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Encyclopedia > University of New South Wales
The University of New South Wales

Motto: Scientia Manu et Mente ("Knowledge By Hand and Mind")
Established 1949 as the New South Wales University of Technology
Type: Public
Endowment: $914million[1]
Chancellor: David Gonski
Vice-Chancellor: Professor Fred Hilmer
Staff: 6,500
Students: 40,000
Location Kensington, New South Wales, Australia
( 33°55′4″S, 151°13′52″E)
Campus: Canberra, ACT
Coogee, New South Wales
Kensington, New South Wales
Little Bay, New South Wales
Manly Vale, New South Wales
Paddington, New South Wales
Randwick, New South Wales
Affiliations: Group of Eight, Universitas 21
Website: www.unsw.edu.au

The University of New South Wales, also known as UNSW or colloquially as New South, is a university situated in Kensington, a suburb in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. Image File history File links UNSW_Crest. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... David Gonski (born 1953) is a prominent Australian businessman and public figure. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Fred Hilmer AO is an Australian academic and business figure. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Kensington is a suburb in Randwick City, in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney. ... NSW redirects here. ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ... Coogee Surf Club Maidstone Coogee is a beachside suburb in south-eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Kensington is a suburb in Randwick City, in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney. ... Little Bay is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Location of Manly Vale Manly Vale is a suburb located in Warringah Shire on Sydneys Northern Beaches. ... Paddington is an inner-city, eastern suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Randwick is a suburb in south-eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... The Group of Eight (Go8) is a lobby group for eight Australian tertiary institutions which are the leading universities in Australia. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Kensington is a suburb in Randwick City, in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney. ... This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... NSW redirects here. ...


Founded in 1949, today it is recognised as one of Australia’s leading teaching and research institutions, and has developed a strong reputation in a number of fields including renewable/alternative energy, quantum computing and nanotechnology, taxation reform, information and communication technology, digital media, electrical engineering, bio-medical engineering, sustainable development, HIV/AIDS research, and social justice and social policy research.[2]


It is a member of Australia's "Group of Eight" lobby group, and is also a founding member of Universitas 21, an international network of leading research-intensive universities. The Group of Eight (Go8) is a lobby group for eight Australian tertiary institutions which are the leading universities in Australia. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ...


The main campus, housing eight of the ten faculties, is located in the suburb of Kensington, about 5 km south-east of the Sydney CBD. One faculty, the College of Fine Arts, is located on its own campus in the inner suburb of Paddington whilst the other, the Australian Defence Force Academy is situated in Canberra. The University also has additional campuses and field stations at Randwick, Coogee, Little Bay, Dee Why, Cowan, Manly Vale and Fowler's Gap. The Central Business District of Sydney, Australia. ... The College of Fine Arts Logo The College of Fine Arts (COFA) is the creative arts wing/campus of the University of New South Wales and is located on Oxford Street, Paddington, Sydney, Australia. ... Paddington is an inner-city, eastern suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... ADFA redirects here, for the Welsh village see Adfa (village). ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Randwick is a suburb in south-eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Coogee Surf Club Maidstone Coogee is a beachside suburb in south-eastern Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Little Bay is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Dee Why Beach Dee Why postcode 2099 is both a suburb of Sydneys Northern Beaches and a beach within the suburb. ... Cowan is a suburb of Sydney, in the state of New South Wales, Australia. ... Location of Manly Vale Manly Vale is a suburb located in Warringah Shire on Sydneys Northern Beaches. ... Fowlers Gap is a place in western New South Wales ...


In 2006, the Times Higher Education Supplement placed UNSW in the top 100 universities of the world at rank 41, the 5th Australian university. The latest rankings to be released have been compiled by Newsweek, and ranked UNSW 64th globally. The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ...


In May 2007, the University announced its termination of all programs offered at its Asian campus in Singapore after only one semester due to financial issues and lower than expected student numbers.[3] The University of New South Wales Asia (Abbreviation: UNSW Asia; Chinese: 亚洲新南威尔斯大学) is a new university slated to open in 2007 in Singapore. ...


On June 25, Vice-Chancellor Professor Fred Hilmer announced the construction of a major new research facility on the UNSW campus, to be known as the Lowy Cancer Research Centre.[4][5] The new centre costing $100 million will be Australia's first facility to research and perform clinical drugs trials into both adult and children's cancers under one roof.[6] is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Sydney Technical College at Maryanne Street, Ultimo in 1950

The idea of founding the University originated from the crisis demands of World War II, during which the nation's attention was drawn to the critical role that science and technology played in transforming an agricultural society into a modern and industrial one.[7] The post-war Labor government of New South Wales recognised the increasing need to have a university specialised in training high quality engineers and technology-related professionals in numbers beyond that of the capacity and characteristics of the existing University of Sydney.[7] This led to the proposal to establish the Institute of Technology, submitted by the then New South Wales Minister for Education RJ Heffron accepted on 9 July 1946. Instead of creating a completely new Institute, the government decided to have the existing Sydney Technical College operating at Ultimo substantially expanded. Image File history File links Sydney_Technical_College. ... Image File history File links Sydney_Technical_College. ... The Sydney Technical College was a name used by Australias oldest technical education institution. ... Ultimo is a suburb in central Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... ALP redirects here. ... Engineering is the application of scientific and technical knowledge to solve human problems. ... The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... Many New South Wales government agencies are coming to adopt a form of the states Coat of Arms as their insignia. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sydney Technical College was a name used by Australias oldest technical education institution. ... Ultimo is a suburb in central Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...


The University, originally named the "New South Wales University of Technology", gained its statutory status through the enactment of New South Wales University of Technology Act 1949 (NSW) by Parliament of New South Wales in Sydney in 1949. In March 1948 classes commenced operation with its first cohort of 46 students pursuing programs including Civil Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Mining Engineering and Electronic Engineering.[8] At that time the thesis programmes were innovative in the sense that each course embodied a specified and substantial period of practical training in the relevant industry. It was also unprecedented for tertiary institutions at that time to include compulsory instruction in humanities.[9] The Parliament of New South Wales consists of the Governor of New South Wales, the New South Wales Legislative Council and the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. ... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Mechanical Engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... Mining Engineering is a field that involves many of the other engineering disciplines as applied to extracting and processing minerals from a naturally occurring environment. ... Electronic discipline that deals with the behavior and effects of electrons (as in electron tubes and transistors) and with electronic devices, systems, or equipment. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ...


Initially the University operated from the inner Sydney city campus at Ultimo. However, in 1951, the Parliament of New South Wales passed the New South Wales University of Technology (Construction) Act 1951 (NSW) to provide funding and allow buildings to be erected at the Kensington site where the university is now located. Ultimo is a suburb in central Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ... The Parliament of New South Wales consists of the Governor of New South Wales, the New South Wales Legislative Council and the New South Wales Legislative Assembly. ... Kensington is a suburb in Randwick City, in the Eastern Suburbs of Sydney. ...

University Library Building

In 1958 the University name was changed to the University of New South Wales to reflect its intention to transform itself from a technology-based university to an all-rounded generalist university. In 1960 it broadened its curriculum and student base with the establishment of a Faculty of Artsand a Faculty of Medicine, soon to be followed by the Faculty of Law in 1971[10] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (572x694, 59 KB) Image of the UNSW Library Building I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (572x694, 59 KB) Image of the UNSW Library Building I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Faculty of Law of the University of New South Wales is a law school situated in Sydney, Australia. ...


The university's first director was Arthur Denning (1949-1952), who made important contributions to the foundations of the university. In 1953 he was replaced by Professor Philip Baxter, who continued on as vice-chancellor when this position's title was changed in 1955.[11] Baxter's dynamic authoritarian management was central to the University's first twenty years. His visionary - but at times controversial - energies saw the university grow from a handful to 15,000 students by 1968[6]. He also pioneered new scientific and technological disciplines against an external background of traditionalist criticism. Growing staff levels, recruited both locally and overseas, conducted research which soon established a wide international reputation. By the time of Sir Philip Baxter's retirement in 1969 the University had made a unique and enterprising mark on Australia. The new Vice-Chancellor, Professor Rupert Myers (1969-1981), brought consolidation and an urbane management style to a period of expanding student numbers, demand for change in University style, and challenges of student unrest.


The stabilising techniques of the 1980s managed by Vice-Chancellor Professor Michael Birt (1981-1992)[12] provided a firm base for the energetic corporatism and campus enhancements pursued by the subsequent Vice-Chancellor, Professor John Niland (1992 - 2002). The 1990s saw the addition of a Fine Arts dimension to the University and further development of the public and community outreach which has characterised the University from its beginnings. At present, private sources contribute 45% of its annual funding[7]. The John Niland Scientia Building John Niland is an Australian businessman and professor. ...


The University established Colleges in Newcastle (1951) and Wollongong (1961), which eventually became two independent universities in 1965 and 1975 respectively, namely the University of Newcastle and the University of Wollongong. This article is about the metropolitan area in Australia. ... Wollongong is an industrial city located on the eastern coast of Australia in the state of New South Wales. ... The University of Newcastle is a public university located in Callaghan, a suburb of Newcastle, New South Wales. ... The University of Wollongong is a large University with approximately 21,000 students in the city of Wollongong, New South Wales, Australia. ...


Governance

University council's first meeting in 1949

The University is governed by a Council of 22 members including parliamentary and ex-officio members, members elected by staff, students and graduates of the University, and members appointed by the Minister for Education or by Council itself. It is responsible for acting on the University’s behalf to promote its objectives and interests. The governance of universities has come under increasing scrutiny nationally in recent years, and UNSW and its Council are committed to meeting this scrutiny by demonstrating the highest standards. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3536x2592, 3902 KB) Own scanning UNSW first council meeting Photo taken at 1949 1means the typographical arrangement and layout of a published work. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (3536x2592, 3902 KB) Own scanning UNSW first council meeting Photo taken at 1949 1means the typographical arrangement and layout of a published work. ... Hon Julie Bishop The current Minister for Education, Science and Training is Julie Bishop. ...


The principal academic body is the Academic Board which receives advice on academic matters from the Faculties, College (Australian Defence Force Academy), and the Boards of Studies. It is responsible for academic policy setting, academic strategy via its eight standing committees, approval and delivery of programs, and academic standards. The Board comprises 56 members, including the Chancellor and Deputy-Chancellor, members of the SMG, Deans and Faculty Presiding Members, 24 members elected from the academic staff and four from the student body. Membership also includes ‘such other persons’ approved by Council. The Academic Board advises the Vice-Chancellor and Council on matters relating to teaching, scholarship and research and takes decisions on delegation from Council. Its purpose is to make academic policy; approve courses and programs; further and co-ordinate the work of the Faculties and other academic units; and support teaching, scholarship and research. ADFA redirects here, for the Welsh village see Adfa (village). ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...


The Faculties and boards are responsible for the teaching and examining of subjects within their scope and the Academic Board co-ordinates and furthers their work.


The chief executive officer of the University is the Vice-Chancellor and President. The Deputy Vice-Chancellors and Pro-Vice-Chancellors are responsible for academic operations, research policy, research management, quality assurance and external relations including sponsorship. “Chief executive” redirects here. ...


Students

UNSW currently has approximately 40,000 students studying in 600 undergraduate and postgraduate academic programs. Over 5,000 full-time staff work in its 76 schools, 69 research centres, 6 institutes, 4 teaching hospitals, 8 residential colleges and many administrative departments.


It was reported in the 1990s that more than half of New South Wales' top HSC students consistently make UNSW their first preference.[13] In 2000, 17 of the 22 students who achieved a perfect 100 on the University Admissions Index (UAI) decided to commence studies at UNSW.[14] In the same year, the NSW Board of Studies and the Universities Admissions Centre said that the university was also the most popular among other attracted 55 per cent of the top 1 per cent of performers.[14] This article is about the New South Wales Higher School Certificate. ... The University Admissions Index (UAI) is a measure of rank in the Higher School Certificate in New South Wales and ACT, Australia for entry into university. ...


Students support and non-academic services are provided by a number of groups and units across the university. In 2007, the four previous student organisations, the UNSW Student Guild, Postgraduate Board, UNSW Union and the COFA Students' Association were wound up and reformed as a new student organisation known as the Arc. This new student body is a major service provider on campus, running a number of retail outlets, student media such as Tharunka and the entertainment venue, the Roundhouse. The Arc Representative Council represents students to the university and nationally and fights for their rights. The Arc also provides support and funding to university clubs and societies and Arc volunteer programs. The University of New South Wales Sports Association provides support and funding to sporting programs and runs a number of university-based sporting teams that compete both at home and abroad. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Arc @ UNSW. (Discuss) The University of New South Wales Student Guild of Undergraduates and Postgraduates (commonly referred to as the UNSW Student Guild) was the principal student union at the University of New South Wales. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Arc @ UNSW. (Discuss) This article is about the student organisation at UNSW in Sydney, Australia. ... The College of Fine Arts Students Association (COFASA) is the principal student union at the University of New South Wales College of Fine Arts (COFA). ... It has been suggested that University of New South Wales Student Guild, Source (UNSW), College of Fine Arts Students Association, University of New South Wales Postgraduate Board and University of New South Wales Student Union be merged into this article or section. ... Front page of a Tharunka edition from 2004, when the publication was a tabloid newspaper. ... The John Niland Scientia Building There are a number of theatre and music venues at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. ...


Ranking and performance

In 1999, UNSW was ranked 8th around the Asia-Pacific region and 1st among Australian universities by Asiaweek [8]. The position moved to 10th in Asia and 2nd in Australia in 2000 [9], and the ranking had been discontinued since then. This is a list of universities and other higher education institutions in Australia. ... Asiaweek, the English edition, was a news magazine focusing on Asia, published weekly by Asiaweek Limited, a subsidiary of Time Inc. ...


UNSW is ranked in the band 151 - 202 by the authoritative Shanghai Jiao Tong University Institute of Higher Education Academic Ranking of World Universities. Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ...


The 2004 Times Higher Education Supplement world university ranked UNSW at 36th in the world's top 200 universities. In 2005 the position has moved to 40th.[15] Furthermore in the same survey, the university has been ranked 16th for Technology, 24th for social science, 40th for Science and 41st for biomedicine. The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ...


In 2004, the Financial Times Global MBA ranking places UNSW's Australian Graduate School of Management 53rd in the world beating USYD, top among Australian Business Schools. In 2005, its position dropped to 84th, and in 2006 it rose again to 75th making it second nationally following Melbourne Business School.[16] In 2007, the school has again overtaken Melbourne as the top full-time MBA program in the country, being placed at 49th worldwide, and is one of the two leading business-degree providers across the Asia-Pacific region.[17] From the same survey, the school's Executive MBA program has been placed 23rd,[18] and is the only Australian business school featured in the rankings for 6 consecutive years. AGSM alumni achieved an average salary of US$133,768, an average increase of 74 percent after three years of graduation.[18] The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... UNSW John Niland Scientia Building The Australian School of Business applies the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) branding to its most prestigious management teaching and management research centers. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ...


In 2006, UNSW ranks third for both total funds allocated and the number of grants from the Australian Research Council among Australian universities following University of Sydney and Australian National University, by securing more than $26 million[19] in Discovery Project grants. The University also gains the highest number of Linkage Project grants of any university.[20] The Australian Research Council (ARC) is the Australian Government’s main agency for allocating research funding to academics and researchers in Australian universities. ... The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... The Australian National University, or ANU, is a public university located in Canberra, Australia. ...


Faculties

The University has nine faculties: Arts and Social Sciences; Built Environment; the College of Fine Arts (COFA); Business; Engineering; Law; Medicine; Science; and the tertiary education component of the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA) in Canberra (Australian Capital Territory). The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... The phrase refers to the manmade surroundings that provide the setting for human activity, ranging from the large-scale civic surroundings to the personal places. ... The College of Fine Arts Logo The College of Fine Arts (COFA) is the creative arts wing/campus of the University of New South Wales and is located on Oxford Street, Paddington, Sydney, Australia. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Engineering is the discipline of acquiring and applying knowledge of design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... ADFA redirects here, for the Welsh village see Adfa (village). ... For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Capital Canberra Government Constitutional monarchy Administrator none Chief Minister Jon Stanhope (ALP) Federal representation  - House seats 2  - Senate seats 2 Gross Territorial Product (2006)  - Product ($m)  $19,167 (6th)  - Product per capita  $57,303/person (1st) Population (End of November 2006)  - Population  333,667 (7th)  - Density  137. ...


Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences occupies the Morven Brown and Robert Webster buildings, as well as parts of the Mathews Building, at the university's Kensington campus. It comprises twelve schools.

  • School of Education
  • School of English
  • School of History
  • School of History and Philosophy of Science
  • School of Media, Film and Theatre
  • School of Modern Language Studies
  • School of Music and Music Education
  • School of Philosophy
  • School of Politics and International Relations
  • School of Social Science and Policy
  • School of Social Work
  • School of Sociology and Anthropology

In May 2007, the University announced "it will conduct a major review of its Bachelor of Arts program, reduce its teaching semester from 14 weeks to 12 weeks, and cut all casual teaching staff from its Arts and Social Sciences disciplines."[21]


University College/UNSW@ADFA

University College is a campus run by UNSW at the Australian Defence Force Academy (ADFA). ADFA is a tri-service military Academy that provides military and tertiary academic education for junior officers of the Australian Defence Force in the Royal Australian Navy (RAN), Australian Regular Army (ARA) and Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF). It also provides post-graduate study for civilians, more senior ADF personnel and public servants. It is associated with the University of New South Wales, and issues its awards. ADFA redirects here, for the Welsh village see Adfa (village). ... The Australian Defence Force (ADF) is the military organisation responsible for the defence of Australia. ... The Royal Australian Navy (RAN) is the naval branch of the Australian Defence Force. ... The Australian Army is Australias military land force. ... The Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF) is the Air Force branch of the Australian Defence Force. ...


The stated purpose of ADFA is "to serve Australia by providing the Australian Defence Force (ADF) with tertiary graduates who have the foundational attributes, intellect and skills required of an officer."


UNSW@ADFA is composed of five schools:

  • School of Aerospace, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
  • School of Business
  • School of Humanities and Social Sciences
  • School of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering
  • School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences

ADFA is sited in the suburb of Campbell in Canberra, and is adjacent to the Royal Military College, Duntroon. For other uses, see Canberra (disambiguation). ... Royal Military College The Royal Military College, Duntroon is Australias military academy where Staff Cadets train for commissioning into the Australian Army as a part of the Australian Defence Force There are two streams of Cadets: from the Australian Defence Force Academy, and by direct entry. ...


Faculty of the Built Environment

The Faculty of the Built Environment runs undergraduate programs in the areas of Architecture, Science (Architecture), Construction Management & Property, Industrial Design, Interior Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Planning. The Faculty runs postgraduate programs in the areas of Architecture, Construction Project Management, Real Estate/Property and Development, Planning, Sustainable Development, and Urban Development and Design.


The faculty is headquartered in the Red Centre (West Wing), a futuristic building designed by MGT Architects.


College of Fine Arts

The College of Fine Arts (COFA) is the creative arts faculty of the University of New South Wales and is located on Oxford Street, Paddington, Sydney. The College consists of the following five schools: The College of Fine Arts Logo The College of Fine Arts (COFA) is the creative arts wing/campus of the University of New South Wales and is located on Oxford Street, Paddington, Sydney, Australia. ...

  • School of Art
  • School of Art Education
  • School of Art History and Theory
  • School of Design Studies
  • School of Media Arts

The College also runs courses via its online education program, COFA Online.


The above academic units, supported by various administration staff including a large technical support staff that helps maintain the various art, design and digital media disciplines undertaken at the College. The Paddington campus houses the Clement Semmler Library, which maintains a large collection of art and design literature, journals, periodicals and electronic resources. Also on site is The Ivan Dougherty Gallery, which has a regular schedule of exhibitions and seminars throughout the year, focusing on both student and professional work.


Students at the College are represented by the College of Fine Arts Students' Association. The College of Fine Arts Students Association (COFASA) is the principal student union at the University of New South Wales College of Fine Arts (COFA). ...


The Australian School of Business

Quadrangle Building housing the Faculty of Business
Quadrangle Building housing the Faculty of Business

The Australian School of Business is one of the largest business faculties in the world and has over 8,000 students. There are approximately 4,500 undergraduate students, 3,500 postgraduate students and 250 PhD and Honours students with an almost equal mix of women and men. 30-40% are international students. The faculty has 220 full-time academics and researchers.[10] Image File history File links Quadrangle_Building. ... Image File history File links Quadrangle_Building. ... Quadrangle Building housing the Faculty of Business The Australian School of Business (incorporating the Australian Graduate School of Management) at The University of New South Wales has over 8,000 students. ...


The faculty is composed of nine Schools, including: Accounting; Actuarial Studies; The Australian Graduate School of Management; Banking & Finance; Business Law & Taxation; Economics; Information Systems, Technology & Management; Organisation and Management and Marketing. UNSW John Niland Scientia Building The Australian School of Business applies the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) branding to its most prestigious management teaching and management research centers. ...


In January 2007, the Australian Graduate School of Management (formerly a faculty in its own right) officially merged with the Faculty of Commerce and Economics. In addition to the integration, the Faculty of Commerce and Economics also changed their name to the Faculty of Business and relocated into the new Australian School of Business Building in mid-2007. The Faculty was later renamed to The Australian School of Business. UNSW John Niland Scientia Building The Australian School of Business applies the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) branding to its most prestigious management teaching and management research centers. ... Quadrangle Building housing the Faculty of Business The Australian School of Business (incorporating the Australian Graduate School of Management) at The University of New South Wales has over 8,000 students. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Faculty of Engineering

Inside the K17 building, which houses the School of Computer Science and Engineering
Inside the K17 building, which houses the School of Computer Science and Engineering

The Faculty of Engineering is the largest in Australia, offering the widest range of engineering programmes. It is easily the largest faculty in the university, with 9000 students enrolled (2006). It was recently voted the number one engineering faculty in Australia (16th in the world) by the 2005 Times Higher Education Supplement World University Ranking. The Faculty comprises ten schools: Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 390 KB) Inside w:University of New South Wales K17 building (housing Computer Science and Engineering). ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 390 KB) Inside w:University of New South Wales K17 building (housing Computer Science and Engineering). ...

  • Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering
  • School of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (formerly known as the School of Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry)
  • School of Civil & Environmental Engineering
  • School of Computer Science and Engineering (High School portal)
  • School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications
  • School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
  • School of Mining Engineering
  • School of Petroleum Engineering
  • School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering (formerly the Centre for Photovoltaic Engineering)
  • School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems (formerly Geomatic Engineering)

Students of the faculty are involved in a number of high-profile projects: the Sunswift Solar Car (second place in the recent Sunrace from Adelaide to Sydney), the rUNSWift RoboCup team (World Champions [a long time ago]), the Formula SAE-A Racing Car (National winners in 2000) and the BlueSat Satellite (2003). Sunswift is a full-scale, multi-disciplinary, student-led engineering project. ... // Overview RoboCup is an international robotics competition founded in 1993. ... BLUEsat is currently a Student Project managed and run entirely by students at http://www. ...


UNSW Centre for Photovoltaic Engineering currently holds the world record for single-crystalline silicon solar cell efficiency (24.7%). It is one of the leading solar cell research centres in the world with ongoing active research in the area of wafer-based solar cell technologies, thin film cell technologies and advanced third-generation cell concepts.


The Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design is one of Australia's leading polymer institutes with research in all facets of macromolecular design and applications.


Faculty of Law

The new law building
The new law building
Main article: UNSW Faculty of Law

The UNSW Faculty of Law comprises the School of Law, the Australian School of Taxation (Atax), the Kingsford Legal Centre (a community legal centre), a centre for continuing legal education, and 12 affiliated research and specialist legal centres. Currently the Faculty teaches approximately 2400 law students and 1400 tax students. In Winter 2006, the faculty moved to a new building at lower campus. Image File history File linksMetadata Unswlawbuilding. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Unswlawbuilding. ... The Faculty of Law of the University of New South Wales is a law school situated in Sydney, Australia. ... The Faculty of Law of the University of New South Wales is a law school situated in Sydney, Australia. ...


Today, the Faculty is recognised as one of the top law schools in Australia.


Faculty of Medicine

The Faculty of Medicine was established at the university in July 1960. The Faculty has nine schools:

  • School of Medical Sciences
  • School of Psychiatry
  • School of Public Health and Community Medicine
  • School of Women's and Children's Health
  • Prince of Wales Clinical School
  • Rural Clinical School
  • St George Clinical School
  • St Vincent's Clinical School
  • South Western Sydney Clinical School

Faculty of Science

One of the aircraft owned by the Department of Aviation
One of the aircraft owned by the Department of Aviation

The Faculty of Science consists of: Image File history File links UNSW_aircraft. ... Image File history File links UNSW_aircraft. ...

  • Department of Aviation
  • School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences
  • School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences
  • School of Chemistry
  • School of Materials Science and Engineering
  • School of Mathematics and Statistics
  • School of Optometry and Vision Science
  • School of Physics
  • School of Psychology
  • School of Safety Science
  • Centre for Quantum Computer Technology

Within the School of Physics, the Centre for Quantum Computer Technology has three major research laboratories at the University of New South Wales: the Atomic Fabrication Facility (AFF), the National Magnet Laboratory (NML) and the Semiconductor Nanofabrication Facility (SNF). These all allow for nanoscale device fabrication and measurement.


Campus

UNSW in relation to Sydney

The UNSW campus is divided geographically into two areas; the upper campus, and the lower campus. These two are separated mainly by an elevation rise between the quadrangle and the Scientia building. It takes roughly twenty minutes to walk from one extreme to the other. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1181 KB) Summary I took this photo from a UNSW in December 2005. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2576x1932, 1181 KB) Summary I took this photo from a UNSW in December 2005. ...


Lower campus

The lower UNSW campus entrance lies at Anzac Parade, and extends up to the quadrangle and Scientia building. It houses student union and sporting venues in the roundhouse precinct near this entrance. Further up along the lower part of the university mall extending from the Anzac parade entrance, is the new faculty of law building, the applied science building, the materials engineering and safety science buildings. The Red Centre (School of Mathematics and Statistics, Faculty of the Built Environment), in addition to the Old Main Building, Science theatre precinct, Heffron building, K17 building, Electrical and Mechanical engineering buildings and the Quadrangle are all located further up the University Mall. The University Mall splits into two separate paths at the Science theatre precinct, with the university mall continuing toward the Scientia Building and the other leading to the Quadrangle and Basser Steps. Anzac Parade, Kingsford Anzac Parade is a major road in the south-eastern suburbs of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. ...


It is important to note that the linear nature of UNSW was considered very early on in the planning process, with the buildings and overall structure making use of this feature.


Upper campus

From the Quadrangle, the university extends up the forested Basser Steps into the Commerce Courtyard, right next to the Central Lecture Block. The Scientia building entrance to upper campus also generally leads into this area, or into the library basement. Located further up, is the Morven Brown Building (arts), the UNSW library tower, the Mathews Building and theatres, the Chancellery, the Clancy auditorium and at the very top of the campus the Biological Sciences Building/Wallace Wurth medical buildings.


Analytical Centre

See also: Venues at the University of New South Wales

Building work has commenced around the Applied Science building on a new facility to co-locate major research instrumentation in a single, purpose built, high-grade facility for the University, due to be completed early in 2007. The John Niland Scientia Building There are a number of theatre and music venues at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia. ...


The UNSW Analytical Centre will house the most important major instruments used in the Faculties of Science, Medicine and Engineering for the study of the structure and composition of biological, chemical and physical materials and will also include preparation laboratories, smaller instruments and computing facilities. In addition, it will provide the technical/professional support for the instruments. The building will also house new teaching and research laboratories for the School of Chemistry.


The UNSW Analytical Centre will consolidate the management of resources to minimise unnecessary duplication, as well as providing the appropriate infrastructure to support the instruments and a world-class research environment within which the instrumentation can operate to specification.[22]


Additionally, the new UNSW Analytical Centre has recently received a $500,000 grant from the Magnowski Institute of Applied Science to use in further advances in the studies of applied science.


Gallery

Academic competitions

UNSW is well known for its engagement with primary and secondary education, administering several national and international academic competitions for school age children. These include, among others, the Australian Schools Science Competition, the Australasian Schools Mathematics Assessment and the UNSW Programming Competition, in which many thousands of students in the Australasian area, the Pacific and South Africa participate each year. UNSW, through the Gifted Education Research Resource and Information Centre (GERRIC), and Grant and Research centre for Education and Scholarly Success (GRESS), also administers the Australian Primary Talent Search (APTS) and Australian Secondary Schools Educational Talent Search (ASSETS) tests to explore and assess the abilities of gifted children. The Australasian Schools Science Competition is a science competition open to school students in years 3-12 in Australia and New Zealand. ...


UNSW has also been a key sponsor and supporter of the TradingPlaces National Universities Portfolio Competition since its inception in 2000.

Bruce Hall controversy

In April 2002, Professor Bruce Hall was claimed to have committed academic misconduct in medical research by Norman Swan on the ABC Radio National program, The Science Show.[23] On December 23, 2003, then Vice-Chancellor of UNSW Professor Rory Hume produced a report, which found Professor Hall guilty of misconduct in relation to five of the six allegations before him.[24] At least $1 million was spent over three years by the university on a series of inquiries into Professor Hall.[25] As a result of his handling of the affair, which drew criticism from the media[26] and within the university, Professor Hume was pressured to resign by the Chancellor and others seeking his resignation.[27] Professor Hume officially resigned on June 30, 2004 after a breakdown in his working relationship with the University's governing council.[28] Professor Mark Wainwright was appointed Vice-Chancellor in July 2004, having been Acting Vice-Chancellor following Professor Hume's resignation. The Australian Broadcasting Corporation or ABC is Australias national non-profit public broadcaster. ... ABC Radio National is an Australia-wide radio network with many various programs, involving news and current affairs, arts, music, society, science, drama and comedy. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 181st day of the year (182nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Professor Mark Wainwright is Vice-Chancellor and President of the University of New South Wales. ...


Residential colleges

Philip Baxter College is a residential college at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Kensington, Sydney, Australia. ... Basser College is a residential college at the University of New South Wales in Kensington, Sydney, Australia. ... Goldstein College is one of the residential colleges of the University of New South Wales. ... New College, University of New South Wales (UNSW) is a residential college, located in the UNSW campus in Sydney, Australia. ... Warrane College is an affiliated residential college at The University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. ... International House UNSW is a multi-cultural college located in the lower campus of The University of New South Wales. ... Shalom College is a residential college located on the Kensington campus of the University of New South Wales, in Sydney, Australia. ... Creston College is one of the residential colleges of the University of New South Wales. ...

Notes

  1. ^ UNSW Annual Report 2006 Vol 2 Financial Statements p29[1], Retrieved on 2007-09-12
  2. ^ About University of New South Wales, University 21, Retrieved on 2006-10-20
  3. ^ UNSW: The University of New South Wales - Search, Retrieved on 2007-05-23
  4. ^ "Donation funds new cancer research centre", ABC News. Retrieved on 2007-06-26
  5. ^ Cohen, David, "Australia's International Education Effort Enters a Shakeout Phase as Universities Cull Overseas Programs", Chronicle of Higher Education, July 9, 2007.
  6. ^ "New cancer research centre for Sydney", Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved on 2007-09-23.
  7. ^ a b O'Farrell, UNSW, a portrait: the University of New South Wales, 1949-1999, UNSW Press, 1999 at p15 ISBN 0-86840-417-9
  8. ^ 'University Official Records', University of New South Wales Records & Archives Office, http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au
  9. ^ O'Farrell, UNSW, a portrait: the University of New South Wales, 1949-1999, UNSW Press, 1999 at p33 ISBN 0-86840-417-9
  10. ^ State Archives, UNSW Records and Archives Office.
  11. ^ http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/About/vice-chancellor.html
  12. ^ http://www.recordkeeping.unsw.edu.au/About/vice-chancellor.html#birt
  13. ^ Luis M, Why Top Students Prefer UNSW, Sydney Morning Herald, 16 July 1996
  14. ^ a b Top University, Sunday Telegraph, 6 February 2000, 25
  15. ^ Times Higher Education Supplement World University Ranking [2] Retrieved on 2005-12-01
  16. ^ Financial Times Business Ranking [3], Retrieved on 2006-10-10
  17. ^ AGSM leapfrogs Melbourne's MBA, The Australian p27, 2007-01-29
  18. ^ a b Executive MBA ranking 2006 Table, Financial Times (UK)[4] Retrieved on 2006-10-27
  19. ^ Australian Research Council Fund Allocation Table. Retrieved on 2006-08-01.
  20. ^ [5]
  21. ^ "University Cuts Staff and Arts Degrees", Village Voice, 2007-05-28.
  22. ^ UNSW Analytical Centre
  23. ^ Norman Swan, "Follow up on Bruce Hall Affair", ABC Radio National, February 2, 2004.
  24. ^ "Decision announced in Hall matter", UNSW Media Release, December 23, 2003. Retrieved on November 27, 2007.
  25. ^ Linda Doherty & Matthew Thompson, "On his uni highway, Hume became roadkill", The Sydney Morning Herald, April 10, 2004. Retrieved on November 27, 2007.
  26. ^ Norman Swan, "Controversy over Prof. Hall's scientific research continues, ABC, February 2, 2004.
  27. ^ Peta Donald, "University of NSW Vice Chancellor to resign, ABC, April 8, 2004.
  28. ^ "Statement from the Chancellor", UNSW Media Release, April 8, 2004. Retrieved on November 27, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 177th day of the year (178th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 197th day of the year (198th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 357th day of the year (358th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... April 8 is the 98th day of the year (99th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Willis, A.H. (1983). The University of New South Wales: The Baxter Years. ISBN 0-86840-057-2. 

See also

This is a list of University of New South Wales, Australia, people, including notable alumni and staff. ... NIDA logo The NIDA complex The National Institute of Dramatic Art (NIDA) is an Australian national training institute for students of theatre, film, and television, based in the Sydney suburb of Kensington. ... National ICT Australia (also known as NICTA) is Australias national ICT research instituion. ...

External links

  • Official website University of New South Wales
  • UNSW Australian Graduate School of Management
  • Source
  • UNSW Student Guild
  • UNSW Sports Association
  • COFA Students Association
  • Campus map
  • Audit report on the University of New South Wales
  • More on the Atomic Fabrication Facility (AFF), the National Magnet Laboratory (NML) and the Semiconductor Nanofabrication Facility (SNF)
  • Google Maps satellite image of the Kensington Campus
  • Google Maps satellite image of the Canberra Campus

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of New South Wales - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2017 words)
The University of New South Wales is a university in Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
UNSW was founded in 1949 as the "New South Wales University of Technology".
The UNSW Faculty of Law is comprised of the School of Law, the Australian School of Taxation (Atax), a community legal centre, a centre for continuing legal education, and 12 affiliated research and specialist legal centres.
University of New South Wales Revues - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1708 words)
In 1999, the show was held in the university union's Roundhouse building, an innovation the tech crew have undertaken never to repeat.
Other revues at the university are held from time to time: students from New College, the Faculty of the Built Environment and the university's Buddhist club organise smaller-scale shows.
A rival medical-student revue called UNSW Medshow (or sometimes Med Show) was established in 2001 by former Med Revuer Neil Jeyasingham, and has been held annually since.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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