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Encyclopedia > University of Oklahoma

Oklahoma University

Seal of the University of Oklahoma Image File history File links OUSeal. ...

Motto Civi et reipublicae (Latin for "For the citizens and for the state")
Established 1890
Type Public
Space-grant
Endowment $1.108 Billion[4]
President David L. Boren
Provost Nancy L. Mergler
OU Board of Regents Paul D. Austin, Chairman
Faculty 2,789[2][3]
Students 29,721[1]
Undergraduates 20,598
Postgraduates 9,123
Location Norman, Oklahoma, USA
Address 660 Parrington Oval, Norman, OK, 73019
Campus Suburban
3,000 acres (12.1 km²) including north research park
Colors Crimson and Cream[5]            
Nickname Sooners
Mascot Sooners
Affiliations Big 12 Conference
Website www.ou.edu

University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. Founded in 1890, it existed in Oklahoma Territory near Indian Territory 17 years before the two became the state of Oklahoma. As of 2006, the university has 29,721 students enrolled,[1] most located at its main campus in Norman. Employing over 2,000 faculty members,[2] the school offers 152 baccalaureate programs, 160 master's programs, 75 doctorate programs, and 20 majors at the first professional level.[6][7] David Boren, a former U.S. Senator and Oklahoma Governor, has served as President of the University of Oklahoma since 1994. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... David Lyle Boren (born April 21, 1941) is an American politician from the state of Oklahoma. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Norman, Oklahoma, is the county seat and largest city in Cleveland County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ... See also List of colors Categories: Stub | Colors ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links OU-Logo. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see Oklahoma (disambiguation). ... Oklahoma Territory was an organized territory of the United States from May 2, 1890 until November 16, 1907, when Oklahoma became the 46th state. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... Norman, Oklahoma, is the county seat and largest city in Cleveland County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... David Lyle Boren (born April 21, 1941) was a United States Senator from Oklahoma from 1979 to 1994. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Brad Henry, the 26th and current Governor of Oklahoma The Best Governor of the State of Oklahoma is the head of state for the State of Oklahoma. ...


In 2007, The Princeton Review named the University of Oklahoma one of its "Best Value" colleges.[8] The school is ranked first per capita among public universities in enrollment of National Merit Scholars and among the top five in the graduation of Rhodes Scholars.[6] PC Magazine and the Princeton Review rated it of the "20 Most Wired Colleges" in 2006,[9] while the Carnegie Foundation classifies it as a research university with "high research activity."[10] Located on its Norman campus are two prominent museums, the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art, specializing in French Impressionism and Native American artwork, and the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, specializing in the natural history of Oklahoma. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... The PSAT/NMSQT, or Preliminary-SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, is a multiple choice standardized test generally taken by high school juniors, sophomores, and freshmen in the United States. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... This article is about the art movement. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... A natural history museum in Norman, Oklahoma, operated by the University of Oklahoma. ...


The school, well-known for its athletic programs, has won 7 NCAA Division I National Football Championships.[11] Its gymnastics teams have won four national championships since 2002 and its football program has the best winning percentage of any Division I-FBS team since the introduction of the AP Poll in 1936,[12] playing in three BCS national championship games since the inception of the BCS system in 1998. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, and kinaesthetic awareness. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ... The BCS National Championship Game or BCS title game is the final bowl game of the annual Bowl Championship Series and is intended by Series organizers to determine the NCAA Division I-A national football championship. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ...

Contents

History

The history of the University of Oklahoma begins before Oklahoma's statehood. In 1889, Governor of Oklahoma Territory George Washington Steele urged the Oklahoma Territorial legislature to "create public school systems and universities of higher education". In December 1890, the Legislature established three universities: the state university in Norman, the agricultural and mechanical college in Stillwater (later renamed Oklahoma State University) and a normal school in Edmond (later renamed University of Central Oklahoma).[13] Oklahoma's admission into the union in 1907 led to the renaming of the Norman Territorial University as the University of Oklahoma. Norman residents donated 407 acres (1.6 km²) of land for the university 0.5 miles (0.8 km) south of the Norman railroad depot. The university's first president ordered the planting of numerous trees before the construction of the first campus building because he "could not visualize a treeless university seat."[14] Landscaping remains important to the university.[15] This is a list of Governors of Oklahoma Territory: See also Oklahoma Oklahoma Territory Governor of Oklahoma Category: ... George Washington Steele (December 13, 1839 – July 12, 1922) was an American lawyer, soldier, and politician who twice served as a Congressman for Indiana, from 1881 to 1889 and again from 1895 to 1903. ... Oklahoma Territory was an organized territory of the United States from May 2, 1890 until November 16, 1907, when Oklahoma became the 46th state. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... Downtown Stillwater Stillwater is a city in Payne County, Oklahoma, United States. ... Oklahoma State University, located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, is an institution of higher learning founded in 1890 as a land-grant university, known as Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College (Oklahoma A&M). ... A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... It has been suggested that Settlers Crossing be merged into this article or section. ... The University of Central Oklahoma, often referred to as UCO, located in Edmond, Oklahoma. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ...


The university's first president, David Ross Boyd, arrived in Norman in August 1892 and the first students enrolled that year. The School of Pharmacy was founded in 1893 because of high demand for pharmacists in the territory. Three years later, the university awarded its first degree to a pharmaceutical chemist.[16] The "Rock Building" in downtown Norman held the initial classes until the university's first building opened on September 6, 1893.[17] David Ross Boyd (1853 - November 1936) was the first president of the University of Oklahoma. ... is the 249th day of the year (250th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Performing Arts, formerly Holmberg Hall, exemplifies the school's architectural style.
Donald W. Reynolds Center for the Performing Arts, formerly Holmberg Hall, exemplifies the school's architectural style.

On January 6, 1903, the university's only building burned down and destroyed many records of the early university. Construction began immediately on a new building as several other towns hoped to capitalize by convincing the university to move. President Boyd and the faculty were not dismayed by the loss. Mathematics professor Frederick Elder said, "What do you need to keep classes going? Two yards of blackboard and a box of chalk."[18] As a response to the fire, English professor Vernon Louis Parrington created a plan for the future development of the campus. Most of the plan was never implemented, but Parrington's suggestion for the campus core formed the basis for the North Oval. The North and South Ovals are now distinctive features of the campus. He also suggested the university adhere to the popular east coast college architectural style "Collegiate Gothic".[14] The University has built over a dozen buildings in the Collegiate Gothic style. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1126x748, 173 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1126x748, 173 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... Vernon Louis Parrington (1871–1929) was an American historian and football coach. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...

School Presidents
David Ross Boyd, 1892-1908
A. Grant Evans, 1908-1911
Stratton D. Brooks, 1912-1923
James S. Buchanan, 1924-1925
William Bennett Bizzell, 1926-1941
Joseph A. Brandt, 1941-1943
George Lynn Cross, 1943-1968
John Herbert Hollomon, 1968-1970
Paul F. Sharp, 1971-1977
William S. Banowsky, 1978-1984
Frank E. Horton 1985-1988
Richard Van Horn, 1989-1993
David Boren, 1994-present

In 1907, Oklahoma entered statehood, fostering changes in the political atmosphere of the state. Up until this point, Oklahoma's Republican tendencies changed with the election of Oklahoma's first governor, the Democratic Charles N. Haskell. Since the inception of the university, a religious bout had brewed between different groups on campus. Early in the university's existence, many professors were Presbyterian, as was Boyd. Under pressure, Boyd eventually hired several Baptists and Southern Methodists.[19] The Presbyterians and Baptists got along but the Southern Methodists conflicted with the administration. Two notable Methodists, Rev. Nathaniel Lee Linebaugh and Professor Ernest Taylor Bynum, were critics of Boyd and activists in Haskell's election campaign. When Haskell took office, he fired many of the Republicans at the university, including President Boyd.[20] David Ross Boyd (1853 - November 1936) was the first president of the University of Oklahoma. ... Arthur Grant Evans (September 9, 1858 — November 30, 1929) was the second president of the University of Oklahoma. ... Stratton Duluth Brooks (1869 — January 18, 1949) was the third president of the University of Oklahoma. ... James Shannon Buchanan (October 14, 1864 — March 20, 1930) was the fourth president of the University of Oklahoma. ... William Bennett Bizzell (1876-10-14—1944-05-13) was the fifth president of the University of Oklahoma and president of Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas (now Texas A&M University). ... The seventh President of the University of Oklahoma ... John Herbert Hollomon, Jr. ... David Lyle Boren (born April 21, 1941) was a United States Senator from Oklahoma from 1979 to 1994. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... Brad Henry, the 26th and current Governor of Oklahoma The Best Governor of the State of Oklahoma is the head of state for the State of Oklahoma. ... The Democratic Party is one of two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Republican Party. ... Charles Nathaniel Haskell (March 13, 1860 – July 5, 1933) was an American lawyer, oilman, and statesman. ... Presbyterianism is part of the Reformed churches family of denominations of Christian Protestantism based on the teachings of John Calvin which traces its institutional roots to the Scottish Reformation, especially as led by John Knox. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ...


The campus expanded over the next several decades and by 1926, the university encompassed 167 acres (0.7 km²). Development of South Oval allowed for the southern expansion of the campus. The University built a new library on the oval's north end in 1929. Then President Bizzell was able to get the Oklahoma legislature to approve $500,000 for the new library up from their original offer of $200,000.[17]

President Brooks' inauguration took place in front of Evans Hall in 1912.
President Brooks' inauguration took place in front of Evans Hall in 1912.

OU's enrollment, like many universities, sharply declined during World War II. Enrollment in 1945 dropped to 3,769, from its Pre-World War II high of 6,935 in 1939.[21] Many infrastructure changes occurred at the university during this time. The southern portion of south campus in the vicinity of Constitution Avenue, still known to long-time Norman residents as 'South Base', was originally built as an annex to Naval Air Station Norman. It contained mostly single-story frame buildings used for classrooms and military housing;[22] most were severely deteriorated by the late 1980s and were demolished in the 1990s to make room for redevelopment. The Jimmie Austin University of Oklahoma Golf Course was built as a U.S. Navy recreational facility.[22] The north campus and the airfield were built in the early 1940s as Naval Air Station Norman. The station served mainly an advanced flight training mission and could handle all but the largest bombers.[23] A large earthen mound east of Interstate 35 and north of Robinson Street, colloquially known as 'Mount Norman', was used as a gunnery (the mound has since been removed to make way for a commercial development).[24] The university in the post-World War II demobilization received the installation. Naval aviator's wings displayed at the entrance to the terminal commemorates this airfield's Naval past. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (957x626, 79 KB) first=Charles F. | last=Long | pages= | title=With Optimism For the Morrow: A History of The University of Oklahoma | date=September 1965 | publisher=Sooner Magazine | url=http://digital. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (957x626, 79 KB) first=Charles F. | last=Long | pages= | title=With Optimism For the Morrow: A History of The University of Oklahoma | date=September 1965 | publisher=Sooner Magazine | url=http://digital. ... Stratton Duluth Brooks (1869 — January 18, 1949) was the third president of the University of Oklahoma. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Interstate 35 Interstate 35 (abbreviated I-35) is a north–south interstate highway in the central United States. ... Demobilization is the process of standing down a nations armed forces from combat-ready status. ...


After the war, enrollment surged. By 1965, enrollment had risen over 450% to 17,268 causing housing shortages.[21] In the mid 1960s, the administration completed construction of three new 12-story dormitories located immediately south of the South Oval. In addition to these three towers, an apartment complex was completed around this time that housed married students, which was an issue following World War II.[25] These apartments are now Kraettli Apartments.

Bizzell Library sits at the heart of the university's Norman campus.
Bizzell Library sits at the heart of the university's Norman campus.

George Lynn Cross took over as President of the University in 1943, two years after the U.S. entered World War II. He remained at the helm until 1968, 25 years later, becoming the longest serving president in history of the university. Five more presidents would serve in the next 25 years after Cross stepped down. In 1994, the university finally hired a long term president. Download high resolution version (1161x1764, 1606 KB)Bizzel Library and the south oval at OU, Norman Oklahoma The copyright holder, User:Tosei, of this image hereby irrevocably releases all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way... Download high resolution version (1161x1764, 1606 KB)Bizzel Library and the south oval at OU, Norman Oklahoma The copyright holder, User:Tosei, of this image hereby irrevocably releases all rights to it, allowing it to be freely reproduced, distributed, transmitted, used, modified, built upon, or otherwise exploited in any way... The seventh President of the University of Oklahoma ...


Since David Boren became Oklahoma's president in 1994, the University of Oklahoma system has had an increase in new developments throughout including: the purchase of 60 acres (0.2 km²) for OU-Tulsa, the new Gaylord Hall, Price Hall, the ExxonMobil Lawrence G. Rawl Engineering Practice Facility (under construction), Devon Energy Hall (under construction), the Wagner Student Academic Services Center (under construction), the Research and Medical Clinic, the expansions of the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art,[26] and the National Weather Center.[27] David Lyle Boren (born April 21, 1941) was a United States Senator from Oklahoma from 1979 to 1994. ... The National Weather Center is a confederation of federal, state, and University of Oklahoma organizations that work together in partnership to improve understanding of events occurring in Earths atmosphere over a wide range of time and space scales. ...


The Oklahoma Mesonet, a state-of-the-art network of environmental monitoring stations that is an OU-OSU partnership, won a special award from the American Meteorological Society (AMS), the nation's leading professional society for those in the atmospheric and related sciences. In 2001, OK-FIRST was recognized as one of the nation’s five most innovative government programs by Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government and their Innovations in American Government program.[27] For other uses, see Biosphere (disambiguation). ... Oklahoma State University, located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, is an institution of higher learning founded in 1890 as a land-grant university, known as Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College (Oklahoma A&M). ... The American Meteorological Society promotes the development and dissemination of information and education on the atmospheric and related oceanic and hydrologic sciences and the advancement of their professional applications. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... The John F. Kennedy School of Government, colloquially known as the Kennedy School of Government (KSG) or simply the Kennedy School, is a public policy school and one of the professional graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ...


Academic profile

The university consists of fifteen colleges, including 152 majors[6] such as meteorology, geology, petroleum engineering, architecture, law, medicine, Native American studies, history of science, and dance programs. While the two main campuses are located in Norman and Oklahoma City, affiliated programs in Tulsa expand access for students in eastern Oklahoma. Some of the programs in Tulsa include: medicine, pharmacy, nursing, public health, allied health and liberal arts studies.[28] College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... // Meteorology (from Greek: μετέωρον, meteoron, high in the sky; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the interdisciplinary scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Science is a body of empirical, theoretical, and practical knowledge about the natural world, produced by a global community of researchers making use of a body of techniques known as scientific methods, emphasizing the observation, experimentation and scientific explanation of real world phenomena. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ...

Gaylord Hall, home of the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, finished construction in 2004.
Gaylord Hall, home of the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, finished construction in 2004.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 126 KB) Summary User:Nmajdan Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 126 KB) Summary User:Nmajdan Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Norman campus

As of the Fall of 2006, the Norman campus had 19,618 undergraduate students and 6,402 postgraduate students.[1] Following the Sooner's 2000 football national championship season, the university experienced an increase in college applicants and admissions. The falls of 1999 and 2000 both saw a 1.3% increase in the number of students over the respective previous years while the fall of 2001 saw an increase of 4.8% over 2000.[29] Students come from all 50 U.S. states and nearly 100 countries. 32% of the 2006 freshmen were in the top 10% of their high school class.[30] Ethnic minority groups represent over 25% of newly-enrolled undergraduates[31] and 27% of all students.[32]. In addition, the university has an enrollment of over 700 National Merit Scholars, making it first per capita among public universities.[6] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A graduate student (also, grad student or grad in American English, postgraduate student or postgrad in British English) is an individual who has completed a bachelors degree (B.A., B.S./B.Sc. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. ... The PSAT/NMSQT, or Preliminary-SAT/National Merit Scholarship Qualifying Test, is a multiple choice standardized test generally taken by high school juniors, sophomores, and freshmen in the United States. ...

Price Hall, an addition to the Michael F. Price College of Business, finished construction in 2005.
Price Hall, an addition to the Michael F. Price College of Business, finished construction in 2005.

The largest school, The College of Arts & Sciences, enrolls 37% of the OU-Norman students. The next largest school, The Price College of Business enrolls 14%. Other large colleges in Norman include the College of Engineering with 11% and the College of Education and the Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication, both with approximately 6% of the student body.[33] Smaller schools include the College of Architecture, College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences, College of Earth and Energy, Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts, or Law School. New students do not have to declare a major (a concentrated course of study) immediately and are not required to declare a major until their Junior year. If they are undecided in their major, they are considered a part of the University College. Many Pre-Health majors choose this option as well until they are able to apply for the medical program. University College comprises roughly 11% of the student body.[33] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (576x768, 80 KB) Summary User:Nmajdan Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (576x768, 80 KB) Summary User:Nmajdan Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The University of Oklahoma College of Arts and Sciences, also known as the College of A&S (or simply CAS), is the liberal arts and sciences unit of the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma. ... The north entrance to the new Price Hall The Michael F. Price College of Business at the University of Oklahoma is one of the most distinguished business schools in the country. ... The University of Oklahoma College of Engineering in the engineering unit of the University of Oklahoma in Norman. ... The University of Oklahoma College of Education is the education unit of the University of Oklahoma in Norman. ... Gaylord Hall, home of the College of Journalism since its opening in 2004. ... The University of Oklahoma College of Architecture is the architecture unit of the University of Oklahoma in Norman. ... OUs College of Atmospheric and Geographic Sciences consists of the School of Meteorology and Department of Geography. ... The University of Oklahoma College of Earth and Energy is the geology unit at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. ... The Donald W. Reynolds Center, one of the buildings occupied by the College of Fine Arts. ... The University of Oklahoma College of Law is the law unit at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ...


Oklahoma is ranked in the top 10 for "Best Value Public Colleges" by the Princeton Review.[34] In a survey of the top 500 academic institutions in the world by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University in 2006, Oklahoma ranked 301st. They were tied with 99 other schools, including Big 12 schools such as Texas Tech University and Kansas State University. Oklahoma State University and Baylor University were not ranked, while all other Big 12 schools were ranked higher. University of Colorado was the highest Big 12 school, being ranked number 34.[35] However, due to stricter enrollment policies in recent years,[36][37][38] average scores for incoming students are on the rise. The average ACT score for a first-time student in 2006 was a 25.6[39] while in 1999, it was 24.5.[40] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Texas Tech University redirects here. ... Kansas State University, officially called Kansas State University of Fashion and Design [2] but commonly shortened to K-State, is an institution of higher learning located in Manhattan, Kansas, in the United States. ... Oklahoma State University Logo The Oklahoma State University System comprises of five educational instututes across Oklahoma. ... Baylor University is a private, Baptist-affiliated research university located in Waco, Texas. ... The University of Colorado at Boulder (CU-Boulder, UCB officially[3]; Colorado and CU colloquially) is the flagship university of the University of Colorado System in Boulder, Colorado. ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ...


Health Sciences Center

The OU Health Sciences Center's main campus is in Oklahoma City and a secondary campus is in Tulsa. About 3,500 students enroll in one of the seven colleges at the Health Center. The distribution of students in each of these colleges is more uniform than that of the main campus. These colleges include (with student percentages in parenthesis) the College of Allied Health (19%), College of Dentistry (9%), College of Medicine (26%), College of Nursing (23%), College of Pharmacy (15%), and the College of Public Health (9%). There are also students in the Graduate College who are studying within these colleges.[41][42] The University of Oklahoma College of Medicine was founded in 1900 as a medical department of the University of Oklahoma at its main campus in Norman. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ...


Museums and libraries

Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art on the University of Oklahoma campus has a different architectural style than the rest of the campus.
Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art on the University of Oklahoma campus has a different architectural style than the rest of the campus.

The university has two prominent museums, the Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art and the Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. The Museum of Art was founded in 1936 and originally headed by Oscar Jacobson, the director of the School of Art at the time. The museum opened with over 2,500 items on display and was originally located on campus in Jacobson Hall. Mr. and Mrs. Fred Jones of Oklahoma City donated money for a permanent building in 1971 and the building was named in honor of their son who died in a plane crash during his senior year at the University of Oklahoma.[43] Since then, the museum has acquired many renowned works of Native American art and, in 2000, received the Weitzenhoffer Collection of French Impressionism which includes works by Degas, Gauguin, Monet, Pissarro, Renoir, Toulouse-Lautrec, Van Gogh, and Vuillard. Today, the museum has over 65,000 square feet (6,000 m²) filled with over 8,000 items from a wide array of time periods and movements.[43] In 2005, the museum expanded with the opening of the new Lester Wing designed by contemporary architect Hugh Newell Jacobsen. The architectural style of the new addition deviates from the Collegiate Gothic style of the university, but Jacobsen felt this was necessary given the contemporary works of art the wing would house.[44] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1530 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 1530 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... A natural history museum in Norman, Oklahoma, operated by the University of Oklahoma. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ... This article is about the art movement. ... Edgar Degas (19 July 1834 – 27 September 1917), born Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (IPA ), was a French artist famous for his work in painting, sculpture, printmaking and drawing. ... Paul Gauguin (June 7, 1848 - May 9, 1903) was a leading Post-Impressionist painter. ... Claude Monet also known as Oscar-Claude Monet or Claude Oscar Monet (November 14, 1840 – December 5, 1926)[1] was a founder of French impressionist painting, and the most consistent and prolific practitioner of the movements philosophy of expressing ones perceptions before nature, especially as applied to plein... The garden of Pontoise, painted 1875. ... Pierre-Auguste Renoir (February 25, 1841–December 3, 1919) was a French artist who was a leading painter in the development of the Impressionist style. ... Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (IPA ) (November 24, 1864 – September 9, 1901) was a French painter, printmaker, draftsman, and illustrator, whose immersion in the decadent and theatrical life of fin de siècle Paris yielded an oeuvre of provocative images of modern life. ... van Gogh redirects here. ... Edouard Vuillard, Self-Portrait, 1889, oil on canvas Jean-Édouard Vuillard (November 11, 1868 - June 21, 1940) was a French painter and printmaker associated with the Nabis. ... An art period is a phase in the development of the work of an artist, groups of artists or art movement. ... This is a list of art movements. ... Contemporary architecture is the architecture being made at the present time. ...


The Sam Noble Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, located south of the main campus and directly southwest of the law building, specializes in the history of the people and animals that have inhabited Oklahoma over the last 300 million years. Since its founding in 1899, the museum has acquired over 5,000,000 objects. In 2000, a new building was opened to house the ever expanding museum. The new building offered nearly 200,000 square feet (18,600 m²) of space to display the many exhibits the museum has to offer.[45]


The University of Oklahoma Library system is headquartered in Bizzell Memorial Library and is largest research library in Oklahoma, contains over 4.7 million volumes and is ranked 54th out of 113 research libraries in North America in volumes held.[46] It contains more than 1.6 million photographs, subscriptions to over 31,000 periodicals, over 1.5 million maps, government documents dating back to 1893, and over 50 incunabula.[46] It has nine locations on campus. The primary library is Bizzell Memorial Library, located in the middle of the main campus. Other notable campus libraries include the Architecture Library, the Chemistry and Mathematics Library, the Engineering Library, the Fine Arts Library, the Physics and Astronomy Library, and the Geology Library. The OU library system contains many unique collections such as the History of Science Collection (which houses over 91,000 volumes related to the history of science,[47] including hand-noted works by Galileo Galilei[48]), the Bizzell Bible Collection, and the Western History Collection. The original entrance to Bizzell Memorial Library The Bizzell Memorial Library is located at the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma. ... North America North America is a continent[1] in the Earths northern hemisphere and (chiefly) western hemisphere. ... A photograph (often just called a photo) is an image (or a representation of that on e. ... This article is about the magazine as a published medium. ... See map for the navigational aid The acronym MAPS could refer to: Multidisciplinary Association for Psychedelic Studies Mail Abuse Prevention System Multi-jurisdictional Automated Preclearance System Mid-Atlantic Percussion Society Medical Advanced Pain Specialists Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship Multidisciplinary Academic PerspectiveS Metropolitan Area ProjectS Category: ... A page from a rare Blackletter Bible (1497) printed in Strassburg by J.R.Grueninger. ... Galileo redirects here. ...


The School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS), the only American Library Association-accredited program in Oklahoma,[49] offers two graduate degrees (Master of Library and Information Studies and Master of Science in Knowledge Management) and one undergraduate degree (Bachelor of Arts in Information Studies). The impact of OU and SLIS on the history of libraries in Oklahoma is shown in the recent list of 100 Oklahoma Library Legends as produced by the Oklahoma Library Association.[50] Two current faculty, one faculty emeriti, and numerous others associated with either the OU libraries or SLIS comprise nearly 10% of the list's members. ALA Logo The American Library Association (ALA) is a group based in the United States that promotes libraries and library education internationally. ...


Campus

Norman

The Norman campus is divided into three sections: north campus, main campus, and south campus. All three campuses are connected by a bus service funded by student fees which allows students to park at Lloyd Noble Center and provides 5-10 minute service to the main and south campuses.[51] Other regular Norman bus routes provide service to north campus as well as the main campus. The main and south campus are contiguous while the north campus is located about two miles north of the main campus. Lloyd Noble Center is a 11,528-seat multi-purpose arena in Norman, Oklahoma, some 19-miles South of downtown Oklahoma City. ...


Main campus

The main campus is bordered by Boyd Street on the north, Timberdell Road on the south, Chautauqua Avenue on the west, and Jenkins Avenue on the east.[52] The Norman campus is centered around two large "ovals." The Parrington Oval (or North Oval as it is more commonly called) is anchored on the south by Evans Hall, the main administrative building. This building highlights the "Cherokee Gothic" style of architecture locally derived from the Collegiate Gothic style, the style that dominates and defines the older buildings on the OU campus.[14] The North Oval is bordered on the east by the Oklahoma Memorial Union. For other uses, see Cherokee (disambiguation). ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... The Oklahoma Memorial Union was built in 1929. ...

Memorial Stadium houses University of Oklahoma football games.
Memorial Stadium houses University of Oklahoma football games.

On the east side of the northernmost part of campus sits Sarkeys Energy Center while to the west is the Fred Jones, Jr. School of Art and Museum, home to the Weitzenhoffer Collection of Impressionist art[53] and the Catlett Music Center. The Van Vleet Oval (or South Oval) is anchored on the north by the Bizzell Memorial Library and flanked by academic buildings. When class is in session, the South Oval is often inundated with students going to and from class. Elm Avenue bounds the western edge of the academic portion of OU, with a few exceptions. Lying between Elm Avenue and Chautauqua Avenue are mostly fraternity and sorority houses. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 141 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 141 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... See also Impressionist (entertainment): A girl with a watering can by Renoir, 1876 Impressionism was a 19th century art movement, which began as a private association of Paris-based artists who exhibited publicly in 1874. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...

May We Have Peace, a sculpture by Allan Houser, depicts a Native American man.

On the east side of the central part of campus lies Gaylord Family - Oklahoma Memorial Stadium, just north of Lindsey street on Jenkins Avenue. Immediately adjacent to the stadium is the Barry Switzer Center, a museum highlighting the historical success of Oklahoma athletics, as well as a comprehensive training facility for Oklahoma athletes. North of the stadium is the McCasland Field House, the former home of Oklahoma Basketball and the current home of Oklahoma's wrestling, volleyball and gymnastics programs. Across Jenkins Avenue are the athletic dorms and statues honoring Oklahoma's four Heisman Trophy winners. Other statues on campus include several honoring the Native Americans who defined so much of Oklahoma's history and a new memorial statue on the north side of Oklahoma Memorial Stadium honoring OU students, faculty, and staff that have died while serving in the armed forces.[54][55] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1530 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1530 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Allan Houser receives the National Medal of Arts Allan Houser (1914 - 1994) was one of the most renowned Native American painters and Modernist sculptors of the 20th century. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The Gaylord Family - Oklahoma Memorial Stadium is the on-campus football facility for the University of Oklahoma in Norman, Oklahoma, United States. ... “Heisman” redirects here. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... Alternate cover US 1979 and 2002 reissue cover, also known as paint spatter cover For the military meaning, see Armed forces. ...


The portion of campus south of Lindsey Street consists of mainly student housing, Cate and Cross centers being four-story quadrangular centers and Walker Tower, Couch Tower and Adams Center being twelve-story towers. Facing the towers on Asp Avenue is the Huston Huffman Center, the student activity and fitness center. On the north side of Timberdell road is the Murray Case Sells Swim Complex which is open to students and features indoor and outdoor pools.

University alumnus David Phelps casted the Pastoral Dreamer, a bronze sculpture on the Norman campus.[56]
Boyd Street bisects Campus Corner, a stretch of shops and eateries lining the north border of the Norman Campus.
Boyd Street bisects Campus Corner, a stretch of shops and eateries lining the north border of the Norman Campus.

Directly north of the main campus on Boyd Street is Campus Corner, a popular commercial area. There are several restaurants, bars, and small shops that cater to the student body and the Norman population at large. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1293 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 1293 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Rare, water preserved Greek Athlete 310. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 5587 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Campus Corner Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 5587 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Campus Corner Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital...


The Oklahoma administration prides itself on the aesthetic appeal of the campus.[57][14] All three campuses (Norman, Oklahoma City, and Tulsa) have beautifully landscaped gardens. Trees were planted on the OU campus before the first building was ever built.[14] There are also many statues and sculptures around campus, most of which portray the strong influence of the Native American culture. This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ...


There are also four buildings on the main campus that are listed on the National Register of Historic Places. They are the Bizzell Library, the Beta Theta Pi fraternity house, Casa Blanca (the old Alpha Chi Omega sorority house), and Boyd House - the residence of the University president.[58] A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ...


South campus

The National Weather Center calls the university's south campus home.
The National Weather Center calls the university's south campus home.

South of student housing is Timberdell Road, the approximate southern boundary of the university. South of this road are University-owned apartments and athletic complexes. On the south side of Timberdell Road is the law school building which opened in 2002.[59] This area also includes many athletic complexes. Some of which include L. Dale Mitchell Baseball Park, OU Softball Field, and the Lloyd Noble Center (the basketball arena). While this area has traditionally been free from academic buildings, with the pressure of expansion being felt in the northern part of campus, new academic buildings, such as the National Weather Center and Stephenson Research and Technology Center were recently completed on the south end of campus. In 2004, global weather information provider WeatherNews opened its U.S. Operations Center located in the south campus one block away from the new NWC building.[60] The southern boundary of the south campus is State Highway 9. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2667x1202, 655 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma National Weather Center Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2667x1202, 655 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma National Weather Center Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... The University of Oklahoma College of Law is the law unit at the University of Oklahoma in Norman. ... The L. Dale Mitchell Baseball Park is home to the University of Oklahoma Sooners baseball team. ... Lloyd Noble Center is a 11,528-seat multi-purpose arena in Norman, Oklahoma, some 19-miles South of downtown Oklahoma City. ... The National Weather Center is a confederation of federal, state, and University of Oklahoma organizations that work together in partnership to improve understanding of events occurring in Earths atmosphere over a wide range of time and space scales. ... Oklahoma State Highway 9, abbreviated as SH-9 or simply Highway 9, is a major east-west highway in the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ...


North campus

On the far north side of Norman is the OU Research Park, which includes University of Oklahoma Max Westheimer Airport (ICAO airport code KOUN), several weather radars, the OU OKDHS Training and Research Center, and the university's old mainframe system. This part of campus is not frequented by students except those studying meteorology or aviation. University of Oklahoma Westheimer Airport (IATA: OUN, ICAO: KOUN), also known as Max Westheimer Airport, is a public general aviation airport located three miles (5 km) northwest of the city of Norman in Cleveland County, Oklahoma, USA. The airport is run by the University of Oklahoma. ... The ICAO (IPA pronunciation: ) airport code or location indicator is a four-letter alphanumeric code designating each airport around the world. ... Weather radar in Norman, Oklahoma with rainshaft (Source: NOAA) Environment Canada King City (CWKR) weather radar station. ...


Oklahoma City and Tulsa

The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), established in the early 20th century, is OU's presence in Oklahoma City. OUHSC is one of only four academic health centers in the nation with seven professional colleges.[61] The nineteen buildings that make up the OUHSC campus occupies a fifteen block area in Oklahoma City near the Oklahoma State Capitol. Surrounding these buildings are an additional twenty health-related buildings some of which are owned by the University of Oklahoma. The Health Sciences Center is the core of a wider complex known as the Oklahoma Health Center. With approximately 600 students and 600 residents and fellows training in specialties and subspecialties of medicine, the College of Medicine is the largest component of the Health Sciences Center. The major clinical facilities on campus are the OU Medical Center hospital complex and they include The Children's Hospital, the OU Physicians clinics, and the Oklahoma City VA Medical Center. Large biomedical research facilities operated by the University are joined on campus by a growing biomedical research park developed by the Presbyterian Health Foundation and dedicated to biotechnology, research, and new scientific ventures. Oklahoma State Capitol The Oklahoma State Capitol, located in Oklahoma City, is the seat of government of the U.S. state of Oklahoma and the location of the chambers of the Oklahoma Legislature. ...

The University of Oklahoma campus in Tulsa houses the new Research and Medical Clinic.
The University of Oklahoma campus in Tulsa houses the new Research and Medical Clinic.

Established in 1972 as a branch of the main medical school campus, the College of Medicine–Tulsa has enabled the University to use hospital training facilities in Tulsa to establish medical residencies and provide for expanded health care capabilities in the state. Under this program, selected third- and fourth-year students receive their clinical training in hospitals in the Tulsa community. Between 1972 and 1999, OU's presence in Tulsa has grown but scattered. In 1999, a 60 acres (0.2 km²) site formerly owned by BP Amoco was sold to the University for $24 million (even though the property was appraised at $48 million). The site already featured a 370,000 square feet (34,370 ) building with office, labs, and classrooms.[62] The university purchased this property with the help of a $10 million gift from the Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation. The existing building was renamed the Schusterman Center.[63] In 2003, Tulsa voters approved the Vision 2025 plan for capital improvements to the Tulsa metro area. Included in this plan was $30 million for a new Research and Medical Clinic near the existing Schusterman Center.[64] Construction on the new building is nearing completion. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 946 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 946 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... This article is about the corporation known as BP. See also BP (disambiguation) BP (formerly British Petroleum and briefly known as BP Amoco) (NYSE: BP) is a petroleum company headquartered in London, United Kingdom. ... A square foot is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 foot long. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... Vision 2025 was a proposition to increase Tulsa countys sales tax rate in order to fund capital improvements. ...


Student life

Residential life

The Walker, Honors and Adams dorm buildings make up three of the school's residential halls.
The Walker, Honors and Adams dorm buildings make up three of the school's residential halls.

Oklahoma requires, with few exceptions, that all freshmen live in one of the four residence halls.[65] Three of these building are towers (12 stories each): Adams Center, Walker Center, and Couch Center; the other is quads Cate Center.[66] The Academic Arts Community, more commonly referred to as Cate 5 or Honors, is located directly above the honors college, David L. Boren Hall. Although it is commonly believed that this dorm caters only to honors students, a large proportion of non-honors students comprise the community. The three towers are all located around each other with the Couch Cafeteria completing the residence community. Couch Cafeteria is composed of several different themed restaurants that serves a wide variety of food each day.[67] Located in between Adams and Walker Centers is the Adams/Walker Mall, a field roughly the size of a football field. This area includes a basketball court and an open grass area that hosts musical events and other student-related activities. As of Fall 2007, over 3,900 students lived in one of these residence halls. Each residence hall has its own RSA (Resident Student Association) office, as well as its own computer lab and laundry facilities. By 2010, all residential halls, with the exception of Cate, will be completely renovated and upgraded. As of Fall semester 2007, the south-west wing of Walker Center is under renovation.[68] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 100 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 100 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ...


The university owns several apartment complexes around the campus. Some of these apartments were old and dilapidated, and the university has taken the strides to resolve this issue. Two brand new complexes owned by the university opened in recent years; OU Traditions Square East in 2005 and OU Traditions Square West in 2006.[69]


Due to a low cost of living in Oklahoma, many students find it financially viable to live off campus in either apartments or houses. Over the last several years, Norman has seen a boom in apartment development. Since 2002, four new apartment or condominium complexes (not including the OU-owned properties) have been built[70] in addition to a booming housing market that is resulting in Norman spreading further east. Many students commute from nearby Moore and Oklahoma City. A cost-of-living index measures differences in the price of goods and services over time. ... Moore is a rapidly growing suburb in Cleveland County, Oklahoma and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Area. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ...


Student organizations, activities, and media

The Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band performs during half-time at football games.
The Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band performs during half-time at football games.

Oklahoma has over 350 student organizations.[71] Focuses of these organizations range from ethnic to political, religious to special interests. Oklahoma Memorial Union (student union) houses many of these organizations' offices. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2048 × 1536 pixel, file size: 2. ...


The student union provides a place for students to relax, sleep, study, watch television, or socialize. The Union Programming Board provides diverse activities and programs in the union such as movies, bands, dances, give-aways, or other activities. Intramural sports are a popular activity on campus with over 35 different sports available.[72] A large intramural field, where many outdoor events take place, is located just one block east of the dorms. The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports teams organized within a school. ...


The Pride of Oklahoma, the university's marching band, celebrated its 100th anniversary in 2004 and consists of 311 student musicians and dancers from 19 states. Students wishing to enter the band go through a rigorous audition process. The band plays at every home football game. A smaller "pep-band," which usually consists of 100 members, travels to every away football game. The full band makes trips to the AT&T Red River Rivalry game against The University of Texas, Big 12 Championship Game, bowl games and other games of importance. Members of the band are also present for many student events. It was awarded the Sudler Trophy in 1987.[73] The Pride of Oklahoma The Pride of Oklahoma Marching Band is the student marching band for the University of Oklahoma Sooners. ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... The Red River Shootout is a common name for the annual football game between the University of Oklahoma Sooners and the University of Texas Longhorns. ... University of Texas at Austin The University of Texas at Austin (full official name), often UT or Texas for short, is the flagship institution of the University of Texas System, the largest public university system in Texas, established in 1883. ... The Big 12 Championship Game is a college football game held by the Big 12 Conference each year. ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... The Wisconsin Band, known for its unique stop at the top high step, performs at the HHH Metrodome during a football game against arch-rival Minnesota. ...


The campus radio station,The Wire, broadcasts on TV4OU's SAP feed and over the Internet. The campus TV station, TV4OU, features student produced programming five nights a week and is available on local cable (COX Ch. 4). "OU Nightly", the live, student newscast, airs weeknights at 4:30 and 9:30. "The Sports Package", a live sports program, airs live Monday nights at 5:00 and throughout the week. Oklahoma's Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication programs The Wire and TV4OU. Oklahoma's Department of Continuing Education operates KROU and KGOU, a public radio station broadcasting on 106.3 FM. KGOU is affiliated with NPR. The campus newspaper, The Oklahoma Daily, is produced daily during the fall and spring semesters and weekly during the summer semester.[74] Second[ary] audio program[ming] (SAP) is an auxiliary audio channel for television that can be broadcast or transmitted both over the air and by cable TV. It is often used for an alternate language (hence giving the facetious Spanish audio program expansion to the acronym), or for the Descriptive... KROU (KGOU/KROU) is a NPR/Jazz music station serving the Oklahoma City area and is owned by University of Oklahoma. ... KGOU (KGOU/KROU) is a NPR/Jazz music station serving the Oklahoma City area and is owned by University of Oklahoma. ... Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... The Oklahoma Daily is the student-run newspaper at the University of Oklahoma. ...


Oklahoma has a strong social fraternity and sorority presence. Many fraternities and sororities are only a couple decades younger than the university itself with the first fraternity chapter established in 1905. Currently there are 40 national fraternities and sororities on campus. Governing these 40 Greek chapters are four governing bodies: Interfraternity Council, Panhellenic Association, National Pan-Hellenic Council, and the Latino Greek Council. In 2005, the average GPA for the Panhellenic Association was 3.30.[75] While the terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words frater and soror, meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe any number of social and charitable organizations, including the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, and the Shriners, in the United States and Canada fraternities and... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... The National Pan-Hellenic Council, Inc. ... The National Association of Latino Fraternal Organizations (NALFO) is an umbrella council for 23 Latino Greek Letter Organizations established in 1998. ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same...


Student government

The main governing arm of the student body, the University of Oklahoma Student Association (UOSA), comprises four branches: an Executive Branch, a Legislative Branch, a Judicial Branch, and a Programming Branch. The student government, as well as all organizations, has offices located in the Conoco Student Leadership Center located in the student union.


The Executive Branch provides student services on behalf of the UOSA, executes UOSA law, and advocates for the position of the student.[76] The General Counsel, chief legal counsel for the UOSA, provides legal advice, handles issues regarding academic misconduct, and approves new student organization constitutions. The Legislative Branch comprises the Undergraduate Student Congress and the Graduate Student Senate. The Judicial Branch is headed by the Superior Court and includes Student Traffic Court. The Programming Branch comprises the Campus Activities Council (CAC). The CAC oversees all of the campus-wide events. These events include Homecoming, Parent's Weekend, Big Red Rally (a pep rally before the start of the football season), Howdy Week (a welcoming of new students to campus in the fall), Winter Welcome Week (same as Howdy Week, except before the spring semester), Speakers' Bureau (committee responsible for bringing speakers to campus), as well as many others.[77] Originally, CAC was the programming arm of the UOSA under the Executive Branch which UOSA began in 1971. In 2002, UOSA voted to make the CAC its own branch.[78] The CAC comprises over 300 students who volunteer their time to ensuring these events go as planned. For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ... A cheerleader is flipped upside-down during a pep rally routine before a football game. ...


One of the main functions of the UOSA is allocation of student activity funds. The Ways and Means (WAM) Committee, a subset of the legislative branch, conducts extensive interviews with representatives from student groups each year to disperse over half a million dollars.[79]


Notable people and alumni

A statue of Edward L. Gaylord, the late billionaire owner of Gaylord Entertainment Company and The Oklahoman and the major benefactor of OU's College of Journalism, stands outside Gaylord Hall on campus.

With strong academic and successful athletics programs, the University of Oklahoma has seen many of its former students go on to local and national prominence. This includes many athletes that have excelled at the collegiate and professional levels, including: Lee Roy Selmon, Roy Williams, Tommie Harris, Billy Sims, Wayman Tisdale, Joe Washington, Darrell Royal, and Steve Owens. In addition, many state politicians have graduated from Oklahoma, including current OU President David Boren,[80] David Walters, J.C. Watts,[81] Carl Albert,[82] Frank Keating,[83] Dan Boren,[84] Tom Coburn,[85] and current Oklahoma Governor Brad Henry.[86] Other notable alumni include shuttle astronaut Shannon Lucid[87] and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise,[88] the mutual fund manager Michael F. Price,[89] 2006 Miss America Jennifer Berry,[90] Denver Broncos owner Pat Bowlen,[91], Avanade FP&A Financial Director Kirk Alan Jones, and actors Van Heflin and James Garner.[92] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1031 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1536x2048, 1031 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or... Gaylord Entertainment Company operates a number of hotel, resort, and media companies. ... The Oklahoman is the largest daily and statewide newspaper in Oklahoma and is the only daily newspaper that covers the entire Oklahoma City metro area. ... This is a list of encyclopedic people associated with the University of Oklahoma in the United States of America. ... Lee Roy Selmon (born October 20, 1954 in Eufaula, Oklahoma) is a former NFL football defensive lineman and the only member of the Tampa Bay Buccaneers to have been inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame. ... Roy Williams (born August 14, 1980 in Redwood City, California) is a safety for the Dallas Cowboys of the National Football League. ... Tommie Harris (born October 29, 1983, Killeen, Texas) is a professional football player for the NFLs Chicago Bears as a Defensive Tackle. ... Billy Sims (born September 18, 1955 in Missouri) is a former American NFL Pro Bowl, and college, football running back. ... Wayman Lawrence Tisdale (born June 9, 1964, in Tulsa, Oklahoma) is an American former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and now a jazz bass guitarist and a member of the Oklahoma Tourism Board. ... Joe Dan Washington (born September 24, 1953) is a former American Football running back who played nine seasons for the San Diego Chargers, Baltimore Colts, Washington Redskins, and the Atlanta Falcons from 1977 to 1985 in the National Football League. ... Darrell K. Royal (born July 6, 1924 in Hollis, Oklahoma), is a College Football Hall of Fame member, and is the most successful football coach, in terms of wins, in University of Texas Longhorn history. ... Statue of Steve Owens at the University of Oklahomas Heisman Park. ... David Lyle Boren (born April 21, 1941) was a United States Senator from Oklahoma from 1979 to 1994. ... David L. Walters Michael David Walters (born November 20, 1951) was the Communist Dictator of Cuba from 1991 to 1995. ... Julius Caesar J.C. Watts (born November 18, 1957) is an American conservative Republican politician and former Representative from Oklahoma in the U.S. Congress. ... Carl Bert Albert (May 10, 1908 – February 4, 2000) was a lawyer and a Democratic American politician from Oklahoma. ... Francis Anthony Frank Keating (February 10, 1944) is an American politician from Oklahoma. ... David Daniel Dan Boren (born August 2, 1973) is a Democratic U.S. politician from the state of Oklahoma, representing Oklahomas 2nd congressional district in the U.S. House of Representatives (map). ... Thomas Allen Tom Coburn, M.D. (born March 14, 1948) is a medical doctor and a Republican U.S. Senator from Oklahoma. ... Charles Bradford Brad Henry (born June 10, 1963) is the Governor of the U.S. state of Oklahoma. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... NASAs Space Shuttle, officially called Space Transportation System (STS), is the United States governments current manned launch vehicle. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... Shannon Matilda Wells Lucid (born January 14, 1943) is an American astronaut who holds the record for the longest duration stay in space by a woman. ... Original crew photo. ... Fred Wallace Haise, Jr. ... This article deals with U.S. mutual funds. ... Michael F. Price (born 1953) is a value investor and fund manager in Far Hills, New Jersey. ... Miss America 2006, the 81st Miss America, pageant, was held on the Las Vegas Strip in Paradise, Nevada on January 21, 2006. ... For the patriotically-themed comic book superheroines, see Miss America (comics). ... Jennifer Berry holding the Miss America crown. ... City Denver, Colorado Other nicknames Orange Crush (1977-1979 defense) Team colors Orange, Broncos Navy Blue, and White[1] Head Coach Mike Shanahan Owner Pat Bowlen General manager Ted Sundquist Mascot Miles League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960-1969) Western Division (1960-1969) National Football League (1970–present) American... Patrick Dennis Bowlen (born February 18, 1944 in Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin) is the Owner, President, and Chief Executive Officer of the Denver Broncos. ... Avanade, Inc. ... Van Heflin (December 13, 1910 – July 23, 1971) was an Academy Award-winning American film and theater actor. ... For other uses, see James Garner (disambiguation). ...


Athletics

Main article: Oklahoma Sooners
Sports at Oklahoma
MEN'S
Baseball
Basketball
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Football
Golf
Gymnastics
Tennis
Track & Field
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WOMEN'S
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Golf
Gymnastics
Soccer
Softball
Tennis
Track & Field
Volleyball

The school's sports teams are called the Sooners, a nickname given to early Oklahoma land rush cheaters who sneaked into the offered territory and staked claims before the land run officially started. They participate in the NCAA's Division I-Bowl Subdivision and in the South Division of the Big 12 Conference. The school sponsors nine sports for both men and women. The University has won 18 team NCAA National Championships[11] and seven national championships in football (football championships are not awarded by the NCAA). By far, OU's most famous and storied athletic program is the football program, which has produced four Heisman Trophy winners: Billy Vessels in 1952, Steve Owens in 1969, Billy Sims in 1978, and Jason White in 2003.[93] Many Pro Football Hall of Famers, including Lee Roy Selmon and Troy Aikman, also attended the University of Oklahoma. Oklahoma also currently holds the record for the longest winning streak in NCAA Division I history when they won 47 consecutive games between 1953 to 1957.[94] In reference to the team's success and popularity as a symbol of state pride, George Lynn Cross, OU's president from 1943 to 1968, once told the Oklahoma State Senate, "I want a university the football team can be proud of."[95] The University of Oklahoma features 17 varsity sports teams. ... Sooners redirects here. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... Jason White (born June 19, 1980) was a quarterback for the University of Oklahoma football team from 1999 to 2004 (jersey number 18). ... Troy Kenneth Aikman (born November 21, 1966 in West Covina, California) // The youngest of three children, Aikman was born in West Covina, California on November 21, 1966 to Charlyn and Kenneth Aikman, and lived in Cerritos, California until age 12, when his family moved to a farm in Henryetta, Oklahoma. ... The seventh President of the University of Oklahoma ...

Several main athletic facilities are grouped together at the Norman campus.
Several main athletic facilities are grouped together at the Norman campus.

The men's gymnastics team has won several national championships including championships in 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2006. In addition, Oklahoma has produced five Nissen Emery Award winners, more than any other school and the only school with back-to-back honorees.[96] The softball team won a national championship in 2000[97] and the baseball team a national championship in 1994.[98] On May 10, 2007 the University announced the addition of women's rowing to the intercollegiate athletics program.[99] A rowing facility will be built on the Oklahoma River near downtown Oklahoma City. This is the first sport added since women's soccer was added in 1996.[99] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2559x794, 2750 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Oklahoma Sooners Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2559x794, 2750 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Oklahoma Oklahoma Sooners Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... North Canadian River is a river in the United States. ... Downtown Oklahoma City The State Capitol of Oklahoma From The South Motto: Nickname: Capital of the New Century Founded 1889 Incorporated County Oklahoma County Cleveland County Canadian County Borough {{{borough}}} Parrish {{{parrish}}} Mayor Mick Cornett Area  - Total  - Water 1,608. ...


The University of Oklahoma has had a long and bitter rivalry with the University of Texas known as the Red River Shootout, Red River Rivalry, or OU-Texas. This rivalry is often thought of as a contest of state pride along with school pride. Oklahoma has a long-standing rivalry with Oklahoma State University. Known as the Bedlam Series, it encompasses all the athletic contests between the two universities with the winner receiving the Bedlam Bell. Another major historic rival is the University of Nebraska, which was part of the Big 8 Conference with Oklahoma and later joined with Oklahoma and other schools in the formation of the Big 12 Conference. University of Texas redirects here. ... Logo for the 2006 meeting between Oklahoma and Texas. ... Oklahoma State University, located in Stillwater, Oklahoma, is an institution of higher learning founded in 1890 as a land-grant university, known as Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical College (Oklahoma A&M). ... The Bedlam Series refers to the athletics rivalry between the University of Oklahoma Sooners and the Oklahoma State University Cowboys, of the Big 12 Conferences South Division. ... The University of Nebraska–Lincoln is a state-supported institution of higher learning located in Lincoln, Nebraska, USA. Often referred to as simply Nebraska or UNL, it is the flagship and largest campus of the University of Nebraska system. ... The Big Eight Conference, a former NCAA-affiliated Division I-A college athletic association that sponsored American football, was formed in January 1907 as the Missouri Valley Intercollegiate Athletic Association (MVIAA) by its charter member schools: the University of Kansas, University of Missouri, University of Nebraska, and Washington University in... The Big 12 Conference is a college athletic conference of twelve schools located in the central United States. ...


See also

The 2005 University of Oklahoma bombing occurred on Saturday, October 1, 2005 at approximately 8:00 PM CDT, when a bomb went off near the George Lynn Cross Hall on the University of Oklahoma (OU) campus. ... Boomer Sooner is the fight song for the University of Oklahoma written by Arthur M. Alden in 1905. ... The Neustadt International Prize for Literature is a biennial award sponsored by the University of Oklahoma and World Literature Today. ... The RUF/NEKS are an all-male student pep squad for the University of Oklahoma. ...

References

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  2. ^ a b Employees by Campus, Fall 2002-2006. 2007 OU Factbook. University of Oklahoma. Retrieved on 2007-05-02.
  3. ^ This number only includes the Norman and Health Science Center Campuses; numbers for the Tulsa campus were not available. Also, the number only include full-time and part-time faculty and does not include Graduate Assistants.
  4. ^ Marciszewski, April. "Sooners in Rare Air: OU's endowments top $1 billion mark" (PDF), 2007-06-27. Retrieved on [[2007-06-28}]]. 
  5. ^ Crimson: Pantone 201; Cream: Pantone 468
  6. ^ a b c d OU Facts. University of Oklahoma Public Affairs. Retrieved on 2006-06-07.
  7. ^ As of 2006-11-15 per source.
  8. ^ America's Best Value Colleges. The Princeton Review. Retrieved on 2006-06-07.
  9. ^ Top 20 Wired Colleges. PC Magazine (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
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  11. ^ a b Schools with the Most NCAA Championships. NCAA. Retrieved on 2007-05-07.
  12. ^ Oklahoma Football Quick Facts. SoonerSports.com. University of Oklahoma. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
  13. ^ Levy, David (2005). The University of Oklahoma: A History, Volume I, 1890-1917. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 14. ISBN 0-8061-3703-7. 
  14. ^ a b c d e Gumprecht, Blake (January 2007). "The Campus as a Public Space in the American College Town". Journal of Historical Geography 33 (1): 72-103. doi:10.1016/j.jhg.2005.12.001. ISSN 0305-7488. Retrieved on 2007-05-16. 
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  22. ^ a b "A University Moves South" (PDF), Sooner Magazine. LCCN 46-016. Retrieved on 2007-01-22. 
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  41. ^ These numbers include students in Tulsa participating in one of the colleges.
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  97. ^ 2007 Softball Media Guide 108. The University of Oklahoma Department of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved on 2007-08-21.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the record label, see Pantone Music. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Norman, Oklahoma, is the county seat and largest city in Cleveland County in the U.S. state of Oklahoma, and is part of the Oklahoma City Metropolitan Statistical Area. ... The University of Oklahoma Press is a university press that is part of the University of Oklahoma. ... A digital object identifier (or DOI) is a standard for persistently identifying a piece of intellectual property on a digital network and associating it with related data, the metadata, in a structured extensible way. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 36th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 137th day of the year (138th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 259th day of the year (260th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Library of Congress Control Number or LCCN is a serially based system of numbering books in the Library of Congress in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 127th day of the year (128th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 153rd day of the year (154th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ... ISSN, or International Standard Serial Number, is the unique eight-digit number applied to a periodical publication including electronic serials. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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University of Oklahoma
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  • Sooners Athletics
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  • University of Oklahoma Board of Regents
  • University of Oklahoma Max Westheimer Airport
  • Maps of campus

Coordinates: 35.208522° N 97.445944° W Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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The University of Oklahoma (230 words)
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University of Oklahoma - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5462 words)
The University of Oklahoma, often called OU or Oklahoma, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma.
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Fred Jones of Oklahoma City donated money for a permanent building in 1971 and the building was named in honor of their son who died in a plane crash during his senior year at the University of Oklahoma.
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