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Encyclopedia > University of Montpellier

The University of Montpellier, (Université de Montpellier), is a French university in Montpellier. A professor giving a lecture at the Helsinki University of Technology A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Location within France Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ...


It is considerably older than its formal founding date, associated with a bull issued by Pope Nicholas IV in 1289, combining all the long-existing schools into a university. Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (September 30, 1227 - April 4, 1292), was pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292, a native of Ascoli and a Franciscan monk, had been legate to the Greeks under Pope Gregory X in 1272, succeeded St Bonaventura as general of his order in...


It is not known exactly when the schools of liberal arts were founded that developed into the Montpellier faculty of arts; it may be that they were a direct continuation of the Gallo-Roman schools that gathered around masters of rhetoric. The school of law was founded by Placentinus, from the school of law at Bologna, who came to Montpellier in 1160, taught there during two different periods, and died there in 1192. The faculty of law has had a long career. Professors from Montpellier were prominent in the drafting of the Napoleonic Code, the civil code by which France is still guided and a foundation for modern law codes wherever Napoleonic influence extended. The faculty of law was reorganized in 1998. This article covers the culture of Romanized areas of Gaul. ... The University of Bologna (Università di Bologna, UNIBO) is a university in Bologna, Italy. ... Location within France Montpellier (Occitan Montpelhièr) is a city in the south of France. ... The original Napoleonic Code, or Code Napoléon (originally called the Code civil des francais, or civil code of the French), was the French civil code, established at the behest of Napoléon. ...


The famous school of medicine was founded perhaps by Jews trained in the Spanish medical schools; it is certain that, as early as 1137, there were excellent physicians at Montpellier. The school of medicine owed its success to a policy of the Guilhem lords of Montpellier, by which any licensed physician might lecture there: with no fixed limit to the number of teachers, lectures multiplied, and there was a great choice of teachers. The statutes given in 1220 by Cardinal Conrad von Urach, legate of Pope Honorius III, which were confirmed and extended in 1240, placed this school under the direction of the Bishop of Maguelonne, but the school enjoyed a great deal of de facto autonomy. Rabelais took his medical degree at Montpellier, and his portrait hangs among the gallery of professors. The botanical garden, founded in 1593, is the oldest in France. It was in this school that the biological theory of vitalism, elaborated by Barthez (1734-1806), had its origin. The French Revolution did not interrupt the existence of the faculty of medicine.The Benedictine monastery that had been converted into the bishop's palace, was given to house the medical school in 1795. A gallery devoted to the portraits of professors since 1239 contains one of Rabelais. Honorius III, né Cencio Savelli (1148 – March 18, 1227), was pope from 1216 to 1227. ... François Rabelais (ca. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Inside the United States Botanic Garden Inside Kew Gardens Palm House Botanical gardens (in Latin hortus botanicus) grow a wide variety of plants both for scientific purposes and for the enjoyment and education of visitors. ... Vitalism is the doctrine that life cannot be explained solely by mechanism. ...


The school of theology had its origins in lectures in the convents: St. Anthony of Padua, Raymond Lulles, and the Dominican Bernard de la Treille all lectured. Two letters of King John prove that a faculty of theology existed at Montpellier independently of the convents, in January, 1350. By a Bull of 17 December, 1421, Martin V granted canonical institution to this faculty and united it closely with the faculty of law. Saint Anthony of Padua Saint Anthony of Padua, also venerated as Anthony of Lisbon, particularly in Portugal (August 15, 1195 - June 13, 1231) is a Catholic saint born in Lisbon as Fernando de Bulhões, to a wealthy family. ...


In the 16th century the local triumph of Calvinism interrupted the somewhat somnolent Catholic school of theology, which was reinstated in 1622; but the rivalries of Dominicans and Jesuits interfered seriously with the prosperity of the faculty, which disappeared at the Revolution. In better days, among Montpellier's illustrious pupils of law were Petrarch, who spent four years at Montpellier, and among its lecturers were William of Nogaret, chancellor to Philip IV, Guillaume de Grimoard, afterwards Pope Urban V, and Pedro de Luna, afterwards antipope Benedict XIII. From the c. ... Guillaume de Nogaret (1260-70 - 1313) was councillor and keeper of the seal to Philip IV of France. ... Philippe IV, recumbent statue on his tomb, Royal Necropolis, Saint Denis Basilica Philip IV (French: Philippe IV; 1268–November 29, 1314) was King of France from 1285 until his death. ... Urban V, né Guillaume de Grimoald (1310 - December 19, 1370), pope from 1362 to 1370, was a native of Grisae in Languedoc. ... For Pedro de Luna, see Antipope Benedict XIII. Benedict XIII, born Pietro Francesco Orsini, and later in religion Vincenzo Maria Orsini (Gravina di Puglia, February 2, 1649 - February 23, 1730) was pope from 1724 to 1730. ...


The faculties of science and of letters were re-established in 1810; that of law in 1880.


The modern University of Montpellier II concentrates in science and technology. The Paul-Valéry University "Montpellier III" completes the trio of universities in the old city.


See also


For medieval universities in Asia see Medieval university (Asia). ...

Coimbra Group
(of European research universities)
Coimbra Group
Aarhus | Barcelona | Bergen | Bologna | Bristol | Budapest | Cambridge | Coimbra | Dublin | Edinburgh | Galway | Geneva | Göttingen | Granada | Graz | Groningen | Heidelberg | Jena | Kraków | Leiden | Leuven | Louvain | Lyon | Montpellier | Oxford | Padua | Pavia | Poitiers | Prague | Salamanca | Siena | Tartu | Thessaloniki | Turku I | Turku II | Uppsala | Würzburg

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Montpellier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (622 words)
The University of Montpellier (French: Université de Montpellier) is a French university in Montpellier.
The university is considerably older than its formal founding date, associated with a bull issued by Pope Nicholas IV in 1289, combining all the long-existing schools into a university.
Professors from Montpellier were prominent in the drafting of the Napoleonic Code, the civil code by which France is still guided and a foundation for modern law codes wherever Napoleonic influence extended.
Montpellier - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1748 words)
William VII of Montpellier established a faculty of medicine in 1180, recognised by Pope Nicholas IV; the city's university was established in 1220 and was one of the chief centers for the teaching of medicine.
Montpellier remained a possession of the crown of Aragon until it passed to James III of Majorca, who sold the city to the French king Philip VI in 1349, to raise funds for his ongoing struggle with Peter IV of Aragon.
The University of Montpellier is one of the oldest in France, having been granted a charter in 1220 by Cardinal Conrad von Urach and confirmed by Pope Nicholas IV in a papal bull of 1289.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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