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Encyclopedia > University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Latin: Universitat Carol Septent

Motto Lux Libertas
Light, Liberty
Established 1789[1]
Type Public
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $2.2 billion[3]
Chancellor James Moeser
Faculty 3,100[1]
Staff 6,261 (part and full time)
Undergraduates 17,124[2]
Postgraduates 10,593[2]
Location Chapel Hill, NC, USA
Campus Suburban, 729 acres (3 km²)[1]
Athletics 28 varsity teams
Nickname Tar Heels
Mascot Rameses the Ram
Affiliations AAU (Academic)
ACC (Athletic)
Website www.unc.edu

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. Also known as The University of North Carolina, Carolina, North Carolina, or simply UNC, the university is the oldest institution in the University of North Carolina System. It was the first American public university to open its doors to students, and the only public university to graduate students in the eighteenth century. UNC is one of the original eight Public Ivys[4][5][6][7] and is the flagship institution of the University of North Carolina System.[8][9][10] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... James Moeser is the current chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange, Durham, and Chatham Founded 1793 Government  - Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - City  19. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Legend has it that the Tar Heel nickname applied to the state and inhabitants of North Carolina--as well as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s athletic teams--dates back to the Civil War. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Rameses Rameses is the mascot for the North Carolina Tar Heels. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Orange, Durham, and Chatham Founded 1793 Government  - Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - City  19. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... There are several geographical locations named Carolina: Carolina, North America = Between 1663 and 1729 Carolina was the united and singular North American British colony of the Province of Carolina. ... University of North Carolina Seal The University of North Carolina System is a sixteen university system which comprises all public 4-year colleges and/or universities in North Carolina and consists of 16 separate campuses across the state. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ...

Contents

History

Chartered by the North Carolina General Assembly on December 11, 1789 and beginning instruction in 1795, the University of North Carolina is known as the oldest public university in the nation[11]. A political leader in Revolutionary America, William Davie led efforts to build legislative and financial support for the University.[12] The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... December 11 is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1789 (MDCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... Gov. ...


The university opened in a single building, which came to be called Old East. Still in use as a residence hall, it is the oldest public university building in the United States.[13] Its cornerstone was laid October 12, 1793, near an abandoned Anglican chapel which lead to the naming of the town as Chapel Hill.[14][15]. The spot was chosen due to its geographic centrality in the state.[14] The first student, Hinton James, arrived on foot from Wilmington on February 12, 1795[16]. The first public university building in America, Old Easts corner stone was laid in 1793. ... A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1793 (MDCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 11-day slower Julian calendar). ... This box:      Anglicanism most commonly refers to the beliefs and practices of the Anglican Communion, a world-wide affiliation of Christian Churches, most of which have historical connections with the Church of England. ... Chapel Hill may refer to: Chapel Hill, Queensland, a town in Australia Chapel Hill, North Carolina, a town in the United States, or the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, a major university within the town. ... Hinton James (24 April 1884 - 3 November 1948) was a U.S. Congressman from the state of North Carolina between 1930 and 1931. ... Wilmington is a city in New Hanover County, North Carolina, United States. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


The University of North Carolina was the first to hold classes and to graduate students. The University of Georgia was chartered first in 1785 but did not start classes until 1801. The University of North Carolina is the only university in the United States that awarded degrees as a public institution in the eighteenth century. The University of Georgia (UGA) is the largest institution of higher learning in the U.S. state of Georgia. ...


The early nineteenth century saw a period of much growth and development with the help of the backing of the trustees. Through this growth, the University began to move away from its original purpose, to train leadership for the state, as it added to the curriculum, first starting with the typical classical trend. By 1815, the University started giving equal ground to the natural sciences. This development continued with the establishment of the first astronomical observatory at a state university in 1831. Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... Classical education as understood and taught in the Middle Ages of Western culture is roughly based on the ancient Greek concept of Paideia. ... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ... The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ...


During the Civil War, the University was among the few that managed to keep its doors open. Soon thereafter, however, the University was forced to close during Reconstruction from 1870 until 1875. With a change in political leadership following the close of Reconstruction, and the readmission of North Carolina into the Union, attempts made to control the direction through appointments during Reconstruction were blocked and the University quickly resumed leadership through the addition of programs such as the first summer school in America, and the establishment of regular Medical and Pharmaceutical offerings by 1879. A civil war is a war in which parties within the same culture, society or nationality fight against each other for the control of political power. ... For other uses, see Reconstruction (disambiguation). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1879 (MDCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1932 UNC became one of the three original campuses of the Consolidated University of North Carolina (since 1972 called the University of North Carolina system). During the process of consolidation, programs were moved between the schools to prevent competition between system schools.[citation needed] For instance, the Engineering school moved from UNC to North Carolina State University in Raleigh in 1932.[17] In 1963 the Consolidated University was made fully coeducational. As a result, the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina was renamed the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and the University of North Carolina itself became the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The University of North Carolina is a seventeen campus system which includes all sixteen public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States and one public residential high school. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... springfield va ... The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is an American public university in Greensboro, North Carolina and is a constituent institution of the University of North Carolina system. ...

Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...

Campus

The Old Well, Carolina's most recognized landmark.

UNC’s sprawling and well-landscaped campus is dominated by its two central quads. One of the quads is named Polk Place, after President James K. Polk, a native of North Carolina and an alumnus of the university.[18] Students mill about in a sunken brick courtyard known as the Pit, often engaging in debate with the Pit Preacher. The Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower, located in the heart of campus, tolls the hour. In 1999, UNC was one of 16 recipients of the American Society of Landscape Architects Medallion Awards and was identified as one of 50 college or university 'works of art' by T.A. Gaines in his book 'The Campus as a Work of Art'.[1][19] The Old Well and McCorkle Place at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... The Old Well and McCorkle Place at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... This article is about the U.S. President. ... Official language(s) English Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Largest metro area Charlotte metro area Area  Ranked 28th  - Total 53,865 sq mi (139,509 km²)  - Width 150 miles (240 km)  - Length 560[1] miles (901 km)  - % water 9. ... Gary Birdsong - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... This article is about the year. ...

Graham Memorial in the fall

The most enduring symbol of the university is the Old Well, a small neoclassical rotunda based on the Temple of Love in the Garden of Versailles, at the spot of the original well that provided water for the school.[20] It stands at the south end of McCorkle Place, the northern quad, between two of the campus's oldest buildings, Old East and Old West. Also in McCorkle Place is the Davie Poplar tree under which the university's founder, William Davie, supposedly selected the location for the university in 1792. Due to its questionable health from damages caused by severe weather, such as Hurricane Fran in 1996, the university has planted two genetic clones, Davie Poplar Jr. and Davie Poplar III, nearby to ensure the continued livelihood of this important university symbol. The second clone was planted in conjunction with the University's bicentennial celebration in 1993.[21] Another University landmark is Silent Sam, the statue commemorating the soldiers who lost their lives fighting for the Confederacy. The statue has become a point of debate on Carolina's campus and within its classrooms, as some claim that it is a monument to racism and slavery, while others take the view that it is simply a piece of the rich heritage of the South, and should be viewed as such.[22] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Old Well in front of South Building. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Quadrangle of University of Sydney In architecture, a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space or courtyard, usually square or rectangular in plan, the sides of which are entirely or mainly occupied by parts of a large building. ... According to legend, as long as Davie Poplar stands, the University of North Carolina will prosper. ... Gov. ... This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 1996; for other storms of the same name, see Tropical Storm Fran (disambiguation). ... Silent Sam is the American name for the Swedish comic strip Adamson, created by Oscar Jacobsson in 1920. ...

Mangum and Ruffin residential halls on North Campus

As a whole the campus is divided into north, middle, and south campuses. North Campus includes the two quads along with the Pit, Frank Porter Graham Student Union, Student Stores, and the Davis, House, and Wilson libraries. Almost all classrooms are located in North Campus along with the majority of undergraduate residence halls. Middle Campus includes Fetzer and Woollen Gymnasiums along with the Student Recreation Center, Kenan Stadium, the Irwin Belk outdoor track, the Eddie Smith Field House and indoor track, the Cary C. Boshamer baseball field, Carmichael Auditorium for women's basketball, women's volleyball, women's gymnastics, and men's wrestling, the Sonja Haynes Stone Center for Black Culture and History, the School of Government, the School of Law, UNC Hospitals, the George Watts Hill Alumni Center, the Ram's Head complex with a dining hall, parking garage, grocery store, and state of the art gymnasium; and the Carmichael, Parker, Teague, and Avery residence halls. South Campus includes the Dean Smith Center for men's basketball, Kenan-Flagler Business School, the Ram Village and Odum Village Apartment complexes, Baity Hill at Mason Farm Road student family housing complex, the undergraduate apartments of Ram Village, and the undergraduate residence halls of Hinton James, George Moses Horton, Ehringhaus, Ehringhaus South, Morrison, Paul Hardin, Craige and Craige North. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Kenan Stadium Kenan Memorial Stadium is located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina and is the home field of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tar Heels. ... Carmichael Auditorium is a 10,180-seat multi-purpose arena in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ... University of North Carolina School of Law is a school within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... The Dean E. Smith Student Activities Center, usually called simply the Dean Smith Center and popularly referred to as the Dean Dome is a multi-purpose arena in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ...


A new satellite campus, Carolina North, has recently been proposed and is now in the planning stages. This addition is planned to be primarily a research park with new science facilities for the twenty-first century, but will also add residence halls, enabling the continued growth of the student population.


Academics

UNC campus in the summer
Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower of Chapel Hill
Wilson Library, which houses the Rare Book Collection, the North Carolina Collection and the Manuscripts Department

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 826 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (2288 × 1712 pixel, file size: 826 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ...

Curriculum

UNC offers 71 bachelor's, 107 master's and 74 doctoral degree programs.[23] Carolina enrolls more than 27000 students from all 100 North Carolina counties, the other 49 states and 47 other countries. State law requires that the percentage of students from North Carolina in each freshman class meet or exceed 82%.[24] For other degrees, see Academic degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Aquatint of a Doctor of Divinity at the University of Oxford, in the scarlet and black academic robes corresponding to his position. ...


At the undergraduate level, students spend their first two years at UNC working to fulfill "perspective" requirements. English, social science, history, foreign language, mathematics, and natural science courses are required of all students, ensuring that students receive a broad liberal arts education. After their sophomore year, students move on to the College of Arts and Sciences, or choose other degree programs in the Schools of Medicine, Business, Pharmacy, Information and Library Science, Public Health, or Journalism and Mass Communication.


Libraries

UNC's library system has more than 5.8 million volumes.[23] UNC's North Carolina Collection is the largest of its kind among state-oriented collections on campuses nationwide[25], and the Southern and rare book collections housed in Wilson Library are among the country's finest. The university is home to ibiblio, the third largest WWW Internet website in the world and one of the world's largest collections of freely available information including software, music, literature, art, history, science, politics, and cultural studies. Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ibiblio (formerly SunSITE and MetaLab) is a collection of collections, and hosts a diverse range of publicly available information and open source software. ...


Reputation & Rankings

Medicine and law have been taught at the University since before the U.S. civil war. The School of Business' Executive Masters of Business Administration program was ranked 5th in the world in the biannual rankings published by Businessweek. Kenan-Flagler's MBA program as a whole is ranked 10th in the world by Forbes with the only international schools ranked higher being INSEAD of France and IMD of Switzerland. Kenan-Flagler's Master of Accounting program was ranked 7th in the 2004 Public Accounting Report, and boasts 95% to 100% employment for its graduates each year. Moreover, the School of Medicine is ranked second in the nation for primary care and 20th in the nation in research according to US News & World Report. For 2007 US News ranked the School of Information and Library Science first in the nation tied with the University of Illinois for the eighth time in a row. US News ranked the School of Public Health second in the nation tied with Harvard. US News also ranked the School of Pharmacy as third in the nation. The School of Education, School of Law, and School of Nursing were also ranked in the top 30 nationally. The School of Government's MPA Program has the distinction of being the only MPA program in North Carolina nationally ranked: 6th nationally in city management and 10th nationally in Public Affairs and Administration. UNC also offers graduate programs through the School of Social Work, continuously ranked among the top 5 in the Nation. Department of Statistics and Operations Research was also ranked 4th in the Statistics specialty among Mathematical Sciences by US News in its 2007 edition of "America’s Best Graduate Schools", while Department of Chemistry was ranked 1st in the Analytical Chemistry specialty area. INSEAD is a graduate business school and research institution with campuses in Fontainebleau (near Paris), France and in Singapore. ... The International Institute for Management Development is a business school located in Lausanne, Switzerland. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... University of North Carolina School of Law is a school within the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... This article is about the field of statistics. ...


Overall, the undergraduate program for 2006 is ranked 28th in the nation by US News & World Report, tied with Tufts University in Boston.[26] UNC is consistently ranked 5th among public universities, just behind UC Berkeley, University of Virginia, UCLA, and the University of Michigan based on US News & World Report surveys. For the sixth straight year, Kiplinger's Personal Finance ranked UNC as the number 1 best value public school for in-state students.[27] UNC is 1st among public universities and 9th overall in "Great Schools, Great Prices," based on academic quality, net cost of attendance and average student debt according to US News & World Report in 2006.[28] UNC is also 4th among public universities in "The Top American Research Universities," produced in December 2005 by the Center for Measuring University Performance.[29] UNC also has the highest percentage of undergraduates studying abroad for any public institution.[30] For undergraduates, the university offers one of the nation's most acclaimed Honors Programs in a public institution with a 3-star rating (the highest given). [4] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, Massachusetts, suburbs of Boston. ... Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Kiplingers magazine cover Kiplingers Personal Finance is a magazine that has been continuously published, on a monthly basis, from 1947 to the present day. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Rank of Selected Programs:

School, Department, or Academic Unit Rank Publication
Overall undergraduate program 28th U.S. News & World Report
Undergraduate program among public universities 5th U.S. News & World Report
School of Library and Information Science 1st U.S. News & World Report
School of Medicine 2nd for primary care, 20th for research U.S. News & World Report
School of Pharmacy 3rd U.S. News & World Report
School of Public Health 2nd U.S. News & World Report
Computer science 10th 2005 Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Kenan-Flagler Business School 5th for undergraduate, 18th for M.B.A. U.S. News & World Report
Social work 9th 2005 Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, The Chronicle of Higher Education
School of Education 22nd U.S. News & World Report
Undergraduate program 1st, best value for in-state students Kiplinger's Personal Finance
Undergraduate program 9th, best value U.S. News & World Report
School of Law 36th U.S. News & World Report
Materials science and engineering 3rd 2005 Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Comparative literature 7th 2005 Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index, The Chronicle of Higher Education
Analytical Chemistry 1st U.S. News & World Report

U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Kiplingers magazine cover Kiplingers Personal Finance is a magazine that has been continuously published, on a monthly basis, from 1947 to the present day. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Scholarships

Carolina has for decades offered an undergraduate merit scholarship known as the Morehead-Cain Scholarship. Recipients receive tuition, room and board, books and funds for summer study for four years. Since the inception of the Morehead-Cain scholarship program, 23 alumni of the program have been named Rhodes Scholars.[31] Also offered is the Robertson Scholarship, an innovative scholarship granting recipients the opportunity to attend both UNC-Chapel Hill and neighboring Duke University. The Morehead-Cain Scholarship is a full four-year scholarship to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, modeled after the Rhodes Scholarship. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ...


Carolina has the second largest number of Rhodes Scholars among public universities (41 since 1902) behind the University of Virginia.[32] Additionally, many students have won Truman, Goldwater, Mitchell, Churchill, Fulbright, and Mellon fellowships. [5] Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ...


Athletics

The school's sports teams are called the Tar Heels, and the mascot is Rameses the ram. They participate in the NCAA Division I (Football Bowl Subdivision, former I-A) and in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The NCAA refers to Chapel Hill as "University of North Carolina" for athletic purposes, leading to the popular misnomer of the campus itself. This refers to the athletic teams for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC). The name Tar Heel is also often used to refer to individuals from the state of North Carolina, the Tar Heel State. ... Image of Tar Heel logo used by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Tar Heel is a nickname applied to the state and inhabitants of North Carolina, as well as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills athletic teams (see North Carolina Tar Heels). ... Rameses Rameses is the mascot for the North Carolina Tar Heels. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is one of the oldest collegiate athletic leagues in the United States. ...


The University of North Carolina has won 38 team national championships in five different sports, 9th all-time, and 51 individual national championships. The women's soccer team has won 19 national championships since 1981; the men's soccer team won the championship in 2001; the women's basketball team in 1994; the men's basketball team in 1924, 1957, 1982, 1993, and 2005; the men's lacrosse team in 1982, 1986, and 1991; the women's field hockey team in 1985, 1995, 1996, and 1997; the women's team handball team won in 2004; and the men's team handball team has won three National Championships in 2004, 2005, and 2006. The men's crew team won the 2004 ECAC National Invitational Collegiate Regatta in the varsity eight category. The North Carolina Men's Baseball team is also a perennial power, and in 2006 and 2007 made it to the finals of the College World Series. This article lists NCAA Womens soccer championships. ... Handball player leaps towards the goal prior to throwing the ball, while the goalkeeper extends himself trying to stop it. ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ...

Dean Smith Center

From 1961 to 1997 the men's basketball team was coached by Dean Smith, who is second for most wins in NCAA Division I Men's Basketball with 879 wins. Coach Smith led the Tar Heels to NCAA championships in 1982 and 1993.[33] In only his second year at UNC, Roy Williams coached his team to a national championship in 2005 and was named Coach of the Year by the Associated Press in 2006.[34] Also, on April 2, 2007, Coach Williams was elected to the Hall of Fame.[35] Its first NCAA men's title was in 1957 under coach Frank McGuire, who coached the Tar Heels to a triple overtime victory in the title game over a Kansas team featuring Wilt Chamberlain, after beating Michigan State in the semi-final game also in triple overtime. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931) is a retired head coach of men’s college basketball. ... Roy Williams (born August 1, 1950 in Marion, North Carolina) is head coach of the mens basketball team at the University of North Carolina. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


In 1994, the University's athletic programs won the Sears Directors Cup 'all-sports national championship' which is awarded for cumulative performance in NCAA competition. Sears Directors Cup - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


Notable alumni from the varsity athletic programs include Michael Jordan, Mia Hamm, Davis Love III, Eddie Pope, Roy Williams, B.J. Surhoff, Kristine Lilly, Jeff Reed, Andrew Miller, Daniel Bard, Marion Jones, Lawrence Taylor, Julius Peppers, Alge Crumpler, Willie Parker , Brian Simmons, Vince Carter, Nick Monroe, Antwan Jamison and Dré Bly. For other persons named Michael Jordan, see Michael Jordan (disambiguation). ... Mia Hamm (born Mariel Margaret Hamm on March 17, 1972 in Selma, Alabama) is a former American soccer player. ... Davis Love III Davis Milton Love III (born April 13, 1964) is an American professional golfer. ... George Edward Eddie Pope, December 24, 1973, in Greensboro, North Carolina is a soccer defender, who currently plays for Real Salt Lake of Major League Soccer and is an important part of the United States national team. ... Roy Williams (born August 1, 1950 in Marion, North Carolina) is head coach of the mens basketball team at the University of North Carolina. ... William James B.J. Surhoff (born August 4, 1964 in the Bronx, New York City, New York) is an outfielder, first baseman, third baseman, and designated hitter in Major League Baseball who last played for the Baltimore Orioles in 2005. ... Kristine Marie Lilly (born July 22, 1971 in New York City) is an American soccer player, who has been a fixture on the U.S. womens national team since 1987. ... Jeffrey Montgomery Reed (born April 9, 1979) is an American football place kicker currently playing for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Andrew Miller is a pitcher in the Detroit Tigers organization. ... Daniel Paul Bard (born June 25, 1985, in Houston, Texas) is a right-handed baseball pitcher in the Boston Red Sox organization. ... Marion Jones, also known as Marion Jones-Thompson (born October 12, 1975 in Los Angeles, California), is a former American athlete in track and field. ... Lawrence Julius Taylor (born February 4, 1959, in Williamsburg, Virginia), commonly referred to as LT, is a retired Hall of Fame American football player. ... Julius Frazier Peppers (born January 18, 1980 in Wilson, North Carolina) is a professional American football player. ... Algernon Darius Alge Crumpler (born December 23, 1977) is an American football player in the National Football League, currently playing for the Atlanta Falcons. ... For the offensive lineman of the same name see Willie Parker (offensive lineman). ... Brian Simmons is a National Football League linebacker for the Cincinnati Bengals. ... Vincent Lamar Vince Carter (born January 26, 1977) is an American All-Star basketball player in the NBA. He currently is a player and co-captain for the New Jersey Nets. ... Benjamin Nicholas Nick Monroe (born April 12, 1982, in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma) is an American professional tennis player. ... Antawn Cortez Jamison [pronounced an-TWAHN] (born June 12, 1976, in Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Donald André Bly (born May 22, 1977 in Chesapeake, Virginia), better known as Dré Bly, is an American football player. ...


Student organizations

General student organizations (excluding most Greek organizations, club sports, and the independent student newspaper, The Daily Tar Heel) at UNC are officially recognized and provided with assistance (meeting space, equipment, and eligibility for funding from the Student Government Student Activity Fee) by the Carolina Union, an administrative unit of the University. Funding for student organizations is derived from the 'Student Government Student Activity Fee', which are monies collected to be spent at the discretion of Student Government's Student Congress.


Student Government is composed of the Executive Branch, headed by the Student Body President, a 41-member Student Congress, an entirely student-run honor system as well as a Student Supreme Court, Elections Board, and loosely-affiliated Carolina Athletic Association and Senior Class. Student Government authority derives from the Student Code, a document written and adopted in 1946 at the suggestion of Douglass Hunt. Prior to that time, the Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies as well as other organizations rallied behind student concerns. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


A history of student government at UNC has been compiled by Albert and Gladys Hall Coates and is available under the title The Story of Student Government in the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.


The Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies [6], Black Student Movement, UNC Young Democrats, College Republicans, Campus Y, Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender Straight Alliance, Bounce Magazine, the Loreleis, Carolina Student Biotechnology Network, and over 600 other recognized clubs and 48 Greek organizations contribute to a diverse and vibrant student life. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


The school's student run newspaper The Daily Tar Heel is ranked as the best school newspaper in the nation by the Princeton Review, and has received other awards such as the Pacemaker award from the Associated Collegiate Press[36]. The DTH, as it is known on campus, also offered its newspaper online as early as 1995.[37] The first campus newspaper to be offered online was The Orion, the campus newspaper of California State University, Chico, in 1994.[38] The Daily Tar Heel (commonly referred to as the DTH) is the independent student newspaper of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


The largest student fundraiser, the UNC Dance Marathon, involves thousands of students, faculty and community members in raising funds for the NC Children's Hospital. The organization conducts fundraising and volunteer activities throughout the year and has donated $1m to date since its inception in 1999.

Gimghoul Castle
Gimghoul Castle

At the University of North Carolina, two all-male "secret societies" exist. The The Order of Gimghoul and The Order of the Gorgon's Head, both of which select several rising juniors each year. Information about both societies can be retrieved from the University's Southern Historical Collection at Wilson Library. Many honor societies, such as the Order of the Golden Fleece, the Order of the Grail-Valkyries, and the Order of the Old Well, round out the student body. The membership of the Order of the Golden Fleece and Order of the Grail-Valkyries is public, but the activities remain secret. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3264 × 2448 pixel, file size: 2. ... The Order of Gimghoul is a secret society headquartered at the Gimghoul Castle in Chapel Hill, NC . The Order was founded in 1889 by Robert Worth Bingham, Shepard Bryan, William W. Davies, Edward Wray Martin, and Andrew Henry Patterson, who were students at the University of North Carolina at Chapel... The Order of the Gorgons Head is a secret society at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


Founded in 1977, WXYC 89.3 FM is UNC's award winning student radio station, broadcasting 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Though programming is left up to student DJs, WXYC typically plays little heard music from a wide range of genres and eras. On November 7th, 1994 it became the first radio station in the world to broadcast its signal over the internet.[39][40] There is also a student-run television station, STV. WXYC is the student radio station of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Student Television (STV) is the local student access channel for the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


Between Resident Advisors (RAs) and the Residence Hall Association (RHA), organization within UNC residence halls is largely student-led. Both groups provide social and educational programs for the benefit of on-campus students, as well as communication with university officials and arbitration in student conflicts. A resident assistant, commonly shortened to RA is a trained student leader, within a college or university, charged with supervising students living in a residence hall. ...


There are numerous fraternities and sororities on campus, belonging to the Panhellenic Council (PHC), Interfraternity Council (IFC), Greek Alliance Council (GAC), and National Panhellenic Council (NPHC), but only 14.4% of undergraduates are Greek. UNC offers many professional and service fraternities, many of which fall under the Carolina Union, that do not have houses but are still recognized by the school. Although no GAC or NPHC fraternities and sororities have houses, the organizations remain quite prestigious and are recognized nationwide. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


The many athletic teams at the university are supported by the Marching Tar Heels, the University’s marching band. This all-volunteer band supports the 28 Olympic sports programs, including basketball, field hockey, football, lacrosse, soccer, volleyball and wrestling. The Marching Tar Heels, nicknamed the "Pride of the ACC," currently has approximately 275 members. An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ...


Traditions

Commencement ceremony in Kenan Football Stadium

Since the beginning of the athletics department, the school's colors have been Carolina Blue and White. The colors were chosen years before, with the blue (a shade similar to sky blue or Columbia blue) representing the Dialectic society and white representing the Philanthropic society. The school had required participation in one of the clubs; traditionally the "Di's" were from west of the Chapel Hill area, and the "Phi's" were from the east. On public occasions, both groups were equally represented, and eventually both colors were used by processional leaders to signify the unity of both groups as part of the university.[41] In recent years, the teams have also used navy blue as a third, "highlight" color. The team nickname is "Tar Heels", a term that originally referenced the state's 18th century prominence as a tar and pitch producer. The nickname's cultural relevance, however, has a complex history that includes anecdotal tales from both the American Civil War and the American Revolution. The mascot is a live ram named Rameses, a tradition that dates back to 1924, when the team manager brought a ram to the annual game against VMI, inspired by the play of former football player Jack "The Battering Ram" Merrit. The kicker rubbed its head for good luck before a game-winning field goal, and the ram stayed. There is also an anthropomorphic ram mascot who appears at all games. The modern Rameses is depicted in a sailor's hat, a reference to a United States Navy flight training program that was attached to the university during World War II. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Carolina Blue is a light blue tertiary color. ... This article is about the color. ... Wonderful Days is a Korean animated science fiction film, released in 2003. ... Columbia blue is a light blue tertiary color. ... In classical philosophy, dialectic (Greek: διαλεκτική) is controversy, Viz. ... Philanthropy involves the donation or granting of money to various worthy charitable causes. ... Navy blue is an especially dark shade of the color blue. ... Legend has it that the Tar Heel nickname applied to the state and inhabitants of North Carolina--as well as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s athletic teams--dates back to the Civil War. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress in Philadelphia The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen... The Virginia Military Institute (VMI), located in Lexington, Virginia, is the oldest state military college in the United States. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... USN redirects here. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Though the South's Oldest Rivalry between UNC and its first opponent, the University of Virginia, has seen downplayed significance in recent years, it was a major rivalry throughout the 1980s in basketball. The rivalry recently saw the 111th meeting in football between the two teams. The bitterness of this rivalry has been recently replaced by somewhat less historical rivalries with Duke University, North Carolina State University, a state institution of larger size with a greater focus on technical and agricultural sciences, and Wake Forest University, a private university in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. It is traditional to exchange pranks with North Carolina State (See UNC-NCSU rivalry), including painting their "Free Expression Tunnel" in UNC colors every year before big athletic competitions. In retaliation, North Carolina State University students travel to Chapel Hill to play their fight song and occasionally dye fountains red. For years, Wake Forest men would steal UNC's live animal mascot, Rameses the Ram, before athletic events. This article is about the rivalry between UVA and UNC. For the rivalry between Georgia and Auburn, see Deep Souths Oldest Rivalry. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... Wake Forest University is a private, coeducational university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... Nickname: Motto: Youre Something Special in Winston-Salem Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Forsyth County Founded Consolidated 1766 Salem 1849 Winston 1913 Government  - Mayor Allen Joines (D) Area  - City  132. ... The UNC-NCSU rivalry is a rivalry, primarily in sports, between University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC) and North Carolina State University (NCSU). ...


North Carolina's rivalry with Duke is particularly intense, especially in the realm of college basketball. (See UNC-Duke Rivalry) For several decades, each team has been a frequent contender for the national championship, and, located just eight miles apart, the students and fans of the two schools are quite focused in their enmity. The rivalry had led people to use their respective school colors to differentiate between the distinct shadings of blue in daily occurrences, with people referring to the lighter, powder blue hue as "Carolina blue" and the darker blue as "Duke blue." Tipoff of UNC-Duke game The UNC-Duke rivalry, sometimes referred to as The Battle of Tobacco Road or The Battle of the Blues, is a fierce rivalry, particularly in mens college basketball, between Duke University and the University of North Carolina athletic teams. ...

UNC victory over Duke celebration on Franklin Street

After important basketball victories (vs. Duke, tournaments), it has become tradition to rush downtown to Franklin Street, which the police shut down. People converge at and around Franklin and Columbia Streets, near campus, and light bonfires. On occasion, these celebrations have gotten out of hand. One incident, after an 85-83 victory, the celebration led to vandalism and an overturned car. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A view of Franklin Street in Downtown Chapel Hill Franklin Street is a prominent thoroughfare in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ...


Every Halloween is marked by celebration on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. In recent years, an estimated 80,000 costumed students and onlookers have packed into a mile-long section of Franklin Street abutting campus.[42] Students come from Appalachian State, NC State, Duke, Elon, and other schools in the University of North Carolina system. This article is about the holiday. ... A view of Franklin Street in Downtown Chapel Hill Franklin Street is a prominent thoroughfare in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. ... Appalachian State University is a public university located in Boone, North Carolina and the sixth largest institution in the University of North Carolina system. ... North Carolina State University is a public, coeducational, extensive research university located in Raleigh, North Carolina, United States. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... Elon University is a private, liberal arts university located in Elon, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina is a seventeen campus system which includes all sixteen public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States and one public residential high school. ...


UNC has a longstanding honor code known as the Instrument of Student Judicial Governance, supplemented by an Honor Court to resolve issues with students accused of academic and conduct offenses against the university community. Faculty are forbidden to punish students caught cheating in any way (such as failing grades), but instead are to report such cases to the Student Attorney General. Only if found guilty in the Honor Court, composed of students, can a student be sanctioned. An honor code or honor system is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that community. ...


Alumni

UNC has 243,000 alumni that live in all 50 states and 146 countries. This page lists notable alumni of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ...


Leaders of the university

Presidents

Joseph Caldwell (1773 – 1835), was a U.S. educator, Presbyterian minister, and mathematician. ... Joseph Caldwell (1773 – 1835), was a U.S. educator, Presbyterian minister, and mathematician. ... Gov. ... Kemp Plummer Battle served as North Carolina State Treasurer and as president of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in the nineteenth century. ... George Tayloe Winston, teacher and university president, was born on October 12, 1852, at Windsor, North Carolina, the son of Patrick Henry and Martha Elizabeth (Byrd) Winston. ... Edwin A. Alderman Edwin Anderson Alderman (born May 15, 1861 in Wilmington, North Carolina; died April 30, 1931 in Charlottesville, Virginia) served as the President of three universities. ... Francis Preston Venable (b. ... President of the University of North Carolina (1919-1930), President of the University of Illinois (1930-1933), 8th President of New York University (1933-1951) see also: NYU University Archives, [1] ... Frank Porter Graham (14 October 1886 - 16 February 1972) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina from March 29, 1949, to Nov. ... The University of North Carolina is a seventeen campus system which includes all sixteen public four-year universities in North Carolina, United States and one public residential high school. ...

Chancellors

  • Robert B. House (1934-1945 as Dean of Administration; 1945-1957 as Chancellor)
  • William Brantley Aycock (1957-1964)
  • Paul F. Sharp (1964-1966)
  • J. Carlyle Sitterson (1966-1972)
  • N. Ferebee Taylor (1972-1980)
  • Christopher C. Fordham (1980-1988)
  • Paul Hardin (1988-1995)
  • Michael Hooker (1995-1999)
  • William O. McCoy (acting and interim chancellor, 1999-2000)
  • James Moeser (2000-2008) [43]

William Brantley Aycock (born 1915) is an American educator who served as chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) from 1957 until 1964 and is the retired Kenan professor of law at UNCs School of Law. ... Joseph Carlyle (Lyle) Sitterson (January 17, 1911 - May 19, 1995) is an American educator who served as chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill from February 16, 1966 to January 31, 1972. ... James Moeser is the current chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...

Notes

  1. ^ a b c d http://www.unc.edu/news/facts.shtml
  2. ^ a b Enrollment and Student Characteristics (2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-15.
  3. ^ University Endowment: The Launchpad to Leadership (2006). Retrieved on 2007-06-06.
  4. ^ Spark College: The Elite Schools (2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  5. ^ LHI- University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  6. ^ UNC: Academics: Overview (2005). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  7. ^ America's Best Colleges 2007: University of North Carolina: Mission (2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  8. ^ http://gradschool.unc.edu/pursue.html
  9. ^ http://distance.unc.edu/
  10. ^ http://www.fpg.unc.edu/~ndrc/postdoctoral_training/about_ndrc.cfm
  11. ^ (http://museum.unc.edu/get_page.html?chapter=1&slide=1)
  12. ^ (http://docsouth.unc.edu/unc/unc01-09/unc01-09.html)
  13. ^ Old East Tour Stop (2001). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  14. ^ a b (http://museum.unc.edu/get_page.html?chapter=1&slide=9&chtotal=17)
  15. ^ (http://museum.unc.edu/get_page.html?chapter=1&slide=10&chtotal=17)
  16. ^ (http://museum.unc.edu/get_page.html?chapter=1&slide=13&chtotal=17)
  17. ^ Little, M. Ruth. The Town and Gown Architecture of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 1795-1975. Chapel Hill, NC: The Presevation Society of Chapel Hill, 2006.
  18. ^ Biography of James Polk. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  19. ^ http://www.appa.org/FacilitiesManager/article.cfm?ItemNumber=394&parentid=203
  20. ^ UNC-CH Landmarks. Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  21. ^ Davie Poplar Tour Stop (2001). Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  22. ^ http://campus-y.unc.edu/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=107&Itemid=2&limit=1&limitstart=6
  23. ^ a b Compendium of Key Facts (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  24. ^ CTL: Publications/ Teaching at Carolina (2001). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  25. ^ North Carolina Collection-Research Library (2007). Retrieved on 2007-10-19.
  26. ^ America's Best Colleges 2008 (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  27. ^ [1]. Best Values in Public Colleges, 2007. Retrieved on August 11, 2007.
  28. ^ [2]. Best Values: Great Schools at Great Prices, 2006. Retrieved on August 11, 2007.
  29. ^ The Center: The Top American Research Universities (2005). Retrieved on 2007-08-11.
  30. ^ Moeser takes stock of UNC career (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-30.
  31. ^ Timeline (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-12.
  32. ^ [http://www.unc.edu/news/archives/nov06/rhodesjohnston112806.htm Rhodes Scholarship for Johnston makes two from Carolina in 2006] (2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-14.
  33. ^ He's the Dean of College Hoops (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  34. ^ Player Bio: Roy Williams (2006). Retrieved on 2008-08-10.
  35. ^ [3]. Roy Williams 'speechless' at Hall of Fame selection, 2007. Retrieved on August 11th, 2007.
  36. ^ http://www.studentpress.org/acp/winners/npm05.html
  37. ^ http://www.duke.edu/web/abduke/archive/Herald-Sun2-26-95Rogers.htm
  38. ^ http://www.csuchico.edu/jour/from_the_lab/orion_online.html
  39. ^ http://www.wxyc.org/about/first
  40. ^ http://www.cc.utah.edu/~jay/history.html
  41. ^ http://tarheelblue.cstv.com/trads/unc-trads-colors.html
  42. ^ Town of Chapel Hill Official Website- Halloween. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  43. ^ http://projects.newsobserver.com/blogs/moeser_to_step_down

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 292nd day of the year (293rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) will be a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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