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Encyclopedia > University of Mississippi
University of Mississippi
(Ole Miss)
University of Mississippi logo

Motto: Pro scientia et sapientia
Motto in English: On behalf of knowledge and wisdom
Established: 1848
Type: Public, Co-ed
Endowment: $495,000,000 as of 06-30-2007[1]
Chancellor: Robert Khayat
Students: 17,323 [2]
Location: Oxford, Mississippi

(34.3663° N 89.5368° WCoordinates: 34.3663° N 89.5368° W)
Campus: Rural 1,000+ acres
Sports teams: Rebels
Colors: Harvard Crimson and Yale Blue           
(adopted in 1893)[3]
Mascot: Colonel Reb
Website: www.olemiss.edu

The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. Founded in 1848, the school is composed of the main campus in Oxford and three branch campuses located in Booneville, Tupelo, and Southaven. UM maintains a field station in Bay Springs as well as the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson. Additionally, it is both a sea-grant and space-grant institute. Image File history File links OleMissCrest. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Dr. Robert Khayat is the 15th Chancellor of the University of Mississippi. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... For other uses, see Crimson (disambiguation). ... Yale Blue – the dark blue color used in association with Yale University – varies with use and history. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Origin of Colonel Reb Blind Jim Ivy Noted University of Mississippi historian David Sansing has long pointed out that the model for the original Colonel Rebel emblem was a black man. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... This article is about the concept. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Booneville is a city located in Prentiss County, Mississippi. ... Tupelo (IPA: [tu:pəlo]) is the largest city and county seat within Lee County, Mississippi. ... Southaven, a city in DeSoto County, Mississippi, is a suburb of Memphis, Tennessee. ... Bay Springs is a city in Jasper County, Mississippi, United States. ... This article is about Jackson, the city and related subjects within the city. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ...


Sixty-nine percent of undergraduates are from Mississippi, and nineteen percent of all students are minorities. International students come from sixty-six nations.

Contents

History

The Lyceum

The University got its nickname Ole Miss via a contest in 1897. That same year, the student year book was being published for the first time. As a way to find a name for the book, a contest was held to solicit suggestions from the student body. Elma Meek, a student at the time, submitted the winning entry of Ole Miss. Interestingly, Ole Miss is not derived from Mississippi but is actually a takeoff from the title often given to the mistress of a plantation. [4] This sobriquet was chosen not only for the yearbook, but also became the name by which the University is now affectionately known.[5] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Ventress Hall
Ventress Hall
Civil Rights Monument (statue of James Meredith) on the Ole Miss campus.
Civil Rights Monument (statue of James Meredith) on the Ole Miss campus.

The Lyceum, built in 1848, is the oldest building on campus. In its first year, it housed all of the classrooms and faculty offices of the university. The Lyceum is now the home of the university's administration offices. The columned facade of the Lyceum is represented on the official crest of the university, along with the date of establishment. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


The School of Medicine, which was originally located at the eastern gate of the campus, was used as a hospital during the Civil War for both Union and Confederate soldiers, especially those who were wounded at the battle of Shiloh. The School of Medicine is now located in Jackson, Mississippi and the original building, which served as a dormitory for male students in its last years before being condemned in the early 1970s, was replaced by a new Chemistry building in the mid 1970s. Soldiers who died in the campus hospital were buried in a mass grave located at the northeast corner of the Coliseum which was built nearly 100 years later as a venue for concerts and basketball games. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... In this map:  Union states prohibiting slavery  Union territories  Border states on the Union side which allowed slavery  Kansas, which entered and fought with the Union as a free state after the Bleeding Kansas crisis  The Confederacy  Confederate claimed and sometimes held territories During the American Civil War, the Union... Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God, Our Vindicator) Anthem (none official) God Save the South (unofficial) The Bonnie Blue Flag (unofficial) Dixie (unofficial)  States that seceded under CSA control  States and territories claimed by CSA without formal secession and/or control Capital Montgomery, Alabama (until May 29, 1861) Richmond, Virginia... Belligerents United States (Union) CSA (Confederacy) Commanders Ulysses S. Grant, Don Carlos Buell Albert Sidney Johnston â€ , P.G.T. Beauregard Strength Army of West Tennessee (48,894), Army of the Ohio (17,918)[1] Army of Mississippi (44,699)[1] Casualties and losses 13,047: 1,754 killed, 8,408...


With the outbreak of the Civil War, classes were interrupted when the entire student body and many faculty from Ole Miss enlisted in the Confederate army. Their company, Company A, 11th Mississippi Infantry, was nicknamed the University Grays, and suffered a high casualty rate during The Civil War. A great number of those casualties occurred during Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg on July 3, 1863, when the University Grays made the deepest encroachment into Union territory. Some of the soldiers actually crossed the Union defensive fortification wall, only to be killed, wounded or captured. On the very next day, July 4, Confederate forces surrendered at Vicksburg, Mississippi; the two battles together are commonly viewed as the turning point in the war. When Ole Miss re-opened, only one member of the University Greys was able to visit the university to address the student body. The university was led, during the post-war period, by former Confederate general A.P. Stewart, a Rogersville, Tennessee native, who was President from 1874-1886. The University Greys (or Grays) were Company A of the 11th Mississippi Infantry regiment in the Confederate Army during the American Civil War. ... Map of Picketts Charge, July 3, 1863. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America Commanders George G. Meade Robert E. Lee Strength 93,921[1] 71,699[2] Casualties 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured/missing)[1] 23,231 (4,708 killed, 12,693 wounded, 5,830 captured/missing... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Combatants United States of America Confederate States of America Commanders Ulysses S. Grant John C. Pemberton Strength 77,000[1] ~30,000 Casualties 4,855[2] 32,697 (29,495 surrendered)[2] The Battle of Vicksburg, or Siege of Vicksburg, was the final significant battle in the Vicksburg Campaign of... The historic Mississippi River Commission Building in Vicksburg, constructed in 1894 Vicksburg is a city in Warren County, Mississippi. ... This does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... General A.P. Stewart, 1821-1908, was an Army officer, college professor, and Chancellor of the University of Mississippi Alexander Peter Stewart (October 2, 1821 – August 30, 1908) was a U.S. Army officer, college professor, general in the Confederate States Army during the American Civil War, and the Chancellor... Rogersville is a town located in Hawkins County, Tennessee. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...

James Meredith walking to class at the University of Mississippi, accompanied by U.S. Marshals.
James Meredith walking to class at the University of Mississippi, accompanied by U.S. Marshals.

The University of Mississippi was also the site of rioting during desegregation, when James Meredith of Kosciusko, Mississippi, attempted to enroll in the school to become the university's first black student. Thousands of students and citizens from the surrounding area, a number of whom were armed, swarmed the campus on September 30, 1962 in a riotous effort to prevent Meredith's enrollment. Meredith, thanks to the protection afforded by federal marshals, was able to enroll and attend his first class on October 2. Two people died during the race riots on campus. Following the riot, elements of an Army National Guard division were stationed in Oxford to preserve the peace. While most Ole Miss students did not riot prior to his official enrollment in the university, many harassed Meredith during his first two semesters on campus. Though the majority of students accepted Meredith's presence, according to first person accounts chronicled in Nadine Cohodas's book The Band Played Dixie, students living in Meredith's dorm bounced basketballs on the floor just above his room through all hours of the night. When Meredith walked into the cafeteria for meals, the students eating would all turn their backs. If Meredith sat at a table with other students, all of whom were white, the students would immediately get up and go to another table. Because of this incident, the university itself is mentioned in Billy Joel's history themed song "We Didn't Start the Fire" ("Ole Miss").
Image File history File links Download high resolution version (952x598, 148 KB)James Meredith walking to class at University of Mississippi, accompanied by U.S. marshals. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (952x598, 148 KB)James Meredith walking to class at University of Mississippi, accompanied by U.S. marshals. ... “U.S. Marshals” redirects here. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity... Meredith walking to class accompanied by U.S. marshals James Howard Meredith (born June 25, 1933) is an American civil rights movement figure, although he vocally prefers not to be regarded as such. ... Kosciusko is a city in Attala County, Mississippi, United States. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Teamsters, armed with pipes, riot in a clash with riot police in the Minneapolis Teamsters Strike of 1934. ... Seal of the Army National Guard The Army National Guard consists of the land force of the United States National Guard, or organized militia, of the several States and Territories, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia, active and inactive, as defined in Title 32, USC Section 101. ... William Joseph Martin Billy Joel (born May 9, 1949) is an American singer, pianist, songwriter, composer and musician. ... We Didnt Start the Fire is a song by Billy Joel that references a catalog of headline events during his lifetime, from March 1949 to 1989, when the song was released on his album Storm Front. ...


Academics

Divisions of the University

The degree-granting divisions located at the Main Campus:

  • School of Accountancy
  • School of Applied Sciences
  • School of Business Administration
  • School of Education
  • School of Engineering
  • College of Liberal Arts
  • School of Nursing (added 2006)
  • Graduate School
  • School of Law
  • School of Pharmacy - created in 1908

The colleges in the University of Mississippi Medical Center in Jackson: // The School of Business Administration at the University of Mississippi is a leading business school in the South. ... The University of Mississippi School of Engineering was officially established in 1900 as part of the University of Mississippi in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... University of Mississippi Medical Center is part of the University of Mississippi (Ole Miss). ...

  • School of Dentistry
  • School of Health Related Professions
  • School of Nursing
  • School of Medicine

Statistics

  • The University of Mississippi is among the top 30 public institutions with the largest endowments per student.
  • The University of Mississippi has produced 24 Rhodes Scholars and has also produced one Fulbright, one Marshall, five Truman, and seven Goldwater Scholars since 1998.
  • The University of Mississippi is ranked by The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as one of the top 100 Research Extensive institutions in the nation.
  • The School of Pharmacy ranks 20th in the nation among schools of pharmacy for funding from the prestigious National Institutes of Health and 2nd among pharmacy schools for total federal funding.
  • The University of Mississippi's School of Accountancy is ranked 22nd in the nation.
  • The University of Mississippi's Sally McDonnell-Barksdale Honors College (founded and supported by Jim Barksdale in honor of his late wife) was ranked one of the top 3 honors colleges in the nation by Reader's Digest.[6]
  • The University of Mississippi Medical Center was recently granted a secondary nursing program, which is a program for first semester nursing students who already have a degree. It is the only school in Mississippi with this type of grant.
  • In 2006, the average ACT score of entering freshmen at the University of Mississippi (excluding the UM Medical Center) was 23.0.[7]

Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... The official logo of the Marshall Scholarship is a blended image of the US and UK flags. ... President Harry S. Truman The Harry S. Truman Scholarship is a federal scholarship granted to U.S. college juniors for demonstrated leadership potential and a commitment to public service. ... Barry Goldwater Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a United States politician who was a founding figure in the modern American conservatism movement in the USA. Goldwater personified the shift in balance in American politics from the Northeast to the West. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ... Jim Barksdale was the president and CEO of Netscape Communications Corporation from January 1995 until the company merged with AOL in March 1999. ...

Student Media

  • The Daily Mississippian is the student-published newspaper of The University, established in 1937. Although The Daily Mississippian (DM) is located on the Ole Miss campus, it is operated largely as an independent newspaper run by students. The DM is the only college newpaper in Mississippi that is published five times a week. The editorial staff consists of approximately 15 students, along with a staff of 15-20 writers and 5 photographers, though these numbers vary from year to year and semester to semester. There is also an entire department devoted entirely to advertising sales and production. With a circulation of 15,000, it is one of the largest college newspapers in the country. The paper also runs The DM Online, one of the few online college newspapers that is independent of the print edition. With an independent staff and editor in chief, The DM Online is dedicated to strengthening the publications of Ole Miss through multimedia interaction.[8]
  • The Ole Miss student yearbook is a 415-page color book produced by students with faculty advice. It has won various awards including the Gold Crown.[9]
  • WUMS-FM 92.1 Rebel Radio, operated by students, is a 3,000-watt FCC-commercially licensed radio station.
  • NewsWatch is the only student-produced, live newscast in the state of Mississippi. Broadcast through the Metrocast cable company, it is live at 5:30 Monday-Friday.[10]

These five publications are a part of the S. Gale Denley Student Media Center at Ole Miss. The Daily Mississippian, commonly called The DM, is the student newspaper of the University of Mississippi. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ...


Facts

Archie Manning's uniform number as the official speed limit on campus.
Archie Manning's uniform number as the official speed limit on campus.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Archie Elisha Manning (born May 19, 1949 in Drew, Mississippi) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Blues is a vocal and instrumental musical form which evolved from African American spirituals, shouts, work songs and chants and has its earliest stylistic roots in West Africa. ... Riley B. King aka B. B. King (b. ... Archie Elisha Manning (born May 19, 1949 in Drew, Mississippi) is a former American football quarterback in the National Football League. ... Cover of a NIDA educational booklet. ... This article is about the plant genus Cannabis. ... The Compassionate Investigational New Drug program, or Compassionate IND, is the Investigational New Drug program allowing a limited number of patients to use National Institute on Drug Abuse-provided medical marijuana grown at the University of Mississippi. ... William Cuthbert Faulkner (born William Falkner), (September 25, 1897–July 6, 1962) was an American author. ... An Estate comprises the houses and outbuildings and supporting farmland and woods that surround the gardens and grounds of a very large property, such as a country house or mansion. ... Rowan Oak is William Faulkners former home in Oxford, Mississippi. ... Yoknapatawpha County is a fictional county created by American author William Faulkner as a setting for many of his novels. ... This article is about the entire Star Trek franchise. ... Dr. Leonard H. McCoy (nicknamed Bones), played by DeForest Kelley, is a character in the original Star Trek series, and the first six Star Trek films. ... This article is about a television show. ... Suzanne Sugarbaker Goff Dent Stonecipher is a character in the television series Designing Women and the sort-of spin-off series, Women of the House. ... For other uses, see Time to Kill (disambiguation) For the 1996 film, see A Time to Kill (film) A Time to Kill is the name of a legal suspense thriller authored by John Grisham in 1989. ... Grisham redirects here. ... Sandra Annette Bullock (born July 26, 1964) is a German-American film actress. ... For the lead singer of the UK indie band The Long Blondes, see Kate Jackson (singer). ... As the World Turns (ATWT) is the second longest-running American television soap opera (the first being Guiding Light),[1] airing each weekday on CBS Daytime. ... Anthony Herrera (born January 19, American actor. ... For the patriotically-themed comic book superheroines, see Miss America (comics). ... Susan Akin from Meridian, Mississippi, was Miss America 1986. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Mary Ann Mobley (born February 17, 1939 in Brandon, Mississippi) was Miss America in 1959, and later appeared in movies, including two with Elvis Presley; and on such television shows as Fantasy Island and The Love Boat. ... Lynda Lee Mead (born c. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... The Mississippi Teacher Corps (MTC) is a two-year teaching program that recruits college graduates to teach in critical-need areas of Mississippi, specifically in the Mississippi Delta and Jackson, Mississippi. ... The first intra-party debates between candidates for the 2008 Presidential election. ...

Athletics

Main article: Ole Miss Rebels

University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely...

Greek Life

Despite the relatively small number of Greek-letter organizations on campus, many students participate in Greek life at Ole Miss. The tradition of Greek life on the Oxford campus is a deep-seated one. In fact, the first fraternity founded in the South was the W.W.W. (or Rainbow Society), founded at Ole Miss in 1848, which went on to charter other chapters across the South. The fraternity merged with Delta Tau Delta in 1886.[13] Delta Gamma national sorority was founded in 1872 at the Lewis School for Girls in nearby Oxford. Today, sorority chapters are very large, with many boasting of around 250 active members. Recruitment is fiercely competitive and potential sorority members are encouraged to secure personal recommendations from Ole Miss sorority alumna in order to increase the chances of receiving an invitation to join one of the 9 NPC sororities on campus. Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ...

NPC Sororities

NPHC Organizations Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Alpha Omicron Pi (ΑΟΠ, AOII) is an international womens fraternity that was founded on January 2, 1897 at Barnard College on the campus of Columbia University in New York. ... Alpha Xi Delta (ΑΞΔ) was founded in 1893 by ten women at Lombard College, Galesburg, Illinois, who shared a vision of an organization dedicated to the personal growth of women. ... Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Delta Zeta (ΔΖ) is a college sorority founded on October 24, 1902, at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) was the first sorority founded at the State Female Normal School (now Longwood University), in Farmville, Virginia. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest female fraternal organization established in the United States, after the Adelphean Society (now Alpha Delta Pi). ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Zeta Tau Alpha (ΖΤΑ) is a womens fraternity, founded October 15, 1898 at what used to be State Female Normal School but is now known as Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ...

Fraternities Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΆΚΆ) is the first Greek-lettered sorority established and incorporated by African-American college women. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Omega Psi Phi (ΩΨΦ) is a national fraternity, and was the first black national fraternal organization to be founded at a historically black college. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Sigma Gamma Rho (ΣΓΡ) was founded on November 12, 1922, by seven educators in Indianapolis, Indiana. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority, Inc. ...

ATΩ (Alpha Tau Omega) (commonly known as ATO, Taus, Alpha Taus) is an American social fraternity that annually ranks among the top ten national fraternities for numbers of chapters and total number of members. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Chi Psi, ΧΨ is a fraternity consisting of more than 30 chapters (known as alphas) at American colleges and universities. ... St. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class who, upon hearing that some but not all of them had been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon), instead... Delta Tau Delta (ΔΤΔ, DTD, or Delts) is a U.S.-based international college fraternity. ... Kappa Alpha Order (commonly known as KA) is a collegiate Order of Knights and American social fraternity. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 116 chapters and 5 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Phi Kappa Tau (ΦΚΤ) is a U.S. national college fraternity // Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity (commonly called Phi Tau) was founded in the Union Literary Society Hall of Miami Universitys Old Main Building in Oxford, Ohio on March 17, 1906. ... Phi Kappa Theta (ΦΚΘ) is a national social fraternity with over 50 chapters and colonies at universities across the United States. ... Alpha Sigma Phi (ΑΣΦ, commonly abbreviated to Alpha Sig) is a social fraternity with 68 active chapters, colonies, and interest groups. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Pi (ΣΠ) is an international college social fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ... ZBT redirects here. ...

Noteworthy alumni

Main article: List of University of Mississippi notable alumni

See also

University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely...

External links

References

  1. ^ University of Mississippi Foundation Statistics
  2. ^ Official website
  3. ^ Ole Miss Traditions
  4. ^ Chodas, Nadine. The Band Played Dixie: Race and Liberal Conscience at Ole Miss.
  5. ^ The Ole Miss Student Yearbook
  6. ^ http://www.rd.com/best-of-america-sally-mcdonnell-barksdale-/article36185.html
  7. ^ http://www.ihl.state.ms.us/research/fast_facts_0607.pdf
  8. ^ The DM
  9. ^ The Ole Miss
  10. ^ NewsWatch
  11. ^ The Clarion-Ledger: University lands first of 3 debates; Accessed November 20, 2007
  12. ^ 2008 Presidential Debate | The University of Mississippi - Official Home Page
  13. ^ The New York Times: Two secret societies united, Delta Tau Delta and the Rainbow Society join hands; Published March 28, 1885; Accessed December 08, 2007
  14. ^ a b c Brown, LaRaye. "Ole Miss punishes fraternity", The Clarion-Ledger, 2007-04-04. Retrieved on 2007-04-04. 
The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Athletic teams at The University of Alabama are known as the Crimson Tide. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... (The) LadyBacks refers to any of the womens sports teams that competes officially for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 24,100 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the second largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... Auburn Tigers is the name given to Auburn University athletic teams. ... For other uses, see LSU. Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College, generally known as Louisiana State University or LSU, is a public, coeducational university located in Baton Rouge, Louisiana and the main campus of the Louisiana State University System. ... LSU (Louisiana State University) is a member of the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) and the Southeastern Conference. ... University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles (200 km) northeast of Jackson and 23 miles (37 km) west of Columbus. ... The Mississippi State Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Mississippi State University. ... Alcorn State University, located near Lorman, Mississippi, United States, is a public land grant university. ... Delta State University is a regional public university located in Cleveland, Mississippi, in the heart of the Mississippi Delta; one of eight publicly funded universities in the state. ... Jackson State University, often abridged as Jackson State or by its initials JSU is a historically black university located in Jackson, Mississippi founded in 1877. ... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles (200 km) northeast of Jackson and 23 miles (37 km) west of Columbus. ... Mississippi University for Women, also known as MUW or sipmly the W is a four-year coeducational public university located in Columbus, Mississippi. ... Mississippi Valley State University is a historically black university located in Itta Bena, Mississippi. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Copiah-Lincoln Community College (Co-Lin) is a junior college with campuses in Wesson and Natchez, Mississippi. ... East Mississippi Community College (EMCC), formerly known as East Mississippi Junior College, is a community college in Mississippi with five campuses. ... The main campus of Hinds Community College is located in Raymond, Mississippi, about five miles west of Jackson, Mississippi, the state capital. ... Holmes Community College traces its origin to 1911 when plans were made to establish Holmes County Agricultural High School in Goodman, Mississippi. ... Itawamba Community College, formerly known as Itawamba Junior College, is a community college in Mississippi, United States, with two campuses; the main campus is located in Fulton, and a branch campus in Tupelo that mainly handles technical education programs. ... Meridian Community College is a two-year public community college in Meridian, Mississippi (USA). ... Mississippi Delta Community College is a community college in Moorhead, Mississippi. ... MGCCC Logo Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College consists of four campuses and four centers: the main campus, located in Perkinston, Mississippi, the Jackson County Campus, in Gautier, The Jefferson Davis Campus, in Gulfport, the Community Campus, a non-traditional campus without walls, George County Center in Lucedale, West Harrison County... Northeast Mississippi Community College is a community college located in Booneville, Mississippi in the United States. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Pearl River Community College http://www. ...

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