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Encyclopedia > University of Notre Dame
University of Notre Dame du Lac
Seal of the University of Notre Dame
Seal of the University of Notre Dame

Latin: Universitas Dominae Nostrae a Lacu
Motto: Vita, Dulcedo, Spes
Our Life, Our Sweetness, and Our Hope[1]
Established: 1842
Type: Private, Coeducational
Religious affiliation: Roman Catholic, Congregation of Holy Cross
Endowment: $6.54 billion[2]
President: The Rev. John Jenkins, CSC
Provost: Thomas Burish
Faculty: 1241[3]
Students: 11,603[4]
Undergraduates: 8,352
Postgraduates: 3,251
Location: Notre Dame, Indiana, USA
Campus: Suburban: 1,250 acres (5.1 km²)
Sports: 26 Division I NCAA teams
Colors: Blue and Gold[1]
         
Nickname: Fighting Irish
Mascot: Leprechaun
Website: http://www.nd.edu/

The University of Notre Dame du Lac (or simply Notre Dame) (our lady) (IPA: /ˌnoʊtɚˈdeɪm/) is a private research university located in Notre Dame, Indiana. It was founded by Father Edward Sorin, CSC, who was also the school's first president. Founded as an all-male institution, it became co-educational in 1972. The school's Catholic identity is evident around campus with the ornate Basilica of the Sacred Heart together with numerous chapels and religious iconography. This article is about the Notre-Dame cathedral in Paris. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The Salve Regina or Hail Holy Queen is a Christian hymn and prayer to the Virgin Mary. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity,[1] as opposed to public universities. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... Various Religious symbols, including (first row) Christian, Jewish, Hindu, Bahai, (second row) Islamic, tribal, Taoist, Shinto (third row) Buddhist, Sikh, Hindu, Jain, (fourth row) Ayyavazhi, Triple Goddess, Maltese cross, pre-Christian Slavonic Religion is the adherence to codified beliefs and rituals that generally involve a faith in a spiritual... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... The Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) is a Roman Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC in Le Mans, France. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... The Rev. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... An arial view of the University of Notre Dame du Lacs (Our Lady of the Lake) center campus and its Main Building with its famous Golden Dome. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... NCAA redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Not to be confused with the University of Notre Dame Australia University of Notre Dame du Lac The University of Notre Dame (standard name; full legal name University of Notre Dame du Lac) is a Roman Catholic institution of higher learning located in Notre Dame, Indiana, USA adjacent to the... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This article is about the creature in Irish mythology. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... An arial view of the University of Notre Dame du Lacs (Our Lady of the Lake) center campus and its Main Building with its famous Golden Dome. ... The Very Rev. ... The Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) is a Roman Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC in Le Mans, France. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... The Basilica of the Sacred Heart serves as the college church of the University of Notre Dame as well as the mother church of the Congregation of Holy Cross in the United States. ...


The university today is organized into five colleges and one professional school, the oldest of which awarded degrees as early as 1849. Many of the colleges' academic programs have been ranked highly in national publications, with the university as a whole ranked in the top 20 nationally by U.S. News and World Report. Many of the graduate programs participate in research endeavors, with a stated goal by the university president, Father John I. Jenkins, CSC, to become a pre-eminent research institution. Additionally, the university's library system is one of the top-100 largest in the United States. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... This article is about the concept. ... The Rev. ...


More than 80% of the University's 8,000 undergraduates live on campus in one of 27 single-sex residence halls, each of which field teams for more than a dozen intramural sports. Notre Dame's alumni are located around the world and number near 120,000.[5] The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports within a school. ...


Notre Dame is also known for its sports programs, especially its college football team. The sports teams are members of the NCAA Division I, and are known collectively as the Fighting Irish, a name it adopted in the 1920s. The football team, an Independent, has accumulated eleven national championships, seven Heisman Trophy winners, and many members in the College Football Hall of Fame. Additionally, other sport teams, most members of the Big East Conference, have won 18 national championships throughout the years. This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Heisman redirects here. ... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ...

Contents

History

The University's historic "God-quad" with the "Golden Dome" of the administration building visible. Many of the oldest buildings on campus are around this area.
The University's historic "God-quad" with the "Golden Dome" of the administration building visible. Many of the oldest buildings on campus are around this area.

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2154x1521, 1229 KB)Main building of the University of Notre Dame. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2154x1521, 1229 KB)Main building of the University of Notre Dame. ...

Foundations

According to correspondence of the early French Jesuit missionaries, one of the first missions in northern Indiana was founded for the Potawatomi and Miami Indians on the St. Joseph River in about the year 1685. In 1686 Father Claude-Jean Allouez S.J. built the first log chapel in Indian Territory on the shore of the St. Mary's Lake, establishing a mission post known as the St. Joseph Mission. The missionaries were later forced to neglect the region for over fifty years due to the French and Indian Wars and the suppression of the Society of Jesus.[6] The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... Rain dance, Kansas, c. ... The Miami are a Native American tribe originally found in Indiana and Ohio, and now living also in Oklahoma. ... Saint Joe River flowing west from Elkhart (top) through Osceola (middle) and into Mishawaka (bottom). ... Claude Jean Allouez (b. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Country redirects here. ... The French and Indian Wars is a name used in the United States for a series of conflicts in North America that represented the actions there that accompanied the European dynastic wars. ... The Suppression of the Jesuits in Portugal, France, the Two Sicilies, Parma and the Spanish Empire by 1767 was a result of a series of political moves rather than a theological controversy. ...


The Potawatomi elders remembered the faith taught to them by the missionaries, and in 1830 Leopold Pokagon appealed to Father Gabriel Richard of Detroit to send him a Catholic priest to help convert the younger members of his tribe.[7] Father Stephen Badin, the first priest ordained in the United States, returned with Pokagon to establish a mission school for the Indian children. In 1831, he purchased 524 acres (212 ha) of land at St. Mary's Lake in St. Joseph County to establish an orphan asylum. A chapel was erected near the present site of the Log Chapel, but the orphanage idea was abandoned, and in 1835 Father Badin transferred all this property to Bishop Simon Bruté of the Dioceses of Vincennes. Following his death in 1839, the new bishop, Father Célestine Guynemer de la Hailandière, transferred the property to Father Ferdinand Bach of the Fathers of Mercy in 1840 for the purpose of establishing a college there, but this attempt was unsuccessful. However, Father Bach procured another 375 acres (152 ha) of land from Father Badwin, and both land titles returned to the Dioceses.[6] Leopold Pokagon, Potawatomi Wkama (chief). ... Gabriel Richard (1767 - 1832) was a Representative from Michigan and Roman Catholic priest born in France. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Reverend Fr. ... St. ... Simon William Gabriel Bruté (1779-1839), (Bruté de Rémur, Simon William Gabriel) American prelate, first Roman Catholic bishop of the diocese of Vincennes, Indiana, was born at Rennes, France, on 20 March 1779, his father, Simon Gabriel Guillaume Brute de Remur (1729-1786), being superintendent of the crown lands... This article is about the United States city, Vincennes. ... The Fathers of Mercy are a Roman Catholic congregation of missionary priests. ...


In 1842, Guynemer de la Hailandière offered the original 524 acres (212 ha) to Father Edward Sorin of the Congregation of Holy Cross, on the condition that he build a university in two years or the land title would revert back to the Dioceses.[8] Sorin traveled to the site with eight priests and began the school using Badin's old log chapel. They immediately acquired two students from the day of their arrival, Theodore Coquillard, the son of one of the South Bend's founders, and Clement Reckers, and set about building additions to the campus. Notre Dame began as a primary and secondary school, but soon received its official university charter from the Indiana General Assembly on January 15, 1844 after a push by State Senator John Defrees.[9] Under the charter the school is officially named the University of Notre Dame du Lac, which means University of Our Lady of the Lake. Though the word Lac is singular, the university's campus actually contains two lakes. According to a legend, when Sorin arrived at the school, everything was frozen. He thought there was only one lake and named the university accordingly.[10] Although the university was originally only for male students, the female-only, Saint Mary's College was founded by the Sisters of the Holy Cross near Notre Dame in 1844.[11] The Very Rev. ... The Congregation of Holy Cross (C.S.C.) is a Roman Catholic congregation of priests and brothers founded in 1837 by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC in Le Mans, France. ... This article is about the city in Indiana, US. For other uses of the name South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... University charter is a charter given by provincial, state or regional governments to legitimize the universitys existence. ... Image:Indianapolis Capitol. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jan. ... Single-sex education is the practice of conducting education where male and female students attend separate classes or in separate buildings or schools. ... Saint Marys College is a private Catholic liberal arts college founded in 1844 by the Sisters of the Holy Cross. ... The Sisters of the Holy Cross (CSC) headquartered on the campus of Saint Marys College, Notre Dame, Indiana, is one of three Catholic congregations of religious sisters which trace their origins to the foundation of the Congregation of Holy Cross by the Venerable Father Basil Anthony-Marie Moreau, CSC...


Early history

More students attended the college and the first degrees were awarded in 1849.[12] Additionally, the university was expanded with new buildings allowing more students and faculty to live, study, and eat at the university.[9] With each new president, new academic programs were offered and new buildings were built to accommodate these programs. The original Main Building Sorin built just after Fr. Sorin arrived was replaced by a larger "Main Building" in 1865, which housed the university's administration, classrooms, and dormitories. Beginning in 1873, a library collection was started by Father Lemonnier. By 1879 it had grown to ten thousand volumes that were housed in the Main Building. This Main Building, and the library collection, was destroyed by a fire in April of 1879; however, it was rebuilt before the next school year.[13] The library collection was also rebuilt and stayed housed in the new Main Building for years afterwards.[14] Around the time of the fire, a Music Hall was opened. Eventually becoming known as Washington Hall, it hosted plays and musical acts put on by the school.[15] By 1880, a science program was established at the university, and a Science Hall was built in 1883. The hall housed multiple classrooms and science labs needed for early research at the university.[16] By 1890, individual residence halls were built to house the increasing number of students.[17]

Notre Dame's administration building, featuring the famous golden dome topped by a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Notre Dame's administration building, featuring the famous golden dome topped by a statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 3. ... Our Lady redirects here. ...

Co-educational institute

Notre Dame continued to grow over the years adding more colleges, programs, and even sports teams. By 1921, with the addition of the College of Commerce,[18] Notre Dame had grown from a small college to a university with five colleges and a professional law school.[19] The university continued to expand and add new residence halls and buildings with each subsequent president until 1972. At that time, then-president Father Theodore Hesburgh made the decision to admit women into the university.[20] Two of the male residence halls were converted for the newly admitted female students that first year,[21][22] while two others were converted for the next school year.[23][24] The first female student, a transfer from St. Mary's College, graduated in 1972 with a bachelor's degree in marketing.[20] The Rev. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ...


Modern

Currently Notre Dame is led by Father John I. Jenkins, the 17th president of the university.[25] Jenkins took over the position from Father Edward Malloy, on July 1, 2005.[26] In his inaugural address, Jenkins described his goals of making the university a leader in research that recognizes ethics and building the connection between faith and studies.[27] In addition to Jenkins' leadership, the university is governed by two groups, Fellows of the University and a Board of Trustees.[28] These groups help to maintain the bylaws of the university and also elect officials for the university.[29] Finally, the provost of the university, currently Dr. Thomas Burish, works under the president to oversee many of the academic activities and functions of the university.[30] The Rev. ... The Rev. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Board of directors. ... A bylaw (sometimes also spelled by-law or byelaw) was originally the Viking town law in the Danelaw. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ...


Campus

A statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary at the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes on campus
A statue of the Blessed Virgin Mary at the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes on campus

Notre Dame's campus is located in Notre Dame, Indiana, an unincorporated community in north Indiana, just north of South Bend and four miles (6 km) from the Michigan state line.[31] Development of the campus began in the spring of 1843 when Father Sorin and some of his congregation built the "Old College", a building used for dormitories, a bakery, and a classroom. A year later, after an architect arrived, a small "Main Building" was built allowing for the launch of the college.[9] Today the campus lies on 1,250 acres (5.1 km²) just south of the Indiana Toll Road and includes 137 buildings located on quads throughout the campus.[32] ImageMetadata File history File links NDgrottoMary. ... ImageMetadata File history File links NDgrottoMary. ... An arial view of the University of Notre Dame du Lacs (Our Lady of the Lake) center campus and its Main Building with its famous Golden Dome. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with unincorporated. ... For other uses, see Indiana (disambiguation). ... This article is about the city in Indiana, US. For other uses of the name South Bend, see South Bend (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Indiana Toll Road Length: 156. ...

Close up of the famous Golden Dome, which sits atop the main building
Close up of the famous Golden Dome, which sits atop the main building

A number of the buildings that Father Sorin built still stand on the campus, while others have been replaced. The Old College building has become one of two seminaries on campus run by the Congregation of the Holy Cross.[33]The current Basilica of the Sacred Heart is located on the spot of Sorin's original church which became too small for the growing college and the Main Building, after a fire destroyed parts of it, has become home to Notre Dame's administration. There are two lakes located on campus, and near the lakes is the Grotto of Our Lady of Lourdes, which was built in 1896 as a replica of the original in Lourdes, France.[34] For the Ecuadorian artist, see Manuel Rendón Seminario. ... The Basilica of the Sacred Heart serves as the college church of the University of Notre Dame as well as the mother church of the Congregation of Holy Cross in the United States. ... The apparitions of Our Lady of Lourdes began when Bernadette Soubirous, a 14-year old peasant girl from Lourdes, when questioned by her mother, admitted that she had seen a lady in the cave of Massabielle, about a mile from the town, on 11 February 1858, while she was gathering... There is another Lourdes with a different pronunciation, see Lourdes, Brazil Our Lady of Lourdes Basilica Lourdes (Lorda in Occitan) is a town in the Hautes-Pyrénées département in France. ... There is another Lourdes with a different pronunciation, see Lourdes, Brazil Our Lady of Lourdes Basilica Lourdes (Lorda in Occitan) is a town in the Hautes-Pyrénées département in France. ...


New buildings

The university continues to expand and add new buildings each year. Since 2004, many buildings have been built-the most prominent being the Debartolo Performing Arts Center,[35] the Guglielmino Complex,[36] and the Jordan Hall of Science.[37] Additionally, a new male residence hall, Duncan Hall, began construction on March 8, 2007,[38] and will begin accepting residents for the Fall 2008 semester. A new engineering building, Stinson-Remick Hall, a new combination Center for Social Concerns/Institute for Church Life building and a law school addition are also currently under construction.[39] is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


London Centre

The university has had a presence in London since 1968. Since 1998, its London Centre has been based in the former United University Club at 1, Suffolk Street in Trafalgar Square. The Centre enables the Colleges of Arts & Letters, Business Administration, Science, Engineering and the Law School to develop their own programs in London.[40] The Oxford and Cambridge Club is in Pall Mall, London, England, close to St James Palace. ...


Academics

The University's Coat of Arms
The University's Coat of Arms

Notre Dame has a student body population of 11,603 total students and employs 1241 full-time faculty members and another 166 part-time members to give a student/faculty ratio of 13:1.[3] Named by Newsweek as one of the "25 New Ivies".[41] It is an Oak Ridge Associated University.[42] Image File history File links Notre_dame_coat_of_arms. ... Image File history File links Notre_dame_coat_of_arms. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...


Colleges

The College of Arts and Letters was established as the university's first college in 1842 with the first degrees given in 1849.[12] The university's first academic curriculum was modeled after the Jesuit Ratio Studiorum from Saint Louis University.[43] Today the college, housed in O'Shaughnessy Hall,[44] includes 21 departments in the areas of fine arts, humanities, and social sciences, and awards Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) degrees in over 40 majors, making it the largest of the university's colleges. There are around 2,500 undergraduates and 750 graduates enrolled in the college.[45] The College of Arts and Letters is the oldest and largest college within the University of Notre Dame. ... The Society of Jesus (Latin: Societas Iesu), commonly known as the Jesuits, is a Roman Catholic religious order. ... The Ratio Studiorum, 1598 The Ratio Studiorum (Latin: Plan of Studies) often designates the document that formally established the globally influential system of Jesuit education in 1599. ... Saint Louis University is a private, co-educational Catholic Jesuit university in the United States of America located in St. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ...


The College of Science was established at the university in 1865 by then-president Father Patrick Dillon. Dillon's scientific courses were six years of work, including higher-level mathematics courses.[46] Today the college, housed in the newly-built Jordan Hall of Science,[47] includes over 1,200 undergraduates in five departments of study, biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and pre-professional studies, each awarding Bachelor of Science (B.S.) degrees.[48] According to university statistics, its science pre-professional program has one of the highest acceptance rates to medical school of any university in the United States.[49] B.S. redirects here. ...


The School of Architecture was established in 1899,[50] although degrees in architecture were first awarded by the university in 1898.[51] Today the school, housed in Bond Hall,[52] offers a five year undergraduate program leading to the Bachelor of Architecture degree. One year of study is completed in Rome by all students enrolled in the school.[53] The School of Architecture at the University of Notre Dame is the oldest architecture school at a Catholic institution in the United States. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ...


The College of Engineering was established in 1920,[54] however, early courses in civil and mechanical engineering were a part of the College of Science since the 1870s.[55] Today the college, housed in the Cushing Hall of Engineering,[56] includes five departments of study in aerospace and mechanical engineering, chemical and biomolecular engineering, civil engineering and geological sciences, computer science and engineering, and electrical engineering, with eight B.S. degrees offered. Additionally, the college offers five year dual degree programs with the Colleges of Arts and Letters and of Business awarding additional B.A. and Master of Business Administration (MBA) degrees, respectively.[57] MBA redirects here. ...


The Mendoza College of Business was established by Father John F. O'Hara in 1921, although a foreign commerce program was launched in 1917.[58] Today the college offers degrees in accountancy, finance, management, and marketing and enrolls over 1,600 students.[59] The Mendoza College of Business is one of the colleges at the University of Notre Dame, which is located in Notre Dame, Indiana of the United States. ...


All of Notre Dame's undergraduate students are a part of one of the five undergraduate colleges at the school or are in the First Year of Studies program. The First Year of Studies program was established in 1962 to guide incoming freshmen in their first year at the school before they have declared a major. Each student is given an academic advisor from the program who helps them to choose classes that give them exposure to any major in which they are interested.[60] The program also includes a Learning Resource Center which provides time management, collaborative learning, and subject tutoring.[61] This program has been recognized previously, by U.S. News & World Report, as outstanding.[62] “Freshman” redirects here. ...


Graduate and professional schools

The exterior of the Notre Dame Law School
The exterior of the Notre Dame Law School

The University first offered graduate degrees, in the form of a Master of Arts (MA), in the 1854–1855 academic year. The program expanded to include Master of Laws (LL.M.) and Master of Civil Engineering in its early stages of growth, before a formal graduate school education was developed with a thesis not required to receive the degrees. This changed in 1924 with formal requirements developed for graduate degrees, including offering Doctorate (Ph.D.) degrees.[63] Today each of the five colleges offer graduate education. Most of the departments from the College of Arts and Letters offer Ph.D. programs, while a professional Master of Divinity (M.Div.) program also exists. All of the departments in the College of Science offer Ph.D. programs, except for the Department of Pre-Professional Studies. The School of Architecture offers a Master of Architecture, while each of the departments of the College of Engineering offer Ph.D. programs. The College of Business offers multiple professional programs including MBA and Master of Science in Accountancy programs. It also operates facilities in Chicago and Cincinnati for its executive MBA program.[64] Additionally, the Alliance for Catholic Education program offers a Master of Education program where students study at the university during the summer and teach in Catholic elementary schools, middle schools, and high schools across the Southern United States for two school years.[65] The Magister Artium, Magister in Artibus, or Master of Arts degree is an academic degree of medieval origin which has later acquired different characteristics in different educational systems. ... The Master of Laws is an advanced law degree, commonly abbreviated LL.M. (also LLM or LL.M) from its Latin name, Legum Magister. ... This article is about the thesis in academia. ... ‹ The template below is being considered for deletion. ... The Master of Architecture (M.Arch. ... Master of Accountancy (MAcc, MAc, or MAcy), alternatively Master of Professional Accountancy (MPAcy or MPA) or Master Science in Accountancy (MSAcy), is graduate professional degree designed to prepare students for public accounting and to provide them with the 150 credit hours required by most states before taking the Certified Public... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Cincinnati, Ohio viewed from the SW, across the Ohio River from Kentucky. ... The Master of Education (M.Ed or M.A.E.) is a degree conferred by American institutions for educators moving on in their field. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ... Middle school (also known as intermediate school or junior high school) covers a period of education that straddles primary/elementary education and secondary education, serving as a bridge between the two. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Historic Southern United States. ...


In addition to the programs offered by each of the colleges, the Notre Dame Law School offers a professional program for students. Established in 1869, Notre Dame was the first Catholic university in the United States to have a law program.[19] Today the program has consistently ranked among the top law schools in the nation according to US News and World Report.[66] The Law School grants the professional Juris Doctor degree as well as the graduate LL.M. and Doctor of Juridical Science degrees.[64] Currently, the law school is experiencing an expansion that will double the size of its learning space and is expected to be in operation for the Spring 2009 semester. It is the only accredited American law school to offer a full year of study abroad in London. The University of Notre Dame Law School, or NDLS, is the professional graduate law program of its parent institution, the University of Notre Dame. ... // A law school is an institution where future lawyers obtain legal degrees. ... J.D. redirects here. ... Legum Doctor (English: Doctor of Laws; abbreviated to LL.D.) In the UK, Australia and New Zealand, the LL.D. is a higher doctorate usually awarded on the basis of exceptionally insightful and distinctive publications, containing significant and original contributions to the science or study of law. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

Theodore Hesburgh Library, with the Word of Life mural, popularly known as "Touchdown Jesus"
Theodore Hesburgh Library, with the Word of Life mural, popularly known as "Touchdown Jesus"

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2336 × 3504 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 400 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2336 × 3504 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Rev. ...

Libraries

The library system of the university is divided between the main library and each of the colleges and schools. The main building is the fourteen-story Theodore M. Hesburgh Library, which is the third building to house the main collection of books.[67] The front of the library is adorned with the Word of Life mural. This mural is popularly known as "Touchdown Jesus" because of its proximity to Notre Dame Stadium and Jesus' arms appearing to make the signal for a touchdown.[68][69] The library system also includes branch libraries for Architecture, Chemistry & Physics, Engineering, Law, the Life Sciences, and Mathematics as well as information centers in the Mendoza College of Business and the Kellogg/Kroc Institute for Peace Studies, and a slide library in O'Shaughnessy Hall.[70] The library system holds over three-million volumes and is one of the top–100 largest libraries in the country.[71] Salle des illustres, ceiling painting, by Jean André Rixens. ... Notre Dame Stadium is the home football stadium for the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... Texas Longhorn quarterback Vince Young (center top of picture), now with the Tennessee Titans, rushing for a touchdown vs. ...


Rankings

See also: College and university rankings

Notre Dame ranked 19th overall in the United States in U.S. News and World Report's best colleges.[72] U.S. News and World Report also lists Notre Dame Law School as 22nd overall, and the Gourman Report, which is published by the Princeton Review, ranks the Law School at 18th. BusinessWeek ranks Mendoza College of Business graduate school as 26th overall.[66][73] Additionally, The Washington Monthly ranked the university 13th nationally in its 2006 edition.[74] BusinessWeek also ranked the undergraduate business program as 3rd nationally.[75] The Philosophical Gourmet Report ranked Notre Dame's graduate philosophy program as 13th nationally,[76] while ARCHITECT Magazine, ranked the undergraduate architecture program as 12th nationally.[77] Additionally, the study abroad program ranks sixth in highest participation percentage in the nation, with 57.6% of students choosing to study abroad in 17 countries.[78] In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... The Philosophical Gourmet Report (also known as the Leiter Report) attempts to score and rank the university philosophy departments in the English-speaking world, based on a survey of philosophers who are nominated as evaluators by the Advisory Board of the Report. ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ...


Research

Notre Dame has a long history of scientific research. In 1882, Professor Albert Zahm built the first wind tunnel used to compare lift to drag of aeronautical models. Around 1899, Professor Jerome Green became the first American to send a wireless message. Also, in 1931, Father Julius Nieuwland performed early work on basic reactions that was used to create neoprene.[79] Additionally, nuclear physics study at the university began with the building of a nuclear accelerator in 1936.[80] NASA wind tunnel with the model of a plane A wind tunnel is a research tool developed to assist with studying the effects of air moving over or around solid objects. ... Fr. ... Neoprene is the DuPont Chemical trade name for a family of synthetic rubbers based on polychloroprene. ... This box:      Nuclear physics is the branch of physics concerned with the nucleus of the atom. ...


Today, research continues in many fields, as the current university president, Father Jenkins, described his hope that Notre Dame would become "one of the pre–eminent research institutions in the world" in his inaugural address.[27] The university has many multi-disciplinary institutes devoted to research in varying fields, including the Medieval Institute, the Kroc Institute for International Peace studies, and the Center for Social Concerns.[81] Recent research includes work on family conflict and child development, [82][83]genome mapping,[84] the increasing trade deficit of the United States with China,[85] studies in fluid mechanics,[86] and marketing trends on the internet.[87] Peace and conflict studies can be defined as the inter-disciplinary inquiry into war as human condition and peace as human potential, as an alternative to the traditional Polemology (War Studies) and the strategies taught at Military academies. ... Balance of trade figures are the sum of the money gained by a given economy by selling exports, minus the cost of buying imports. ... This box:      Fluid mechanics is the study of how fluids move and the forces on them. ...


Endowment

Notre Dame's financial endowment was started in the early 1920s by then-president of the university, Father James Burns, and increased to $7 million by 1952 when Father Hesburgh became president. By the 1980s it reached $150 million, and in 2000 it returned a record 57.9% investment.[88] For the 2007 fiscal year, the endowment had grown to approximately $6.5 billion, putting the university in the top–15 largest endowments in the country.[2] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ...


Students

The Notre Dame student body consists of 11,603 students, with 8,352 undergraduates and 3,251 graduate and professional students[4] Around 21–24% of students are children of alumni,[89] and although 37% of students come from the Midwestern United States, the student body represents all 50 states and 100 countries.[4] The Princeton Review ranks the school as the fifth highest "dream school" for parents to send their children.[90] The school has been previously criticized for its lack of diversity,[91] and The Princeton Review ranks the university highly among schools at which "Alternative Lifestyles [are] Not an Alternative".[92] However, it has also been commended by publications such as Hispanic Magazine, ranking the university ninth on its list of the top–25 colleges for Latinos,[93] and the Journal of Blacks in Higher Education for raising enrollment of African-American students.[94] With 6,000 participants, the university's intramural sports program has been named by Sports Illustrated as the best program in the country,[95] while The Princeton Review named it as the top school where "Everyone Plays Intramural Sports".[96] The annual Bookstore Basketball tournament is the largest outdoor five-on-five tournament in the world with over 700 teams participating each year,[97] while the Notre Dame Boxing Club hosts the annual Bengal Bouts tournament that raises money for Bangladesh.[98] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... This article is about the Midwestern region in the United States. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports teams organized within a school. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other meanings of these words, see boxing (disambiguation) or boxer. ...


Residence halls

Main article: List of residence halls at the University of Notre Dame

About 80% of undergraduates and 20% of graduate students live on campus.[4] The majority of the graduate students on campus live in one of four graduate housing complexes on campus, while all on-campus undergraduates live in one of the 27 residence halls and Old College pre-seminary[99] Because of the religious affiliation of the university, all residence halls are single-sex, with 14 male dorms and 13 female dorms.[100] The university enforces a visitation policy (known as parietals) on those students who live in dormitories, specifying times when members of the opposite sex are allowed to visit, however, most residence halls have 24 hour social spaces in which parietals are not enforced. There are no fraternities or sororities at the university, but many students live in the same residence hall for all four years fostering a strong sense of community. Some intramural sports are based on residence hall teams, where the university offers the only non-military academy program of full-contact intramural American football.[101] A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... A military academy (American English), or service academy (British English) is an educational institution which prepares candidates for service in the military (officer corps of the Army), naval service or air force or provides education in a service environment, the exact definition depending on the country. ...

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart on Notre Dame's campus
The Basilica of the Sacred Heart on Notre Dame's campus

The Basilica of the Sacred Heart serves as the college church of the University of Notre Dame as well as the mother church of the Congregation of Holy Cross in the United States. ...

Religious life

With the university affiliated with the Congregation of the Holy Cross, its Catholic identity permeates into student life. More than 93% of students identify as Christian, while over 80% are Catholics.[102] The Basilica of the Sacred Heart is on campus and each residence hall has a chapel. Collectively, Catholic Mass is celebrated over 100 times per week on campus.[101] There are multitudes of religious statues and artwork around campus, most prominent of which are the statue of Mary on the Main Building, the Notre Dame Grotto, and the Word of Life mural on Hesburgh Library depicting Christ as a teacher. Additionally, every classroom displays a crucifix.[91] There are many religious clubs at the school, including Council #1477 of the Knights of Columbus (KOC), Communion and Liberation of Notre Dame, Baptist Collegiate Ministry, Jewish Club, Muslim Student Association, Orthodox Christian Fellowship and many more. The Notre Dame KOC are known for being the first collegiate council of KOC, operating a charitable concession stand during every home football game and owning their own building on campus which can be used as a cigar lounge.[103] For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... For other uses of Mass, see Mass (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Crucifix (disambiguation). ... Knights of Columbus emblem The Knights of Columbus is the worlds largest Roman Catholic fraternal service organization. ... Communion and Liberation, or CL, is a lay ecclesial movement within the Catholic Church. ... Concession stand is the term used to refer to a place where patrons can purchase snacks or food at a theatre, fair, or other event. ...


Student-run media

Like most universities, Notre Dame's students run a number of media outlets. The nine student-run outlets include a number of newspapers, both a radio and television station, and several magazines and journals. The three newspapers have varying publication interests, with The Observer published daily and mainly reporting university and other news.[104] In 1987, when some students believed that The Observer began to show a conservative bias, a liberal newspaper, Common Sense was published. Likewise, in 2003, when other students believed that the paper showed a liberal bias, the conservative paper Irish Rover went into production. Neither paper are published as often as The Observer, however, all three are distributed to all students.[105] The television station, NDtv, grew from one show in 2002 to a full 24 hour channel with original programming by September 2006.[106] The radio station, WVFI, began as a partner of WSND-FM, however, has since been airing independently on the internet.[107] Begun as a one-page journal in September 1876,[108] the Scholastic magazine is issued twice monthly and claims to be the oldest continuous collegiate publication in the United States. The other magazine, The Juggler, is released twice a year and focuses on student literature and artwork.[105] The Dome yearbook is published annually. In Spring 2008 the undergraduate journal for political science research, Beyond Politics, will make its debut. Conservative may refer to: Conservatism, political philosophy A member of a Conservative Party Conservative extension, premise of deductive logic Conservativity theorem, mathematical proof of conservative extension Conservative Judaism britney spears Category: ... Look up liberal on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Liberal may refer to: Politics: Liberalism American liberalism, a political trend in the USA Political progressivism, a political ideology that is for change, often associated with liberal movements Liberty, the condition of being free from control or restrictions Liberal Party, members of...


Alumni

Main articles: List of University of Notre Dame alumni and List of University of Notre Dame athletes

Notre Dame alumni number near 120,000,[109] and are members of 275 alumni clubs around the world.[110] Many alumni give yearly monetary support to the university, with a school-record 53.2% giving some donation in 2006.[111] Many buildings on campus are named for those whose donations allowed their building, including residence halls,[112][113] classroom buildings,[114] and the performing arts center.[35] This is a list of notable alumni of the University of Notre Dame. ...


Notre Dame alumni work in various fields. Alumni working in political fields include state governors,[115] members of the United States Congress,[116] and current United States Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice.[117] A number of university heads are alumni, including Notre Dame's current president, Rev. John Jenkins.[118] Additionally, many alumni are in the media, including talk show hosts Regis Philbin and Phil Donahue,[119][120] and television and radio personalities such as Mike Golic and Hannah Storm.[121][122] With the university having high profile sports teams, a number of alumni became a part of sports teams, including professional baseball, basketball, and football players, such as Joe Montana,[123] Megan Duffy,[124] and Jeff Samardzija,[125] current collegiate head football coaches, such as Notre Dame coach Charlie Weis,[126] and former football coaches, such as Knute Rockne.[127] Other notable alumni include prominent businessman Edward J. DeBartolo Jr. and astronaut Jim Wetherbee.[128][129] For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Type Bicameral Houses Senate House of Representatives President of the Senate President pro tempore Dick Cheney, (R) since January 20, 2001 Robert C. Byrd, (D) since January 4, 2007 Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, (D) since January 4, 2007 Members 535 plus 4 Delegates and 1 Resident Commissioner Political... The United States Secretary of State is the head of the United States Department of State, concerned with foreign affairs. ... Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush to hold the office. ... Regis Francis Xavier Philbin (born August 25, 1931) is an Emmy Award-winning American television personality and occasional actor known for his roles as a talk show host, game show host, and presenter at various events. ... Phillip John Donahue (born December 21, 1935 in Cleveland, Ohio) is an American media personality and writer, best known as the creator and star of The Phil Donahue Show, also known as Donahue, the first tabloid talk show. ... Michael Mike Golic (born December 12, 1962 in Cleveland, Ohio), is a co-host of ESPN Radios Mike and Mike in the Morning and a former defensive lineman in the NFL. He also serves as an analyst for ESPN and ESPN2s NFL studio programming, as well as for... Hannah Storm (born Hannah Storen on June 13, 1962) is an American television news journalist and a current co-host of CBS The Early Show. ... Joseph Clifford Joe Montana, Jr. ... Megan Duffy Megan Duffy (born July 13, 1984 in Dayton, Ohio, USA) is a American professional basketball player in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA), currently playing for the Minnesota Lynx. ... Jeffrey Alan Samardzija (born January 23, 1985 in Merrillville, Indiana) is an American baseball player as a pitcher with the Tennessee Smokies, the Double-A affiliate of the Chicago Cubs. ... Charles Joseph (Charlie) Weis (born March 30, 1956 in Middlesex, New Jersey) is the head coach of the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... Knute (pronounced kah-noot) (noot is the anglicized nickname) Kenneth Rockne (March 4, 1888 – March 31, 1931) was an American football player and is regarded as one of the greatest coaches in college football history. ... Edward John DeBartolo, Jr. ... For other uses, see Astronaut (disambiguation). ... External link NASA Biography Categories: Stub | 1952 births | Astronauts ...


Athletics

The interlocking ND is the logo for the university's athletic teams

Notre Dame's NCAA Division I teams are known as the Fighting Irish. This name was used in the early 1920s with respect to the football team and was popularized by alumnus Francis Wallace in his New York Daily News columns.[130] The official colors of Notre Dame are "madonna blue" and "papal gold,"[131] which are worn in competition by its athletic teams. In addition, the color green is often worn because of the Fighting Irish nickname.[132] The Notre Dame Leprechaun is the mascot of the athletic teams. Created by Theodore W. Drake in 1964, the leprechaun was first used on the football pocket schedule and later on the football program covers. The leprechaun was featured on the cover of Time in November of 1964 and gained national exposure.[133] This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Virgin Mary redirects here. ... For other uses, see Pope (disambiguation). ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... TIME redirects here. ...


The university offers 26 varsity sports, 13 each for men and women.[134] 21 of these teams compete in the Big East Conference,[135] while football is Independent,[136] both fencing teams are in the Midwest Fencing Conference,[137] the hockey team is in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association,[138] and the men's lacrosse team is in the Great Western Lacrosse League.[139] The university marching band plays at home games for most of the sports. The band, which began in 1846 and has a claim as the oldest university band in continuous existence in the United States, was honored by the National Music Council as a "Landmark of American Music" during the United States Bicentennial.[140] The band regularly plays the school's fight song the Notre Dame Victory March, which was named as the most played and most famous fight song by Northern Illinois Professor William Studwell.[141] In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ... Hockey is any of a family of sports in which two teams compete by trying to maneuver a ball, or a hard, round disc called a puck, into the opponents net or goal, using a hockey stick. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... For other uses, see Lacrosse (disambiguation). ... The Great Western Lacrosse League is a NCAA Division 1 conference that only sponsors men’s lacrosse. ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... The United States Bicentennial was celebrated on Sunday, July 4, 1976, the 200th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence. ... For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ... When you think of college fight songs, the Notre Dame Victory March is without a doubt the most recognizable collegiate fight song in the nation. ... Northern Illinois University is a public university located in DeKalb, Illinois. ...


Football

Notre Dame Stadium on the university campus
Notre Dame Stadium on the university campus

The Notre Dame football team has a long history, first beginning when the Michigan Wolverines football team brought football to Notre Dame in 1887 and played against a group of students.[142] In the long history since then, 13 Irish teams have won consensus national championships (although the university only claims 11),[134] along with another nine teams being named national champion by at least one source.[143] Additionally, the program has the most members in the College Football Hall of Fame,[144][145] is tied with the University of Southern California(USC) and The Ohio State University with the most Heisman Trophies won,[146] and have the second highest winning percentage in NCAA history.[147] With the long history, Notre Dame has accumulated many rivals, and its annual game against USC for the Jeweled Shillelagh has been named by some as the second greatest college football rivalry ever.[148] Head coach Charlie Weis 3rd year, 22–15–0 through 11/24/07 Home stadium Notre Dame Stadium Capacity 80,795 - Grass Conference Independent First year 1887 Athletic director Dr. Kevin White Website UND.com Team records All-time record 824–278–42 (.739) Postseason bowl record 13–15 Awards... Download high resolution version (1400x1050, 592 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1400x1050, 592 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Notre Dame Stadium is the home football stadium for the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team. ... Head coach Lloyd Carr 13th year, 121–40 Home stadium Michigan Stadium Capacity 107,501 - Field Turf Conference Big Ten First year 1879 Athletic director William C. Martin Website MGoBlue. ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... College Football Hall of Fame front. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... This article is about Ohio State; there is also an Ohio University. ... Heisman redirects here. ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... Notre Dame Fighting Irish football rivalries encompass many teams. ... Head coach Pete Carroll 7th year, 75–14 Home stadium Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum Capacity 92,500 - Grass Conference Pac-10 First year 1888 Athletic director Mike Garrett Website USCTrojans. ... The Jeweled Shillelagh (shuh-LAY-lee) is passed between the annual winner of the college football game between the University of Southern California Trojans and the University of Notre Dame Fighting Irish. ... Pairs of schools, colleges and universities, especially when they are close to each other either geographically or in their areas of specialization, often establish a college rivalry with each other over the years. ...


Today the team competes in Notre Dame Stadium, an 80,795 seat stadium on campus.[149] The team is coached by Charlie Weis who was named as coach on December 12, 2004,[126] and is currently signed to coach until 2015.[150] After three years coaching the Irish, Weis has accumulated a 22–15 record,[151] and led his team to two Bowl Championship Series bowl games.[152] However, the 2007 team had the most losses ever for the school.[153] The football team generates enough revenue to operate independently while $22.1 million is retained from the team's profits for academic use. Forbes named the team as the most valuable in college football, worth a total of $101 million in 2007.[154] is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BCS Logo 2006-Present with logo of Television Rightsholder Fox Broadcasting Company The Bowl Championship Series (BCS) is a selection system designed to pair the top two teams in college football against each other in the BCS National Championship Game, with the winner crowned the BCS national champion. ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... The 2007 Notre Dame Fighting Irish football team is the college football team that represents the University of Notre Dame in the 2007 NCAA Division I-A football season. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ...


Men's basketball

Main article: Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's basketball

The men's basketball team has over 1,600 wins, one of only 12  schools who have reached that mark, and have appeared in 28 NCAA tournaments.[155] Former player, Austin Carr, holds the record for most points scored in a single game of the tournament with 61.[156] Although the team has never won the NCAA Tournament, they were named by the Helms Foundation as national champions twice.[155] The team has orchestrated a number of upsets of number one ranked teams, the most notable of which was ending UCLA's record 88 game winning streak in 1974.[157] The team has beaten an additional eight number one teams, and those nine wins rank second, to UCLA's 10, all-time in wins against the top team.[155] Currently, the team plays in the 11,418 seat, Edmund P. Joyce Center.[158] The team is coached by Mike Brey, who, as of the 2006–07 season, his seventh, has achieved a 142–78 record.[159] This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Austin George Carr (born March 10, 1948 in Washington, D.C.) is a former professional basketball player for the National Basketball Association. ... The Helms Athletic Foundation was an athletic foundation based in Los Angeles, founded in 1936 by Bill Schroeder and Paul Helms. ... Look up Upset in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The UCLA Bruins mens basketball program, established in 1920, owns a record 11 NCAA championships. ... The Joyce Center is an 11,418-seat multi-purpose arena in Notre Dame, Indiana just north of South Bend, Indiana. ... Mike Brey (born March 22, 1959 in Bethesda, Maryland) is an American college basketball coach. ...


Other sports

See also: Notre Dame Fighting Irish men's ice hockey

Notre Dame has been successful in other sports besides football, with an additional 14 national championships in various sports. Three teams have won multiple national championships with the fencing team leading them with seven,[160] followed by the men's tennis and women's soccer teams each with two.[161][162] Also, the men's cross country,[163] men's golf,[164] and women's basketball teams each won one in their histories.[165] Additionally, in the first ten years that Notre Dame competed in the Big East Conference its teams won a total of 64 championships.[166] Head Coach Jeff Jackson 2nd season, 45-26-7[1] Captain T.J. Jindra Home Ice Joyce Center Capacity: 2,713 Surface: 200 x 85 Conference Affiliation CCHA (1992 - Present) Independent (1983 - 1992) CCHA (1981 - 1983) WCHA (1971 - 1981) Independent (1912-13, 1919 - 1927) Honors NCAA Tournament Appearances (2) 2004... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... The striker (wearing red jersey) has run past the defender (in white jersey) and is about to take a shot at the goal, while the goalkeeper positions himself to stop the ball. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... This article is about the game. ...


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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see October (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 121st day of the year (122nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 9th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 365th day of the year (366th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 270th day of the year (271st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 316th day of the year (317th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 349th day of the year (350th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 59th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 350th day of the year (351st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 324th day of the year (325th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 317th day of the year (318th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 325th day of the year (326th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Notre Dame, Our Mother is the alma mater of the University of Notre Dame. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Category:University of Notre Dame
  • http://www.nd.edu — Official university site
  • http://und.cstv.com — Official Notre Dame athletics site
  • University of Notre Dame Online
  • http://alumni.nd.edu - Official Alumni Association Web Site
  • University of Notre Dame is at coordinates 41°42′11″N 86°14′20″W / 41.702995, -86.238972 (University of Notre Dame)Coordinates: 41°42′11″N 86°14′20″W / 41.702995, -86.238972 (University of Notre Dame)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Welcome to Notre Dame OpenCourseWare — Notre Dame OpenCourseWare (266 words)
Notre Dame OpenCourseWare is a free and open repository of educational materials originating from courses taught at the University of Notre Dame.
Notre Dame OCW is a free and open educational resource for faculty, students, and self-learners throughout the world.
What Notre Dame OCW does give you is open access to the materials used in a variety of courses.
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: University of Notre Dame (1034 words)
Notre Dame was founded in 1842 by the Very Reverend Edward Sorin, C.S.C., late superior-general of his congregation, who came from France at the invitation of the Right Reverend Celestine A. Guynemer de La Hailandière, D.D., Bishop of Vincennes.
Notre Dame has had distinct influence on movements of the Church in the Middle West from its foundation.
Notre Dame has merited consideration by the State not only by her position as a leading university, but also by a remarkable display of
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