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Encyclopedia > University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Newcastle University
Coat of arms of the University of Newcastle upon Tyne
Established 1963 (became independent from the University of Durham)
Type Public
Chancellor Lord Patten of Barnes
Vice-Chancellor Prof. Christopher Edwards Prof.Chris Brink from 2007
Students 17,784
Undergraduates 13,830
Postgraduates 3,954
Location Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UK
Campus Urban
Affiliations Russell Group, EUA
Website www.ncl.ac.uk

Newcastle University is a British university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north of England. It was founded as the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne by an Act of Parliament in August 1963. Image File history File links University_of_newcastle_upon_tyne2. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... Durham University is a university in England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Lord Patten of Barnes The Right Honourable Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... This page has been deleted, and should not be re-created without a good reason. ... Chris Brink is the current Rector and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Stellenbosch in Stellenbosch, South Africa, a post he took up in January 2002. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... Tyne and Wear is a metropolitan county in the North East of England around the mouths of the Rivers Tyne and Wear. ... An urban area is a term used to define an area where there is an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The Russell Group is a group of large research-led British universities established in 1994 to represent their interests to the UK Government, Parliament and other similar bodies. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... Website - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital London Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister Tony Blair MP Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq...

Contents

History

The University has its origins in the College of Medicine which was established in the city in 1834, and formally became a college of Durham University in 1851. In 1871 the College of Physical Science was founded, which subsequently became Armstrong College (named after William George Armstrong). 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Durham University is a university in England. ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William George Armstrong, 1st Baron Armstrong (November 26, 1810 - December 27, 1900) was an English industrialist, the effective founder of the Armstrong-Siddeley manufacturing empire. ...


Armstrong College and the College of Medicine were merged in 1937 to form King's College, Durham (the Durham Division remained predominantly dedicated to the teaching of theology and liberal arts). 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Growth of the Newcastle Division of the federal Durham University led to tensions within the structure and in 1963 an Act of Parliament separated the two divisions, leaving Durham as an 'Oxbridge'-style collegiate university and creating the University of Newcastle upon Tyne as a civic university similar to Birmingham, Leeds, and Manchester. 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (the link is to a full 1963 calendar). ... In Westminster System parliaments, an Act of Parliament is a part of the law passed by the Parliament. ...


Today

The University has a core population of 17,784 students (2005-2006), including more than 2,000 overseas students from over 100 countries. 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

King's Walk, giving access to the Union Building (left) and the arches of the Fine Art building, leading into the Quadrangle
King's Walk, giving access to the Union Building (left) and the arches of the Fine Art building, leading into the Quadrangle

Its medical school consistently ranks as one of the top in the UK due to its high level of teaching and research. It was also the first institution in Europe, 2nd in the world, to be given permission to pursue stem-cell research in human embryos. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 399 KB) Summary The Kings Walk. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1024x768, 399 KB) Summary The Kings Walk. ...


The current Chancellor of the university is Chris Patten, former Chairman of the Conservative Party and European Commissioner for External Affairs (1999-2004). He is also Chancellor of Oxford University. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Lord Patten of Barnes The Right Honourable Christopher Francis Patten, Baron Patten of Barnes, CH, PC (born 12 May 1944) is a prominent British Conservative politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative & Unionist Party) is currently the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), and the largest in terms of public membership. ... The European Commission (formally the Commission of the European Communities) is the executive of the European Union. ... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


The university won the Sunday Times University of the Year award in 2000. In December 2004 it sparked controversy when it announced the closure of its physics course because of declining interest and financial pressures. However, a month later the university noted that there had been a rise in applications to its chemistry course. The Sunday Times University of the Year is an annual award given to a British university by The Sunday Times. ... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up Controversy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The first few hydrogen atom electron orbitals shown as cross-sections with color-coded probability density. ... Finance studies and addresses the ways in which individuals, businesses and organizations raise, allocate, and use monetary resources over time, taking into account the risks entailed in their projects. ... Chemistry (from Greek χημεία khemeia meaning alchemy, see below for possible origins of this word) is the science of matter at the atomic to molecular scale, dealing primarily with collections of atoms (such as molecules, crystals, and metals). ...


The university enjoys a friendly sporting rivalry with the neighbouring (only a few yards away) Northumbria University with the major sporting teams of both universities competing against each other every year for the Stan Calvert Cup To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Stan Calvert Cup, sometimes referred to as the Stan Calvert sports day, is a annual contest that takes place between the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne and Northumbria University. ...


Student Organisations

The Union Society aims to represent the interests of students at the University.[1] The University of Newcastle Students Union is an organisation which aims to represent students interests at the University of Newcastle. ...

  • The Courier - Award winning student newspaper
  • Student Societies

Notable alumni

This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Kate Adie (born September 19, 1945) is a British journalist. ... Bruce Edward Babbitt (born June 27, 1938), a Democrat, served as United States Secretary of the Interior and as Governor of Arizona. ... // Contributors attention is drawn to sub judice conventions in the UK for their own protection and that of the publisher, Wikipedia. ... Robert Carter (b. ... Ed Coode, MBE (born June 19, 1975 in Bodmin, Cornwall) is a British rower, twice World Champion and Olympic Gold medalist. ... The Hon. ... R. G. Casey House, the headquarters of the Australian Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade This is a list of Australian Foreign Ministers: Note: Prior to 1970, the office was known as the Minister for External Affairs. ... Bryan Ferry (born 26 September 1945 in Washington, Tyne and Wear) is an English singer, musician and songwriter, famed for his suave visual and vocal style, who came to public prominence in the 1970s as lead vocalist and principal songwriter with Roxy Music. ... Roxy Music is a British art rock group founded in the early 1970s as a collaborative project between art school graduates Bryan Ferry (vocals, keyboards) and Brian Eno (electronic music specialist). ... Adrian Henri (April 10, 1932 – December 21, 2000) was a British poet and painter. ... Wilko Johnson (born John Wilkinson on 12 July 1947, in Canvey Island) is a guitarist particularly associated with 1970s British rhythm and blues band, Dr. Feelgood. ... Dr. Feelgood is a British Pub rock band, which was formed in mid 1971. ... Paul Kennedy can refer to: Paul Kennedy a professor of history at Yale University who is known for his study of the history of international relations. ... Baron Redesdale is a peerage title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom. ... Alan Frederick Plater, CBE (born 15 April 1935) is an English playwright and screenwriter, who has worked extensively in British television from the 1960s to the 2000s. ... Stuart Prebble (born April 15, 1951) is a former chief executive of ITV. He was chief executive of the ill fated ITV Digital venture, placed into administration in March 2002. ... Jack Shepherd (born October 29, 1940, Leeds, Yorkshire) is a British actor, well-known for playing avuncular policemen, army personnel, and clergy. ... Paul Tucker (born 12 August 1968, in Crystal Palace, London, England) is a record producer and songwriter. ... The Lighthouse Family were a British duo from the mid-1990s to the early 2000s. ... Nationwide Building Society is a major UK building society, the largest one in the world, and has its headquarters in Swindon, Wiltshire, South West England. ...

Research Institutes

  • Informatics Research Institute (IRI)
  • Institute for Ageing and Health (IAH)
  • Institute for Cell and Molecular Biosciences
  • Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology (INSAT)
  • Institute for Policy and Practice (IPP)
  • Institute for Research on Environment and Sustainability (IRES)
  • Institute of Human Genetics (IHG)
  • Institute of Neuroscience
  • Newcastle Institute for the Arts, Social Sciences and Humanities (NIASSH)
  • Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR)

Schools and Faculties

Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences

  • Architecture, Planning and Landscape
  • Arts and Cultures
  • University of Newcastle upon Tyne Business School
  • Education, Communication and Language Sciences
  • English Literature, Language and Linguistics
  • Geography, Politics and Sociology
  • Historical Studies
  • The Language Centre
  • Newcastle Law School
  • Modern Languages

Faculty of Medical Sciences

  • Biomedical Sciences
  • Clinical and Laboratory Sciences
  • Clinical Medical Sciences
  • Dental Sciences
  • Medical Education Development
  • Postgraduate Institute for Medicine and Dentistry
  • Neurology, Neurobiology and Psychiatry
  • Population and Health Sciences
  • Surgical and Reproductive Sciences

Faculty of Science, Agriculture and Engineering

  • Agriculture, Food and Rural Development
  • Biology
  • Chemical Engineering and Advanced Materials
  • Civil Engineering and Geosciences
  • Computing Science
  • Electrical, Electronic and Computer Engineering
  • Marine Science and Technology
  • Mathematics and Statistics
  • Mechanical and Systems Engineering
  • Natural Sciences

See also

Universities in North East England

Durham | Newcastle upon Tyne | Northumbria | Sunderland | Teeside The University of Newcastle Medical School was established in 1834 in the city of Newcastle upon Tyne and served as the College of Medicine in connection with Durham University from 1851 to 1937 when it joined Armstrong College, to form Kings College, Durham. ... Centre for Life The Centre for Life is a “science village” in the heart of the English city Newcastle upon Tyne, located close to Central Station. ... The North East of England has five major universities. ... Durham University is a university in England. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... St Peters Campus The University of Sunderland is located in the City of Sunderland in North East England. ... The University of Teesside, based in Middlesbrough, England, has a student body of 20,685 students as of 2005. ...

Russell Group
(of British research universities)
Birmingham | Bristol | Cambridge | Cardiff | Edinburgh | Glasgow | Imperial College London | King's College London | Leeds | Liverpool | London School of Economics | Manchester | Newcastle | Nottingham | Oxford | Sheffield | Southampton | University College London | Warwick

  Results from FactBites:
 
Newcastle University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (658 words)
The University has its origins in the College of Medicine which was established in the city in 1834, and formally became a college of Durham University in 1851.
Growth of the Newcastle Division of the federal Durham University led to tensions within the structure and in 1963 an Act of Parliament separated the two divisions, leaving Durham as an 'Oxbridge'-style collegiate university and creating the University of Newcastle upon Tyne as a civic university similar to Hull, Leicester, Nottingham and Southampton.
Though Newcastle was the subject of the Channel 4 'Redbrick' documentary in 1986 it is not often considered to be either a redbrick or a plate glass university.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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