andrews in St Andrews, Scotland. ...

                                 
Affiliations 1994 Group
Website http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk

The University of St Andrews is the oldest university in Scotland and third oldest in the English-speaking world, having been founded between 1410 and 1413. It is a renowned centre for teaching and research, situated in the small town of St Andrews, in Fife, on the east coast of Scotland. It is one of the most prestigious universities in the UK, attracting students from over 100 countries. Independent school intake is high, but the university has an active widening participation policy. The modern library and many departments are in the town centre. The town's population of 16,000 is boosted considerably by the University's 7,000 students. It is often seen as an alternative to England's universities of Oxford and Cambridge. The 1994 Group is a coalition of smaller research-intensive universities founded to defend their interests after the larger research-intensive universities founded the Russell Group. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, images, videos and other digital assets and hosted on a particular domain or subdomain on the World Wide Web. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Motto (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity Wha daur meddle wi me?(Scots)1 Anthem (Multiple unofficial anthems) Scotlands location in Europe Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official languages English, Gaelic, Scots3 Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  -  First Minister Jack McConnell... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... March 29 - The Aragonese capture Oristano, capital of the giudicato di Arborea in Sardinia July 15 – Battle of Grunwald (also known as Tannenberg or Zalgiris). ... // March 21 - Henry V becomes King of England. ... Named after Saint Andrew the Apostle, the Royal Burgh of St Andrews (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a town on the east coast of Fife, Scotland, and the home of golf. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Independent school. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Motto (French) God and my right Anthem God Save the King (Queen) England() – on the European continent() – in the United Kingdom() Capital (and largest city) London (de facto) Official languages English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  -  Queen Queen Elizabeth II  -  Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification  -  by Athelstan 967  Area... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (usually abbreviated as Cantab. ...

Contents

History

St Salvator's Chapel, by Malcolm McFadyen
St Salvator's Chapel, by Malcolm McFadyen

The University was founded in 1410 when a charter of incorporation was bestowed upon the Augustinian priory of St Andrews Cathedral. A Papal Bull was issued in 1413 by the Avignon Pope Benedict XIII. The University grew in size quite rapidly; A pedagogy, St John's College was founded 1418-1430 [1] by Robert of Montrose and Lawrence of Lindores, St Salvator's College was established in 1450, St Leonard's College in 1511, and St Mary's College in 1537. St Mary's College was a refoundation of St Johns College. Some of these early college buildings are in use today date from this period such as St Salvator's Chapel and St Leonards College chapel. At this time, much of the teaching was of a religious nature and was conducted by clerics associated with the cathedral. The history of the University of St Andrews begins with its foundation in 1410 when a charter of incorporation was bestowed upon the Augustinian priory of St Andrews Cathedral. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... March 29 - The Aragonese capture Oristano, capital of the giudicato di Arborea in Sardinia July 15 – Battle of Grunwald (also known as Tannenberg or Zalgiris). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Augustinians, named after Saint Augustine of Hippo (died AD 430), are several Roman Catholic monastic orders and congregations of both men and women living according to a guide to religious life known as the Rule of Saint Augustine. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ... Saint Andrew is the name of several Cathedrals of the Anglican, Roman Catholic, Episcopalian and Orthodox Churches: St. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... // March 21 - Henry V becomes King of England. ... Benedict XIII, born Pedro Martínez de Luna, (b. ... There are a number of colleges with the name St. ... St Salvators College, north and east wings St Salvators College of the University of St Andrews was formed in 1450 by Bishop James Kennedy, at the site that it presently occupies on North Street, St Andrews. ... // March - French troops under Guy de Richemont besiege the English commander in France, Edmund Beaufort, Duke of Somerset, in Caen. ... St Leonards Chapel St Leonard’s College, University of St Andrews (originally ‘the College of Poor Clerks of the Church of St Andrews’) was founded in 1511 by Prior Hepburn (receiving Papal recognition by proxy in 1545), on the site of St Leonard’s hospital and church. ... 1511 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... St Marys College The College of St Mary of the University of St Andrews, in full, the New College of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded in 1539 by Archbishop James Beaton, uncle of Cardinal David Beaton. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... St Salvators Chapel (formally The Chapel of St Salvator) is one of two chapels belonging to the University of St Andrews, the other being St Leonards Chapel. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... A cleric is a member of the clergy of a religion, especially one that has trained or ordained priests, preachers, or other religious professionals. ... A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ...


From the 17th to 19th centuries, the university underwent many changes. The distinctive red gowns, which are still in use today, were adopted in 1672. Toward the end of the seventeenth century, the university considered and eventually rejected a move to Perth. In 1747, St Salvator's and St Leonards's merged to form the United College of St Salvator and St Leonard. (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events England, France, Munster and Cologne invade the United Provinces, therefore this name is know as ´het rampjaar´ (the disaster year) in the Netherlands. ... The Royal Burgh of Perth (Peairt in Scottish Gaelic) is a large burgh in central Scotland. ... Year 1747 (MDCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... St Salvators College, north and east wings St Salvators College of the University of St Andrews was formed in 1450 by Bishop James Kennedy, at the site that it presently occupies on North Street, St Andrews. ... St Leonards Chapel St Leonard’s College, University of St Andrews (originally ‘the College of Poor Clerks of the Church of St Andrews’) was founded in 1511 by Prior Hepburn (receiving Papal recognition by proxy in 1545), on the site of St Leonard’s hospital and church. ... The United College (in full, United College of St Salvator and St Leonard) is one of the two colleges of the University of St Andrews in St Andrews, Scotland. ...


During the 19th century, student numbers were very low and the university faced the possibility of closing. In the 1870s, the student population was fewer than 150, and perhaps partly in response to this, the university founded University College in Dundee in 1897, which became a centre of medical and scientific excellence. This affiliation ended in 1967 when the college, renamed Queen's College, became a separate and independent institution of the University of Dundee. The loss of teaching facilities for clinical medicine caused the university's Bute Medical School to form a new attachment with the University of Manchester. Today, the university is growing in international reputation, attracting more students than ever before. // The invention of the telephone (1876) by Alexander Graham Bell. ... For other uses see Dundee (disambiguation) Dundee is Scotlands fourth largest city, population 154 674 (2001), situated on the North bank of the Firth of Tay. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... The Bute Medical School is the school of medicine at the University of St Andrews in Fife, Scotland. ... It has been suggested that Victoria University of Manchester be merged into this article or section. ...


Reputation

It is currently listed as being the best university in Scotland, according to the Sunday Times Good University Rankings of 2006. It frequently features in the top ten of establishments in the United Kingdom as a whole and is currently listed at number 4 in the UK according to the Guardian Good University guide. It has achieved the most consistently high ratings in research assessment exercises with no subjects receiving a rating less than 4 on a grading scale from 1-5*, with 5* marking outstanding international research. The departments of English and Psychology have received a 5* in the latest exercise, and 72% of staff across the university in received a 5 or 5* rating. The Philosophical Gourmet report ranks St Andrews' graduate philosophy programme as third in the UK. The joint programme with Stirling University is ranked second in the UK and joint 13th in the world with UC Berkeley. The Philosophical Gourmet Report (also known as the Leiter Report) attempts to score and rank the university philosophy departments in the English-speaking world, based on a survey of philosophers who are nominated as evaluators by the Advisory Board of the Report. ... Looking out over Airthrey Loch on the main campus of The University of Stirling The University of Stirling is a campus university created in 1967 and is based in a custom-built campus situated on a greenfield site in the outskirts of Stirling, Scotland. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ...


Nearly eight in ten graduates obtain a First Class or an Upper Second Class Honours degree. A similar proportion enter further employment requiring a respected degree or obtaining placements for further postgraduate research. The ancient Scottish universities award Master of Arts degrees which are classified upon graduation, in contrast to Oxbridge where one becomes a Master of Arts after a certain number of years, and the rest of the UK, where graduates are awarded BAs. Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ...


Entry to the University is highly competitive; the latest UCAS figures show that there are generally eight applications for every place available, and the University did not enter Clearing at the end of the last admissions round. The standard offer of a place tends to require at a minimum AAABB at Scottish Highers for Scottish applicants, AAB at GCE A Levels for English, Welsh and Northern Irish candidates, or a score of at least 36 points on the International Baccalaureate.


Governance and administration

The "Gateway" building, built in 2000 and now used for the University's Management department
The "Gateway" building, built in 2000 and now used for the University's Management department

As with the other Ancient universities of Scotland, governance is determined by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858. This Act created three bodies: the General Council, University Court and Academic Senate (Senatus Academicus). Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1178 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1178 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The governance of the University of St Andrews is laid down in a series of Acts of Parliament (the Universities (Scotland) Acts) enacted between 1858 and 1966. ... Ancient university is a term used to describe the medieval and renaissance universities of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland that have continued to exist. ... The General Council of an ancient university in Scotland is the corporate body of all graduates and senior academics of each university. ... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ...


General Council

The General Council is a standing advisory body of all the graduates, academics and former academics of the University. It meets twice a year and appoints a Business Committee to transact business between these meetings. Its most important functions are to appoint two Assessors to the University Court and elect the University Chancellor. The General Council of the University of St Andrews is the corporate body of all graduates and senior academics of the University of St Andrews in Scotland. ... “Alumni” redirects here. ... Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... Assessor as evaluator An assessor is an expert that calculates the amounts to be paid or assessed for tax or insurance purposes. ... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


University Court

The University Court is the body responsible for administrative and financial matters, and is in effect the governing body of the University. It is chaired by the Rector, who is elected by all the matriculated students of the University. Members are appointed by the General Council, Academic Senate and Fife Council. The President of the Students' Representative Council and Director of Representation are routinely co-opted onto the Court. Several lay members are also co-opted and must include a fixed number of alumni of the University. A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... The matriculation ceremony at Oxford Matriculation refers to the formal process of entering a university, or of becoming eligible to enter by acquiring the required prior qualifications. ... The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ... Fife (Fìobh in Gaelic) is a council area of Scotland, situated between the Firth of Tay and the Firth of Forth, with landward boundaries to Perth and Kinross and Clackmannanshire. ... Scottish Students Representative Councils (SRC) were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1896 and are present at the four ancient universities of Scotland: Aberdeen, St. ... This page is a candidate to be moved to Wiktionary. ...


Academic Senate

The Academic Senate (in Latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for the University. Its members include all of the Professors of the University, certain senior Readers, a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers and three elected student Senate Representatives - one from the Arts / Divinity faculty, one from the Science / Medicine faculty and one postgraduate student . It is responsible for authorising degree programmes and issuing all degrees to graduates. Another function of the Senate is to discipline students. The President of the Senate is the University Principal. The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... A reader might be several different things, depending on the context: there are several cities in the United States named Reader a reader is a minor member of the clergy in some Christian churches a reader is a book of different pieces of writing, often by many authors, collected for... Lecturer is the name given to university teachers in most of the English-speaking world (but not at most universities in the US or Canada) who do not hold a professorship. ... Lecturer is the name given to university teachers in most of the English-speaking world (but not at most universities in the U.S. or Canada) who do not hold a professorship. ... President is (Brandon) a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ...


Faculties

The University is divided into four academic Faculties: A faculty is a division within a university. ...

Each is governed by a Faculty Council and administered by a Dean. Students apply to become members of a particular faculty, as opposed to any particular school or department. The humanities are those academic disciplines which study the human condition using methods that are largely analytic, critical, or speculative, as distinguished from the mainly empirical approaches of the natural and social sciences. ... Divinity is the academic study of Christian and other theology and religious ministry at a school, divinity school, university, or seminary. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ...


Number of students by faculty - Academic Year 2005/2006 [1]

Faculty Undergraduate Postgraduate
Arts 3,582 604
Divinity 48 50
Medicine 419 7
Science 1,731 367
Total 5,780 1,028

Office of the Principal

The Principal is the chief executive of the University and is assisted in that role by several key officers. The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... Chief Executive may refer to: Chief Executive of Hong Kong Chief Executive of Macau Chief Executive Officer This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


The current composition of the Office of the Principal is:

  • The Principal: Dr Brian Lang
  • Master of the United College and Deputy Principal: Professor Keith Brown
  • Secretary and Registrar: Mark Butler
  • Vice-Principal (Research): Professor Alan Miller
  • Vice-Principal (Learning and Teaching): Professor Ronald Piper
  • Vice-Principal (External Relations): Stephen Magee
  • Quaestor and Factor: Derek Watson
  • Assistant to the Principal: Hugh Martin

Brian Lang, FRSE, is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of St Andrews. ... The Master of the United College is a senior academic at the University of St Andrews in St Andrews, Scotland who is charged with carrying out duties as required by the Academic Senate of that University. ... A secretary is an administrative support position. ... Registrar may refer to: In education, a registrar or registry is an official in an academic institution (a college, university, or secondary school) who handles student records. ... The Quaestor at the University of St Andrews is a senior executive, member of the University Court and is responsible for the finances of the University; the equivalent of treasurer or Finance Director in other institutions. ... In Scotland a Factor (or property manager) is a person or firm charged with superintending or managing properties and estates -- sometimes where the owner or landlord is unable to or uninterested in attending to such details personally, or in tenements in which several owners of individual flats contribute to the...

Student residences

St Andrews is characterised amongst Scottish Universities as having a significant number of students in University operated accommodation. Residences include:

  • Albany Park
  • Andrew Melville Hall
  • David Russell Apartments (a new apartment complex built on the site of the now-demolished original David Russell Hall)
  • Deans Court
  • Fife Park
  • Gannochy House
  • John Burnet Hall
  • McIntosh Hall
  • New Hall
  • St Regulus Hall
  • St Salvator's Hall
    Royal & Ancient Golf Clubhouse and Hamilton Hall, by Malcolm McFadyen
  • Stanley Smith House & Angus House
  • University Hall

It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Gannochy House, John Burnet Hall, St Salvators Hall and University Hall (University of St Andrews) (Discuss) This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... The David Russell Apartments (or DRA), a large residential complex owned by the University of St Andrews was opened in its first phase in September 2003. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with David Russell Apartments. ... Deans Court Deans Court is a student hall of residence at the University of St Andrews, and arguably the oldest dwelling house in the city of St Andrews. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Former residences

In addition to the residences listed above, the University formerly also had the following residences:

  • Hamilton Hall
  • Hepburn Hall
  • Southgait Hall
  • Kinnessburn Hall
  • David Russell Hall

Hamilton Hall, St Andrews (Scotland, UK) Hamilton Hall was a hall of residence for the University of St Andrews, Scotland, between the years of 1949 and 2006. ...

Alumni

See also Category:Alumni of the University of St Andrews


Arts and media

Crispin Bonham Carter (b. ... Gavin Douglas (c. ... This article is about William Dunbar, the poet. ...   Statue of Fergusson on Edinburghs Royal Mile Robert Fergusson (September 5, 1750 - October 16, 1774), Scottish poet, son of Sir William Fergusson, a clerk in the British Linen Company, was born at Edinburgh. ... Hazel Irvine (born May 26, 1965, St. ... Sir David Lyndsay (c. ... Ian McDiarmid (born August 11, 1944) is a Tony Award-winning Scottish actor born in Carnoustie. ... Louise Minchin is a newscaster and journalist in the United Kingdom, currently presenting on BBC News 24. ... Siobhan Redmond (born August 27, 1959) is a British actress. ... Early Career Brian Dolphin Taylor is a British drummer, whose career started when he gave a friend a lift to audition as bass guitarist, for the Tom Robinson Band in 1976. ... Fay Weldon (born September 22, 1931) is a British novelist, short story writer, playwright and essayist whose work has been associated with the cause of feminism. ...

Education and academia

Sir William Eric Kinloch Anderson, KT (born 27 May 1936) is provost of Eton College. ... Walter Laing MacDonald Perry, Lord Perry of Walton (June 16, 1921 - July 17, 2003) was a distinguished academic. ... The Open University (OU) is the UKs open learning university. ... Dominic Sandbrook (born 1974) is a British historian and writer. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...

Politics and public affairs

Angie Bray is a Conservative Party politician and member of the London Assembly for West Central London. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... Malcolm Bruce Malcolm Bruce, MP (born November 17, 1944) is a Scottish Liberal Democrat politician. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Thomas Bruce, 7th Earl of Elgin and 11th Earl of Kincardine (July 20, 1766 - November 14, 1841) was a British nobleman and diplomat, known for the removal of marble sculptures from the Parthenon in Athens -- popularly known as the Elgin Marbles. ... Christopher Robert Chope OBE (born May 19, 1947) British politician and barrister. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... Barry Strachan Gardiner (born March 10, 1957, Glasgow) is a british politician, and Labour member of Parliament for Brent North. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose (1612 - 21 May 1650), was a Scottish nobleman and soldier, who initially joined the Covenanters in the Wars of the Three Kingdoms, but subsequently supported King Charles I as the English Civil War developed. ... The Viscount Dundee John Graham, 1st Viscount Dundee (c. ... Charles Edward Stuart, Bonnie Prince Charlie, wearing the Jacobite blue bonnet Jacobitism was (and, to a very limited extent, remains) the political movement dedicated to the restoration of the Stuart kings to the thrones of England and Scotland. ... Michael Cathel Fallon (born May 14, 1952, Scotland) is a British politician. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... Michael Bruce Forsyth, Baron Forsyth of Drumlean, PC, (born 16 October 1954) is a Conservative & Unionist Party politician in the United Kingdom. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... Marek Jerzy Lazarowicz, known as Mark Lazarowicz, (born Dagenham, August 8, 1953) is a Scottish politician, and Labour and Co-operative member of Parliament for Edinburgh North and Leith. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... For the recipient of the Victoria Cross see John MacGregor (VC) John Roddick Russell MacGregor, Baron MacGregor of Pulham Market, PC (born February 14, 1937), is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... Lewis George Moonie (born 25 February 1947) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... Dr (Duncan) Madsen Pirie is President of the Adam Smith Institute, and was one of three who founded the Institute in 1977. ... The Adam Smith Institute is a think tank based in the United Kingdom, named after the father of modern economics, Adam Smith. ... Lord Playfair Lyon Playfair, 1st Baron Playfair, GCB, FRS (May 1, 1818) - (May 29, 1898) was a Scottish scientist and Parliamentarian. ... This article is about the historic Liberal Party. ... Rt Hon George Reid MSP George Newlands Reid PC MSP (born 4 June 1939) is the Presiding Officer (Speaker) of the Scottish Parliament. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For the national legislative body up to 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... Alexander Elliot Anderson Salmond, known as Alex Salmond (born 31 December 1954), is a Scottish politician, National Convener (leader) of the Scottish National Party (SNP) and Member of Parliament for the constituency of Banff and Buchan. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Alex Singleton is Director-General of the Globalisation Institute, a trade and international development think tank in London. ... The Globalisation Institute is a free-market international development think tank founded in London in 2005 and much favoured by Conservative Party (UK) leader David Cameron. ... Catherine Dalling Stihler (née Catherine Dalling Taylor) (born July 30, 1973) is a British Labour Party politician. ... The Labour Party has been, since its founding in the early 20th century, the principal political party of the left in England, Scotland and Wales. ... Desmond Angus Swayne (born 20 August 1956) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... Hugo Swire MP Hugo George William Swire (born 30 November 1959) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The party logo since September 2006. ... James Wilson (September 14, 1742–August 21, 1798), was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, twice elected to the Continental Congress, a major force in the drafting of the nations Constitution, a leading legal theoretician and one of the six original justices appointed by George Washington to the... A copy of the 1823 William J. Stone reproduction of the Declaration of Independence The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies were independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...

Religion, church, and theology

Cardinal David Beaton Archbishop David Cardinal Beaton (c. ... George Buchanan. ... Rev. ... Note: Judaism commonly uses the term Tanakh. ... The Church of South India (C.S.I.) is a union of many Protestant Christian churches spread throughout South India. ... Thomas Chalmers Thomas Chalmers (March 17, 1780 - May 31, 1847), Scottish divine, was born at Anstruther in Fife. ... The Free Church of Scotland (1843-1900) was a Scottish denomination formed by the withdrawal of a large section of the established Church of Scotland in a schism known as the Disruption of 1843. ... Patrick Hamilton (1504 - February 29, 1528) was a Scottish churchman and Reformer. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Alexander Henderson Alexander Henderson (1583? – August 19, 1646) was a Scottish theologian. ... Andrew Melville (August 1, 1545_1622) was a Scottish scholar, theologian and religious reformer. ... A Minister of Tain in the Scottish Highlands, the Rev. ... Klyne Ryland Snodgrass, (1944-), American scholar Born Dec 28, 1944 in Kingsport, Tennessee. ... The Venerable Sheila Watson (born 1954) is a cleric in the Church of England. ... John Witherspoon Dr. John Witherspoon (February 5, 1723 – November 15, 1794), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... A declaration of independence is an assertion of the independence of an aspiring state or states. ...

Royalty

James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ... “Prince William” redirects here. ...

Sciences

Sir James Whyte Black, OM, FRS, FRSE, FRCP (born 14 July 1924) is a Scottish pharmacologist who invented Propranolol, synthesized Cimetidine and was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine in 1988 for these discoveries. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... James Gregory James Gregory (November 1638 – October 1675), was a Scottish mathematician and astronomer. ... Sir Walter Norman Haworth (born Chorley, Lancashire March 19, 1883 – March 19, 1950) was a British chemist who is best known for his groundbreaking work on ascorbic acid (vitamin C) whilst working at Birmingham University. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Lysergic acid diethylamide, commonly called LSD, LSD-25, or acid. ... Alan Graham MacDiarmid ONZ, (born April 24, 1927) is a chemist. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... For other people with the same name, see John Napier (disambiguation). ...

Miscellaneous

Alexander Berry (November 30, 1781- September 17, 1873) was a Scottish born surgeon, merchant and explorer who in 1822 was given a land grant of 10,000 acres (40 km²) and 100 convicts to establish the first European settlement on the south coast of New South Wales, Australia. ... For James Crichton, the recipient of the Victoria Cross, see James Crichton (VC) James Crichton (the Admirable Crichton) (1560 - 1582) was a significant Scottish scholar. ... John Honey (1781-1813) became famous as a nineteen-year-old student of the University of St Andrews. ... Chris Hoy racing for Scotland during the 2006 Commonwealth Games Chris Hoy (born March 23, 1976 in Edinburgh) is a Scottish track cyclist and Olympic Games gold and silver medal winner. ... Russell Kirk Russell Kirk (1918, Plymouth, Michigan – 29 April 1994, Mecosta, Michigan), was an American political theorist, historian, social critic, and man of letters, best known for his influence on 20th century American conservatism. ... This article deals with conservatism as a political philosophy. ... Catherine Elizabeth Kate Middleton (born 9 January 1982) is the former girlfriend of Prince William of Wales. ... HRH Prince William of Wales William Arthur Philip Louis His Royal Highness Prince William of Wales (William Arthur Philip Louis Mountbatten-Windsor) (born June 21, 1982) is a member of the British Royal Family, grandson of Queen Elizabeth II and first son of Prince Charles, the Prince of Wales. ...

Famous Rectors

In Scotland, the position of Rector exists in the four ancient universities - which are the Universities of St Andrews, Glasgow, Aberdeen and Edinburgh - as well as in the University of Dundee. The post (officially Lord Rector, but by normal use Rector alone) was made an integral part of these universities by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1889. The Rector chairs meetings of the University Court, the governing body of the university, and is elected at regular intervals by their matriculated student bodies. This role is considered by many students to be integral to their ability to shape the universities' agendas.

see Rector of University of St Andrews for a more detailed list Lord Neaves as jurist Charles Neaves (1800–1876), also known as Lord Neaves, is a Scottish theologian, jurist and writer who served as Rector of the University of Saint Andrews. ... Theology is literally rational discourse concerning God (Greek θεος, theos, God, + λογος, logos, rational discourse). By extension, it also refers to the study of other religious topics. ... A jurist is a professional who studies, develops, applies or otherwise deals with the law. ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... John Cleese as Q in Die Another Day. ... This article is about the British author. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awards in Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, Physiology or Medicine and Economics. ... Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American industrialist, businessman, a major and widely respected philanthropist, and the founder of the Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... John Stuart Mill (20th May 1806 – 8th May 1873), a British philosopher and political economist, was an influential liberal thinker of the 19th century. ... Field Marshal Lord Haig Field Marshal Douglas Haig, 1st Earl Haig, KT, GCB, OM, GCVO, KCIE, ADC (June 19, 1861 – January 28, 1928) was a British soldier and senior commander (Field Marshal) during World War I. He was commander of the British Expeditionary Force during the Battle of the Somme... Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet, Scottish author Sir James Matthew Barrie, Baronet (May 9, 1860 - June 19, 1937), more commonly known as J. M. Barrie, was a Scottish novelist and dramatist. ... Fridtjof Nansen Fridtjof Nansen (born October 10, 1861 in Oslo - died May 13, 1930 in Oslo) was a Norwegian explorer, scientist and international statesman. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequested by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... The position of Lord Rector of the University of St Andrews is elected every three years by the students at the University of St Andrews. ...


Links with the United States

The University has a strong link with the United States. Significant numbers of students matriculate from the United States (approximately 15% of university in 2005[citation needed]). Many important American figures have been associated with the university. Benjamin Franklin, Bill Bryson, golfer Bobby Jones, and most recently, Bob Dylan and Michael Douglas, have been awarded honorary degrees. Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ... William Bill McGuire Bryson, OBE, (born December 8, 1951) is a best-selling American-born author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. ... Bobby Jones won the first Grand Slam of golf in 1930. ... Bob Dylan (born Robert Allen Zimmerman, May 24, 1941) is a Grammy, Golden Globe and Academy Award-winning American singer-songwriter, author, musician, and poet who has been a major figure in popular music for five decades. ... For other people bearing this name, see Michael Douglas (disambiguation). ...


Signatories of the Declaration of Independence

Also, three of the signatories of the 1776 American Declaration of Independence attended or received degrees from St Andrews, including: Year 1776 (MDCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ...

  • James Wilson, born at Carskerdo, near Cupar (signer from the state of Pennsylvania)

Wilson attended three Scottish Universities including St Andrews, but did not earn a degree from any of them. Carrying important letters of introduction, Wilson arrived in America in 1765. He became a Latin tutor at Philadelphia College (now the University of Pennsylvania), and successfully petitioned that institution to grant him an honorary Master of Arts. James Wilson (September 14, 1742–August 21, 1798), was a signer of the Declaration of Independence, twice elected to the Continental Congress, a major force in the drafting of the nations Constitution, a leading legal theoretician and one of the six original justices appointed by George Washington to the... Location within the British Isles The Royal Burgh of Cupar is a burgh in Fife, Scotland, and is Fifes former county town, although in 1975 the administration of the newly-created Fife Regional Council was moved to Glenrothes. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ...

Witherspoon had an impressive list of credentials and was a significant public figure. He was president of the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University). Witherspoon was largely responsible for converting the institution into a success by employing Scottish educational standards. He received his Master of Arts, Bachelor of Divinity, and was made a Doctor of Divinity at the University of St Andrews. His direct descendants may include the Academy Award winning actress Reese Witherspoon, who attended the private all-girl's Harpeth Hall School and Stanford University as a literature major. John Witherspoon Dr. John Witherspoon (February 5, 1723 – November 15, 1794), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. ... Gifford may refer to: Gifford, South Carolina Gifford, Illinois Gifford, Florida Gifford Lectures Edric Frederick, The Lord Gifford This is a disambiguation page — a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... East Lothian (Lodainn an Ear in Gaelic) is one of 32 unitary council areas in Scotland, and a lieutenancy Area. ... Princeton University is a coeducational private university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ... A Master of Arts in Scotland is an undergraduate academic degree in humanities and social sciences awarded by the five ancient universities. ... A Bachelor of Divinity (BD or BDiv) is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a courses taken in the study of divinity or related disciplines, such as theology or, rarely, religious studies. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Laura Jeanne Reese Witherspoon (born March 22, 1976),[1] known simply as Reese Witherspoon, is an Academy Award-winning American actress. ... The Harpeth Hall School is a private middle school and high school for girls in Nashville, Tennessee. ... The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly known as Stanford University (or simply Stanford), is a private university located approximately 37 miles (60 kilometers) southeast of San Francisco and approximately 20 miles northwest of San José in an unincorporated area of Santa Clara County. ...

  • Benjamin Franklin, born Boston, Massachusetts (signer from the state of Pennsylvania)

In 1759 Franklin Received an honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from the University of St Andrews. Benjamin Franklin (January 17 [O.S. January 6] 1706 – April 17, 1790) was one of the most well known Founding Fathers of the United States. ...


Exchange Programs

Additionally, Emory University runs an exchange programme with St Andrews called the Bobby Jones Scholars programme, which allows for recent graduates of both universities to study at the other university. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bobby Jones won the first Grand Slam of golf in 1930. ...


University scarves

Students and staff at the University are able to wear a variety of different scarves depending on whether they are an undergraduate, post-graduate or members of either the Faculties of Divinity or Medicine. A scarf is a piece of textile worn on or near the head or around the neck for warmth, cleanliness, fashion or for religious reasons. ...


University of St Andrews

Any alumnus, student or staff member can wear a scarf of dark blue, sky blue and white:[5][6]

                                 

University of St Andrews

                                       

St Mary's College
St Marys College The College of St Mary of the University of St Andrews, in full, the New College of the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded in 1539 by Archbishop James Beaton, uncle of Cardinal David Beaton. ...

                                 

Bute Medical School
The Bute Medical School is the school of medicine at the University of St Andrews in Fife, Scotland. ...

                                 

St Leonard's College (Postgraduate) The United College (in full, United College of St Salvator and St Leonard) is one of the two colleges of the University of St Andrews in St Andrews, Scotland. ...


Student organisations

Students' Association

Main Article: University of St Andrews Students' Association

The University of St Andrews Students' Association was formed in 1983 by the adoption of the principle of closer co-operation between the Students' Representative Council (SRC) and the Students' Union. The Union was founded in 1864 as a "Common and Reading Room" and was located in the "cloister" behind St Salvator's Chapel. The Students' Union of the University of St Andrews is the oldest in Scotland. The SRC is a statutory body established in 1885 but formalised by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1889. The University of St Andrews Students Association is an organisation which represents the student body of the University of St Andrews. ... Students Representative Councils (SRC) were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1896 and are present at the five ancient universities of St Andrews, Aberdeen, Glasgow and Edinburgh as well as Dundee University. ... A students union, student government, student leadership,or student council is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ...


Societies

Students at the university form various voluntary societies for academic, social, political, religious and other reasons. Many of these are affiliated with the Students' Association. Other groups are not affiliated to the University or the Students Association, and therefore not a part of the University structure, see Independent Student Groups in St Andrews. Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... There are a number of unaffiliated groups run by students in St Andrews Newspapers The Saint, published fortnightly, is the oldest of the student publications (although it has been published under a number of titles, of which The Saint is the most recent) and has the highest circulation. ...

Bex Heath (President 2005) Alex Glover (Vice President 2005) The Bute Medical Society (BMS) of the Bute Medical School, University of St Andrews, was founded in 1915 by its first president Margaret Shirlaw with the support of Miss Mildred Clark, Calum McCrimmon, Clive Mackie Whyte, Cecily Thistlewaite, Mary Ellison... The University of St Andrews Union Debating Society is a student debating society at the University of St Andrews in Scotland. ... The Kate Kennedy Club coat of arms The Kate Kennedy Club is a historical club from the University of St Andrews. ... Founded in 2001, by Alex Singleton, Dr. Marian Tupy and Conyers Davis, the University of St Andrews Liberty Club has inherited the mantle of the University of St. ... Shinty teams which play University Shinty are clubs which play under the banner of a university. ... The Strafford Club is a private gentleman’s dining club with no fixed home that operates within the University of St Andrews. ...

Media

  • Newspapers:
    • The Saint is the longest-lasting student newspaper, published fortnightly since 1997 and tracing its roots several decades further. It is fully independent of both the Student's Union and the University, which has led to some controversy about certain articles in the past. This independence is only matched by two other student newspapers in Britain - the Cherwell in Oxford and Varsity in Cambridge.
    • In 2006, on 17 April, the "Vine" magazine (supported by the Students' Association) was re-launched. The magazine claims to generate discussion and thought throughout the student population of the town.
    • The Chihuahua, which began in 2002, was a free alternative monthly magazine in an 8-page tabloid newspaper format, known for provocative and surreal humour which is not for the easily offended. The Chihuahua's disclaimer together with use of satire sometimes allowed it to tackle issues that the Vine is unable to but it rarely received complaints about content being unsuitable (merely that sometimes it is not funny). However the issue of November 27, 2006 attracted a large number of complaints to the extent that the society that ran the magazine was shut down for the publication of an issue that was deemed to breach several laws including Obscenity and Blasphemy. The University is likely to introduce a system of guidelines for any future publication of a similar nature. The Saint reported on the story in early March.
  • Radio:
    • On the 28th of February 2005, a number of St Andrews students launched the University's first FM station broadcasting over 3 km on the 87.7 MHz frequency. The station was granted a Restricted Service Licence by OFCOM, which allowed for six hours of broadcast a day. The station had another successful run for two weeks from November 21st 2005, this time broadcasting for 24 hours a day for two weeks. The station also broadcast live 24 hours a day on the internet [2]. The radio station is now a sub-committee of the Students' Association under the name of the Broadcasting Committee. Its most recent broadcast was from the 18th November 2006 to the 8th of December of the same year. This was the longest broadcast to date and achieved record numbers of listeners. The station currently plans to relaunch for a three week period beginning on the 13th of April.[3]

The Saint is a newspaper written by, and aimed at, students of the University of St Andrews in Scotland. ... 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cherwell newspaper is a student newspaper published by and for students of Oxford University. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... Varsity is the older of Cambridge Universitys main student newspapers (The Cambridge Student is the other, younger, one). ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... April 17 is the 107th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (108th in leap years). ... For album titles with the same name, see 2002 (album). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... November 27 is the 331st day (332nd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The Saint is a newspaper written by, and aimed at, students of the University of St Andrews in Scotland. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... km redirects here. ... A megahertz (MHz) is one million (106) hertz, a measure of frequency. ... A UK Restricted Service Licence (often called an RSL), is typically granted to radio stations and television stations broadcasting within the UK to serve a local community or a special event. ... Ofcom is a regulator for communication industries in the United Kingdom. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ...

Websites

There are two official sites for the students of the university: http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk which is the University's site, and http://www.yourunion.net which is the official site for the Students' Association. The Sinner (http://www.thesinner.net) remains a popular and unofficial website for the student population.


See also

There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The position of Lord Rector of St Andrews University is elected every three years by the students at the University of St Andrews. ... The Ancient universities of Scotland are those universities founded during the medieval period, and comprise (list by year of being chartered): The University of St Andrews, founded 1411 by papal bull The University of Glasgow, founded 1451 by papal bull The University of Aberdeen, founded 1495 by papal bull (as... The University of St Andrews was founded between 1410 and 1413, being the oldest of the Ancient universities of Scotland and the third oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...

References

  1. ^ http://foi.st-andrews.ac.uk/PublicationScheme/servlet/core.generator.gblobserv?id=710#search=%22university%20st.%20andrews%20endowment%22
  2. ^ http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/publications/univ_statistics.shtml#StaffNumbers
  3. ^ http://www.st-andrews.ac.uk/publications/univ_statistics.shtml#StaffNumbers
  4. ^ a b c Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  5. ^ a b Online Catalogue > University Branded Clothing > Hats, Scarves, Ties > Scarves. University of St Andrews Students' Association Shop. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  6. ^ a b Scarves of the University of St Andrews. Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  • University of St Andrews - Facts and Figures
  • http://browse.guardian.co.uk/education?SearchBySubject=true&Subject=University+ranking&Institution=St+Andrews&Go=Go
  • R.G. Cant The University of St Andrews, A Short History (Oliver and Boyd Ltd. 1946)

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was set up in 1993 by the UK government as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in Britain. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... April 5 is the 95th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (96th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the Anno Domini era. ... April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (97th in leap years). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of St Andrews - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1803 words)
It is situated in the Royal Burgh of St Andrews, in Fife, on the east coast of Scotland.
The town's population of 16,000 is increased considerably by the University's 7,000 students.
The University of St Andrews Students' Association was formed in 1983 by the adoption of the principle of closer co-operation between the Students' Representative Council (SRC) and the Students' Union.
St Andrews - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2058 words)
Bishop Kennedy founded and richly endowed St Salvator's College in 1456; seven years later it gained the right to confer degrees in theology and philosophy, and by the end of the century was regarded as a constituent part of the university.
Currently (2006), St Andrews is part of the North East Fife Parliamentary Constituency, which is represented in the UK Parliament by Sir Menzies Campbell CBE QC MP and in the Scottish Parliament by Iain Smith MSP.
St Andrews is said to have become a bishopric in the 9th century, and when the Pictish and Scottish churches merged in 908, the primacy was transferred to it from Dunkeld, its bishops becoming thereafter known as bishops of Alban.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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