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Encyclopedia > University of North Carolina at Greensboro
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro

Motto: "Service"
Established: 1891
Endowment: $183 Million
Chancellor: Patricia A. Sullivan
Faculty: 989 (part and full time)
Staff: 2,522 (full time)
Undergraduates: 13,408 (2007)
Postgraduates: 3,769 (2007)
Location: Greensboro, North Carolina, USA
Campus: Urban, 210 acres (0.85 km²)
Colors: Gold, White, and Navy Blue                
Mascot: Spartan & Minerva
Website: www.uncg.edu

The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a public university in Greensboro, North Carolina and is a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina system. Also known as UNCG, the university offers more than 100 undergraduate, 59 master's and 22 doctoral programs. The University's academic schools and programs include Arts & Sciences, Business & Economics, Education, Health & Human Performance, Human Environmental Sciences, Music, Nursing, Continual Learning, Graduate School and Lloyd International Honors College. Image File history File links UncgUniversity-seal. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... Alternate meanings: White (disambiguation) White is a color (more accurately it contains all the colors of the spectrum and is sometimes described as an achromatic color—black is the absence of color) that has high brightness but zero hue. ... ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links UNCG_FullNameHColor. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Greensboro redirects here. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ... University of North Carolina Seal The University of North Carolina System is a sixteen university system which comprises all public 4-year colleges and/or universities in North Carolina and consists of 16 separate campuses across the state. ...


UNCG is distinguished by its five leadership areas - business, cultural leadership, education, public policy and social change, and science. Additionally, the university is home to a bevy of research institutes and centers including the Center for Applied Research, Center for Creating Writing in the Arts, Center for Global Business Education & Research, Center for Biotechnology, Genomics & Health Research, McDowell Research Center for Global IT Management, Center for Music Research and the Southeastern Regional Vision for Education (SERVE).

Contents

History

North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College, ca. 1906.
North Carolina State Normal and Industrial College, ca. 1906.

Credit for the founding of UNCG goes mainly to Charles Duncan McIver, a crusader for the cause of women's education. The school was established as a women's college by legislative enactment on February 18, 1891 as the State Normal and Industrial School and opened October 5, 1892. The school provided instruction in business, domestic science, and teaching with a student body of 223 and a faculty of 15 in its first year. R. S. Pullen and R. T. Gray gave the original 10-acre site in Greensboro, N.C. where the first building was erected with state funds totaling $30,000. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The school has seen many names over the years, changing from the "State Normal and Industrial School" to the State Normal and Industrial College in 1896, and again in 1919 to North Carolina College for Women. In 1932, it changed to the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, when it became one of the three charter institutions of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, and changed again to The University of North Carolina at Greensboro when men were first admitted to the school in 1963. It is remembered fondly by many graduates of the Woman's College simply as "the W.C." Year 1896 (MDCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar). ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ...


Charles D. McIver served the institution as its first chief executive officer with the title of President. This position has also seen various names, with the administrator being known as the Dean of Administration after 1934 and Chancellor from 1945 to present. Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1945 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ...


Recognition

The Princeton Review ranked UNCG #2 in its list of best bargains in public universities in the nation[citation needed]. It also placed UNCG in the top 136 colleges named "Best in the Southeast." For the eighth year in a row, The Princeton Review ranked UNCG among the nation's top colleges in the 2007 edition of "The Best 357 Colleges" guide. Students say UNCG "is a small university in comparison to other public universities, but it is big enough for a variety of people – poor and rich, rural and urban, in-state and out-of-state, and international." The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ...


Kiplinger's ranks UNCG as one of the 100 best values among public, 4-year schools in the United States. Six other North Carolina institutions made the list--Appalachian State, East Carolina, NC State, UNC-Asheville, UNC-Chapel Hill, and UNC-Wilmington.


The UNCG School of Nursing has received one of the top national honors for nursing schools. The National League of Nursing named the school a Center of Excellence in Nursing Education, a distinction held by only three other schools in the country for 2006.


UNCG's Counselor Education program is among the best in the nation. US News and World Report-The Department of Counseling and Educational Development is ranked second (nationally) among counseling programs in the magazine’s 2006-2007 list. The program – the only specialty education program in the state to be ranked – was ranked fifth last year and third the year before.


The School of Education is 33rd in the country for 2004. UNC-Chapel Hill is the only other North Carolina school in the top 50, coming in at 31st place. Previously, UNCG was ranked 29th.


UNCG was named as having the best chapter of Phi Beta Kappa in the country at a public university for the year 2006. It is also the home institution of NC Poet Laureate emeritus Fred Chappell. The Phi Beta Kappa Society is an honor society which considers its mission to be fostering and recognizing excellence in undergraduate liberal arts and sciences. ...


The University's endowment is ranked third among North Carolina's public institutions of higher learning (behind UNC-Chapel Hill and NC State University) and 275th nationally.


Campus

The Fountain in front of the Cafeteria
The Fountain in front of the Cafeteria

UNCG has an intimate campus with distinctively unique landmarks. Among these features is a statue of Minerva, the goddess of wisdom, located to the east of Elliot University Center. Minerva has been a part of campus from the first diploma bearing her likeness in 1894 to the statue erected near the center in 2003. Minerva also inspired the university's new graphic identity program, which was launched in 2004. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 4. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 4. ...


Other landmarks include "Charlie," a statue of the University's founder Charles Duncan McIver outside Jackson Library. The white tower stacks of the Jackson Library and the Spartan water tower are recognizable structures in the Greensboro community, and the campus is also home to "the Rock" and the clock tower—two campus landmarks—and school traditions (See Traditions below). A new bell tower at the corner of College Ave. and Spring Garden St. was completed at the end of the 2004-2005 academic year. ...


The Fountain is another landmark on UNCG's campus, and is a common meeting place for student groups. Visible from parts of the quad all the way to the Elliot University Center and from above in the Jackson Library and "the Caf," the large steps and platform around the fountain are frequently home to demonstrations, performances, and fraternity/sorority functions.


The campus is in close proximity (within 1.5 hours drive) to many other universities — North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, Duke, Elon, High Point University, NC State, UNC-Chapel Hill, UNC-Charlotte, Wake Forest, and Winston-Salem State University. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, United States. ... Elon University is a private, liberal arts university located in Elon, North Carolina. ... High Point University is a private liberal arts university in High Point, North Carolina, USA affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is the eleventh-oldest institution of higher education and the oldest public university in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is a public university located in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Winston-Salem State University is a four-year is a public, coeducational, research university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ...


Students

Of the approximately 16,632 (12,692 undergraduate) students enrolled at the school, 32 percent are male and 68 percent female. Students come from 46 states and 90 countries. Around 25 percent of undergraduates are minorities, and 20 percent are African-American.


Student demographics

  • Faculty: 891 (Fall 2005)
  • Student-faculty ratio: 16:1
  • Average class size: 27 students
  • Classes with 20 or fewer students: 30%
  • Average SAT score: 1051
  • Campus size: 210 acres (0.85 km²)
  • Male-female ratio: 1:2
  • African-American: 19.8% undergraduate, 13% graduate
  • Asian-American: 3.3% undergraduate, 5.3% graduate
  • White: 69.9% undergraduate, 75.7% graduate
  • Hispanic: 2.2% undergraduate, 1.6% graduate
  • Native American: .39% undergraduate, .4% graduate

Sports, clubs, and traditions

UNCG is home to a large amount of diverse and active sports and student organizations from Greek life to a radio station, and some traditions unique to the school.


Athletics

UNC-Greensboro Spartans logo
UNC-Greensboro Spartans logo

The intercollegiate athletics program at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro reaches as far back as the late 1940s during the days of the WCUNC, with students participating in national golf tournaments in 1948 and the school hosting the national tournaments for women's golf (1954) and tennis (1965). During the 1980s, all Spartan teams competed in Division III (non-scholarship) and then Division II (scholarship) of the National Collegiate Athletic Association, and all teams have competed in Division 1 since Fall 1991. In 2004, the UNCG's Men's Soccer team lost in the Sweet 16 of the NCAA Tournament to UC-Santa Barbara's Men's Soccer team, 1-0 in Overtime. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara Gauchos soccer team competes at the NCAA Division I level. ...


There is a student organization dedicated to cheering on the Spartans in all of their athletic events. They are called the Blue Crew. In 2006, Blue Crew was joined by 8 dedicated young men who formed a new group called "The OCHO". The eight of them paint their chests to spell out 'SPARTANS'. They are always a crowd favorite.


The 16 athletic teams currently at UNCG include:


Baseball, Men's Basketball, Women's Basketball, Men's Cross Country, Women's Cross Country, Men's Golf, Women's Golf, Men's Soccer, Women's Soccer, Softball, Men's Tennis, Women's Tennis, Men's Track, Women's Track, Women's Volleyball, Wrestling,


Clubs

In Fall 2004, the Clubs and Organizations affiliated with UNCG included 36 Honor Societies and 18 Fraternities and Sororities. The University also has an active Student Government Association, founded in 1910[1] and several foreign culture groups, a Neo-Black Society, PRIDE! (A GLBT support and acceptance group.) , The Science Fiction Fantasy Federation, and various performing arts, religious and service programs. Student media groups also produce UNCG's newspaper The Carolinian, CORADDI Fine Arts Magazine, and WUAG 103.1 Campus Radio Station. The campus also includes numerous political organizations for students, including the College Republicans, College Democrats, College Libertarians and the International Socialist Organization and other activist groups including STAND, an organization focused on the situation in the Darfur region of Sudan. A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... LGBT (or GLBT) is an acronym used as a collective term to refer to lesbians, gays, bisexuals, and transgender people. ... WUAG (103. ...


Club Sports: Disc Golf, Equestrian, Fencing, Football, Ice Hockey, Kendo, Rugby (Men's), Rugby (Women's), Soccer (Men's), Swimming, Ultimate (Men's and Women's) , Volleyball, Women's Soccer, Tennis Ultimate (sometimes called ultimate Frisbee in reference to the trademarked brand name) is a non-contact competitive team game played with a 175 gram flying disc. ...


Greek Life

UNCG is home to 19 Social Fraternities and Sororities that each have their own traditions. Their main event is Greek Week, a weeklong celebration of Greek life and team building games that take place each year in April.


The following Greek organizations are present at UNCG:


Interfraternity Conference:

National Panhellenic Conference: This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... Pi Kappa Phi is a national social fraternity that was founded in the spirit of nu phi, meaning non-fraternity. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ...

National Pan-Hellenic Council Sororities: Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Sigma Sigma Sigma (ΣΣΣ), also known as Tri Sigma or Sigma, is a national American women’s sorority with membership of more than 92,000 members (as of August 1, 2006). ...

National Pan-Hellenic Council Fraternities: Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ...

Council Independent: Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ...

The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ...

Traditions

Some of the most visible traditions at UNCG take place between the University Dining Hall and the Elliott University Center where "The Rock" and the clock tower are located.


The Rawk

The Rawk[2] is a large boulder donated by members of Alpha Phi Omega in 1973 and spray-painted nearly every day by students, who use it as a giant message board. Unofficial rules govern the use of the Rock, and students know not to use foul language and that messages painted on the rock must be left for at least 24 hours before being painted over. Students know when they can begin to paint over the previous message on The Rock by the two smaller rocks in front of it; one for the date, and one for the time at which the message was painted. The Rock was originally placed where the Fountain is today, on the hill in front of the Dining Hall. Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ...


The spelling of 'The Rawk' came about as a means to express the more iconic status of it. It is a part of UNCG's "Rawkin' Welcome Week," which they host a venue of activities to welcome the incoming freshman at the university.


Clock Towers

Most students at the University also uphold the tradition of not walking beneath the four-faced clock tower located near the Rock. It is said that those who walk under the clock will not graduate on time, and some students believe in this almost religiously, avoiding the bricks around the clock tower as well. Only graduates and the occasional unbeliever walk through the middle of the four posts to read the plaque below the clocks.


Students are also told not to depend on the time shown on any of the clock's faces. All four faces tend to show slightly different times.


A new clock and bell tower, the Nicholas A. Vacc Bell Tower, was constructed in 2005 on the site of the old University Bell, at the corner of College Avenue and Spring Garden Street. The bells ring on the hour and on every quarter of the hour in a sequence made famous by the Big Ben chimes. Big Ben redirects here. ...


Other traditions

It is also a tradition each year to give new students a Spartan pin and a daisy--the school flower of UNCG--after student convocation. The daisy was the inspiration for the original two school colors: gold and white. (Navy blue was added to the color palette in 1987 "to provide better visual contrast to publications, merchandise and athletic uniforms."[3]) Another tradition is the ringing of the University Bell to open the academic year at the start of each Fall Semester.


Yet another tradition is to put a wreath of daisies at the foot of the statue of Charles McIver at UNCG and on the grounds of the North Carolina state capitol on Founder's Day. This is done by the Alumni of the University.


Administration

  • Charles Duncan McIver (president, 1891-1906)
  • Julius Foust (president/dean 1906-1934)
  • Walter Clinton Jackson (dean of administration, 1934-1945; chancellor, 1945-1950)
  • Edward Kidder Graham (chancellor, 1950-1956)
  • William Whatley Pierson (acting chancellor, 1956-1957)
  • Gordon Williams Blackwell (chancellor, 1957-1960)
  • William Whatley Pierson (acting chancellor, 1960-1961)
  • Otis Arnold Singletary (chancellor, 1961-1966)
  • James Sharbrough Ferguson (acting chancellor, 1964-1967; chancellor, 1967-1979)
  • William Edward Moran (chancellor, 1979-1994)
  • Debra W. Stewart (interim chancellor, 1994)
  • Patricia A. Sullivan (chancellor, 1995-Present); On December 6, 2007, Dr. Sullivan announced her intention to retire, effective July 31, 2008 if approved by the President of the UNC System.

... The University of North Carolina is a seventeen campus system which includes all sixteen public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States and one public residential high school. ...

Academic Units

The University is organized into the College of Arts and Sciences and six professional schools: Joseph M. Bryan School of Business and Economics, School of Education, School of Health and Human Performance, School of Human Environmental Sciences, School of Music, and School of Nursing. The University offers three doctoral degrees in eighteen areas of study, master's degrees in a wide variety of concentrations including four Master of Fine Arts degrees, and a number of Post-Baccalaureate and Post-Master's Certificates.


Bryan School of Business & Economics

The Bryan School of Business and Economics is the largest of UNCG's six professional schools. It was founded in 1969, and is named for Joseph Bryan, a prominent figure in North Carolina politics and philanthropy. It is accredited by the The Associate to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business, and is in the top 10% of schools in the nation that have earned this accreditation for business and economics. The school is organized into four different departments; Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, and Information Systems and Operations Management. A new degree in Marketing was added in the Fall of 2006.
Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (900 km)  - % water 9. ...


The Bryan School offers degrees at different levels. They include:


Undergraduate:

  • Accounting
  • Accounting and Information Systems
  • Business Administration
  • Economics
  • Finance
  • Information Systems and Operations Management
  • International Business Studies
  • Marketing

Graduate:

  • Master of Arts in Applied Economics
  • MBA
  • MBA/Master of Science in Nursing joint degree
  • Master of Science in Accounting
  • Master of Science in Information Technology Management
  • Ph.D. in Economics
  • Ph.D. in Information Systems

Certificates:

  • Post-baccalaureate Certificate for Studies in Business Administration
  • Post-baccalaureate Certificate for Studies in Information Technology
  • Post-master’s Certificate in Management
  • Post-master’s Certificate in Financial Analysis
  • Post-master’s Certificate in International Business
  • Post-master’s Certificate in Information Technology

The Bryan School has 75 full-time faculty as well as 2,000 undergraduates and 450 graduate students. There are also more than 18,000 alumni.


College of Arts & Sciences

School of Education

The school of Education has several graduate programs, one notable one being a PhD in Educational Leadership and Cultural Foundation which has a concentration in Cultural Studies.


School of Health & Human Performance

The School of Health and Human Performance is a growing and popular school of study at UNCG. It is one of two schools in the state to offer a Recreation and Hospitality Management degree, and the program is very well known on the east coast.
Majors in this school include:

  • Public Health
  • Dance
  • Exercise and Sport Science
  • Hospitality Management
  • Leisure Service Management
  • Recreation and Parks Management
  • Therapeutic Recreation
  • Travel and Tourism

Faculty for the RTH Department include:

  • Dr. Leandra Bedini
  • Dr. Erick Byrd
  • Dr. David Cardenas
  • Dr. Bonnie Canziani
  • Dr. Nancy Gladwell
  • Dr. Jerrie Hsieh
  • Dr. Stephen Maynard
  • Dr. Stuart Schelein
  • Dr. Jim Sellers
  • Dr. Charlsena Stone

School of Human Environmental Sciences

  • Bachelor of Science in Interior Architecture (4+ year degree)

Department of Interior Architecture


School of Music

The UNCG School of Music is home to over 600 music majors and 60 distinguished faculty members. Music has been a central discipline at UNCG since the University's founding. The school was the first in the South to offer an undergraduate music education degree (1912). The North Carolina High School Music Contest Festival - the precursor of today's influential North Carolina Music Educators Association - arose on campus during the 1920s.


The UNCG School of Music has been fully accredited by the National Association of Schools of Music since 1938. The school offers the only comprehensive music program from undergraduate through doctoral study in performance and music education in North Carolina. It is continually recognized as one of the best music institutions in the United States.


Degree Programs offered include:

  • Bachelor of Music in Composition, Jazz Studies, Music Education, Vocal or Instrumental Performance
  • Bachelor of Arts in Music
  • Master of Music in Music Theory, Composition, Music Education, Vocal or Instrumental Performance with specialties in Accompanying, Conducting, Early Keyboard Instruments, Piano Pedagogy, or Vocal Pedagogy
  • Doctor of Musical Arts in Accompanying, Conducting, Vocal or Instrumental Performance
  • Doctor of Philosophy in Music Education

Student Organizations include:

Mu Phi Epsilon (ΜΦΕ) is a co-ed international professional music fraternity and honor society. ... Phi Mu Alpha (ΦΜΑ) Sinfonia is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... The Music Educators National Conference (MENC), founded in 1907, is an American organization for music educators that provides professional development and advocacy. ... The American Choral Directors Association (ACDA), headquartered in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, is a non-profit organization with the stated purpose of promoting excellence in the field of choral music. ... The American String Teachers Association with the National School Orchestra Association (or ASTA with NSOA) is a professional organization for music teachers. ...

School of Nursing

The School of Nursing was established in September of 1966 under the leadership of the first Dean, Eloise R. Lewis. The first class of BSN students graduated in 1970. In 1976, the MSN program was initiated. The School began the PhD program Fall 2005. The School continues to offer both undergraduate and graduate programs with over 4,000 alumni. The School also offers an outreach program in Hickory, North Carolina for RN to BSN students and a concentration in education for MSN students.


The average passage rate for the NCLEX is over 90% for prelicensure graduates and all of the graduates from the nurse anesthesia program are nationally certified. The Adult and Gerontological Nurse Practitioner program leads to eligibility for national certification.


Students have the opportunity for clinical experiences in over 400 agencies throughout the state of North Carolina. The School supports four nursing clinics for the elderly as educational sites for students. All students are advised by nursing faculty.


Lloyd International Honors College

Lloyd International Honors College is a selective honors college at The University of North Carolina at Greensoro and provides undergraduate students in all majors an excellent opportunity to reach a higher level of academic achievement in the same time it takes to earn a regular degree. Alumni Hall - Home to many Lloyd International Honors College celebrations Lloyd International Honors College is a selective honors college within the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) that gives excellent undergraduate students in all majors the opportunity to reach a higher level of academic achievement in the same time... Alumni Hall - Home to many Lloyd International Honors College celebrations Lloyd International Honors College is a selective honors college within the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (UNCG) that gives excellent undergraduate students in all majors the opportunity to reach a higher level of academic achievement in the same time...


Lloyd International Honors College offers its students enhanced academic opportunities, international and global perspectives, and a variety of co-curricular and extracurricular options that help round out their education.


The College offers three Honors academic programs that allows students to enhance their general-education studies (General-Education Honors Program), work in their major (Disciplinary Honors Program), or their entire undergraduate education while at UNCG (Full University Honors Program). All Honors students take special Honors courses that are generally restricted to no more than 20-25 students and often have an interdisciplinary focus. For those who wish to complete General-Education Honors or Full University Honors, an international experience and a second language are required.


There are also a variety of independent study and research opportunities that give Honors students the chance to design courses their fit their special needs and interests and to work one-on-one with faculty. Finally, Lloyd International Honors College offers a variety of extracurricular opportunities including weekly coffees where students and faculty discuss issues of the day, student symposia, debates, special lectures and performances, enhanced study abroad opportunities, and special residence hall options.


The Graduate School

The Graduate School at The University of North Carolina at Greensboro directs and manages the graduate programs on campus for approximately 3600 graduate students from 33 states and 34 foreign countries.


Some of the activities coordinated by The Graduate School Staff:

  • Disseminate program and admission information to prospective students
  • Collect and process application materials submitted to The University
  • Coordinate the admission process with academic departments
  • Assist students with interpretation of policy, course registration and withdrawal
  • Monitor academic eligibility
  • Review theses/dissertations for formatting requirements
  • Process applications for Graduation
  • Process degree audits/degree clearances
  • Work with the Graduate Studies Committee to approve all new/revised graduate programs, curricula, and policy M.F.A. Writing Program The MFA Writing Program is one of the oldest such programs in the country. During the early years, the University had among its faculty a number of noted writers, such as Allen Tate, Caroline Gordon, John Crowe Ransom, Hiram Haydn, Peter Taylor, and Randall Jarrell. They invited other distinguished writers to campus to read from their work and to meet with students; these writers included Robert Lowell, Robert Frost, Flannery O’Connor, Robert Penn Warren, Eudora Welty, and Saul Bellow. In 1965, under the leadership of Robert Watson, creative writing offerings were formalized. Since that time, enrollment has grown, but the faculty has intentionally kept the program small, enabling students to have individual conferences with faculty. Notable faculty members have included Fred Chappell, H.T. Kirby-Smith, Michael Parker, Craig Nova, Stuart Dischell, Jennifer Grotz and David Roderick. Notable graduates include Claudia Emerson, Lee Hadaway and Rodney Jones.

Residential Colleges

UNCG is home to three residential colleges, smaller communities within the university designed to enrich the student experience. John Orley Allen Tate (November 19, 1899 - February 9, 1979) was an American poet, essayist, and social commentator, and Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress, 1943 - 1944. ... Caroline Ferguson Gordon 1895-1981 Her early novels of southern history: Penhally (1931), None Shall Look Back (1937), and The Garden of Adonis (1937). ... John Crowe Ransom (April 30, 1888, Pulaski, Tennessee- July 3, 1974, Gambier, Ohio) was an American poet, essayist, social and political theorist, man of letters, and academic. ... People called Peter Taylor include: Peter Taylor (1917-1994), author, winner of the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction Peter Taylor (born 1956), Australian cricketer Peter Taylor, editor of The Bridge on the River Kwai and winner of the 1957 Academy Award for Film Editing Peter Taylor (born 1953), former winger... Photograph of Jarrell in 1956 Randall Jarrell (May 6, 1914 – October 15, 1965), was a United States author, writer and poet. ... Robert Lowell (March 1, 1917–September 12, 1977), born Robert Traill Spence Lowell, IV, was a highly regarded mid-twentieth-century American poet. ... Robert Lee Frost (March 26, 1874 – January 29, 1963) was an American poet. ... Mary Flannery OConnor (b. ... Robert Penn Warren Robert Penn Warren (April 24, 1905 – September 15, 1989) was an American poet, novelist, and literary critic, and was one of the founders of The New Criticism. ... Eudora Welty (b. ... Saul Bellow, born Solomon Bellows, (Lachine, Quebec, Canada, June 10, 1915 – April 5, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts) was an acclaimed Canadian-born American writer. ... Fred Davis Chappell (b. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Craig Nova is an American novelist and author of eleven novels. ... Jennifer Grotz (born 1971) is an American poet and translator who teaches English and creative writing at the Warren Wilson College MFA Program for Writers and at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, where she is Assitant Professor. ... David Roderick (born 1970) is an award-winning American poet. ... Claudia Emerson (b. ... Rodney Jones is an American poet and professor of English at Southern Illinois University at Carbondale. ... A residential college system is a housing and educational aspect of certain universities across the world, most notably Oxford University and Cambridge University in the United Kingdom; Yale University, Rice University, and the California Institute of Technology in the United States. ...


Cornelia Strong College

Cornelia Strong College provides a social and academic community within the context of the larger university. There is no specific curriculum. The college is open to resident and non-resident undergraduate and graduate students. Strong College fellows are faculty members who take an active role in the development of Strong College's student members. Cornelia Strong College Arms Cornelia Strong College is one of three residential colleges on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. ... Cornelia Strong College Arms Cornelia Strong College is one of three residential colleges on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro. ...


Grogan College

Ione Grogan College, established in 1997, is limited to freshman and serves about 300 students per year. The college is divided into smaller learning communities, each headed by a faculty fellow. The college offers classes that meet general requirements, and ease freshman into the college experience.


Warren Ashby Residential College

The Warren Ashby Residential College at Mary Foust, established in 1970, is a community of freshman and sophomore students, faculty and staff who live or work in Mary Foust Hall. Also known as the RC (or WARC), the college offers small classes, close student and faculty interaction and a rich community living experience. The Residential College at Mary Foust (abbreviated RC) is a living-learning community located on the campus of the University of North Carolina Greensboro. ...


In addition to freshmen and sophomores, those who have graduated from the program and are rising juniors or seniors may apply to be Mary Foust upperclassmen. Typically 8-12 or so juniors and seniors are selected each year to continue living in Mary Foust as mentors. Each upperclassman is required to complete an "upperclassman project." These projects are typically activities that support community interaction within Mary Foust.


Many Mary Foust alumni continue to support and participate in Ashby Residential College. Many of the staff are alumni.


Notable alumni

  • Gerald Austin - NFL Referee
  • Russ Bowen - News Anchor and Reporter for WLOS-13
  • Andy Cabic - Singer and songwriter for the band Vetiver.
  • Richard M. Coffey - American conductor
  • Claudia Emerson - Pulitzer Prize-winning author
  • Dale Folwell - North Carolina House of Representatives, Republican, District 74, (2004-Present)
  • Kyle Hines (graduates in May 2008) - basketball player who is one of only six men's players in NCAA history to score 2,000 points, grab 1,000 rebounds and block 300 shots in a career[4]
  • Emmylou Harris - Grammy-winning Country music/folk singer-songwriter
  • Beth Leavel - Tony Award-winning broadway actress
  • Jason S. Martin- Planner for Alamance County, NC
  • Alejandro Moreno - MLS Forward for Columbus Crew
  • Cleveland Sellers, Jr. - Civil Rights Movement activist, Professor of History and Director of African American Studies at the University of South Carolina

Dr. Gerald Gerry Austin is an American football official in the National Football League (NFL) since 1982. ... WLOS channel 13 is the ABC television affiliate in Asheville, North Carolina. ... Andy Cabic is a folk rock singer/songwriter, and a member of the band Vetiver. ... Claudia Emerson (b. ... North Carolina House of Representatives, Republican, District 74, (2004-Present) A graduate of the University of North Carolina at Greensboro ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Emmylou Harris (born April 2, 1947, Birmingham, Alabama) is a country, folk, alternative rock, and alternative country musician. ... Beth Leavel (born Nov. ... An Urban planner is a professional who works in the field of urban planning. ... Alamance County is a county located in the state of North Carolina. ... Alejandro Moreno (born July 8, 1979 in Barquisimeto, Venezuela) is a Venezuelan soccer player, who currently plays striker for Houston of Major League Soccer. ...

Notable events

House of Cards is a 1993 drama film directed by Michael Lessac and starring Kathleen Turner and Tommy Lee Jones. ... Home of the Giants is a 2006 American film. ... University of North Carolina Seal The University of North Carolina System is a sixteen university system which comprises all public 4-year colleges and/or universities in North Carolina and consists of 16 separate campuses across the state. ... Erskine Boyce Bowles is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ...

Shooting

On Saturday March 24, 2007 a shooting occurred in Weil Residence hall. UNCG Police charged Brian Patrick Martin, 19, of Greensboro, in the shooting. Charges filed against Martin are attempted first degree murder, attempted robbery with a firearm, possession of a weapon on campus, and discharge of a weapon on campus. Sidney R. Lowe Jr., son of Sidney Lowe Sr. who currently serves as head basketball coach at NC State University, turned himself in to UNCG Police officers at the Guilford County Magistrate’s Office in Greensboro. Charges due to drugs were also filed against the victim, Stephen D. Cobb, the UNCG freshman who was shot in his room. Sidney Lowe (born January 21, 1960 in Washington, D.C.) is a current college basketball head coach at North Carolina State University and former NBA basketball player and coach. ...


External links

References

  1. ^ UNCG Student Government Association, "About Us"
  2. ^ UNCG Posting Policy
  3. ^ The University Colors, UNCG. Accessed 9 September 2006.
  4. ^ UNCG Spartans Athletics website. "Hines has career records at UNCG with 2,187 points, 1,047 rebounds and 349 blocks. He is one of 97 players in college basketball history to record 2,000 career points and 1,000 career rebounds and one of just six to also have 300 career blocks joining Alonzo Mourning, David Robinson, Tim Duncan, Pervis Ellison and Derrick Coleman." Accessed March 14, 2008.
Womens colleges in the United States in higher education are American undergraduate, bachelors degree-granting institutions, often liberal arts colleges, whose student populations are comprised exclusively or almost exclusively of women. ... Adelphi University is a private, nonsectarian university located in Garden City, in Nassau County, New York. ... Albertus Magnus College is a small private liberal arts college in New Haven, Connecticut. ... Andrew College is a private, two-year liberal arts school located a few blocks off the town square in Cuthbert, Randolph County, Georgia, U.S.. It is associated with the United Methodist Church. ... Arcadia University is a private liberal arts university located in Glenside, Pennsylvania, on the outskirts of Philadelphia. ... Bennington College is a liberal arts college located in Bennington, Vermont. ... 199. ... Cazenovia College is a private, four-year, residential liberal arts college located in the Village of Cazenovia in Madison County, New York. ... Chestnut Hill College is a coeducational Catholic college in the Chestnut Hill section of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA. It was founded in 1924 as a womens college by the Sisters of Saint Joseph. ... Chowan University is a small private university of about 800 students located in Murfreesboro, North Carolina. ... Photo of Columbia College (then Christian College), 1904 Columbia College (also called Columbia College of Missouri) is a private liberal arts university based in Columbia, Missouri. ... , Connecticut College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... Drexel University College of Medicine is the medical school of Drexel University and was originally founded as a womens college. ... Elms College is a coeducational private liberal arts college that is located in Chicopee, Massachusetts. ... Elmira College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located in Elmira, in New York States Southern Tier region. ... Emmanuel College is a four-year Catholic liberal arts college located on The Fenway in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Florida State University (commonly referred to as Florida State or FSU)[8] is a public research university located in Tallahassee. ... Georgia College & State University (GCSU) is a public university in Milledgeville, Georgia with over 5,500 students. ... Goucher redirects here. ... Greensboro College is a four year, independent, coeducational institution located in Greensboro, North Carolina and affiliated with the United Methodist Church. ... Hood College is a co-educational liberal arts college located in Frederick, Maryland. ... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... Immaculata University is a Catholic university on King Road in Malvern, Pennsylvania. ... JMU redirects here. ... Founded in 1890 and located on the shores of Keuka Lake in New York State’s Finger Lakes region, Keuka College is an independent, four-year, residential, coeducational college that places emphasis on career and pre-professional education. ... LaGrange College is the oldest private college in Georgia. ... Lake Erie College is a private liberal-arts college that is located in Painesville, Ohio. ... Lasell College is a private college in the Newton, Massachusetts village of Auburndale. ... Lesley University is a university in Cambridge, Massachusetts specializing in education and art. ... Longwood University is a four-year public, liberal-arts university located in Farmville, Virginia. ... MacMurray College is a liberal arts college located in Jacksonville, Illinois. ... Mississippi University for Women, also known as MUW or sipmly the W is a four-year coeducational public university located in Columbus, Mississippi. ... Marymount Manhattan College is a liberal arts college located in Manhattan, New York City, New York. ... Moravian College is a private liberal arts college located in Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States, in the Lehigh Valley region of Pennsylvania. ... Notre Dame College is a Catholic coeducational liberal arts college in South Euclid, Ohio and was established in 1922. ... Ohio Dominican University is a coed, four-year private Catholic liberal arts university in Columbus, Ohio, USA, with nearly 3000 students from 13 states and 20 foreign countries. ... Queens University of Charlotte is a private university in Charlotte, North Carolina, USA. It was established in 1857 as a womens institute. ... Radford University is a medium-size public, state-funded university in the City of Radford, in Southwestern Virginia, founded in 1910 as a womens college and coeducational since 1972. ... Randolph College is a private coeducational liberal arts college located in Lynchburg, Virginia. ... This article is about the college in Massachusetts. ... Rivier College in 2006 Rivier College is a Catholic liberal arts college located in Nashua, New Hampshire, United States. ... Sarah Lawrence College is a private liberal arts college located in metropolitan New York City, about a thirty-minute train ride north of Manhattan. ... Ochre Court, Salves administrative building Salve Regina University is a university in Newport, Rhode Island. ... Seton Hill University is a small Catholic liberal arts university in Greensburg, Pennsylvania, near Pittsburgh. ... Shorter College is a Christian liberal arts college, located in Rome, Georgia. ... Skidmores main entrance. ... Silver Lake College is a four-year, Catholic liberal arts college, located in Manitowoc, Wisconsin, United States. ... Texas Womans University (historically the College of Industrial Arts and Texas State College for Women) is a university in Denton, Texas with two health science center branches in Dallas, Texas and Houston, Texas. ... Trocaire College is a private, two-year college specializing in health care training, located in Buffalo, New York. ... The University of Mary Washington (formerly Mary Washington College) is a coeducational, selective, state-funded, four-year liberal arts college and a member of the Council of Public Liberal Arts Colleges in Fredericksburg, Virginia. ... Vassar College is a private, coeducational, liberal arts college situated in the town of Poughkeepsie, New York, USA. Founded as a womens college in 1861, it was the first member of the Seven Sisters to become coeducational. ... Villa Julie College is located in Baltimore County, Maryland, USA, in the Greenspring Valley area. ... Viterbo University is a liberal arts college located in La Crosse, Wisconsin. ... The American University Washington College of Law (WCL) was founded in 1896 as the culmination of the pioneering efforts of two women, Ellen Spencer Mussey and Emma Gillett, who wished to open the field of law to women. ... Wells College is a nationally recognized private coeducational liberal arts college located in Aurora, Cayuga County, New York, on the eastern shore of Cayuga Lake. ... Wheaton College is a four-year, private liberal arts college with an approximate student body of 1,620. ... Douglass Residential College is a part of Rutgers University. ... “Rutgers” redirects here. ... Evelyn College for Women, often shortened to Evelyn College, was the coordinate womens college of Princeton University in Princeton, New Jersey between 1887 and 1897. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, or Newcomb College, was the coordinate womens college of Tulane University located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Margaret Morrison Carnegie College (MMCC), a womens college, was founded in 1903 as one of the four colleges of the Carnegie Institute of Technology, now known as Carnegie Mellon University. ... Carnegie Mellon University is a private research university in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. ... Pembroke College was the womens college of Brown University in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Radcliffe College was a liberal arts womens college in Cambridge, Massachusetts, closely associated with Harvard University. ... Harvard redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of North Carolina at Greensboro: Information from Answers.com (2107 words)
The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a public university in Greensboro, North Carolina, USA and is a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina system.
UNCG is home to a large amount of diverse and active sports and student organizations from Greek life to a radio station, and some traditions unique to the school.
In 1932, it changed to the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina, when it became one of the three charter institutions of the Consolidated University of North Carolina, and changed again to The University of North Carolina at Greensboro when men were first admitted to the school in 1963.
The University of North Carolina (1444 words)
The institution now known as The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill was chartered in 1789 and opened its doors to students in 1795, the first state university in the United States to do so.
In 1963 the General Assembly changed the name of the campus at Chapel Hill to The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and that at Greensboro to The University of North Carolina at Greensboro and, in 1965, the name of the campus at Raleigh was changed to North Carolina State University at Raleigh.
Charlotte College was added as The University of North Carolina at Charlotte in 1965, and, in 1969, Asheville-Biltmore College and Wilmington College became The University of North Carolina at Asheville and The University of North Carolina at Wilmington respectively.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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