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Encyclopedia > University of Phoenix Stadium

| Image File history File links Broom_icon. ...


{{Infobox_Stadium |

 stadium_name = University of Phoenix Stadium | 

image =
Image File history File links UofPStadiumLogo. ...

| Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (876x257, 72 KB)Cardinals Stadium, a football stadium in Glendale, Arizona; the home of the NFLs Arizona Cardinals. ...

 address = 1 Cardinals Drive, Glendale, AZ 85305 | construction start = July 30, 2003 | opened = August 1, 2006 | owner = Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority | operator = Global Spectrum | surface = Tifway 419 Hybrid Bermuda Grass | construction_cost = $455 million | architect = Peter Eisenman|HOK Sport | former_names = Cardinals Stadium (August - September 2006) | tenants = Arizona Cardinals (NFL)| Tostitos Fiesta Bowl seating_capacity = 63,400 permanent seats (can be expanded to 73,000)| field_dimensions = 134 yds x 78 yrds (122m x 71m) | 

University of Phoenix Stadium is a multipurpose stadium located in Glendale, Arizona. Its primary tenants are the Arizona Cardinals of the NFL and the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl. The new stadium is located across the street from the Jobing.com Arena, home to the NHL Phoenix Coyotes. The University of Phoenix, a for-profit university specializing in adult education, acquired the naming rights in September 2006, shortly after the stadium had opened under the name Cardinals Stadium. The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority (AZSTA) is a Municipal Corporation created on April 24, 2000 by Arizona Senate Bill 1220. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Installation art by Peter Eisenman in the courtyard of Castelvecchio Museum in Verona, Italy, Entitled: Il giardino dei passi perduti, (The garden of the lost steps) Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932 in Newark, New Jersey) is one of the foremost practitioners of deconstructivism in American architecture. ... HOK Sport + Venue + Event, a division of Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum, is an architectural practice specializing in the design of public assembly spaces and planning of major special events. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971 in Tempe, Arizona. ... Glendale is a city in Maricopa County, Arizona, USA. As of the 2000 census, the city population was 218,812. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... For other uses of National Football League, see National Football League (disambiguation). ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971 in Tempe, Arizona. ... Jobing. ... NHL can also be an abbreviation for National Historic Landmark or Non-Hodgkins lymphoma. ... The Phoenix Coyotes are a professional ice hockey team based in the Phoenix suburb of Glendale. ... It has been suggested that University of Phoenix controversy be merged into this article or section. ... For-Profit Schools are educational institutions that are run by private, profit-seeking companies or organizations. ... Libraries are a useful resource for adult learners. ... Naming rights are the right to name a piece of property, either tangible property or an event, usually granted in exchange for financial considerations. ...


The 63,400-seat stadium (expandable to 73,000) opened on Aug. 1, 2006 after three years of construction. It is considered an architectural icon for the region and was named by Business Week as one of the 10 “the most impressive” sports facilities on the globe due to the combination of its retractable roof and roll-in natural grass field. It is the only North American facility on the list. BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ...


The ceremonial groundbreaking for the new stadium was held on April 12, 2003. The cost of the project is $455 million. That total includes: April 12 is the 102nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (103rd in leap years). ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ...

  1. $395.4 million for the stadium;
  2. $41.7 million for site improvements;
  3. $17.8 million for the land.

Contributors to the stadium are:

  1. The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority = $302.3 million;
  2. The Arizona Cardinals = $143.2 million;
  3. The City of Glendale = $9.5 million.

The first preseason football game was played Aug. 12, 2006 when the Cardinals defeated the Pittsburgh Steelers, 21-13. The first regular season game was played September 10 against the San Francisco 49ers (the Cardinals won 34-27). The stadium's air-conditioning made it possible for the Cardinals to play at home on the opening weekend of the NFL season since moving to Arizona in 1988. The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority (AZSTA) is a Municipal Corporation created on April 24, 2000 by Arizona Senate Bill 1220. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... Glendale is the name of some places in the United States of America and Canada: Glendale, Arizona Glendale, California Glendale, Colorado Glendale, Rhode Island Glendale, Wisconsin Glendale, Alberta There are also: Glenn Dale, Maryland Glen Dale, West Virginia Glendale is also the name of a neighborhood in the borough of... City Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Team colors Black and Gold Head Coach Mike Tomlin Owner Dan Rooney General manager Kevin Colbert League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1933–present) Eastern Division (1933–1943; 1945–1949) Western Division (1944) American Conference (1950–1952) Eastern Conference (1953–1969) Century Division (1967–1969) American Football... September 10 is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years). ... City San Francisco, California Other nicknames Niners, The Red And Gold, Bay Bombers Team colors Cardinal red, metallic gold and black Head Coach Mike Nolan Owner Denise DeBartolo York and John York General manager none Mascot Sourdough Sam League/Conference affiliations All-America Football Conference (1946-1949) Western Division (1946... Official language(s) English Capital Phoenix Largest city Phoenix Area  Ranked 6th  - Total 113,998 sq mi (295,254 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 0. ...


The multipurpose nature of the facility has allowed it to host 91 events representing 110 event days between the dates of Aug. 4, 2006 through the BCS National Championship Jan. 8, 2007. These events included Arizona Cardinals games; public grand opening tours held Aug. 19 & 20, 2006 (attended by 120,000 people); various shows, expositions, tradeshows and motor sport events; the Rolling Stones concert Nov. 8, 2006; the AIA 4A and 5A state championship games for football (the first high school to win a football championship at the stadium was Cactus Shadows High School on Dec. 2, 20060); an international soccer exhibition match; the Fiesta Bowl National Band Championship High School Marching Band competition (the first marching band to ever play on the field was Foothill High School, from Pleasanton, California on December 29, 2006); the Tostitos Fiesta Bowl Jan. 1, 2007 featuring the Boise State Broncos vs. the University of Oklahoma Sooners (Boise State 43-42); and the BCS National Championship Jan. 8, 2007 between the No. 1 Ohio State Buckeyes and the No. 2 University of Florida Gators (Florida 41-14). The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final game of the annual Bowl Championship Series intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... This article is about the rock band. ... Image:Fhs areil. ... Location of Pleasanton within Alameda County, California. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971 in Tempe, Arizona. ... Boise State University is a state university located near downtown Boise, the capital city of Idaho. ... The University of Oklahoma, often called OU or Oklahoma, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... The University of Florida (Florida or UF) is a public land-grant research university located in Gainesville, Florida. ...


The stadium hosted the highest attended soccer match in Arizona with the Feb. 7 game featuring the U.S. Men's Team vs. the Mexico National Team.


Upcoming events include Super Bowl XLII in 2008 and the It will also be the site for the West Regional Finals of the 2009 NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Tournament. The 2009 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament will involve 65 schools playing in a single-elimination tournament to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ...

Contents

Unique features

Retractable roof

The stadium's retractable roof is a state-of-the-art, computer controlled feature which allows the building's owner to provide either an arena-like atmosphere or a more traditional open-air stadium feel for events. Having an enclosed, air-conditioned environment is important for fan comfort during games and events during the summer and early fall months in the Arizona desert. A retractable roof is a technology used in many sports venues. ...


The roof is 206 feet (63 m) above grade with a cable drive system designed by Uni-Systems that moves two 258 foot x 185 foot roof panels along an arced path. There are other examples of retractable roofs that operate on a single, flat plane, but this is the first roof which retracts along an arc. The roof uses more than 100,000 square feet of Teflon coated translucent fabric (provided by Birdair), which allows light to pass through. This reduces the need for interior lighting for daily operations and many non-sports activities in the facility. Rails set in the two arced Brunel trusses (designed by Walter P Moore) at the top of the east and west sides of the stadium provide the travel path for the roof panels. The panels meet directly over the 50-yard line when in the closed position, and roll downhill to reside over each end-zone when in the open position. The roof operates at a maximum speed of 25 feet per minute (1/4 m.p.h.) and runs at two different speeds. From the “Open” to “Half-Open” positions, the roof operates at a speed of 16 feet per minute. From the “Half-Open" to “Closed” positions the roof operates at a speed of 25 feet per minute. These speeds take the curve of the roof track into consideration (The slope of the two rails varies from 0 degrees at the “Closed” position to 14 degrees over the “Open” position.) The time to fully open or close the roof is approximately 12 minutes. Teflon is polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), a polymer of fluorinated ethylene. ... Brunel can mean: Isambard Kingdom Brunel Marc Isambard Brunel, Isambards father Brunel Bridge Brunel University Shlomo Ben Avraham Ole Brunell This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...


Each roof panel is supported by eight transporters/carriers (four on each side) that ride along steel rails to move the panels between the open and closed positions. Half of the transporters/carriers are equipped with cable drums that spool and unspool the cables, which are anchored to the Brunel truss above the fifty yard line. Each cable drum is powered by electric induction motors with fail-safe DC electric brakes that automatically engage when roof movement stops. This non-traditional arrangement, in which the cable drums travel with the roof panels, puts the drive system in close proximity to the encoders that monitor roof movement, and dramatically simplifies the control system. This arrangement also allows the large cable drums to be positioned along the roof panels, eliminating the need to make space for all sixteen drums at the center of the fixed roof structure. The design is also attractive because the cable drums lay the cables down and pick them up as they spool and unspool, rather dragging the cables across the roof steel.


The roof panels travel on two 700-foot steel rails running parallel to the field sidelines. The 257 ½-foot center-to-center distance between the rails varies with time due to lateral movement of the Brunel trusses under a variety of loading conditions. To accommodate this movement, linear bearings provide the connection between the west side of each roof panel and the roof transporters/carriers. This sliding connection expands and contracts, allowing up to 36” of relative movement between the roof panels and the transporters/carriers, while keeping the roof panel wheels aligned and engaged with the fixed building’s rails.


A personal computer provides the interface between the operator and the retractable roof control system. The PC allows the operator to monitor and control roof movement and also to perform maintenance and troubleshooting procedures. The control system interface provides the operator with on-board camera views of the travel path, along with feedback on all relevant roof parameters (motor torque, roof speed and position, cable payout, wind conditions, etc.) The control system interface also provides the operator with fault diagnostic screens for real time troubleshooting.


The fully redundant control system ensures the retractable roof remains completely under control throughout start-up and operation, an important consideration due to the weight of each roof panel. The system utilizes variable frequency drive (VFD) newly developed by ABB that provides 100% torque at start-up, when motor speed is at 0 Hz. The entire roof load is fully shifted from the brakes to the motors prior to roof movement, while the brakes are still engaged. The control system self-tests at every start-up, meaning the brakes will never be released in the unlikely event of a catastrophic drive motor failure. The control system is also designed to ensure that, once moving, the retractable roof remains completely under control. Should the roof ever move above the maximum allowed speeds, a redundant overspeed sensing system operating independently of the control system would take over. In 180 milliseconds, the overspeed system can sense that the roof is traveling too fast and fully engage the brakes.


The retractable roof utilizes state-of-the-art VFD/PLC technology for the control system, which continuously synchronizes all cable drums, ensures the drums equally share the roof loads, and keeps the roof panels square on the track. Using a parallel fiber optic network, one VFD in each roof quadrant operates as a master, and controls the remaining VFDs which operate as followers, keeping all movement fully synchronized. As a result, operation staff at University of Phoenix Stadium will never be faced with the tasks of retensioning cables or resquaring the roof on the track.


The retractable roof can be operated with up to 4 of the 16 motors in each quadrant off line, and can be stopped with up to 7 of the 16 brakes in each quadrant off-line. Every time roof movement is initiated, each of the 64 brakes is automatically tested by the control system. In the unlikely event of catastrophic motor or brake failure, roof movement will not take place. This built-in testing and redundancy ensures that the roof will operate safely and reliably.


Schuff Steel developed a unique steel erection strategy that optimized safety and efficiency during stadium construction, but also required a high degree of team coordination and collaboration. The Brunel trusses and the retractable roof components were assembled on the ground, and then lifted as a single unit into place at the top of the stadium. The entire construction team worked closely together throughout the 3-day roof lift, which took place in February 2005.


Roll in Field

One of the original design considerations for the stadium was to provide for a natural grass playing field, something preferred by players in the NFL and World Cup Soccer. However, there are numerous operational and maintenance issues with natural grass fields housed inside of stadiums, even those with fully-retractable roofs.


The answer was to provide a mechanism which could move the playing surface outside the stadium, where it could reside and receive full sunshine. This solution has worked in the newest stadiums like the Sapporo Dome in Japan, the Gelredome in the The Netherlands and the Veltins Arena (formerly known as Arena AufSchalke) in Gelsenkirchen, Germany. The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority estimates the roll-in field saved approximately $50 million in design, steel and construction costs in that it is more expensive to build a fully-retractable roof than it is to build a field tray which rolls on steel railroad wheels. Sapporo Dome is a stadium in Sapporo, Japan. ... The Gelredome is the home stadium of Vitesse in Arnhem. ... Veltins Arena during a Pur concert. ... The Arizona Sports and Tourism Authority (AZSTA) is a Municipal Corporation created on April 24, 2000 by Arizona Senate Bill 1220. ...


The facility's fully-retractable, natural-grass playing surface is the first to be built in the United States and was designed by Uni-Systems. The field (sized to accommodate World Cup Soccer as well as American football)is 234 feet wide by 403 feet-4 inches long, has a 2.2 acre playing surface and is contained in a moveable field tray that is like a gigantic cookie sheet. The tray includes all components required for a healthy playing field including irrigation, drainage and an optimized growing surface. The total weight of the field tray and field is 18.9 million pounds. While the tray is carried on 542 steel wheels, only 76 of those wheels actually power the tray along the 13-rails embedded into the floor which support its massive weight. Each of those 76 wheels, located along the outboard portion of the tray, are powered by one-horsepower electric motors.


The uniform depth soil/sod system within the field tray which was designed by CMX Sports Engineers, maintains a NFL-quality playing surface with a irrigation and drainage system fully-contained inside of the field tray. For proper water drainage, the playing field is crowned such that the centerline (perpendicular to the 50-yard line) is 2” higher than the sidelines, which are approximately 40 3/8 inches above the finished floor. An 18-inch wide synthetic edge strip runs the perimeter of the playing field, and allows maintenance staff to safely work on the natural grass without having to place themselves or their equipment directly on the edge. The soil/sod system is supported by a 5”-thick composite decking system and an 18-inch W-beam structural framing grid. The massive support structure provides the playing field with considerable stiffness and superior vibration characteristics.


The retractable field normally resides outdoors, on the south side of the facility, where conditions for maintaining its natural grass playing surface are optimal. The stadium itself is aligned along a northwest by southeast axis to prevent it from casting any shadow on the grass. The field tray travels at 11.5 feet per minute (1/8 m.p.h.) into the stadium through doors (nicknamed flipper doors) on the south side of the facility. It takes about 1 hour for the field to travel one-way along its 741-foot path. To provide lateral guidance and maintain alignment for the field structure as it moves, 360 small guide wheels ride horizontally along each side of the center rail. All 13 rail lines are identical with the exception of the center rail that has a cutout in each side of the adjacent concrete to provide the clearance for the guide wheels.


Workers inspect and maintain the field tray components from underneath. A 3-foot wide and 8-foot deep trench allows workers to view the entire width of the field. Operators simply roll the field over the trench to access the length of the tray. Grates cover the top of the trench when not in use. One personnel access hatch and ladder is located at each end of the trench.


During operation, two 250-foot cords are connected to the field and provide power from receptacles located inside the stadium. A portable operator control station (OCS) is plugged into a pendant receptacle at the leading edge of the retractable field and is used to monitor and control field operation. Throughout movement, 4 light and horn beacons on the leading and trailing edges of the field provide visual and audio warnings.


Other features

The stadium also features oversized 30-foot (9.1 m) tall gate identifiers outside of each parking lot. This was done to differentiate the stadium from others that use multiple small signs within each parking lot.


Award winning architect Peter Eisenman, in collaboration with HOK Sport, designed the facility, which is said to resemble an abstracted, coiled rattlesnake.[1] Structural engineering and structural design was provided by Walter P Moore Engineers and Consultants. Design- Builder of the facility was the nations #1 sports facility builder, Hunt Construction Group, Inc. (Part of the construction was featured on The Discovery Channel's show Extreme Engineering.) Installation art by Peter Eisenman in the courtyard of Castelvecchio Museum in Verona, Italy, Entitled: Il giardino dei passi perduti, (The garden of the lost steps) Peter Eisenman (born August 11, 1932 in Newark, New Jersey) is one of the foremost practitioners of deconstructivism in American architecture. ... HOK Sport + Venue + Event, a division of Hellmuth, Obata and Kassabaum, is an architectural practice specializing in the design of public assembly spaces and planning of major special events. ... Species 27 species; see list of rattlesnake species and subspecies. ... Walter P Moore Engineers and Consultants, based in Houston, Texas, is one of the preeminent structural engineering companies in the United States. ... Discovery Channel is an American cable TV network, based in Silver Spring, MD, that has a variety of science programming, particularly documentaries and nature shows. ... Extreme Engineering is a series of programs on the Discovery Channel which deal with futuristic engineering challenges. ...


A plaza surrounding the stadium is named the Pat Tillman Freedom Plaza in memory of the former Cardinals defensive back who was killed in action by friendly fire while serving with the United States Army Rangers in Afghanistan. Patrick Daniel Tillman, Jr. ... For other uses, see Friendly Fire (disambiguation). ... The 75th Ranger Regiment —also known as the United States Army Rangers— is a light infantry special operations force of the United States Army Special Operations Command (USASOC); with headquarters in Fort Benning, Georgia. ...


On September 8, 2006, Alltel Wireless announced the activation of the only cell site located directly within the stadium. The cell site, located on the Service Level of the stadium, provides service to all levels of the facility through an antenna built into the structure. Alltel (NYSE: AT) is an American telecommunications company with headquarters in the Riverdale neighborhood of Little Rock, Arkansas. ... A cell site is a site where a wireless antenna and network communications equipment are placed to create the network cells for the use of mobile phones. ...


Facility information

The stadium has 88 luxury suites — called luxury lofts — with space for 16 future suites as the stadium matures. Luxury box or luxury suite is the North American term for a special seating section in arenas, stadiums and other sports venues. ...


The 25 acres surrounding the stadium is called Sportsman's Park. Included within the Park is an eight-acre landscaped tailgating area called the Great Lawn.


There are no obstructed view seats in the stadium. There are visible areas in the upper deck of the end zone where seats could have been put in but were not due to the giant super columns supporting the roof structure.


The stadium seating capacity can be expanded by 9,600 for "mega-events" such as college bowls and NFL Super Bowls by adding risers and ganged, portable "X-frame" folding seats. The endzone area on the side of the facility where the mobile turf moves in and out of the facility can be expanded to accommodate the additional ticketholders.


The roof is made out of translucent "Bird-Air" fabric and opens in twelve minutes. It is the first retractable roof ever built on an incline.


Naming rights

Pink Taco, a Mexican restaurant known for its controversial name, had indicated interest in buying the naming rights.[2] However on August 21, 2006, Cardinals spokesman Mark Dalton stated "We're in serious discussions with companies about naming rights, and Pink Taco is not one of them".[3] Pink Taco Logo Pink Taco is a Las Vegas, Nevada based Mexican restaurant that has earned notoriety for its name, which is the same as a slang term for a human vagina. ... This topic should not be confused with Tex-Mex which is commonly refered to as Mexican food in the U.S.. Mexican food is a style of food that originated in Mexico. ...


On September 26, the University of Phoenix acquired the naming rights to the stadium totalling $154.5 million over 20 years.[4] The University does not field any intercollegiate sports teams, because it is a non-traditional university, specializing in providing access to higher education for adults already in the workforce. It has been suggested that University of Phoenix controversy be merged into this article or section. ...


External links

Notes and references

  1. ^ Rogers, Matthew. "Really Big Things" (television series) Discovery Channel, 2007-01-16.
  2. ^ McClay, Bob. "Pink Taco Owners Want to Buy Naming Rights to Cardinals Stadium", KTAR, 2006-08-21. Retrieved on 2006-09-26.
  3. ^ Kress, Adam. "Cardinals sack 'Pink Taco Stadium' idea", The Business Journal of Phoenix, 2006-08-21. Retrieved on 2006-09-26.
  4. ^ Wong, Scott. "Stadium name deal: $154.5 mil over 20 years", Arizona Republic, 2006-09-26. Retrieved on 2006-09-26.
  • 12 News Special: Stadium Kickoff. Aired 7:00pm. NBC. KPNX, Phoenix, 10 August 2006.
Preceded by
Sun Devil Stadium
19882005
Home of the
Arizona Cardinals
2006
Succeeded by
Current

Coordinates: 33°31′39.72″N, 112°15′45.39″W This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Arizona Republic is a newspaper published in Phoenix, Arizona. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... September 26 is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NBC (an abbreviation for National Broadcasting Company, its former corporate name) is an American television network headquartered in the GE Building in New York Citys Rockefeller Center. ... KPNX is the NBC television affiliate for Phoenix, Arizona. ... Sun Devil Stadium, Frank Kush Field is located on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe. ... 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Arizona Cardinals v d e

FranchiseHistoryPlayers • Quarterbacks • Statistics
StadiumsNormal ParkComiskey ParkSportsman's ParkBusch StadiumSun Devil StadiumUniversity of Phoenix Stadium
PeopleBill BidwellCharles Bidwell City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... City Glendale, Arizona Other nicknames The Cards, The Birds, Big Red Team colors Cardinal Red, Black, and White Head Coach Ken Whisenhunt Owner William V. Bidwill General manager Rod Graves Mascot Big Red League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1920–present) Western Division (1933-1949) American Conference (1950-1952) Eastern... Normal Park is the name of a former football field in Chicago, Illinois. ... This article is about the original Comiskey Park. ... Sportsmans Park was the name of a former Major League Baseball ballpark in St. ... Busch Stadium in St. ... Sun Devil Stadium, Frank Kush Field is located on the campus of Arizona State University in Tempe. ... William V. Bill Bidwell, Sr. ... Charles W. Bidwell, Sr. ...

Club Head Coaches

Driscoll • Horween • Barry • Chamberlin • Gillies • Scanlon • Nevers • Andrews • Chevigny • Schissler • Creighton • NeversConzelmanHandlerConzelmanLambeauHandlerKuharichStydaharRichardsIvyLemmWinnerHollway • Coryell • WilkinsonWilsonHanifanStallings • Kuhlmann • BugelRyanTobinMcGinnisGreenWhisenhunt John Leo Paddy Driscoll (January 11, 1895 - June 28, 1968) was a Pro Football Hall of Fame quarterback. ... Guy Chamberlin (January 16, 1894 - April 4, 1967) was a professional football player and coach in the National Football League (NFL). ... Ernest Nevers (1903 - 1976) was a U.S. football player. ... Ernest Nevers (1903 - 1976) was a U.S. football player. ... Jimmy Conzelman (March 6, 1898 - August 5, 1970) was a professional football player for in the National Football League. ... Phil Handler (July 21, 1908 - December 8, 1968) was a football player and coach who spent his entire professional career in the city of Chicago. ... Jimmy Conzelman (March 6, 1898 - August 5, 1970) was a professional football player for in the National Football League. ... Earl Louis Curly Lambeau (April 9, 1898 - June 1, 1965) was the founder, a player and the first coach of the Green Bay Packers professional football team. ... Phil Handler (July 21, 1908 - December 8, 1968) was a football player and coach who spent his entire professional career in the city of Chicago. ... Joseph Lawrence Kuharich (April 14, 1917-January 25, 1981) was a noted collegiate and professional American football coach. ... Joseph Lee Stydahar (March 17, 1912–March 23, 1977) was an American football offensive tackle for the Chicago Bears from 1936 to 1942 and 1945 to 1946. ... Ray Richards (died September 18, 1974) was a American football player and coach who served at both the collegiate and professional levels and was head coach for the National Football Leagues Chicago Cardinals. ... Frank Pop Ivy (January 25, 1916 - May 17, 2003) was a football player and coach who holds the unique distinction of being the only person ever to serve as a head coach in the National Football League, the American Football League and the Canadian Football League. ... Wally Lemm (October 23, 1919 - October 2, 1988) was a football coach at the high school, collegiate and professional levels and achieved his greatest prominence as head coach of the American Football Leagues Houston Oilers and the National Football Leagues St. ... Charley Winner was a football coach whose professional and personal life was closely intertwined with that of Weeb Ewbank, a member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ... Bob Hollway (born January 29, 1926) was a football coach who served at both the collegiate and professional levels, and was head coach of the National Football Leagues St. ... Don Coryell (born October 17, 1924) is a former American football coach, who coached in the NFL first with the St. ... Charles Burnham Bud Wilkinson (April 23, 1916 – February 9, 1994) was an American football player, coach and broadcaster. ... Lawrence Frank Wilson (born May 24, 1938, in Rigby, Idaho) is a former American football free safety who played for the St. ... Jim Hanifan Jim Hanifan (born September 21, 1933 in Compton, California) is a longtime American football coach and former head coach of the St. ... Gene Stallings (born March 2, 1935) is a former college and professional football coach // Gene Stallings of Powderly, Texas, received his Bachelor of Science degree from Texas A&M University in 1957. ... Joe Bugel is the current assistant head coach-offense for the Washington Redskins. ... Buddy Ryan (born James David Ryan on February 17, 1934) is a former American football coach. ... Vince Tobin is a former head coach of the Arizona Cardinals. ... Dave McGinnis is a former head coach of the Arizona Cardinals. ... Dennis Denny Green (b. ... Ken Whisenhunt (born February 28, 1962, Augusta, GA) is the head coach of the Arizona Cardinals NFL football team. ...

League Championships (2)
1925, 1947


Current Stadiums of the National Football League
American Football Conference National Football Conference
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SandovalArlene22
23rd July 2010
Various people all over the world receive the business loans from different banks, because that's comfortable and fast.

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