FACTOID # 18: Alaska spends more money per capita on elementary and secondary education than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of San Francisco
University of San Francisco

Motto: Pro Urbe et Universitate (Latin)
Motto in English: For City and University
Established: October 15, 1855
Type: Private, Roman Catholic
Endowment: $216 million [1]
President: Rev. Stephen A. Privett, SJ
Staff: 506
Undergraduates: 5,248
Postgraduates: 3,199
Location: San Francisco, California, United States
Campus: Urban, 55 acres (222,157 m²)
Conference: West Coast Conference
Mascot: The Don
Website: www.usfca.edu
USF academic logo

University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. USF was established as San Francisco's first institution of higher learning in 1855. It is the third oldest institution of higher learning established in California. USF rests on a hilltop in a quiet, 55-acre setting between the Presidio and Golden Gate Park and is equidistant from the Pacific Ocean and the San Francisco Bay. USF's 8,500-member student body is composed of students from 75 countries, and are ranked in the Top 15 national universities for student diversity and international student enrollment. USF is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and the School of Business and Management (SOBAM) is accredited by the AACSB. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... The Reverend Stephen Privett, S.J. is a Roman Catholic priest and member of the Society of Jesus. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... The Parade Grounds at the Presidio of San Francisco. ... Golden Gate Park, located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park. ... The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is one of six official academic bodies responsible for the accreditation of public and private universities, colleges, secondary and elementary schools in the United States and foreign institutions of American origin. ... The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ...


Because of its location on Lone Mountain, one of San Francisco's major hills, USF's nickname is "The Hilltop." Reflecting its close historical ties with the City, the University's motto is Pro Urbe et Universitate. Lone mountain is a hill in western San Francisco, and is the site of the University of San Francisco (USF). ... // A nickname is a name of an entity or thing that is not its proper name. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ...

Contents

History

Founded as Saint Ignatius Academy by the Italian Jesuits Rev. Anthony Maraschi, Rev. Joseph Bixio, and Rev. Michael Accolti in 1855, USF began life in a wood frame building along Market Street in what later became downtown San Francisco. A charter from the state of California in 1859 changed the school's name to Saint Ignatius College and granted it the power to confer degrees. The original curriculum included Greek, Spanish, Latin, English, French, Italian, algebra, arithmetic, history, geography, elocution, and bookkeeping. Father Maraschi, apart from being the college's first president, was also a professor and the college's treasurer; and served as Saint Ignatius Church's first pastor. Saint Ignatius of Loyola, also known as Ignacio (Íñigo) López de Loyola (December 24, 1491 – July 31, 1556), was the principal founder and first Superior General of the Society of Jesus, a religious order of the Catholic Church professing direct service to the Pope in terms of mission. ... Anthony Maraschi, S.J. (1820 - 1897) was an Italian-born priest of the Society of Jesus. ... Year 1855 (MDCCCLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... An F Market streetcar turns around at the foot of Market Street, in front of the Ferry Building. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Year 1859 (MDCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... This article is about the branch of mathematics. ... Arithmetic tables for children, Lausanne, 1835 Arithmetic or arithmetics (from the Greek word αριθμός = number) is the oldest and most elementary branch of mathematics, used by almost everyone, for tasks ranging from simple day-to-day counting to advanced science and business calculations. ... HIStory – Past, Present and Future, Book I is a double album by American singer Michael Jackson released in June 1995 and remains Jacksons most conflicting and controversial release. ... Elocution is proper speaking in pronunciation, grammar, style, and tone. ... Bookkeeping (also book-keeping or book keeping) is the recording of all financial transactions undertaken by an individual or organization. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      A pastor is an...


A new building was constructed in 1862 to replace the first frame building and the first degree was awarded a year later. In 1871, Joseph Neri S. J., professor of natural philosophy, displayed an electric arc light from the Market Street church. Five years later, Neri would illuminate Market Street with electric lamps for the centennial of American independence. This article is about 1862 . ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For the current in the 19th century German idealism, see Naturphilosophie Natural philosophy or the philosophy of nature, known in Latin as philosophia naturalis, is a term applied to the objective study of nature and the physical universe that was dominant before the development of modern science. ... A 3000 volt electricity arc between two nails Electricity arcs between the power rail and electrical pickup shoe on a London Underground train An electric arc can melt calcium oxide An electric arc is an electrical breakdown of a gas which produces an ongoing plasma discharge, resulting from a current...


In 1880, the college moved from Market Street to a new site on the corner of Hayes Street and Van Ness Avenue (currently occupied by the Davies Symphony Hall). 1863 saw the founding of the College Players, USF's student theater group, the oldest continuous theater group operating west of the Mississippi River and the second oldest in the United States. The third Saint Ignatius College was destroyed in the earthquake and fire of 1906 and the campus moved further westward to the corner of Hayes and Shrader Streets, close to Golden Gate Park. The college moved to its present site on the south slope of Lone Mountain, in 1927. To celebrate its diamond jubilee in 1930, Saint Ignatius College changed its name to the University of San Francisco. A male-only school for most of its history, USF became fully coeducational in 1964. In 1969, the high school division became wholly separate from the university and became St. Ignatius College Preparatory. Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Louise M. Davies Symphony Hall was built in 1980 to give the San Francisco Symphony a permanent home. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed... For the river in Canada, see Mississippi River (Ontario). ... San Francisco Earthquake redirects here. ... Golden Gate Park, located in San Francisco, California, is a large urban park. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Diamond Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 60th anniversary. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... St. ...


Today USF is organized into six academic divisions, with 7,487 students and 506 faculty members. The university also operates five regional campuses around northern California. USF is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges, and the School of Business and Management (SOBAM) is accredited by the AACSB. Northern California, sometimes referred to as NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is one of six official academic bodies responsible for the accreditation of public and private universities, colleges, secondary and elementary schools in the United States and foreign institutions of American origin. ... The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) - is the USA based body which awards accreditation following a review of the quality of Scotts site can be found at Degree programmes delivered by Management Schools. ...


In September 2005 USF admitted 161 students from Loyola University New Orleans, Xavier University of Louisiana, Tulane University, Dillard University, University of New Orleans, and University of Southern Mississippi who were displaced by Hurricane Katrina.[1] Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Xavier University of Louisiana is a historically African-American Roman Catholic University located off Carrollton Avenue in Mid-City New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Dillard University is a private, liberal arts college in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... The University of New Orleans, often locally called UNO, is a medium sized public urban university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ...


October 2005 marked the 150th anniversary of the university's founding. Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ranking

In 2008, it was on 2008 Princeton Review's Best 366 Colleges Rankings [2]


USF participates in the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU)'s University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN). Founded in 1976, the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities (NAICU) is an organization of private US colleges and universities. ... The University and College Accountability Network (U-CAN) is a network planned to compare private colleges and universities across a wide variety of characteristics. ...


Structure and degrees

The university's academic divisions (with dates of establishment):

  • College of Arts and Sciences (Originally the whole university; became a distinct entity in 1926, reorganized 1982)
  • USF College of Professional Studies (1981)
  • School of Business and Management (1947, reorganized 1999)
  • School of Education (1972)
  • School of Law (1912)
  • School of Nursing (1954)

The university offers the following degrees: Year 1926 (MCMXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1982 (MCMLXXXII) was a common year starting on Friday (link displays the 1982 Gregorian calendar). ... AUGUST 25 1981 US Marine Sean Vance is Born on the 25th of August {ear nav|1981}} Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... Year 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of San Francisco School of Law is a private law school located in San Francisco, California. ... Year 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The University of San Francisco School of Nursing is a private nursing school located in San Francisco, California. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ...

USF is governed by a Board of Trustees along with the University President, the University Chancellor, the University Provost and Vice-presidents, and the Deans. The current president (since 2000) is Rev. Stephen A. Privett, S. J. A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... Public Administration can be broadly described as the development, implementation and study of government policy. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... A Masters of Science in Nursing is an advanced degree a Registered Nurse may obtain to become an advanced practice nurse, such as a Nurse Practitioner or Clinical Nurse Specialist. ... MBA redirects here. ... The Doctor of Education degree (Ed. ... A Doctor of Science in Nursing (DSN) is an advanced-level quaternary education degree for Registered Nurses. ... J.D. redirects here. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a member of a trust, which can be set up for any of a variety of purposes, and is entrusted with the administration of property on behalf of others. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


Academic programs

The university is known for its service learning and public service efforts through its McCarthy Center and other programs. An example is the student-developed campaign funding site, whosfundingwhom.org. USF's Performing Arts and Social Justice major is the only undergraduate program of its kind in the nation.


The University requirements for the baccalaureate degree include completion of the Core Curriculum.


USF MBA program is ranked among the best 143 business schools in the world. USF School of Business and Management is ranked as one of the Best Graduate Schools in the Nation for Entrepreneurs by Entrepreneur Magazine and Princeton Review.


Student exchange programs

USF maintains formal student exchange programs with several foreign universities, notably Blackfriars, University of Newcastle upon Tyne and University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, Sophia University in Japan, Universidad Iberoamericana in Mexico, Ateneo de Manila University in the Philippines, and Pázmány Péter Catholic University in Hungary.[2] A student exchange program is a program in which a student, typically in secondary or higher education, chooses to live in a foreign country to learn, among other things, language and culture. ... and of the Blackfriars Hall College name Blackfriars Hall Latin name Aula Fratrum Praedicatorum Named after The black cappa of the Dominican Friars Established 1221 (re-established as religious house, 1921; as a hall, 1994) Sister college None Regent Very Rev. ... Newcastle University is a British university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north of England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For the Bulgarian university, see Sofia University. ... The Ibero-American University (commonly known as Ibero, Spanish: Universidad Iberoamericana) is a private higher education institution sponsored by the Society of Jesus. ... The Ateneo de Manila University (also called Ateneo de Manila or simply the Ateneo) is a private university run by the Society of Jesus in the Philippines. ... For other universities with similar names, see Pázmáneum (disambiguation) Pázmány Péter Catholic University is a public university of the Catholic Church in Hungary, recognized by the State. ...


The School of Law maintains its own exchange programs with Trinity College in Dublin, Ireland and Charles University in Prague, Czech Republic. Relevant international coursework includes the study of European Community Law, International Business Transactions, and European Constitutionalism. The latter has been taught by Vojtech Cepl, the principal drafter of the post-communist Constitution of the Czech Republic. Following his role in the Velvet Revolution of 1989, Mr. Cepl currently is a justice of the Czech Constitutional Court. For other institutions named Trinity College, see Trinity College. ... For other uses, see Dublin (disambiguation). ... The Charles University of Prague (also simply University of Prague; Czech: Univerzita Karlova; Latin: Universitas Carolina) is the oldest and most prestigious Czech university and among the oldest universities in Europe, being founded in 1340s (for the exact year, see below). ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Non-violent protesters face armed policemen The Velvet Revolution (Czech: , Slovak: ) (November 16 – December 29, 1989) refers to a non-violent revolution in Czechoslovakia that saw the overthrow of the Communist government there;[1] it is seen as one of the most important of the Revolutions of 1989. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ...


Honorary degrees

His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama, was awarded an Honorary Doctoral Degree from USF on September 5, 2003 for his lifelong work in promoting peace and compassion, and helping to bring about a more humane world. Past recipients of honorary degrees include Philippine president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo, former Korean president Kim Dae-Jung, Nobel Peace Prize laureate Shirin Ebadi, journalist Helen Thomas, and the late South African activist Stephen Biko. His Holiness Pope Benedict XVI (born 1927) His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama, Tenzin Gyatso (born 1935) His Holiness is the official style or manner of address in reference to the leaders of certain religious groups. ... (Redirected from 14th Dalai Lama) Tenzin Gyatso is the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama. ... is the 248th day of the year (249th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo (born April 5, 1947), also known by her initials G.M.A., is the 14th and current president of the Republic of the Philippines. ... South Korea, officially the Republic of Korea (ROK; Korean: Daehan Minguk (Hangul: 대한 민국; Hanja: 大韓民國)), is a country in East Asia, covering the southern half of the Korean Peninsula. ... Kim Dae-jung (born December 3, 1925) is a South Korean politician. ... The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish, Danish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... Shirin Ebadi at a press conference in November 2005. ... President George W. Bush conveys birthday wishes to reporter Helen Thomas (middle, seated) in the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room. ... Stephen Biko Stephen Bantu Biko (December 18, 1946 - September 12, 1977) was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s. ...


The campus

The view of USF from the Twin Peaks
Satellite photo of the campus, with Malloy Hall under construction
Satellite photo of the campus, with Malloy Hall under construction
Evening view of Saint Ignatius Church, University of San Francisco
Evening view of Saint Ignatius Church, University of San Francisco
War Memorial Gym interior
War Memorial Gym interior
Lone Mountain Campus

USF's main campus occupies 51 acres three blocks north of the Golden Gate Park Panhandle, on the southern slope and peak of Lone Mountain. It lies on the boundaries of three San Francisco neighborhoods: Haight-Ashbury, the Western Addition, and the Richmond District. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1518x345, 154 KB) Summary The view of the University of San Francisco from the Twin Peaks. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1518x345, 154 KB) Summary The view of the University of San Francisco from the Twin Peaks. ... The Twin Peaks. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1438x1368, 580 KB) Summary U.S. Geological Survey satellite photo of the USF campus on 2/27/2004 This image is a work of a United States Geological Survey employee, taken or made during the course of the persons official... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1438x1368, 580 KB) Summary U.S. Geological Survey satellite photo of the USF campus on 2/27/2004 This image is a work of a United States Geological Survey employee, taken or made during the course of the persons official... Image File history File links Si_tower. ... Image File history File links Si_tower. ... Image File history File linksMetadata USF_WMG.JPG Summary Interior of War Memorial Gym, University of San Francisco. ... Image File history File linksMetadata USF_WMG.JPG Summary Interior of War Memorial Gym, University of San Francisco. ... The Panhandle from Clayton Street The Panhandle is a park in San Francisco, California that forms a panhandle with Golden Gate Park. ... Categories: US geography stubs | San Francisco neighborhoods ... Western Addition is a neighborhood in San Francisco, California. ... The Richmond District is an area in the northwest of San Francisco, USA. Lying directly north of Golden Gate Park, the Richmond is bounded roughly by Fulton Street to the south, Arguello Street to the east, The Presidio and Lincoln Park to the north, and the Pacific Ocean to the...

  • Campion Hall - Named after the English martyr Edmund Campion, S. J., it formerly housed classrooms, the offices of Admissions, Financial Aid, Registrar, Academic Support Services, Academic Services, Business and Finance, Bursar, Personnel Services, several liberal arts departments, and Public Safety, most of which have since moved permanently to Lone Mountain. It is currently under extensive renovation expected to end in Summer 2008. When renovation is complete it will be renamed Kalmanovitz Hall, named after brewing magnate Paul Kalmanovitz.
  • College of Professional Studies - Formerly Lincoln University, the University acquired the building in 1999 and made it the new home of the College of Professional Studies.
  • Cowell Hall - Named after San Francisco philanthropist Samuel Cowell, Cowell Hall houses offices and classrooms for the School of Nursing and other departments, such as the school's Learning and Writing Center.
  • Fromm Hall - Home to the Fromm Institute for Lifelong Learning and provides housing for 175 female students. The building also houses XARTS, the school fine arts program's facility, with two computer labs, two studios, and offices in what used to be the building's large garage. Formerly named Xavier Hall after St. Francis Xavier, S. J., it was renamed after university benefactors Alfred and Hanna Fromm in 2003.
  • Fulton House - Upper-class housing adjacent to the USF campus that offers fully furnished living space for 12 students. The larger house accommodates nine students including one residence life staff member, the smaller house known as "the Cottage," houses three students.
  • Gillson Hall - Named after University benefactor George Gillson, Gillson Hall is a freshmen dorm that provides housing for 325 students.
  • Gleeson Library and Geschke Learning Resource Center - The university library, named for former university professor and prefect, Richard Gleeson, S. J. It contains a learning and research center named for Charles Geschke, university benefactor and co-founder of Adobe Systems, and his wife Nancy. As of the end of the 2005 school year, the library had 695,862 books, 132,316 bound volumes of periodicals, 740,863 microforms, 23,953 electronic resources (including e-books, e-journals, and reference databases), and thousands of maps, AV materials, CDs and DVDs. The library is limited to students, staff, and faculty, with some exceptions.
  • Harney Science Center - Houses classrooms, the offices of the College of Arts and Sciences and the departmental and faculty offices of the Sciences departments. Plans are in place for a new Integrated Science Center and a design firm has been selected for the construction of a new wing to Harney Science Center that will increase by 50 percent the space devoted to science education at USF and provide students and faculty with state-of-the-art facilities and equipment. The building will benefit not only science, math, and nursing majors, but all 4,200 undergraduates who take science as part of their core curriculum. The Integrated Science Center drive is among several continuing project that will carry on beyond the conclusion of The Campaign for USF.
  • Hayes-Healy Hall - Was built through donations given by Ramona Hayes Healy and John F. Healy in honor of their parents. Originally housing only women, it now is a coed freshmen dorm for 350 students.
  • Koret Health and Recreation Center - Built on the site of the old Saint Ignatius High School, this is USF's main student gym, containing exercise and recreation facilities, including an Olympic-sized pool.
  • Koret Law Center - Home of USF's School of Law, containing both the Dorainne Zief Law Library and Kendrick Hall, the original law school building.
  • Lone Mountain - Formerly Lone Mountain College, the Lone Mountain campus now houses faculty offices, classrooms, and housing for 180 students. It also houses the offices of the University President and Vice-Presidents.
  • Loyola House - Residence for the 24 members of the USF Jesuit Community. It was completed in 1999 and is located on Lone Mountain. The house was named after Saint Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuits (the Society of Jesus).
  • Loyola Village - Built in 2002, this residential complex of 136 units for faculty, staff, and students.
  • McLaren Center - Formed from Phelan Hall's west wing, McLaren houses offices and classrooms for the School of Business and Management (SOBAM). McLaren Center includes Malloy Hall, USF's newest addition.
  • Negoesco Stadium - Named after alumnus Steve Negoesco, who coached four championship men's soccer teams. It is USF's soccer stadium.
  • Pedro Arrupe Hall - Originally a nurses' residence for the old French Hospital, USF acquired and renovated the building in 2000. It now currently a residence for 110 students. Named for Pedro Arrupe, S. J., former Superior General of the Society of Jesus, it is located a few blocks west of campus.
  • Phelan Hall - Named after USF alumnus James D. Phelan, former U.S. Senator from California and mayor of San Francisco. It provides housing for 450 first and second year students of which are as well as the school radio stations KDNZ (880 AM) and KUSF (90.3 FM), the University bookstore, the San Francisco Foghorn, and the University Ministry Office.
  • School of Education - Houses the administrative offices of the School of Education as well as classrooms and Presentation Theater. Formerly Presentation High School until it was purchased by USF.
  • Saint Ignatius Church - Often mistaken as San Francisco's Roman Catholic cathedral, Saint Ignatius was completed in 1914 and is the University's spiritual home as well as a parish church for the surrounding community.
  • Ulrich Field - This athletic field was named in honor of Max Ulrich who left his estate to the school. It contains Benedetti Diamond, home field for USF's baseball team.
  • Underhill Building - Located between Lone Mountain and the School of Education, Underhill houses offices and training facilities for USF's Army ROTC unit.
  • University Center - Houses departmental and faculty offices, as well as ASUSF offices and facilities and the main student cafeteria.
  • War Memorial Gymnasium - Home court for the volleyball and men and women's basketball teams. Also houses the athletic department offices and training facilities. Dedicated to USF students and faculty killed in action in various wars.

For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Martyr (disambiguation). ... Portrait of Edmund Campion St. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Paul Kalmanovitz Paul Kalmanovitz (1905-1987) was a millionaire brewer and philanthropist best known for his ownership of the Pabst Brewing Company. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Saint Francis Xavier (Basque: San Frantzisko Xabierkoa; Spanish: San Francisco Javier; Portuguese: São Francisco Xavier; Chinese: 聖方濟各沙勿略) (7 April 1506 - 2 December 1552) was a Spanish pioneering Roman Catholic Christian missionary and co-founder of the Society of Jesus (Jesuit Order). ... A benefactor is a person or other entity providing money or other benefits to another; the person receiving them is called a beneficiary. ... A prefect (from the Latin praefectus, perfect participle of praeficere: make in front, i. ... Charles Geschke Charles M. Chuck Geschke (b. ... Adobe Systems (pronounced a-DOE-bee IPA: ) (NASDAQ: ADBE) (LSE: ABS) is an American computer software company headquartered in San Jose, California, USA. Adobe was founded in December 1982[1] by John Warnock and Charles Geschke, who established the company after leaving Xerox PARC in order to develop and sell... An ebook is an electronic (or digital) version of a book. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Negoesco Stadium is a stadium located in San Francisco, California, on the campus of University of San Francisco and is the home field for the mens and womens soccer teams. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Fr. ... Seal of the Society of Jesus. ... James Duval Phelan (April 20, 1861 San Francisco, California - August 7, 1930) was an American politician and banker. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... </gallery> KUSF 90. ... The San Francisco Foghorn is the official student newspaper at the University of San Francisco. ... Evening view of Saint Ignatius Church, University of San Francisco. ... For other uses, see Cathedral (disambiguation). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... The United States Army is the largest, and by some standards oldest, established branch of the armed forces of the United States and is one of seven uniformed services. ... The Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC) is a training program of the United States armed forces present on college campuses to recruit and educate commissioned officers. ... War Memorial Gym interior. ...

Athletics

Main article: San Francisco Dons
San Francisco Dons logo

The university mascot is the Don and USF's athletic teams compete in NCAA Division I with the West Coast Conference. USF is one of the charter members of the WCC, along with local rivals Santa Clara University and Saint Mary's College of California. USF's athletic teams were previously known as the Gray Fog. USF's colors are green and gold. The San Francisco Dons is the nickname of the athletic teams at the University of San Francisco (USF). ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Don (usually preceded in English by the), derived from Latin Dominus, is a Spanish (pron. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The West Coast Conference is an NCAA collegiate athletic conference consisting of eight member schools in California, Oregon, and Washington. ... Santa Clara University is a private, co-educational Jesuit-affiliated university located in Santa Clara, California. ... Saint Marys College of California is a private, coeducational college located in Moraga, California, United States. ... For other uses, see Green (disambiguation). ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ...


The 1951 University of San Francisco Dons football team was believed by many to be one of the greatest, if not the greatest, college football teams to ever play the game. The 1951 squad went undefeated and the team boasted ten future NFL players, five future NFL Pro-Bowlers, and three future members of the NFL Hall of Fame—a record for one college team. Even the future NFL Commissioner, Pete Rozelle, played a role as the Dons' Athletic Publicist. At the height of their success, the team experienced one of the greatest snubs in college football history. Due to the team having two African-American star players in Ollie Matson and Burl Toler (Toler went on to become the first African-American official in the NFL), they were not invited to play in any of the college football bowl games. The SEC (Southeastern Conference), in 1951, would not schedule teams with "Negro players," and the Orange Bowl invited the USF squad to play, minus Toler and Matson. Here is a list of some of the players from that team who went to the NFL... Ollie Matson, Gino Marchetti, Bob St. Clair, Dick Stanfel, Ed Brown, Lou Stephens, Burl Toler, Joe Scudero, Roy Barni, Mike Mergen, Merrill Peacock, Ralph Thomas



USF won the 1955 & 1956 Men's Basketball NCAA National Championships, going undefeated in the 1956 season. NBA Hall of Famer Bill Russell and K.C. Jones starred on those teams. This article is about the basketball player. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ...


On December 26, 2007, the university hired 798-win coach Eddie Sutton to replace Jessie Evans. Sutton got his 800th career win as a college basketball head coach when the Dons beat Pepperdine, 85-82.


Notable instructors

  • Dr. John Veitch, Chairman of the Department of Economics and professor of Economics and Financial Analysis.
  • Dr. Man-lui Lau is a professor of Economics, specializing in Mathematical Economics and Financial Derivatives.
  • Dr. Heinz Weihrich, professor of management at the School of Business and Management, notable for his development of the TOWS Matrix (a variation to the SWOT Analysis).
  • Jean Marc Fullsack Executive Chef in the Hospitality Management. The first Guest chef with Hurbert Keller to cook for a President (Clinton) he also visited 2 more times later on by himself. The First Guest Chef to Cook for 2 out of 3 U.S Civic Branches (President, House and Senate), Cook in Camp David, Navy Mess, and Air Force one
  • Manuel Vargas One of the leading philosophers in the field of philosophy of action.
  • David Batsone, Author of Not for Sale: The Return of the Global Slave Trade--and How We Can Fight It

Dr. John M. Veitch, Ph. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Financial analysis refers to an assessment of the viability, stability and profitability of a business, sub-business or project. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Mathematical economics is the sub-field of economics that explores the mathematical aspects of economic systems. ... Derivatives traders at the Chicago Board of Trade. ... SWOT Analysis, is a strategic planning tool used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or in a business venture. ... SWOT Analysis, is a strategic planning tool used to evaluate the Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats involved in a project or in a business venture. ... Philosophy of action is chiefly concerned with human action, intending to distinguish between activity and passivity, voluntary, intentional, culpable and involuntary actions, and related question. ...

Notable alumni

Joe Rosenthal at Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima
Joe Rosenthal at Mount Suribachi, Iwo Jima

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x2000, 1126 KB) Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) More information about Joe Rosenthal can be found on US Marine Corp website. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x2000, 1126 KB) Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) More information about Joe Rosenthal can be found on US Marine Corp website. ... Iwo Jima (Japanese 硫黄島 Iōjima, meaning sulfur island) is a volcanic island in Japan, part of the Volcano Islands (also known as the Ogasawara Islands), approximately 650 miles (1046 km) south of Tokyo (24. ... For other uses, see Iwo Jima (disambiguation). ... Angela Alioto is a San Francisco politician. ... Ralph Barbieri is a sports radio personality in San Francisco, California. ... This December 2006 does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Gordon Bowker is an American entrepreneur. ... For other uses of Starbuck, see Starbuck. ... James William Bill Cartwright (born July 30, 1957 in Lodi, California) is a retired American NBA basketball player, a 71 (2. ... NBA redirects here. ... Wesley Chesbro was a State Senator from Californias 2nd district from 1998 until 2006. ... An editor has expressed a concern that the subject of the article does not satisfy one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: If you are familiar with the subject matter, please expand the article to establish its notability, citing reliable sources, so as to avoid it being considered... Justices of the Supreme Court of California (circa May 2005). ... Alfred Chuang is the founder and CEO of BEA Systems. ... BEA Systems, Inc. ... Jermaine Clark (Born September 29, 1976 in Berkeley, CA) is a former Major League Baseball player who debuted on April 3, 2001 with the Detroit Tigers. ... This article is about the sport. ... Bjørn Dahl is a Norwegian footballer from Os, Norway. ... SK Brann (most often called Brann, sometimes (incorrectly) Brann Bergen) is a Norwegian football club from the city of Bergen. ... Troy Dayak (born January 21, 1971 in Walnut Creek, California) is an American soccer player who plays as central fullback for the San Jose Earthquakes of Major League Soccer. ... Soccer redirects here. ... Keith Dorney (born December 3, 1957 in Allentown, Pennsylvania) is a former offensive lineman for the National Football Leagues Detroit Lions. ... City Detroit, Michigan Team colors Honolulu Blue, Silver, and Black Head Coach Rod Marinelli Owner William Clay Ford, Sr. ... Heather Fong is the first female chief of police for San Francisco. ... Michael Franti (born April 21, 1966, in Oakland, California) is an American poet, musician, and composer of African, American Indian, Italian, and German descent. ... Jesse William Foppert [FAH-pert] (born July 10, 1980 in Reading, PA) is an right-handed pitching prospect for the Seattle Mariners. ... This article is about the sport. ... Delia Gallagher on CNN. Delia Buckley Gallagher (Born 11 March 1970) is CNN’s Faith and Values Correspondent. ... Sir John Paul Getty KBE (September 7, 1932 – April 17, 2003) was a wealthy American-born British philanthropist and book-collector. ... Son of business titan J. Paul Getty (d. ... As I See It, J. Paul Getty Autobiography Jean Paul Getty (December 15, 1892 – June 6, 1976) was an American industrialist and founder of the Getty Oil Company. ... Sharon Stone, Mayor Gavin Newsom and Kimberly Guilfoyle Newsom at the NCLR Spirit Awards, San Francisco, April 24, 2004. ... Gavin Christopher Newsom (born October 10, 1967) is the 42nd Mayor of San Francisco, California and a member of the Democratic Party. ... K.C. Jones (born May 25, 1932 in Taylor, Texas) is a former pro basketball player and coach. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Caltrans logo The soaring ramps in the stack interchanges favored by Caltrans often provide stunning views. ... Gino John Marchetti (born January 2, 1927, Smithers, West Virginia) is a former professional American football player in the National Football League. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Oliver Adrian Matson (born May 1, 1930 in Trinity, Texas) is a former professional American football running back who played in the National Football League, in 1952 and from 1954 to 1966. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Leo Tarcissus McCarthy (born August 15, 1930) is a Democratic politician and businessman. ... Stephen Negoesco (September 12, 1925-) is a Romanian-American former soccer player and coach. ... Paul S. Otellini (born October 12, 1950) is Intel Corporations fifth Chief Executive Officer. ... Intel Corporation (NASDAQ: INTC, SEHK: 4335), founded in 1968 as Integrated Electronics Corporation, is an American multinational corporation that is best known for designing and manufacturing microprocessors and specialized integrated circuits. ... James Duval Phelan (April 20, 1861 San Francisco, California - August 7, 1930) was an American politician and banker. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... With the U.S. fleet off Iwo Jima in the background, Joe Rosenthal strikes a pose on the summit of Mount Suribachi Joe Rosenthal (October 9, 1911 – August 20, 2006) was an American photographer who received the Pulitzer Prize for his iconic World War II photograph Raising the Flag on... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Alvin Ray Pete Rozelle (March 1, 1926–December 6, 1996) was the commissioner of the National Football League (NFL) from January 1960 to November 1989, when he retired from office. ... NFL redirects here. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... This article is about the basketball player. ... Basketball Hall of Fame Logo The Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame honors players who have shown exceptional skill at basketball, all-time great coaches and referees, and other major contributors to the game. ... Pierre Salinger. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... Type Upper House President of the Senate Richard B. Cheney, R since January 20, 2001 President pro tempore Robert C. Byrd, D since January 4, 2007 Members 100 Political groups Democratic Party Republican Party Last elections November 7, 2006 Meeting place Senate Chamber United States Capitol Washington, DC United States... Philip Arnold Smith (born April 22, 1952 in San Francisco) is a former American basketball player. ... NBA redirects here. ... Robert Bruce St. ... The Pro Football Hall of Fame is the hall of fame of the National Football League (NFL). ... Alejandro Toledo (Alejandro Celestino Toledo Manrique) (born 28 March 1946) is a Peruvian politician. ...

University Presidents (1855 - Present)

Bust of Anthony Maraschi, S.J in front of Gleeson Library
Bust of Anthony Maraschi, S.J in front of Gleeson Library
  1. Anthony Maraschi, S. J. (1855-1862)
  2. Nicholas Congiato, S. J. (1862-1865)
  3. Burchard Villiger, S. J. (1865-1866)
  4. Nicolas Congiato, S. J. (1866-1869)
  5. Joseph Bayma, S. J. (1869-1873)
  6. Aloysius Masnata, S. J. (1873-1876)
  7. John Pinasco, S. J. (1876-1880)
  8. Robert E. Kenna, S. J. (1880-1883)
  9. Joseph C. Sasia, S. J. (1883-1887)
  10. Henry Imoda, S. J. (1887-1893)
  11. Edward P. Allen, S. J. (1893-1896)
  12. John P. Frieden, S. J. (1896-1908)
  13. Joseph C. Sasia, S. J. (1908-1911)
  14. Albert F. Trivelli, S. J. (1911-1915)
  15. Patrick J. Foote, S. J. (1915-1919)
  16. Pius L. Moore, S. J. (1919-1925)
  17. Edward J. Whelan, S. J. (1925-1932)
  18. William I. Lonergan, S. J. (1932-1934)
  19. Harold E. Ring, S. J. (1934-1938)
  20. William J. Dunne, S. J. (1938-1954)
  21. John F. X. Connolly, S. J. (1954-1963)
  22. Charles W. Dullea, S. J. (1963-1969)
  23. Albert R. Jonsen, S. J. (1969-1972)
  24. William C. Mc Innes, S. J. (1972-1976)
  25. John Lo Schiavo, S. J. (1977-1991)
  26. John P. Schlegel, S. J. (1991-2000)
  27. Stephen A. Privett, S. J. (2000- )

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bust of Father Anthony Maraschi, S.J. on the University of San Francisco campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 150 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Bust of Father Anthony Maraschi, S.J. on the University of San Francisco campus. ... Anthony Maraschi, S.J. (1820 - 1897) was an Italian-born priest of the Society of Jesus. ... The Reverend Nicholas Congiato, S.J., (14 September 1816 - 10 May 1897) was born in Cagliari, Sardinia and entered the Society of Jesus, an order of the Roman Catholic Church, when he was fourteen years of age. ... Joseph Bayma (born November, 1816 in Piedmont, Italy; died February 7, 1892 at Santa Clara, California) was a mathematician, philosopher, and scientist. ... Rev. ... The Reverend Stephen Privett, S.J. is a Roman Catholic priest and member of the Society of Jesus. ...

References

  1. ^ Part One
  2. ^ http://www.princetonreview.com/college/research/rankings/rankingsBest.asp
  • John B. McGloin, S. J. (1972) Jesuits by the Golden Gate: The Society of Jesus in San Francisco, 1849-1969. San Francisco: University of San Francisco Press.
  • Alan Ziajka, Ph.D. (2005) Legacy & Promise: 150 Years of Jesuit Education at the University of San Francisco. San Francisco: USF Office of Publications
  • The University of San Francisco General Catalog 2003-2005.

External links


Coordinates: 37°46′46″N 122°27′07″W / 37.77944, -122.45194 San Francisco redirects here. ... City College of San Francisco, or CCSF, is a two-year community college in San Francisco, California. ... This article is about New College of California. ... San Francisco State University (commonly referred to as San Francisco State, SF State, State and SFSU) is a public university located in the southwestern San Francisco, California, bordering Lake Merced and Lowell High School, near Fort Funston and Daly City, near the San Mateo County line. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_San_Francisco,_California. ... The Academy of Art University, a for-profit institution owned by the Stephens Institute, was founded in San Francisco in 1929 by Richard S. Stephens. ... // The Art Institute of California - San Francisco (or AICA-SF) is a part of EDMCs system of vocational institutions. ... Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (formerly California College of Arts and Crafts) is a regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in Oakland and San Francisco, California, USA. It is one of the premier fine arts and design institutions in the United States. ... California Culinary Academy in San Francisco, California offers Le Cordon Bleu culinary and hospitality management training. ... San Francisco Conservatory of Music, founded in 1917, is a music school, with enrollment of about collegiate 300 students. ... Founded in 1871, the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is one of the U.S.’s older and more prestigious schools of higher education in contemporary art. ... Alliant International University is an independent, not-for-profit, upper-division university formed in July 2001 as a result of a merger between California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP) and United States International University (USIU). ... The California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) is a private graduate school founded in 1968 and based in San Francisco, California with two main schools—the School of Professional Psychology and the School of Consciousness and Transformation. ... Golden Gate University is a private university that was founded as the night school arm of the San Francisco YMCA in 1853. ... The Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry is a school of dentistry located in the Pacific Heights area of the United States city of San Francisco. ... San Francisco Law School is a private, non-profit law school in San Francisco, California. ... Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center, a San Francisco, California based distance learning institution (originally founded in 1971 as the Humanistic Psychology Institute), is geared to providing a personalized, mentored educational experience for graduate students. ... The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is one of the worlds leading centers of health sciences research, patient care, and education. ... University of California, Hastings College of the Law is a law school located in downtown San Francisco, California. ... The Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities (AJCU) is a consortium of the 28 Jesuit colleges and universities and two theological centers in the United States committed to advancing academic excellence by promoting and coordinating collaborative activities, sharing resources, advocating and representing the work of Jesuit higher education at the... Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... Canisius College (pronounced IPA: ) is a private Catholic college in the Hamlin Park district of north-central Buffalo, New York. ... Not to be confused with Holy Cross College (Indiana) or other similarly named Holy Cross Colleges. ... Creighton University is a Jesuit, Catholic university located in Omaha, Nebraska, United States of America. ... University of Detroit Mercy is the largest and most comprehensive Catholic University in Michigan. ... Main Entrance Fairfield University is a private, co-educational undergraduate and masters level university located in Fairfield, Connecticut, in the New England region of the United States. ... Fordham University is a private, coeducational research university[3] in the United States, with three campuses located in and around New York City. ... Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Father John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ... Gonzaga University is a private Catholic university located in Spokane, Washington. ... John Carroll University is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the greater Cleveland, Ohio area in the United States. ... Le Moyne College is a private, four-year Jesuit college of approximately 2,300 undergraduate students that balances a comprehensive liberal arts education with preparation for specific career paths or graduate study. ... A garden sign welcomes residents and visitors to Rogers Park as home of Loyola University Chicago. ... Loyola College in Maryland, formerly Loyola College, is a private, coeducational university in Baltimore, Maryland, United States, affiliated with the Society of Jesus and the Roman Catholic Church. ... Loyola Marymount University (LMU) is a comprehensive co-educational private Roman Catholic Jesuit university in Los Angeles, California, USA. The University is one of 28 member institutions of the Association of Jesuit Colleges and Universities and one of five Marymount institutions of higher education. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Marquette University is a private, coeducational, Jesuit, Roman Catholic university located in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, in the United States of America. ... Regis University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... This article is about Rockhurst University. ... This article is about the university in the United States. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... Saint Peters College is a private, coeducational Roman Catholic college in the United States. ... Santa Clara University is a private, co-educational Jesuit-affiliated university located in Santa Clara, California. ... The University of Scranton is a private, co-educational Jesuit university, located in Scranton, Pennsylvania, in the northeast region of the state. ... Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. ... For the former Mansfield College (University of Oxford), see Spring Hill College, Birmingham. ... Wheeling Jesuit University is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic university in the United States. ... For the school in New Orleans, see Xavier University of Louisiana. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of San Francisco - definition of University of San Francisco in Encyclopedia (679 words)
USF is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges.
The university mascot is the Don and USF's athletic teams compete in NCAA Division 1 with the West Coast Conference.
USF athletics have won nine collegiate titles: three in basketball, five in soccer (including a co-championship with Penn State in 1949) and an individual title in tennis.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m