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Encyclopedia > University of Padua

University of Padua
Università degli Studi di Padova

Latin: Universitas Studii Paduani

Motto Universa Universis Patavina Libertas
Established 1222
Type State-supported
Rector Prof. Vincenzo Milanesi
Students 65,000
Location Padua, Italy
Sports teams CUS Padova (http://www.cuspadova.it/)
Affiliations Coimbra Group
Website www.unipd.it/
"Gymnasivm Patavinum:" The University's main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut
"Gymnasivm Patavinum:" The University's main Bo palace shown in a 1654 woodcut

The University of Padua (Italian Università degli Studi di Padova, UNIPD) located in Padua, Italy was founded in 1222. It is among the earliest of the European universities and the second oldest in Italy. As of 2003 the university had approximately 65,000 students. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s - 1220s - 1230s 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s Years: 1217 1218 1219 1220 1221 1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1227 See also: 1222 state leaders Events Foundation of the University of Padua Completion of the Cistercian convent in Alcobaca... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua. ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Gymnasivm Patavinum the university in a woodcut, by Jacob Tomasini, 1654 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Gymnasivm Patavinum the university in a woodcut, by Jacob Tomasini, 1654 The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 2003 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

The university was founded in 1222 when a large group of students and professors left the University of Bologna in search of more academic freedom. Centuries: 12th century - 13th century - 14th century Decades: 1170s 1180s 1190s 1200s 1210s - 1220s - 1230s 1240s 1250s 1260s 1270s Years: 1217 1218 1219 1220 1221 1222 1223 1224 1225 1226 1227 See also: 1222 state leaders Events Foundation of the University of Padua Completion of the Cistercian convent in Alcobaca... The University of Bologna (Italian: , UNIBO) is the oldest continually operating degree-granting university in the world, and the second biggest university in Italy. ... Academic freedom is the freedom of teachers, students, and academic institutions to pursue knowledge wherever it may lead, without undue or unreasonable interference. ...


The first subjects to be taught were jurisprudence and theology. The curriculum expanded rapidly, however and by 1399 the institution had divided in two: a Universitas Iuristarum for civil law, Canon law, and theology, and a Universitas Artistarum which taught astronomy, dialectic, philosophy, grammar, medicine, and rhetoric. (The two were only reunited into one university in 1813.) Philosophers of law ask what is law? and what should it be? Jurisprudence is the theory and philosophy of law. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... In the common law, civil law refers to the area of law governing relations between private individuals. ... Canon Law is the ecclesiastical law of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... A giant Hubble mosaic of the Crab Nebula, a supernova remnant Astronomy (also frequently referred to as astrophysics) is the scientific study of celestial objects (such as stars, planets, comets, and galaxies) and phenomena that originate outside the Earths atmosphere (such as the cosmic background radiation). ... In classical philosophy, dialectic (Greek: διαλεκτική) is an exchange of propositions (theses) and counter-propositions (antitheses) resulting in a synthesis of the opposing assertions, or at least a qualitative transformation in the direction of the dialogue. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... For the topic in theoretical computer science, see Formal grammar Grammar is the study of rules governing the use of language. ... medicines, see Medication. ... Rhetoric (from Greek , rhêtôr, orator, teacher) is generally understood to be the art or technique of persuasion through the use of spoken language; however, this definition of rhetoric has expanded greatly since rhetoric emerged as a field of study in universities. ...


The student body was divided into groups known as ‘nations’ which reflected their places of origin. The nations themselves fell into two groups: the cismontanes for the Italian students and the ultramontanes for those who came from beyond the Alps.


From the fifteenth to the eighteenth century, the university was renowned for its research, particularly in the areas of medicine, astronomy, philosophy and law. This was thanks in part to the protection of the Republic of Venice, which enabled the university to maintain some freedom and independence from the influence of the Roman Catholic Church. During this time, the University adopted the Latin motto: Universa universis patavina libertas (The Freedom of Padova is complete for everybody). Borders of the Republic of Venice in 1796 Capital Venice Language(s) Venetian, Latin Religion Roman Catholic Government Republic Doge  - 1789–97 Ludovico Manin History  - Established 697  - Treaty of Zara June 27, 1358  - Treaty of Leoben April 17, 1797 * Traditionally, the establishment of the Republic is dated to 697. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ...


On June 25, 1678, Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Piscopia became the first woman graduate in history when she was awarded a degree in Philosophy. is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events August 10 - Treaty of Nijmegen ends the Dutch War. ... Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Piscopia (June 5, 1646 - July 26, 1684) was an Italian mathematician of noble descent, and the first woman to receive a doctor of philosophy degree. ...


The Botanical Garden of Padova, established by the university in 1545, was the second such garden in the world, and is the oldest which remains to this day on its original site. In addition to the garden, best visited in the spring and summer, the university also manages nine museums, including the renowned Museum of History of Physics. The Botanical Garden of Padova (or Garden of the Simples) in a 16th century print; in the background, the Basilica of SantAntonio. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ...


But to return to its intellectual standing, the University of Padua became one the universities of the Kingdom of Italy in 1873, and ever since has been one of the most prestigious in the country for its contributions to scientific and scholarly research: in the field of mathematics alone, its professors have included such figures as Gregorio Ricci Curbastro, Giuseppe Veronese, Francesco Severi and Tullio Levi Civita. For other uses, see Italy (disambiguation). ... Gregorio Ricci-Curbastro (January 12, 1853 - August 6, 1925) was an Italian mathematician. ... Giuseppe Veronese (May 7, 1854 - July 17, 1917) was an Italian mathematician. ... Franceso Severi (13 April 1879, Arezzo, Italy - 8 December 1961, Rome) was an Italian mathematician. ... Tullio Levi-Civita (March 29, 1873 - December 29, 1941) (pronounced le-vee chee-vee-tah) was an Italian mathematician, most famous for his work on absolute differential calculus (tensor calculus) and its applications to the theory of relativity but who also made significant contributions in other areas. ...


The last years of the nineteenth and the first half of the twentieth century saw a reversal of the centralisation process that had taken place in the sixteenth: scientific institutes were set up in what became veritable campuses; a new building to house the Arts and Philosophical faculty was built in another part of the city centre (Palazzo del Liviano, designed by Giò Ponti); the Astro-Physics Observatory was built on the Asiago uplands; and the old Palazzo del Bo was fully restored (1938-45). Obviously, the vicissitudes of the Fascist period - political interference, the Race Laws, etc - had a detrimental effect upon the development of the university, as did the devastation caused by the Second World War and - just a few decades later - the effect of the student protests of 1968-69 (which the University was left to face without adequate help and support from central government). However, the Gymnasium Omnium Disciplinarum continued its work uninterrupted, and overall the second half of the twentieth century saw a sharp upturn in development - primarily due an interchange of ideas with international institutions of the highest standing (particularly in the fields of science and technology). Gio Ponti (18 November 1891, Milan- 16 September, 1979, Milan) was an Italian architect. ... The Astrophysical Observatory of Asiago, or Asiago Observatory is an astronomical observatory owned and operated by University of Padua and members of the Padua Observatory. ... Asiago is the name of both a minor township (population roughly 6,500) and the surrounding plateau region (the Altopiano di Asiago) in the Province of Vicenza in the Veneto region of Northeastern Italy ( 45°52. ... Italian fascism (in Italian, fascismo) was the authoritarian political movement which ruled Italy from 1922 to 1943 under the leadership of Benito Mussolini. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ...


In recent years, the University has been able to meet the problems posed by overcrowded facilities by re-deploying over the Veneto as a whole. In 1990, the Institute of Management Engineering was set up in Vicenza; then the summer courses at Brixen (Bressanone) began once more; and in 1995 the Agripolis centre at Legnaro - for Agricultural Science and Veterinary Medicine - opened. Other sites of re-deployment are at Rovigo, Treviso, Feltre, Castelfranco Veneto, Conegliano, Chioggia and Asiago. Engineering management is a field that bridges the gap between engineering and management. ... Vicenza is a city in northern Italy, is the capital of the eponymous province in the Veneto region, at the northern base of the Monte Berico, straddling the Bacchiglione. ... Brixen (Italian: Bressanone; German: Brixen; Ladin: Porsenù or Persenon; Latin: Brixino; also known as Pressena (827 AD), Prichsna, Brixina) is a town in the Province of Bolzano in the Italian region Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. ... Legnaro is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Padua in the Italian region Veneto, located about 30 km southwest of Venice and about 11 km southeast of Padua. ... Rovigo is a town in the Veneto region of Northern Italy, the capital of the homonymous province. ... Treviso is a town in the Veneto region of Italy. ... Feltre (pop. ... Castelfranco Veneto is a town and episcopal see of Veneto, Italy, in the Treviso province, 16 mi. ... Conegliano is a town and episcopal see of Venetia, Italy, in the province of Treviso, 17 miles N. by rail from the town of Treviso, 230 ft. ... Chioggia is a coastal town and comune of the province of Venice in the Veneto region of northern Italy, 45°13N 12°17E, situated on a small island at the southern entrance to the Lagoon of Venice about 25 km south of Venice (50 km by road); causeways connect it...


Recent changes in state legislation have also opened the way to greater autonomy for Italian universities, and in 1995 Padua adopted a new Statute that gave it greater independence.


As the publications of innumerable conferences and congresses show, the modern-day University of Padua plays an important role in scholarly and scientific research at both a European and world level. True to its origins, this is the direction in which the Institution intends to move in the future, establishing closer and closer links of co-operation and exchange with all the world's major research universities.


Eminent faculty and alumni

Nicholas of Cusa Nicholas of Cusa (1401– August 11, 1464) was a German cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church, a philosopher, jurist, mathematician, and an astronomer. ... Pietro Pomponazzi (also known by his Latin name, Petrus Pomionatius) (16 September 1462 - 18 May 1525) was an Italian philosopher born in Mantua and died in Bologna. ... “Copernicus” redirects here. ... Pietro Bembo (May 20, 1470 - 18 January 1547), Italian cardinal and scholar. ... Sperone Speroni degli Alvarotti (1500-1588) was an Italian Renaissance humanist, scholar, and dramatist. ... Moses Hayyim Luzzatto (1707 - 1747) was an Italian. ... Reginald Pole, cardinal Reginald Pole (1500 – November 17, 1558) was an English prelate, Archbishop of Canterbury, Cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church. ... Andreas Vesalius (portrait from the Fabrica). ... Gabriele Falloppio Gabriele Falloppio (1523- October 9, 1562), often known by his Latin name Fallopius, was one of the most important anatomists and physicians of the sixteenth century; he was born at Modena, Italy in 1523; he died October 9, 1562 at Padua. ... Girolamo Fabrizi d Acquapendente. ... “Tasso” redirects here. ... Francis Walsingham by John de Critz (detail) Sir Francis Walsingham (c. ... Pietro Pomponazzi (also known by his Latin name, Petrus Pomionatius) (16 September 1462 - 18 May 1525) was an Italian philosopher born in Mantua and died in Bologna. ... Jacopo Zabarella (or Giacomo Zabarella) (1532-1589) was an Italian Aristotelian philosopher and logician at the University of Padua. ... Cesare Cremonini, sometimes Cesare Cremonino (22 December 1550[1] in Cento in the then Papal States - 19 July 1631 in Padua then under Republic of Venice rule) was an Italian professor of natural philosophy, working rationalism (against revelation) and Aristotelian materialism (against the dualist immortality of the soul) inside scholasticism. ... Galileo Galilei (15 February 1564 – 8 January 1642) was an Italian physicist, mathematician, astronomer, and philosopher who is closely associated with the scientific revolution. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Year 1592 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... // Events January 7 - Galileo Galilei discovers the Galilean moons of Jupiter. ... William Harvey William Harvey (April 1, 1578 – June 3, 1657) was an English medical doctor, who is credited with being the first to correctly describe, in exact detail, the properties of blood being pumped around the body by the heart. ... Antonio Vallisneri (1661–1730) was an Italian medical scientist, scientist and naturalist. ... Events January 1 - Russia accepts Julian calendar. ... Events Pope Clement XII elected September 17 - Change of emperor of the Ottoman Empire from Ahmed III (1703-1730) to Mahmud I (1730-1754) Anna Ivanova (Anna I of Russia) became czarina Births April 16 - Henry Clinton, British general (d. ... Giovanni Battista Morgagni (February 25, 1682 - December 6, 1771), Italian anatomist, was born on at ForIi. ... Ugo Foscolo (1778-1827), Italian writer, was born at Zakynthos in the Ionian Isles on 6 Febraury 1778. ... Francesco Zantedeschi (1797 – March 29, 1873) was an italian priest and physicist. ... Elena Lucrezia Cornaro Piscopia (June 5, 1646 - July 26, 1684) was an Italian mathematician of noble descent, and the first woman to receive a doctor of philosophy degree. ... Giacomo Casanova “Casanova” redirects here. ... Federico Faggin (born 1 December 1941) is a physicist and electrical engineer considered to be one of the inventors of the microprocessor. ...

List of Faculties

The University of Padova offers a wide range of degrees in 13 faculties:

The arts is a broad subdivision of culture, composed of many expressive disciplines. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ... medicines, see Medication. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is an academic / applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior of humans and animals. ... A graph of a normal bell curve showing statistics used in educational assessment and comparing various grading methods. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ...

See also

Map of medieval European universities This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... This is a list of Italian universities. ... Tronco Maestro Riviera: a pedestrian walk along a section of the inland waterway or naviglio interno of Padua. ...

External links

  • University of Padua Website (Italian) (English) (Spanish)
  • Museums of the University

  Results from FactBites:
 
Padua - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1679 words)
Padua claims to be the oldest city in north Italy; the early medieval commune justified itself by a fabled founder in the Trojan Antenor, whose relics the commune recognized in a large stone sarcophagus exhumed in the year 1274.
Padua prospered economically, and the university (the third in Italy) was founded in 1222, making it one of the oldest universities in continuous operation.
Padua passed under Venetian rule in 1405, and so remained, with a brief interval during the wars of the League of Cambray, till the fall of the republic in 1797.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: University of Padua (894 words)
The opinion that Frederick II transferred the Studium of Bologna to Padua in 1241 is groundless.
The theological faculty was instituted by Urban V in 1363.
University education in Italy is strictly governmental, and without it all professional possibilities are closed to young men.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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