FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of Princeton
Princeton University
Princeton University Coat of Arms
Motto Dei sub numine viget
(Under God's power she flourishes)
Established 1746
School type Private
President Shirley M. Tilghman
Location Princeton, New Jersey, USA
Campus Suburban, 600 acres (2.4 km²)
(Princeton Borough and Township)
Enrollment 4,635 undergraduate,
1,975 graduate
Faculty 1,103
Mascot Tiger
Endowment $9.9 billion
Homepage www.princeton.edu

For other Princetons, see Princeton. Most of them are named after the University. Princeton University shield This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... Events January 8 - Bonnie Prince Charlie occupies Stirling April 16 - Battle of Culloden brings an end to the Jacobite Risings October 22 - The College of New Jersey is founded (it becomes Princeton University in 1896) October 28 - An earthquake demolishes Lima and Callao, in Peru Catharine de Ricci (born 1522... Private schools are schools not administered by local or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public funds. ... Shirley Tilghman (born September 17, 1946) (photo) succeeded Harold Shapiro as President of Princeton University in 2001. ... Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. ... State nickname: The Garden State Other U.S. States Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D) Official languages None defined Area 22,608 km² (47th)  - Land 19,231 km²  - Water 3,378 km² (14. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An acre is a measure of land area in Imperial units or U.S. customary units. ... A kilometre (American spelling: kilometer, symbol: km) is a unit of length equal to 1000 metres (from the Greek words khilia = thousand and metro = count/measure). ... Tiger Uppercut (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family, one of four big cats that belong to the Panthera genus, and the largest of all cats, living or extinct. ... Princeton University Mascot Logo http://www. ... The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... Princeton is the name of several places in the United States of America: Princeton, Florida Princeton, Illinois Princeton, Indiana Princeton, Iowa Princeton, Kansas Princeton, Kentucky Princeton, Louisiana Princeton, Maine Princeton, Massachusetts Princeton, Minnesota Princeton, Missouri Princeton, New Jersey Princeton, North Carolina Princeton, South Carolina Princeton, Texas Princeton, West Virginia Princeton...


Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the United States. One of the nation's foremost universities, Princeton has, in addition to its noted undergraduate college and graduate school, important schools of architecture, engineering, and public and international affairs. Research is carried on in many areas, including plasma physics, meteorology, and jet propulsion. The Forestal Campus has facilities for plasma physics and meteorological research. The university is affiliated with the Brookhaven National Laboratories. The Harvey S. Firestone Library (opened 1948) and the art museum house many outstanding collections. It was founded as the College of New Jersey in 1746, and was originally located in Elizabeth, New Jersey. The school moved to Princeton in 1756. The name was officially changed to "Princeton University" in 1896. While originally a Presbyterian institution, the university is now non-sectarian and makes no religious demands on its students. Princeton, one of the eight schools in the Ivy League, is consistently placed at the top of college and university rankings. Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. ... Nine institutions of higher education, sometimes called colonial colleges, were chartered in the American Colonies before the American Revolution (1775–1783). ... Higher education is education provided by universities and other institutions that award academic degrees, such as university colleges, and liberal arts colleges. ... Architecture (in Greek αρχή = first and τέχνη = craftsmanship) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ... Licensure and Qualifications for the Practice of Engineering The Engineers Ring The origin of then Engineers Ring Engineering Disasters and Learning from Failure American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) ASEE engineering profile (2003) PDF EngineersEdge GlobalSpec Categories: Architecture and engineering occupations | Engineering ... Public is of or pertaining to the people; belonging to the people; relating to, or affecting, a nation, state, or community; opposed to private; as, the public treasury, a road or lake Public also refers to the general body of mankind, or of a nation, state, or community; the people... For more information on international affairs, see one of the following links: Diplomacy Foreign affairs International relations This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Cumulus clouds This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Aerial view of Brookhaven National Laboratory. ... Events January 8 - Bonnie Prince Charlie occupies Stirling April 16 - Battle of Culloden brings an end to the Jacobite Risings October 22 - The College of New Jersey is founded (it becomes Princeton University in 1896) October 28 - An earthquake demolishes Lima and Callao, in Peru Catharine de Ricci (born 1522... Elizabeth, as seen from Bayonne, New Jersey across Newark Bay. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... The Ivy League is an athletics association, founded in 1954, of eight American universities; it is named after the ivy plants traditionally covering their buildings. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of educational institutions in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...


Shirley Tilghman is the current president of Princeton University. Shirley Tilghman (born September 17, 1946) (photo) succeeded Harold Shapiro as President of Princeton University in 2001. ...

Contents


History of the University

Established by the “New LightPresbyterians, Princeton was originally intended to train ministers. The college opened at Elizabeth, New Jersey, under the presidency of Jonathan Dickinson as the College of New Jersey. (It was proposed to name it for the colonial Governor, Jonathan Belcher, but he declined.) Its second president was the father of Aaron Burr; the third was Jonathan Edwards. In 1756 the college moved to Princeton, New Jersey. The First Great Awakening was a religious movement among American colonial Protestants in the 1730s and 1740s. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Elizabeth, as seen from Bayonne, New Jersey across Newark Bay. ... one of the earlier names for Princeton University Trenton State College is now known as The College of New Jersey This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Vice President Aaron Burr Alternate meaning: Rev. ... Jonathan Edwards is the name of several individuals: An American theologian in the 18th century; see Jonathan Edwards (theology). ... Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. ...



From the time of the move to Princeton in 1756 until the construction of Stanhope Hall in 1803, the University's sole building was Nassau Hall, named for William III of England of the House of Orange-Nassau. During the American Revolution, Princeton was occupied by both sides, and the college's buildings were heavily damaged. The Battle of Princeton, fought in a nearby field in January of 1777, proved to be a decisive victory for General George Washington and his troops. Two of Princeton's leading citizens signed the Declaration of Independence, and during the summer of 1783, the Continental Congress met in Nassau Hall, making Princeton the country's capital for four months. The much-abused landmark survived bombardment with cannonballs in the Revolutionary War when General Washington struggled to wrest the building from British control, as well as later fires that left only its walls standing 1802 and 1855, and innumerable minor insults. Rebuilt by Joseph Henry Latrobe, John Notman, and John Witherspoon, the modern Nassau Hall has been much revised and expanded from the Robert Smith-designed original. Over the centuries, its role shifted from an all-purpose building, comprising office, dormitory, library, and classroom space, to classrooms only, to its present role as the administrative center of the university. (Princeton Companion) Nassau Hall is the main administrative building of Princeton University, in Princeton, New Jersey. ... For other men named William of Orange, see William of Orange (disambiguation) William III of England (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland, William Henry and William of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and the Holy Roman Empires Prince of Orange from his... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch Oranje-Nassau), is a family that has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of the Fatherland) organised the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule, which after... Battle of Princeton -- During the American Revolutionary War Lt. ... January is the first month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... 1777 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Order: 1st President Vice President: John Adams Term of office: April 30, 1789 – March 4, 1797 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: John Adams Date of birth: February 22, 1732 Place of birth: Westmoreland, Virginia Date of death: December 14, 1799 Place of death: Mount Vernon, Virginia First Lady: Martha Washington... A declaration of independence is a proclamation of the independence of a newly formed or reformed independent state, usually from a part or the whole of the territory of another nation, or a document containing such a declaration. ... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The Continental Congress was the federal legislature of the Thirteen Colonies and later of the United States from 1774 to 1789, a period that included the American Revolutionary War and the Articles of Confederation. ... cannonball primarily the ammunition for a cannon. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen of her North American colonies. ... Order: 1st President Vice President: John Adams Term of office: April 30, 1789 – March 4, 1797 Preceded by: None Succeeded by: John Adams Date of birth: February 22, 1732 Place of birth: Westmoreland, Virginia Date of death: December 14, 1799 Place of death: Mount Vernon, Virginia First Lady: Martha Washington... John Witherspoon (February 15, 1723–November 15, 1794), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. ... Robert Smith or Bob Smith is a common name. ... A typical American college dorm room A dormitory or dorm is a place to sleep. ... Modern-style library In its traditional sense, a library is a collection of books and periodicals. ...


The Princeton Theological Seminary was separated from Princeton in 1812, since the Presbyterians wanted their ministers to have more theological training, and the faculty and students would be content with less. This reduced the student body and the external support for Princeton for some time. This article or section should include material from Princeton Seminary Princeton Theological Seminary is a professional and graduate school operated by the Presbyterian Church USA in Princeton, New Jersey. ...

Nassau Hall, the University's oldest building. Note the lion sculptures beside the steps.
Nassau Hall, the University's oldest building. Note the lion sculptures beside the steps.

The university was arguably an obscure backwater when President James McCosh took office in 1868. During his two decades in power, he overhauled the curriculum, oversaw an expansion of inquiry into the sciences, and supervised the addition of a number of buildings in the High Victorian Gothic style to the campus. (Princeton Companion) The oft-photographed McCosh Hall is named in his honor. Nassau Hall at Princeton University. ... Nassau Hall at Princeton University. ... James McCosh (April 1, 1811 - November 16, 1894) was a Scottish philosophical writer. ... 1868 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


In 1896, the college officially changed its name from the College of New Jersey to Princeton University to honor the town in which it resided. During this year, the College also underwent large expansion and officially became a university. Under Woodrow Wilson, Princeton introduced the preceptorial system (1905), a then-unique concept that replaced the standard lecture method of teaching with a more personal form where small groups of students, or precepts, could interact with a single instructor, or preceptor, in their field of interest. 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... one of the earlier names for Princeton University Trenton State College is now known as The College of New Jersey This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Order: 28th President Vice President: Thomas R. Marshall Term of office: March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921 Preceded by: William Howard Taft Succeeded by: Warren G. Harding Date of birth: December 28, 1856 Place of birth: Staunton, Virginia Date of death: February 3, 1924 Place of death: Washington, D.C...


In 1930, the Institute for Advanced Study, not affiliated with the University, was founded in Princeton and became the first residential institute for scholars in the country, with Albert Einstein appointed as one of its first professors. The 20th century has seen an influx of scholars, research personnel, and corporations to Princeton from all parts of the world. 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Fuld Hall The Institute for Advanced Study is a private institution in Princeton Township, New Jersey, designed to foster pure cutting-edge research by scientists in a variety of fields without the complications of teaching or funding, or the agendas of sponsorship. ... A scholar is either a student or someone who has achieved a mastery of some academic discipline. ... Albert Einstein, by Yousuf Karsh Albert Einstein (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born American theoretical physicist who is widely regarded as the greatest scientist of the 20th century. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


In 1969, Princeton University first admitted women as undergraduates. In 1887, the university had actually maintained and staffed a sister coIlege in the town of Princeton on Evelyn and Nassau streets, called the Evelyn College for Women, which was closed after roughly a decade of operation. Years later the administration decided to admit women and turned to the issue of transforming the school's operations and facilities into a female-friendly campus. The administration barely finished these plans by April 1969, when the admission's office had to start mailing out its acceptance letters. Its five-year coeducation plan provided $7.8 million for the development of new facilities that would eventually house and educate 650 women students at Princeton by 1974. Ultimately, 148 women, consisting of 100 freshwomen and transfer students of other years, entered Princeton on September 6, 1969 amidst a frenzy of media ogling and ribbing. 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... 1887 is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar). ...


Princeton University has been home to scholars, scientists, writers, and statesmen, including three United States presidents, Woodrow Wilson, Grover Cleveland, and John F. Kennedy, the last of whom spent his freshman fall at the University before leaving due to illness; he later enrolled at Harvard. he entertainer and civil rights figure Paul Robeson grew up in the Borough of Princeton, and artisans from Italy, Scotland, and Ireland have contributed to the town's architectural history. This legacy, spanning the entire history of American architecture, is preserved through buildings by such architects as Benjamin Latrobe, Ralph Adams Cram, McKim, Mead & White, Robert Venturi, and Michael Graves. Order: 28th President Vice President: Thomas R. Marshall Term of office: March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921 Preceded by: William Howard Taft Succeeded by: Warren G. Harding Date of birth: December 28, 1856 Place of birth: Staunton, Virginia Date of death: February 3, 1924 Place of death: Washington, D.C... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Order: 35th President Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson Term of office: January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963 Preceded by: Dwight D. Eisenhower Succeeded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Date of birth: May 29, 1917 Place of birth: Brookline, Massachusetts Date of death: November 22, 1963 Place of death: Dallas, Texas First... USPS Black Heritage stamp Paul LeRoy Bustill Robeson (April 9, 1898–January 23, 1976) was an American actor, athlete, singer, writer, and political and civil rights activist. ... Princeton highlighted in Mercer County. ... Scotland (Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a country and constituent nation of the United Kingdom. ... Americas unmistakable contribution to architecture has been the skyscraper, whose bold, thrusting lines have made it the symbol of capitalist energy. ... Benjamin Henry Latrobe (May 1, 1764 - September 3, 1820) was an architect best known for his design of the United States Capitol. ... Cover of Time Magazine (December 13, 1926) Ralph Adams Cram, (December 16, 1863 - September 22, 1942), was an American architect of collegiate and ecclesiastical buildings of a gothic style. ... McKim, Mead, and White was the premier architectural firm in the eastern United States at the turn of the twentieth century. ... Robert Venturi (June 25, 1925 -) is a Philadelphia-based architect who worked under Eero Saarinen and Louis Kahn before forming his own firm with John Rauch. ... Portland Public Service Building Michael Graves (b. ...


About Princeton

Reputed to be the most undergraduate-friendly Ivy League school, Princeton offers two main undergraduate degrees: the bachelor of arts (A.B.) and the bachelor of science in engineering (B.S.E.). Courses in the humanities are traditionally either seminars or semi-weekly lectures with an additional discussion seminar, called a "precept" (short for "preceptorial"). To graduate, all A.B. candidates must complete a senior thesis and one or two extensive pieces of independent research, known as "junior papers" or "JPs". They must also fulfill a two semester foreign language requirement. B.S.E. candidates follow a different track that includes a rigorous science and math curriculum and at least two semesters of independent research. In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B.) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... A Bachelor of Science (B.S., B.Sc. ...


Princeton offers postgraduate research degrees (most notably the Ph.D.), and ranks among the best in many fields, including mathematics, physics, economics, history, and philosophy. However, it does not have the extensive range of professional postgraduate schools of many other universities --- for instance, it has no medical school or business school (a short-lived Princeton Law School folded in 1852). Its most famous professional school is the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs(known as "Woody Woo" to the students), founded in 1930 as the School of Public and International Affairs and renamed in 1948. The university also offers professional graduate degrees in engineering and architecture. Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... The law school at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University) began instruction in 1847 as a modest effort consisting of three professors. ... Robertson Hall, which houses the Woodrow Wilson School. ... Licensure and Qualifications for the Practice of Engineering The Engineers Ring The origin of then Engineers Ring Engineering Disasters and Learning from Failure American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) ASEE engineering profile (2003) PDF EngineersEdge GlobalSpec Categories: Architecture and engineering occupations | Engineering ... Architecture (in Greek αρχή = first and τέχνη = craftsmanship) is the art and science of designing buildings and structures. ...


The university's libraries have 11 million holdings, and the main university library, Firestone Library, houses over six million volumes and ranks as one of the largest university libraries in the world. In addition to Firestone Library, many individual disciplines have their own libraries, including architecture, art history, East Asian studies, engineering, geology, international affairs and public policy, and Near Eastern studies. Seniors in some departments can register for enclosed carrels in the main library for workspace and the private storage of books and research materials.


The university is also home to the third largest university chapel in the world, the Princeton University Chapel. Known for its impressive gothic architecture, the chapel houses one of the largest and most precious stained glass collections in the country. Both the Opening Exercises for entering freshmen and the Baccalaureate Service for graduating seniors take place in the University Chapel.

Walker, Class of 1903, and Cuyler Halls are Princeton dormitories in the Collegiate Gothic style.
Enlarge
Walker, Class of 1903, and Cuyler Halls are Princeton dormitories in the Collegiate Gothic style.
Fine Hall, the home of the Department of Mathematics, is the tallest building on campus.
Enlarge
Fine Hall, the home of the Department of Mathematics, is the tallest building on campus.

The campus, located on 2 km² of lavishly landscaped grounds, features a large number of Neo-gothic-style buildings, most dating from the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It is situated about one hour from each of two major metropolitan centers, New York City and Philadelphia. The main university administration building, Nassau Hall, was built in 1756 and briefly served as the United States Capitol in 1783. Stanhope Hall (once a library, now the police department and communications office) and East and West College, both dormitories, followed. While many of the succeeding buildings -- particularly the dormitories of the Northern campus -- were built in a Collegiate Gothic style, the university is something of a hodge-podge of American architectural movements. Greek Revival temples (Whig and Clio Halls) abut the lawn south of Nassau Hall, while a crenellated theater (Murray-Dodge) guards the route west to the library. Modern buildings are confined to the west and south of the campus, a quarter overlooked by the 14-story Fine Hall. Fine, the Math Department's home, designed by Warner, Burns, Toan and Lunde and completed in 1970, is the tallest building at the University. Contemporary additions feature a number of big-name architects, including IM Pei's Spelman Halls, Robert Venturi's Frist Campus Center, Rafael Vinoly's Carl Icahn Laboratory, and the Hillier Group's Bowen Hall. A residential college by Demetri Porphyrios and a science library by Frank Gehry are under construction. Much sculpture adorns the campus, including pieces by Henry Moore (Oval with Points, also nicknamed "Nixon's Nose"), Clement Meadmoore (Upstart II), and Alexander Calder (Five Disks: One Empty). At the base of campus is the Delaware and Raritan Canal, dating from 1830, and Lake Carnegie, a man-made lake donated by the steel magnate Andrew Carnegie, used for rowing. Image File history File links Walker, 1903, & Cuyler Halls, Princeton. ... Image File history File links Walker, 1903, & Cuyler Halls, Princeton. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Image File history File links fine hall File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links fine hall File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... When the word metropolitan (from the Greek metera = mother and polis = town) is used as an adjective, as in metropolitan bishop, metropolitan France, or metropolitan area it can mean: of or characteristic of a metropolis; see also metropolitan area of or belonging to the home territories of a country, as... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... Philadelphia is a village located in Jefferson County, New York. ... United States Capitol The Capitol when first occupied by Congress, 1800. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... Robert Venturi (June 25, 1925 -) is a Philadelphia-based architect who worked under Eero Saarinen and Louis Kahn before forming his own firm with John Rauch. ... Rafael Viñoly, a world-famous architect, was born in 1944 in Uruguay. ... Carl Celian Icahn (1936-) is an American billionaire financier. ... Model of Whitman college, neo-Gothic building under construction at Princeton University Demetri Porphyrios (born 1949) is a Greek architect and author. ... The Gehry Tower in Hanover The Pritzker Pavilion in Millennium Park Frank Owen Gehry (born Ephraim Goldberg on February 28, 1929) is an architect known for his sculptural approach to building design. ... Ancient Greeks depiction of ideal form of the body is expressed through sculpture such as this one. ... Reclining Figure (1951) is characteristic of Moores sculptures, with an abstract female figure intercut with voids. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... Alexander Calder Alexander Calder (July 22, 1898 – November 11, 1976), also known as Sandy Calder, was an American sculptor and artist most famous for inventing the mobile. ... Andrew Carnegie (November 25, 1835–August 11, 1919) was a Scottish-American businessman and major philanthropist. ...


Princeton is among the wealthiest universities in the world, with an endowment of almost ten billion US dollars (Daily Princetonian, 8 Feb 2005) sustained through the continued donations of its alumni and maintained by expert investment advisors. Some of Princeton's wealth is invested in its impressive art museum, which features works by Claude Monet and Andy Warhol, among other prominent artists. Princeton is the wealthiest Ivy League school on a per-student basis. The word billion, and its equivalents in other languages, refer to one of two different numbers. ... An art gallery or art museum is a space for the exhibition of art, usually visual art, and usually primarily paintings and sculpture. ... Claude Monet Oscar-Claude Monet (November 14, 1840 – December 5, 1926) was a French impressionist painter. ... Andy Warhol (August 6, 1928 – February 22, 1987) was an American painter, film-maker, publisher, and a major figure in the pop art movement. ...


Among U.S. universities, Princeton has been ranked first or tied for first in U.S. News's college rankings in 2005, 2004, 2002, 2001, and 2000. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Financial Aid

Princeton University was named by the Princeton Review as one of the most affordable colleges in the nation. Leveraging its immense wealth to further advantage in attracting top students, in 2001, Princeton eliminated loans for all students who qualify for aid, expanding a program instituted three years earlier in which loans were replaced with grants for low-income students. The unprecedented move followed a series of enhancements to Princeton's aid program beginning in 1998, which included: admitting international students on a "need-blind" basis along with U.S. students; removing the value of the family home from the formula that calculates how much parents are expected to contribute to college; reducing the contribution rate on student savings; and decreasing summer savings expectations for lower- and middle-income students. Princeton is also named by both US News and Princeton Review to have the least number of students graduate with debt. Since students still may wind up taking out some loans to pay for computer purchases, eating club dues or other living expenses, the Office of Financial Aid estimates that Princeton seniors on aid will graduate with average indebtedness of $2,360. That compares to the national average of about $20,000 for graduating seniors who have borrowed, according to the office. Statistics show that for the incoming class of 2009, close to 60% of the incoming students are on some type of financial aid. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A loan is a type of debt. ... Aid is assistance, often financial, provided to developing countries by developed countries. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... In the United States, financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ... In the United States, financial aid refers to funding intended to help students pay tuition or other costs, such as room and board, for education at a college, university, or private school. ...


Undergraduate program

Undergraduates at Princeton University agree to conform to an academic honesty policy called the Honor Code. Students write and sign the honor pledge "I pledge my honor that I have not violated the Honor Code on this examination." on every in-class exam they take at Princeton. The Code carries a second obligation: upon matriculation, every student pledges to report any suspected cheating to the student-run Honor Committee. As a result of this code, students take all tests unsupervised by faculty members. Violations of the Honor Code incur the strongest of disciplinary action, including suspension and often expulsion. Out-of-class exercises are outside the Honor Committee's jurisdiction, but students are often expected to sign a pledge on their papers that they have not plagiarized their work ("This paper represents my own work in accordance with University regulations."). Plagiarism refers to the use of anothers ideas, information, language, or writing, when done without proper acknowledgment of the original source. ...


Most of the student body lives on campus in dormitories. Freshmen and sophomores live in residential colleges. Later-year students have the option to live off-campus, but very few do, as rents in the Princeton area are extremely high. (Many who live off-campus were residents of the town to begin with.) Undergraduate social life revolves around a number of coeducational "eating clubs" which are open to upperclassmen and serve a similar role to that which fraternities and sororities do at other campuses. Princeton University, located in Princeton, New Jersey, is one of the eight Ivy League universities, and is widely recognized as one of the most prestigious institutions in the world. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ...


Admission is extremely competitive, and according to The Atlantic Monthly, it is the second most selective college in the United States, after MIT. Princeton has a "need-blind" admission policy, in which students are accepted into the incoming class on merit, regardless of their ability to pay the high tuition fees. Unlike other universities which ask students to take on the heavy burden of student loans, Princeton simply pays the remainder of costs the student's family cannot afford through grants from its endowment. Princeton was the first university to implement such a "no-loan" financial aid policy in 2001. Despite these policies, Princeton's student body is often regarded as more culturally conservative or traditional than the student bodies of peer institutions. However, most students have voted Democratic in presidential elections. To change this general perception, Princeton has aggressively pursued a diversification policy. It is a member of the Davis United World College Fund, and students from these international schools can expect to have their full needs, as assessed by Princeton, met by the fund. The Atlantic Monthly (also known as The Atlantic) is an American literary/cultural magazine that was founded in November 1857. ... The Massachusetts Institute of Technology, or MIT, is a research and educational institution located in the city of Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. MIT is a world leader in science and technology, as well as in many other fields, including management, economics, linguistics, political science, and philosophy. ... The United World Colleges Logo The United World Colleges (UWC) are a group of ten international high schools. ...


In 1869 Princeton competed with Rutgers in the first ever intercollegiate football game, losing 6 to 4. Its rivalry with Yale, active since 1873, is the second oldest in American football. In more recent years, Princeton has excelled in men's basketball, both men's and women's lacrosse, and both men's and women's crew. Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ... This article is about the institution of higher learning in the United States. ...


Princeton is also home to one of the world's top-ranked debating societies, the American Whig-Cliosophic Society, which is a member of the American Parliamentary Debating Association and has previously hosted the World Universities Debating Championships. The American Whig-Cliosophic Society (short form: Whig-Clio) is one of the worlds oldest college political, literary, and debating society (The oldest being the Glasgow Universtiy Dialectic Society). ... The American Parliamentary Debating Association (APDA) is one of two major intercollegiate parliamentary debating associations in the United States, the other being the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA). ... The World Universities Debating Championship is the highest-profile tournament in university debating. ...


Residential Colleges

The undergraduate residential colleges are the residential-dining complexes that house freshmen, sophomores, and a handful of junior and senior resident advisers. Each college consists of a set of dormitories, a dining hall (e.g., Ricardo A. Mestres Hall), a variety of other amenities (study spaces, libraries, performance spaces, darkrooms, and the like), and a collection of administrators and associated faculty. A residential college system is a housing and educational aspect of certain universities across the world, most notably Oxford University and Cambridge University in the United Kingdom; Yale University, Rice University, and the California Institute of Technology in the United States. ...


Princeton presently has five undergraduate residential colleges. Rockefeller College and Mathey College are located in the northwest corner of the campus; their Collegiate Gothic architecture often graces University brochures. Wilson College and Butler College, located south of the center of the campus, are more recent additions, built specifically to become residential colleges. Forbes College, located slightly southwest of the southwest corner of the campus, is a former hotel, purchased by the university and expanded to form a residential college. Princeton broke ground for a sixth college, named Whitman College after its principal sponsor, eBay CEO Meg Whitman, in late 2003. The new dormitories will be constructed in the neo-Gothic architectural style and has been designed by renowned architect Demetri Porphyrios. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Wilson College could mean Wilson College, Chambersburg, Philadelphia, USA Warren Wilson College, Asheville, North Carolina, USA Lindsey Wilson College, Kentucky, USA Wilson College, Princeton University, New Jersey, USA Wilson College, Mumbai, India This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... eBay Inc. ... Chief Executive Officer (CEO) is the job of having the ultimate executive responsibility or authority within an organization or corporation. ... Meg Whitman Margaret C. Whitman, also known as Meg Whitman, (born August 4, 1956) has been the President and CEO of the online auction company eBay since March 1998. ... Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ... Architect at his drawing board, 1893 An architect/Building designer is a person involved in the planning, designing and oversight of a buildings construction, whose role is to guide decisions affecting those building aspects that are of aesthetic, cultural or social concern. ... Model of Whitman college, neo-Gothic building under construction at Princeton University Demetri Porphyrios (born 1949) is a Greek architect and author. ...


A variant on the present college system was originally proposed by University President Woodrow Wilson in the early twentieth century. Wilson's model was much closer to Yale's present system, which features four-year colleges. Lacking the support of the Trustees, the plan languished until 1968, when Wilson College was established, capping a series of alternatives to the Eating Clubs. A series of often fierce debates raged before the present underclass-college system emerged. A further addition to the system is slated for the completion date of Whitman College. At the same time that 500 new students will be added to the Princeton undergraduate student body under the Wythes Plan, two of the six residential colleges will be expanded to accommodate upperclassmen—representing the realization of Wilson's plan a century after he proposed it. Order: 28th President Vice President: Thomas R. Marshall Term of office: March 4, 1913 – March 3, 1921 Preceded by: William Howard Taft Succeeded by: Warren G. Harding Date of birth: December 28, 1856 Place of birth: Staunton, Virginia Date of death: February 3, 1924 Place of death: Washington, D.C... This article is about the institution of higher learning in the United States. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ...


Princeton has one graduate residential college, known simply as the Graduate College, located beyond Forbes College at the outskirts of campus. The far-flung location of the G.C. was the spoil of a squabble between Woodrow Wilson and then-Graduate School Dean Andrew Fleming West, which the latter won. (Wilson preferred a central location for the College; West wanted the graduate students as far as possible from the noisy, dissolute undergraduates.) The G.C. is composed of a large Collegiate Gothic section, crowned by Cleveland Tower, a local landmark that also houses a world-class carillon. The attached New Graduate College houses more students. Its design departs from collegiate gothic, and is reminiscent of Butler College, the newest of the five pre-Whitman undergraduate colleges. Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


However, these residential colleges are much more than just residential-dining facilities. Each residential college promotes and creates a bond between students within the same residential college by hosting social events and activities , guest speakers (such as Edward Norton who showed a special sneak-preview of Fight Club on campus, and trips. Residential Colleges are best known for their performing art trips to New York City. Students are eager to sign up to take trips to see the ballet (e.g. The Nutcracker), the opera (e.g. Cavalleria Rustica, Madama Butterfly, and La Boheme), and Broadway (e.g. Dirty Rotten Scoundrels, Wicked (musical), Avenue Q, Spamalot, and The Lion King.) Edward James Norton Jr. ... Fight Club[1] (1996) is the first published novel by Chuck Palahniuk. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the United States, and is at the center of international finance, politics, communications, music, fashion, and culture. ... A performance of The Nutcracker The story of The Nutcracker and the Mouse King was written by E. T. A. Hoffmann. ... Madama Butterfly (Madame Butterfly) is an opera in three acts (originally two acts) by Giacomo Puccini to an Italian libretto by Luigi Illica and Giuseppe Giacosa, based on the book by John Luther Long and the drama by David Belasco. ... La Bohème is an often-adapted story first appearing in Henry Murgers magazine articles in the early 1800s. ... This article is about the street in New York City. ... Dirty Rotten Scoundrels is a 1988 comedy film directed by Frank Oz and starring Steve Martin and Michael Caine as the con artists of the title. ... Wicked is a musical that premiered on Broadway in October 2003. ... The Broadway Musical Avenue Q won the 2004 Tony Award for Best Musical (it also won Tony Awards for Best Score and Best Book of a Musical), defeating the much bigger-scale musical of the season, Wicked. ... Monty Pythons Spamalot is a comedic musical based on the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975). ... The Lion King is the 32nd film in the Disney animated feature canon, and it also was the highest-grossing traditionally animated feature film ever released in the United States. ...


Athletics

The conference logo
The conference logo

Princeton is frequently among the best athletics programs in the Ivy League. The Princeton Review declared the university the 10th strongest "jock school" in the nation. It has also consistently been ranked at the top of the Time Magazine's Strongest College Sports Teams lists. Most recently, Princeton was ranked as a top 10 school for athletics by Sports Illustrated. Princeton is best known for its men and women's lacrosse teams, winning several NCAA titles in the past number of years. And though other varsity teams may not have won the NCAA title, five teams in 1996-1997 came home as national runner-ups. This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... The Ivy League is an athletics association, founded in 1954, of eight American universities; it is named after the ivy plants traditionally covering their buildings. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... (Clockwise from upper left) Time magazine covers from May 7, 1945; July 25, 1969; December 31, 1999; September 14, 2001; and April 21, 2003. ... July 1999 cover showing soccer star Brandi Chastain Sports Illustrated is a popular weekly American sports magazine owned by media giant Time Warner. ... High School lacrosse action. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Princeton has dominated the Ivy league, winning a record 21 conference titles from 2000-2001. At the culmination of 2004, Princeton had garnered a total of 36 Ivy League conference titles from 2001-2004 sports seasons. Most recently in 2005, the Tigers' women's soccer team made the NCAA Final Four, the first Ivy League team to do so. The Tigers have completely dominated field hockey, taking every conference title since 1994. The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... A game of field hockey in progress Field Hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ...


Princeton's basketball team is perhaps the best known team within the Ivy League, nicknamed the "perennial giant killer". From 1992-2001, a nine year span, Princeton's men's basketball team had entered the NCAA tournament 6 times. The basketball team has also dominated the Ivy League, with its first losing season (2005) in 50 years of Ivy League Basketball. College basketball refers to the American basketball league organized by the National Collegiate Athletic Association, or NCAA. History The game of basketball was devised by James Naismith in 1892. ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ...


Significant places

Nassau Hall

Nassau Hall is the main administrative building of the University. For more information on this historic building, please see the main article, Nassau Hall. Nassau Hall is the main administrative building of Princeton University, in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


Cannon Green

Cannon Green is located on the south end of the main lawn. Buried in the ground at the center is a cannon, the top of which protrudes from the earth and is traditionally spray-painted in orange with the current senior class year. A second cannon is buried in the lawn in front of nearby Whig Hall. Both were buried in response to periodic thefts by nearby colleges. A small cast-iron cannon on a carriage A cannon is any large tubular firearm designed to fire a heavy projectile over a considerable distance. ... The American Whig-Cliosophic Society (short form: Whig-Clio) is one of the worlds oldest college political, literary, and debating society (The oldest being the Glasgow Universtiy Dialectic Society). ... Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ...


The Academy Award winning movie, A Beautiful Mind, contains a scene on Cannon Green. John Nash plays Go with his college rival while sitting on stone benches in the middle of the green. (The benches do not exist; like many elements of the Princeton setting, they were introduced for the film.) Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... A Beautiful Mind is a book and film about the Nobel Prize (Economics) winning mathematician John Nash and his experiences of schizophrenia. ... John Nash may refer to: John Nash (architect) (1752-1835), British architect John Forbes Nash (born 1928), mathematician and recipient of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ... Go is a strategic, two-player board game originating in ancient China between 2000 BC and 200 BC. Go is a popular game in East Asia. ...


McCarter Theater

McCarter Theatre is recognized as one of this country's leading regional theaters. Under the Artistic Direction of Emily Mann, the Tony Award-winning McCarter Theatre has demonstrated a commitment to the highest professional standards. McCarter's vision is to create a theater of testimony, engaged in a dialogue with the world around it, paying tribute to the enduring power of the human spirit and scope of the imagination. What is popularly called the Tony Award® (formally, the Antoinette Perry Award) is an annual award celebrating achievements in live American theater, including musical theater. ... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle — indeed...


A hallmark of the Theater Series is the creation of new work. Since 1991, over 20 new plays and adaptations have had their World or American premieres at McCarter including: Emily Mann's Having Our Say, Athol Fugard's Valley Song, John Henry Redwood's The Old Settler, and Stephen Wadworth's adaptations of Marivaux. McCarter premieres have made a significant contribution to the American theater and have been produced in cities across the country. In the past, the famous shows of Rodgers and Hammersteins's South Pacific and Wilder's Our Town made their world premieres at McCarter. 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A play (noun) is a common literary form, usually consisting chiefly of dialog between characters, and usually intended for performance rather than reading. ... South Pacific is a musical play with music by Richard Rodgers and lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II, which opened on Broadway on April 7, 1949. ... Our Town is a play by Thornton Wilder that is set in the fictional community of Grovers Corners, New Hampshire. ...


As a world-class performing arts presenter, McCarter offers audiences diverse programs of music, dance, and special events featuring artists of national and international repute from a wide variety of disciplines and styles. Under the leadership of W. W. Lockwood, Jr. for 40 years, McCarter's programs rival any performing arts series in the country.


McCarter Theater is also the unofficial home of the famous Princeton Triangle Club, a comedy theater troupe whose alumni include Academy Award-winning actor Jimmy Stewart. The Princeton Triangle Club is a drama society at Princeton University, more than a century old. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... Jimmy Stewart, photographed by Carl Van Vechten, 1934 James Maitland Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American film actor beloved for his persona as an average guy who faces adversity and tries to do the right thing, an image which was largely reflected in his own personality. ...


Princeton University Art Museum

The Princeton University Art Museum is one of the most outstanding university museums in the country. The collections have greatly exceeded those of a study collection. The founding principal of the museum was to give students direct, intimate, and sustained access to original works of art to complement and enrich the instruction and research at the University, and this continues to be its primary function. The museum also serves a much larger audience, however, as one of the richest cultural resources in the state of New Jersey and as an active participant in the international community of museums.


Numbering nearly 60,000 objects, the collections range chronologically from ancient to contemporary art, and concentrate geographically on the Mediterranean regions, Western Europe, China, the United States, and Latin America. There is an outstanding collection of Greek and Roman antiquities, including ceramics, marbles, bronzes, and Roman mosaics from Princeton University’s excavations in Antioch. Medieval Europe is represented by sculpture, metalwork, and stained glass. The collection of Western European paintings includes important examples from the early Renaissance through the nineteenth century, and there is a growing collection of twentieth-century and contemporary art. The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Western Europe is distinguished from Eastern Europe by differences of history and culture rather than by geography. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that existed in Europe, North Africa, and the Middle East between 753 BC and its downfall in AD 476. ... Antiquity means different things: Generally it means ancient history, and may be used of any period before the Middle Ages. ... The word ceramic is derived from the Greek word Κεραμεικος (the name of a suburb of Athens), and in its strictest sense refers to clay in all its forms. ... The city of Antioch-on-the-Orontes (modern Antakya; Greek Αντιόχεια) is located in what is now Turkey. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... By Region: Italian Renaissance Northern Renaissance *French Renaissance *German Renaissance *English Renaissance The Renaissance was an influential cultural movement which brought about a period of scientific revolution and artistic transformation, at the dawn of modern European history. ...


Among the greatest strengths in the museum are the collections of Chinese art, with important holdings in bronzes, tomb figurines, painting, and calligraphy; and pre-Columbian art, with remarkable examples of the art of the Maya. The museum has distinguished collections of old master prints and drawings and a comprehensive collection of original photographs. African art is represented as well as Northwest Coast Indian art. Other outstanding works include those of the John B. Putnam, Jr., Memorial Collection of twentieth-century sculpture, including works by such modern masters as Alexander Calder, Jacques Lipshitz, Henry Moore, Claude Monet and Pablo Picasso. Calligraphy in a Latin Bible of AD 1407 on display in Malmesbury Abbey, Wiltshire, England. ... The term Pre-Columbian is used to refer to the cultures of the New World in the era before significant European influence. ... Alexander Calder Alexander Calder (July 22, 1898 – November 11, 1976), also known as Sandy Calder, was an American sculptor and artist most famous for inventing the mobile. ... Reclining Figure (1951) is characteristic of Moores sculptures, with an abstract female figure intercut with voids. ... Claude Monet Oscar-Claude Monet (November 14, 1840 – December 5, 1926) was a French impressionist painter. ... Young Pablo Picasso Pablo Picasso[1], formally Pablo Ruiz Picasso, (October 25, 1881 – April 8, 1973) was one of the recognized masters of 20th century art, probably most famous as the founder, along with Georges Braque, of Cubism. ...


Notable Princeton alumni

See List of Princeton University people. This is a table of notable people affiliated with Princeton University, including graduates of the undergraduate college and all graduate programs, former students, and former professors. ...


Notable Princeton professors

Professors who are also Princeton alumni are listed in italics:

Ben Bernanke Ben S. Bernanke (born December 13, 1953) is Chairman of the Presidents Council of Economic Advisers. ... Economics (from the Greek οίκος [oikos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules, hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... Public affairs is a catch-all term that includes public policy as well as public administration, both of which are closely related to and draw upon the fields of political science as well as economics. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ... Alan Blinder is an American economist, on the faculty of Princeton University, who advised John Kerry during the latters 2004 presidential campaign. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Economics (from the Greek οίκος [oikos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules, hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central bank of the United States. ... Order: 42nd President Vice President: Al Gore Term of office: January 20, 1993 – January 20, 2001 Preceded by: George H. W. Bush Succeeded by: George W. Bush Date of birth: August 19, 1946 Place of birth: Hope, Arkansas First Lady: Hillary Rodham Clinton Political party: Democratic William Jefferson Clinton (born... John Horton Conway (born December 26, 1937, Liverpool, England) is a prolific mathematician active in the theory of finite groups, knot theory, number theory, combinatorial game theory and coding theory. ... Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space and change. ... Air Vice Marshal Sir Robert Allingham George, KCMG, KCVO, KBE, CB, MC (1896–1967) was Governor of South Australia from 23 February 1953 until 7 March 1960. ... Jurisprudence is the scientific and historic study of law, inclusive of: Legal history, including legal historiography and hermeneutics; Legal philosophy; Legal science, e. ... Constitutional law is the study of foundational laws that govern the scope of powers and authority of various bodies in relation to the creation and execution of other laws by a government. ... History Forums - History is Happening -Discuss all historical topics, as well as current events, in an academic setting. ... Brian Kernighan (pronounced Ker-ni-han; the g is silent; born 1942) is a computer scientist who worked at the Bell Labs and contributed to the design of the pioneering AWK and AMPL programming languages. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Computer Science Open Directory Project: Computer Science Collection of Computer Science Bibliographies Belief that title science in computer science is inappropriate Categories: Computer science ... Yusef Komunyakaa (1947- ) is an eminent American poet. ... The Pulitzer Prize for Poetry has been presented since 1922 for a distinguished volume of original verse by an American author. ... Saul Kripke in 1983 Saul Aaron Kripke (b. ... The term philosophy derives from a combination of the Greek words philos meaning love and sophia meaning wisdom. ... Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is an American economist, who has written several books and who currently (as of 2005) is a columnist for The New York Times. ... Economics (from the Greek οίκος [oikos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules, hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Paul Lansky (born 1944) is one of the original electronic music or computer music composers who has been producing works from the seventies right up to the present day (see discography, below). ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikisource, as part of the 1911 Encyclopedia Wikiproject, has original text related to this article: Music Wikicities has a wiki about Music: Music Music City : a collaborative music database All Music Guide... David K. Lewis David Kellogg Lewis (September 28, 1941 - October 14, 2001) is considered by many to have been the leading Analytic philosopher of the latter half of the 20th century. ... The term philosophy derives from a combination of the Greek words philos meaning love and sophia meaning wisdom. ... John Forbes Nash John Forbes Nash Jr. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space and change. ... The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel (Swe. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ... George A. Miller (born February 3 1920) is a famous professor of psychology at Princeton University, whose most famous work was The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on our Capacity for Processing Information, which was published in 1956 in In the linguistics community, Miller is well... Psychology (ancient Greek: psyche = soul. ... The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information is a 1956 paper by the cognitive psychologist George A. Miller. ... Toni Morrison is one of the most prominent authors in world literature, having won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1993. ... 1993 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and marked the Beginning of the International Decade to Combat Racism and Racial Discrimination (1993-2003). ... Joyce Carol Oates (born June 16, 1938 in Lockport, New York) is an American writer of novels, stories, plays, poetry, and non-fiction, known for being one of the most prolific of authors of literary merit. ... John McPhee is widely recognized for his writing on geology. ... 1953 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1999 is a common year starting on Friday of the Common Era, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... Harold Shapiro (born June 8, 1935) is a former president of Princeton University and the University of Michigan. ... 1964 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Economics (from the Greek οίκος [oikos], house, and νέμω [nemo], rules, hence household management) is the social science that studies the allocation of scarce resources to satisfy unlimited wants. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Goro Shimura (志村 五郎, 1930 -) is a Japanese-American mathematician, and currently a professor of mathematics at Princeton University. ... Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space and change. ... Traditionally, number theory is that branch of pure mathematics concerned with the properties of integers. ... In mathematics, the general notion of automorphic form is the extension to analytic functions, perhaps of several complex variables, of the theory of modular forms. ... In mathematics, the Langlands program is a web of far-reaching and influential conjectures that connect number theory and the representation theory of certain groups. ... Yakov G. Sinai is an American mathematician, born in the USSR, who specializes in dynamical systems. ... Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space and change. ... Prof. ... The Elections and Parties Series Democracy Liberal democracy History of democracy Referenda Representative democracy Representation Voting Voting systems Elections Elections by country Elections by calender Electoral systems Politics Politics by country Political campaigns Political science Political philosophy Related topics Political parties Parties by country Parties by name Parties by ideology... For more information on international affairs, see one of the following links: Diplomacy Foreign affairs International relations This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Robertson Hall, which houses the Woodrow Wilson School. ... International law deals with the relationships between states, or between persons or entities in different states. ... Elias M. Stein (born January 13, 1931) is a mathematician born in Belgium. ... Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space and change. ... Robert Endre Tarjan (born April 30, 1948 in Pomona, California) is a renowned computer scientist. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Computer Science Open Directory Project: Computer Science Collection of Computer Science Bibliographies Belief that title science in computer science is inappropriate Categories: Computer science ... A diagram of a graph with 6 vertices and 7 edges. ... 1986 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The A.M. Turing Award is given annually by the Association for Computing Machinery to a person selected for contributions of a technical nature made to the computing community. ... 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nevanlinna Prize is a prize for major contributions to mathematical aspects of computer science. ... Daniel Tsui won the Nobel Prize in Physics with Robert Laughlin and Horst L. Störmer in 1998 for for their discovery of a new form of quantum fluid with fractionally charged excitations (according to the Nobel Committee). ... 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... Cornel Ronald West (born June 2, 1953 in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is a prominent American scholar and public intellectual. ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... African American studies, or Black studies, is an interdisciplinary academic field devoted to the study of the history, culture, and politics of African Americans. ... Andrew John Wiles (born April 11, 1953) is a British mathematician living in the United States. ... Mathematics is the study of quantity, structure, space and change. ... Pierre de Fermat Fermats last theorem (sometimes abbreviated as FLT and also called Fermats great theorem) is one of the most famous theorems in the history of mathematics. ... History Forums - History is Happening -Discuss all historical topics, as well as current events, in an academic setting. ...

Traditions

  • Arch Sings - Free late-night concerts in one of the larger arches on campus offered by one or a few of Princeton's fourteen a cappella groups. Most often held in Blair Arch or Class of 1879 Arch.
  • Bonfire - ceremonial bonfire, held only if Princeton beats both Harvard and Yale at football in the same season.
  • Beer Jackets - Each graduating class (and each class at its multiple-of-5 reunion thereafter -- 5th, 10th, etc.) designs a Beer Jacket featuring their class year. The artwork is almost invariably dominated by the school colors and tiger motifs.
  • Bicker - Competitive new-member selection process employed by selective eating clubs
  • Cane Spree - an athletic competition between freshmen and sophomores held in the fall
  • The Clapper or Clapper Theft - climbing to the top of Nassau Hall and stealing the bell clapper so as to prevent the bell from ringing and, thus, from starting class on the first day of the school year. For safety reasons, the clapper has now been removed permanently.
  • Communiversity - an annual street fair with performances, arts and crafts, and other activities, designed to foster interaction between the University and residents of the Princeton community
  • Dean's Date Theater - tradition of gathering late in the afternoon on Dean's Date (see below under "Lingo") outside McCosh Hall to watch other students run to hand in their papers before the final deadline. Some students perform cartwheels and other antics (if they are not running too late).
  • FitzRandolph Gate - at the end of Princeton's graduation ceremony, the new graduates process out through the main gate of the university as a symbol of their leaving college and entering the real world. According to tradition, anyone who leaves campus through FitzRandolph Gate before their own graduation date will not graduate (though entering through the gate is fine).
  • Holder howl - students in Holder Hall dormitory are known to wail, bellow, and screech after studying for hours before finals
  • Houseparties - formal parties thrown simultaneously by all of the eating clubs at the end of the spring term
  • Lawnparties - parties with live bands thrown simultaneously by all of the eating clubs at the start of classes and conclusion of the year
  • Newman's Day - students attempt to drink 24 beers in the 24 hours of April 24th, named after Paul Newman allegedly based on a quote from Paul: "24 hours in a day...24 beers in a case...Coincidence? I think not." Newman has spoken out against the tradition. [1]
  • Nude Olympics - annual (nude) frolic in Holder Courtyard during the first snow of the winter. For safety and decency reasons, the administration banned the Olympics in 2001.
  • Pong - Played mostly at Charter Club and Tower Club, a common drinking game played on a ping-pong table with paddles and cups of beer.
  • Prospect 11 - referring to the act of drinking a beer at all eleven eating clubs on The Street in one night.
  • P-rade - traditional parade of alumni and their families, organized by class year, during Reunions
  • Reunions - annual gathering of alumni, held the weekend before graduation
  • Robo-pound - unofficial drinking game of Princeton University, along with Beirut. Princeton rules require two teams, one quarter for each team, a hard surface, eight half-full cups, and one pitcher of beer.
  • The Phantom of Fine Hall - a former tradition - before 1993, this was the legend of an obscure, shadowy figure who would infest Fine Hall (the Mathematics department's building) and write complex equations on blackboards. Although mentioned in Rebecca Goldstein's 1980s book The Mind-Body Problem about Princeton graduate student life (Penguin, reissued 1993), the legend self-deconstructed in the 1990s when the Phantom turned out to be in reality the inventor, in the 1950s, of the Nash Equilibrium result in game theory, John Forbes Nash. The former Phantom, by then also haunting the computation center where courtesy of handlers in the math department he was a sacred monster with a guest account, shared the 1993 Nobel prize and is now a recognized member of the University community. The film and book A Beautiful Mind are a somewhat inaccurate recount of Nash's story.

A cappella music is vocal music or singing without instrumental accompaniment, or a piece intended to be performed in this way. ... 1879 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Tiger Uppercut (Panthera tigris) are mammals of the Felidae family, one of four big cats that belong to the Panthera genus, and the largest of all cats, living or extinct. ... Unique to the eating clubs at Princeton University, the Bicker process somewhat resembles fraternity rushing, though without the overt hazing. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... For other Princetons, see Princeton. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... A Princeton University tradition involving drinking 24 beers within a 24 hour period. ... Paul Newman Paul Leonard Newman (born January 26, 1925) is an American actor and film director. ... 2001 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beer Pong game in progress at Boston University Beer Pong and Pong are drinking games that involve propelling a table-tennis ball across a table with the goal of making the ball hit or land in one of several cups of beer. ... The Princeton Charter Club is one of Princeton Universitys eleven eating clubs. ... This article is in need of attention. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... Prospect Avenue is the street in Princeton, New Jersey on which ten of the eleven eating clubs at Princeton University are located. ... Beer Pong game in progress at Boston University Beer Pong and Pong are drinking games that involve propelling a table-tennis ball across a table with the goal of making the ball hit or land in one of several cups of beer. ...

Old Nassau

This phrase can refer to:

  • Old Nassau, Princeton's alma mater since 1859, with words by then-freshman Harlan Page Peck and music by Karl A. Langlotz. The text of Old Nassau is available from Wikisource.
  • By metonymy, Princeton University itself.
  • Nassau Hall, to which the song refers, built in 1756 and named after William III of England, of the House of Orange-Nassau. When built, it was the largest college building in North America. It served briefly as the capitol of the United States when the Continental Congress convened there in the summer of 1783.
  • A chemical reaction, an example of a "clock reaction", dubbed "Old Nassau" because the solution turns first orange and then black, the Princeton colors. It is also known as the "Hallowe'en reaction".

1859 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... In rhetoric and cognitive linguistics, metonymy (in Greek meta = after/later and onoma = name) is the use of a single characteristic to identify a more complex entity. ... 1756 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For other men named William of Orange, see William of Orange (disambiguation) William III of England (14 November 1650–8 March 1702; also known as William II of Scotland, William Henry and William of Orange) was a Dutch aristocrat and the Holy Roman Empires Prince of Orange from his... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch Oranje-Nassau), is a family that has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of the Fatherland) organised the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule, which after... 1783 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ...

Lingo

  • Bicker - the process by which students join selective eating clubs, similar to fraternity/sorority rush at other schools.
  • Boot - To vomit, or vomitus itself, used in much the same way as the word "puke." So ingrained into Princeton's lexicon that for four years, students hardly ever use any other word to describe the act or the substance. See also "boot and rally."
  • Boot and Rally - Often seen during popular Princeton drinking games, such as Beirut and Robo-pound, it is the act of quickly returning to a game after booting.
  • D-Bar - the debasement bar, located in the basement of the Graduate College, hangout for grad students and badly-lit location for the purchase of cheap alcohol.
  • Dean's Date - The last day of reading period; the day when all final papers and other written work must be turned in (see also "Dean's Date Theater" above in the "Traditions" section). Exams start the day after Dean's Date. So named because extensions beyond Dean's Date cannot be granted by a faculty member; they require the permission of a Dean.
  • Dinky - Short (one- or two- car) train that runs between Princeton Junction to Princeton station. Officially called the PJ & B (Princeton Junction & Back).
  • Getting McCoshed - when a student is sent to McCosh Infirmary (not to be confused with the McCosh Hall) for excessive drinking.
  • Getting PMC'ed - when a student is hospitalized for drinking too much alcohol. In this case, a student is deemed too drunk to be treated by McCosh Infirmary and is instead transferred to Princeton Medical Center. The future of this lingo is uncertain due to Princeton Medical Center's recent name change to University Medical Center at Princeton.
  • Hook up - Though it means "to meet up with" in polite society, on the Princeton campus, it means to engage in intimate contact--but not necessarily intercourse--with another person. At the very least, it's defined by "hair a little ruffled, clothes a little untucked."
  • Hose - As a transitive verb, to be rejected from a selective organization, e.g., in eating club bicker, interviews for selective courses, etc. (i.e. "You got hosed!").
  • Intersession - The one-week break between winter finals and the start of the spring semester. Often times, the time when seniors hunker down to begin writing their senior thesis.
  • Junior Slums - Area of undergraduate housing in the southwest part of campus. Includes Henry Hall, Foulke Hall, 1901 Hall, Pyne Hall, Laughlin Hall and Lockhart Hall. So called because these are the dormitories that are usually left over from senior Room Draw and are thus taken by the juniors.
  • Locomotive - Distinctive Princeton cheer... "'rah, 'rah, 'rah, tiger, tiger, tiger, sis, sis, sis, boom boom boom ahhhhhhh. Princeton. Princeton. Princeton". (It's common to replace "Princeton" with a class year to toast a particular class, especially during the P-rade.)
  • The Nass - The Nassau Weekly slang for The Nassau Weekly, a weekly arts and humor magazine. (See its website).
  • Old Nassau - see previous section.
  • Precept - short for "preceptorial." A small seminar-style discussion group held as an adjunct to formal lectures.
  • Prospect 11 - A tradition in which undergraduates visit all eleven currently-active eating clubs and drink a beer from each one.
  • Prox - Proximity card. RFID-based access control card used to unlock dorms and other non-public areas.
  • Pton - Common abbreviation for the school's name.
  • Reading Period - A ten-day study period between the end of classes and the beginning of exams in January and May.
  • Reunions - Generally held on Memorial Day (but not always), reunions is Princeton's largest alumni event.
  • The Prince - The Daily Princetonian, main campus newspaper (See its website).
  • The Street - Prospect Avenue, home of the eating clubs.
  • The Tory - The Princeton Tory, conservative bimonthly magazine (See its website).
  • The Wa - The local Wawa convenience store and food market. A Wa Run is a trip there.
  • Wednesday Night Lectures - A now-defunct tradition held every Wednesday at the Cottage Club, where an inebriated member of the club would prepare and present a speech that often embarrassed many of the members of the club and their close friends.
  • Woody Woo - Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs.

The Daily Princetonian hosts a detailed (if slightly dated) list of Princeton jargon, see A Princeton Dictionary. The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... Central Beirut (2004) Beirut (Arabic: , transliterated BayrÅ«t - the French name, Beyrouth, was also commonly used in English in the past) is the capital, largest city and chief seaport of Lebanon. ... For other Princetons, see Princeton. ... Princeton Station at night, August 2004 The Princeton Branch is a branch off of New Jersey Transits Northeast Corridor Line. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... An EPC RFID tag used for Wal-Mart An RFID tag used for electronic toll collection Radio Frequency IDentification (RFID) is a method of storing and remotely retrieving data using devices called RFID tags or transponders. ... The Daily Princetonian is the daily student newspaper of Princeton University. ... The majority of upperclassmen at Princeton University take their meals in one of eleven eating clubs, which are an amalgamation of dining halls and Greek-letter fraternities. ... Wawa is a chain of convenience store/gas stations, mostly in the Delaware Valley region of Pennsylvania, although the chain has now expanded into Virginia as far as the Hampton Roads, and can be found throughout Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, and Delaware. ... In 1884, a group of freshman, members of the Class of 1888 chose to eat in a private room on the second floor of Dohm’s Restaurant on Nassau Street across from the campus. ... Robertson Hall, which houses the Woodrow Wilson School. ...


In fiction

In the movie Batman Begins, it is revealed that Bruce Wayne attended Princeton University, although he chose not to continue his education there after returning home (being Batman is a full-time job). Batman Begins is a 2005 American superhero/action film based on the comic book fictional character Batman. ... For other uses, see Batman (disambiguation). ...


The movie A Beautiful Mind from 2001 takes place at Princeton University, and contains great location shots. (This movie was a fictionalized biography of Princeton Professor John Nash, rather than pure fiction.) A Beautiful Mind is a book and film about the Nobel Prize (Economics) winning mathematician John Nash and his experiences of schizophrenia. ... John Nash may refer to: John Nash (architect) (1752-1835), British architect John Forbes Nash (born 1928), mathematician and recipient of the Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ...


The movie I.Q., starring Meg Ryan and Tim Robbins with Walter Matthau as Albert Einstein. A scene where Tom Robbins' character gives a lecture is in what is now known as Room 302 of the Frist Campus Center. Meg Ryan Meg Ryan (nee Margaret Mary Emily Anne Hyra, November 19, 1961 in Fairfield, Connecticut) is an American actress who specializes in romantic comedies, but has worked in other film genres as well. ... Tim Robbins winning the 2003 Oscar for Best Supporting Actor in Mystic River Tim Robbins (born October 16, 1958, also Timothy Robbins) is an American actor, screenwriter, director, producer, and small time musician. ... Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 - July 1, 2000) Matthau and Sophia Loren in Grumpier Old Men Walter Matthau (October 1, 1920 – July 1, 2000) was an American comedy actor possibly best known for his role as the gruff and less tidy member of The Odd Couple. ... Albert Einstein, by Yousuf Karsh Albert Einstein (March 14, 1879 – April 18, 1955) was a German-born American theoretical physicist who is widely regarded as the greatest scientist of the 20th century. ...


The books The Rule of Four and This Side Of Paradise, as well as a series of mystery books by Ann Waldron, including The Princeton Murders, Death of a Princeton President, and Unholy Death in Princeton are set on Princeton's campus and the campus of neighboring Princeton Theological Seminary. The Rule of Four (book) - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This Side Of Paradise book cover This Side of Paradise is the debut novel of F. Scott Fitzgerald. ... This article or section should include material from Princeton Seminary Princeton Theological Seminary is a professional and graduate school operated by the Presbyterian Church USA in Princeton, New Jersey. ...


In Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle, Princeton is supposedly one of their destinations. However, the film was not shot on campus. Harold & Kumar Go to White Castle (published in some countries under the title Harold and Kumar get the Munchies) is a 2004 stoner film that explores stereotypes, especially racial, in American culture. ...


In The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement, the first 10 minutes show a Princeton graduation. The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement is a sequel of The Princess Diaries which was released in 2004. ...


In A Cinderella Story, the characters played by Hilary Duff and Chad Michael Murray will be attending Princeton at the end of the movie. A Cinderella Story (2004) is a teen romance movie starring Hilary Duff and Chad Michael Murray . ... Hilary Duff Hilary Ann Duff (born September 28, 1987) is an American film actress and pop music singer. ... Chad with wife Sophia Bush Chad Michael Murray (born August 24, 1981) is an American actor and model. ...


The movie Spanglish is presented as an essay on a fictional Princeton application. Spanglish, a portmanteau of the words Spanish and English, is a name used to refer to a range of language-contact phenomena, primarily in the speech of the Hispanic population of the USA, which is exposed to both Spanish and English. ...


The opening shots of Scent of a Woman were of the Junior Slums (see above in Lingo). However, in the movie, the location was not called Princeton but rather a private boarding school somewhere in New England. Perhaps best renowned as the film which sparked the incidiary catchphrase, Hooah and numerous derivatives thereof, Scent of a Woman is a 1992 film which tells the story of a preparatory school student who takes a job as an assistant to an irascible blind former military officer. ...


In The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air, Princeton is Philip's alma mater. Carlton also dreams of going to Princeton. The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air was a sitcom that ran from 1990 to 1996. ...


The American TV show House M.D. uses aerial shots of the campus to depict the fictional Princeton-Plainsboro Teaching Hospital. House, M.D. (commonly promoted as just House) is an American television series produced by the Fox Broadcasting Company. ...


In the film Risky Business, Tom Cruise as Joel Goodson proves himself to be Princeton material by becoming a pimp and seeing to his interviewer's sexual gratification. Risky Business is a 1983 film written and directed by Paul Brickman. ... Tom Cruise as seen on a poster for the 2001 film Vanilla Sky Tom Cruise (born Thomas Cruise Mapother IV July 3, 1962 in Syracuse, New York, USA) is an American film actor and producer who has starred in a number of top-grossing movies. ... A pimp is an informal term for a man who runs a brothel or otherwise oversees prostitution. ...


See also

A -- B -- C -- D -- E -- F -- G -- H -- I -- J -- K -- L -- M -- N -- O -- P -- Q -- R -- S -- T -- U -- V -- W -- X -- Y -- Z The alphabetical listing is based on Christina DeMellos pages at http://www. ...

External links


Ivy League
Brown University | Columbia University | Cornell University | Dartmouth College
   Harvard University | University of Pennsylvania | Princeton University | Yale University   
Ivy League

  Results from FactBites:
 
WordNet - Princeton University Cognitive Science Laboratory (256 words)
The Global WordNet Organization is coordinating and guiding new the development of new wordnets and holding biannual meetings.
A website originating in Ukraine, http://www.synset.com, has posted the data from the Princeton WordNet without acknowledgment and is furthermore claiming copyright of the Princeton data.
Princeton has no connection to the Ukrainian site.
Princeton University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (6169 words)
According to the university, it is the fourth-oldest institution of higher education in the U.S. and is one of the eight Ivy League universities.
Princeton is among the wealthiest universities in the world, with an endowment just over 11 billion US dollars (#4th largest in the United States) sustained through the continued donations of its alumni and maintained by investment advisors.
Princeton University was named by the Princeton Review (which is, despite the name, unaffiliated with the university) as one of the most affordable colleges in the nation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m