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Encyclopedia > University of Michigan
The University of Michigan

Motto: Artes, Scientia, Veritas ("Arts, Knowledge, Truth")
Established: 1817
Type: Flagship
Public
Sea grant
Space grant
Endowment: US $7.1 billion[1]
President: Mary Sue Coleman
Faculty: 6,238
Students: 41,042
Undergraduates: 26,083
Postgraduates: 14,959
Location: Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.
Campus: 3,176 acres (12.85 km²)
Total: 20,965 acres (84.84 km²), including arboretum
Sports: Wolverines
Colors: Maize and Blue            
Nickname: U of M, Michigan, Wolverines
Website: www.umich.edu
University of Michigan "Block M"

The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. The university was founded in 1817 in Detroit, about 20 years before the territory of Michigan officially became a state, and moved to Ann Arbor in 1837. Today, it is the state's oldest university and the flagship campus of the University of Michigan system, which now has two satellite campuses — the University of Michigan-Flint and the University of Michigan-Dearborn. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... A flagship university is a term that usually refers to the leading comprehensive public research university in a given U.S. state. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Mary Sue Coleman (born October 2, 1943 in Kentucky) is the current president of the University of Michigan, having served since 2002. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Ann Arbor redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... Sum redirects here. ... The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association, and womens water polo, which... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Corn is a color that resembles corn. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Detroit redirects here. ... Ann Arbor redirects here. ... The University of Michigan-Flint, located in Flint, Michigan, USA, is one of three campuses in the University of Michigan system. ... The University of Michigan-Dearborn, located in Dearborn, Michigan, USA, is part of the University of Michigan system. ...


The university is internationally renowned for its academics. In its last published survey in 1995, the National Research Council ranked UM third in the United States in a study that aggregated evaluations of 41 graduate disciplines[2] and is considered as one of the original eight Public Ivys.[3] The university also has one of the largest research expenditures of any American university and one of the largest number of living alumni, at 420,000.[4] UM owns one of the most well-regarded academic medical centers in the United States, the University of Michigan Health System.[5] The university is also recognized for its history of student activism and its athletic teams, notably in football, men's basketball, and ice hockey. The United States National Research Council puts out a ranking of United States graduate programs about every 10 years, although the time elapsed between each new ranking has exceeded 10 years. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... The University of Michigan Health System is the wholly-owned academic medical center of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ...


Despite being a public institution, the University of Michigan is known for its high student fees; in 2007, tuition for out-of-state students was the most expensive in the country.[6] The university has also been at the center of a national controversy involving the use of affirmative action in admissions. Though the university successfully affirmed before the U.S. Supreme Court that consideration of race as a factor in admissions to universities was constitutional for the holistic Law School admissions process in 2003,[7] the Supreme Court also expressed an opinion on the degree to which race could be used by striking down the policy for undergraduate admissions in a separate court case. The former policy automatically awarded 20 points to underrepresented minority applicants in its points-based system.[8] Michigan voters responded by approving restrictions on affirmative action in public universities and governmental hiring in November 2006, forcing the university to cease using race and gender as criteria for admissions.[9] Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Race and ethnicity in the United States Census, as defined by the United States Census Bureau and the Federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), is a self-identification data item in which residents choose the race or races with which they most closely identify. ... MCRIs executive director Jennifer Gratz The Michigan Civil Rights Initiative (MCRI), or Proposal 2 (Michigan 06-2), was a ballot initiative in the U.S. state of Michigan that passed into Michigan Constitutional law by a 58% to 42% margin on November 7, 2006, according to results officially certified...

History

The University of Michigan, was established in Detroit in 1817 as the Catholepistemiad, or University of Michigania, by the governor and judges of Michigan Territory. Ann Arbor had set aside 40 acres (16 ha) that it hoped would become the site for a new state capitol, but it offered this land to the university when Lansing was chosen as the state capital. The university moved to Ann Arbor in 1837. The original 40 acres became part of the current Central Campus. The first classes in Ann Arbor were held in 1841, with six freshmen and a sophomore, taught by two professors. Eleven students graduated in the first commencement in 1845. By 1866, enrollment increased to 1,205 students, many of whom were Civil War veterans. Women were first admitted in 1870, making UM the first major university to do so (and the third college overall, after Oberlin College in 1833 and Lawrence University in 1847). James B. Angell, who served as the university's president from 1871 to 1909, aggressively expanded UM's curriculum to include professional studies in dentistry, architecture, engineering, government, and medicine. UM also became the first American university to use the seminar method of study.[10] The history of the University of Michigan (U-M) began with its establishment in 1817 by the Michigan Territorial legislature. ... From 1805-1818, the western border was a line through Lake Michigan. ... Location in Ingham County, Michigan1 Coordinates: Country United States State Michigan County Ingham, Eaton Settled 1835 Incorporation 1859 Government  - Type Strong Mayor-Council  - Mayor Virg Bernero (D) Area  - City  35. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... Oberlin College is a highly selective liberal arts college in Oberlin, Ohio, in the United States. ... Lawrence University, located in Appleton, Wisconsin, is a private undergraduate college founded in 1847. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ...

The Central Campus Diag, viewed from the Graduate Library, looking North.
The Central Campus Diag, viewed from the Graduate Library, looking North.

From 1900 to 1920 many new facilities were constructed on campus, including facilities for the dental and pharmacy programs, a chemistry building, a building for the natural sciences, Hill Auditorium, large hospital and library complexes, and two residence halls. The university fortified its reputation for research in 1920 by reorganizing the College of Engineering and forming an advisory committee of 100 industrialists to guide academic research initiatives. UM's reputation as an elite national university also began to grow at this time. The university became a favorite alternative choice for Jewish students from New York in the 1920s and 1930s when the Ivy League schools were applying a quota to the number of Jews to be admitted.[11] As a result, UM gained the nickname "Harvard of the West," which became commonly parodied in reverse after John F. Kennedy referred to himself as "a graduate of the Michigan of the East, Harvard University" in his speech proposing the formation of the Peace Corps.[12] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 141 KB) Summary Central Campus Diag at the University of Michigan, looking towards the Rackham School of Graduate Studies. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 141 KB) Summary Central Campus Diag at the University of Michigan, looking towards the Rackham School of Graduate Studies. ... Hill Auditorium in early spring. ... The North Campus Diag, looking towards (from right to left) the EECS Building, G.G. Brown, and H. H. Dow Building (hidden by trees) The University of Michigan College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ...


During World War II, UM's research grew to include U.S. Navy projects such as proximity fuzes, PT boats, and radar jamming. By 1950, enrollment had reached 21,000, of whom 7,700 were veterans supported by the G.I. Bill. As the Cold War and the Space Race took hold, UM became a major recipient of government grants for strategic research and helped to develop peacetime uses for nuclear energy. At present, much of that work, as well as research into alternative energy sources, is pursued via the Memorial Phoenix Project.[13] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... USN redirects here. ... A proximity fuze (also called a VT fuze, for variable time) is a fuze that is designed to detonate an explosive automatically when the distance to target becomes smaller than a predetermined value or when the target passes through a given plane. ... PT boats in line astern. ... Radar jamming is the intentional emission of radio frequency signals to interfere with the operation of a radar by saturating its receiver with false information. ... The Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 (better known as the G.I. Bill) provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G.I.s) as well as one year of unemployment compensation. ... For other uses, see Cold War (disambiguation). ... For a list of key events, see Timeline of space exploration. ... This article concerns the energy stored in the nuclei of atoms; for the use of nuclear fission as a power source, see Nuclear power. ...


On October 14, 1960, Presidential candidate John F. Kennedy proposed the concept of what became the Peace Corps on the steps of Michigan Union.[14] Lyndon B. Johnson's speech outlining his Great Society program also occurred at UM.[14] Also during the 1960s, UM saw many protests by student groups. On March 24, 1965, a group of UM faculty members and 3,000 students held the nation's first ever faculty-led "teach-in" to protest against American policy in Southeast Asia.[15][16] In response to a series of sit-ins in 1966 by Voice–the campus political party of Students for a Democratic Society–UM's administration banned sit-ins. This stimulated 1,500 students to conduct a further one-hour sit-in in the LSA Building, which then housed administrative offices. Former UM student and noted architect Alden B. Dow designed the current Fleming Administration Building, which was completed in 1968. The building's plans were drawn in the early 1960s, before student activism prompted a concern for safety. Nevertheless, the Fleming Building's narrow windows, all located above the first floor, and fortress-like exterior led to a campus rumor that it was designed to be riot-proof. Dow denied those rumors, claiming the small windows were designed to be energy efficient.[17] is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Crisis corps be merged into this article or section. ... LBJ redirects here. ... The Great Society was also a 1960s band featuring Grace Slick, and a 1914 book by English social theorist Graham Wallas. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A sit-in or sit-down is a form of direct action that involves one or more persons nonviolently occupying an area for protest, often to promote political, social, or economic change. ... Alden B. Dow (b. ...

Law Quadrangle
Law Quadrangle

During the 1970s, severe budget constraints challenged the university's physical development; however, the 1980s saw a surge in funds devoted to research in the social and physical sciences. Meanwhile, the university's involvement in the anti-missile Strategic Defense Initiative and investments in South Africa caused controversy on campus. During the 1980s and 1990s, the university devoted substantial resources to renovating its massive hospital complex and improving the academic facilities on the North Campus. The university also emphasized the development of computer and information technology throughout the campus. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 323 KB) Summary View across the Quad of the Lawyers Club dorms at the University of Michigan Law School. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 323 KB) Summary View across the Quad of the Lawyers Club dorms at the University of Michigan Law School. ... The Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) was proposed by U.S. President Ronald Reagan on March 23, 1983[1] to use ground-based and space-based systems to protect the United States from attack by strategic nuclear ballistic missiles. ...


In the early 2000s, UM also faced declining state funding due to state budget shortfalls. At the same time, the university attempted to maintain its high academic standing while keeping tuition costs affordable. There were also disputes between UM's administration and labor unions, notably with the Lecturers' Employees Organization (LEO) and the Graduate Employees Organization (GEO), the union representing graduate student employees. These conflicts led to a series of one-day walkouts by the unions and their supporters.[18] Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ...

The Lawyer's Club
The Lawyer's Club

In 2003, two lawsuits involving UM's affirmative action admissions policy reached the U.S. Supreme Court (Grutter v. Bollinger and Gratz v. Bollinger). President George W. Bush took the unusual step of publicly opposing the policy before the court issued a ruling. The court found that race may be considered as a factor in university admissions in all public universities and private universities that accept federal funding. However, a point system was ruled as being unconstitutional. In the first case, the court upheld the Law School admissions policy, while in the second it ruled against the university's undergraduate admissions policy. The debate still continues, however, because in November 2006 Michigan voters passed proposal 2, banning most affirmative action in university admissions. Under that law race, gender, and national origin can no longer be considered in admissions.[9] UM and other organizations were granted a stay from implementation of the passed proposal soon after that election, and this has allowed time for proponents of affirmative action to decide legal and constitutional options in response to the election results. The university has stated it plans to continue to challenge the ruling; in the meantime, the admissions office states that it will attempt to achieve a diverse student body by looking at other factors such as whether the student attended a disadvantaged school, and the level of education of the student's parents.[9] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 406 KB) Summary Lawyers Club at the University of Michigan. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 406 KB) Summary Lawyers Club at the University of Michigan. ... Affirmative action is a policy or a program of giving preferential treatment to certain designated groups allegedly seeking to redress discrimination or bias through active measures, as in education and employment. ... The Supreme Court of the United States (sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[1]) is the highest judicial body in the United States and leads the federal judiciary. ... Holding University of Michigan Law School admissions program that gave special consideration for being a certain racial minority did not violate the Fourteenth Amendment. ... Holding A state universitys admission policy violated the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment because its ranking system gave an automatic point increase to all racial minorities rather than making individual determinations. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the forty-third and current President of the United States of America, originally inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... The University of Michigan Law School, located in Ann Arbor, is a unit of the University of Michigan. ... The MCRI (Michigan Civil Rights Initiative) seeks to end preferential treatment to any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, education, or contracting. ...


The August 1, 2006, publication of The Advocate College Guide for LGBT Students highlighted the University of Michigan as one of the 20 best campuses for LGBT students.[19] The guide acknowledged colleges and universities across the United States for making strides toward the advancement and integration of LGBT individuals via a wide variety of student support groups, resources, events, policies, and other efforts to create for them an overall exceptional educational climate. is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ...


Academic profile

Central Campus: Angell Hall, one of the major buildings of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.
Central Campus: Angell Hall, one of the major buildings of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts.

The university has 26,083 undergraduate and 14,959 graduate students [20] in 600 academic programs, and each year about 5,400 new students are enrolled. Students come from all 50 U.S. states and more than 100 countries.[21] 98% of the university's incoming class of 2006 earned a high school GPA of 3.0 and higher, while the middle 50% of the incoming class earned a high school GPA of 3.60 to 3.90.[22][23] The middle 50% of applicants reported an SAT score of about 1920–2180 and an ACT score of 27–31, with AP credit granted to over 3000 freshmen students.[24] About 22% of newly-enrolled undergraduates and 25% of all undergraduates are members of ethnic minority groups.[23] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 184 KB) Summary University of Michigan Angell Hall, which houses departments of the College of Literature, Science, and Arts. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 184 KB) Summary University of Michigan Angell Hall, which houses departments of the College of Literature, Science, and Arts. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ... The Advanced Placement Program is a program that offers college level courses at high schools across the United States and Canada. ... In sociology and in voting theory, a minority is a sub-group that is outnumbered by persons who do not belong to it. ...


About 65% of undergraduate students are enrolled in the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LS&A), while the College of Engineering has about 20%. Fewer than 3% of undergraduate students are enrolled in the Ross School of Business. The rest of the undergraduate students are enrolled in the smaller schools, including the School of Kinesiology, School of Nursing, the School of Natural Resources and Environment, and the School of Art and Design.[25] Most graduate students are enrolled in the Rackham Graduate School, the College of Engineering, the Law School, the Ross School of Business, and the Medical School. The Medical School is partnered with the University of Michigan Health System, which comprises the University's three hospitals, dozens of outpatient clinics, and many centers for medical care, research, and education. Other academic units include the Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning and the Schools of Dentistry, Education, Information, Music, Theatre & Dance, Natural Resources and Environment, Public Health, and Social Work, of which Social Work has been ranked first by the U.S. News and World Report every year since 1994.[26] Angell Hall, one of the major buildings housing the College of LS&A The University of Michigan College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also known as the College of LS&A, is the liberal arts and sciences unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The North Campus Diag, looking towards (from right to left) the EECS Building, G.G. Brown, and H. H. Dow Building (hidden by trees) The University of Michigan College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The Stephen M. Ross School of Business (previously known as the University of Michigan Business School) is the business school of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... // The School of Natural Resources and Environment [1] (SNRE) was originally founded as the School of Forestry in 1927. ... The North Campus Diag, looking towards (from right to left) the EECS Building, G.G. Brown, and H. H. Dow Building (hidden by trees) The University of Michigan College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The University of Michigan Law School, located in Ann Arbor, is a unit of the University of Michigan. ... The Stephen M. Ross School of Business (previously known as the University of Michigan Business School) is the business school of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The University Hospital The University of Michigan Health System is the medical unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The University of Michigan Health System is the wholly-owned academic medical center of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy at the University of Michigan, often referred to as the Ford School, is a leading public policy school in the United States. ... The A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning (also Taubman College or TCAUP) is a nationally-renowned undergraduate and graduate institution for the built environment at the University of Michigan. ... The School of Information (SI) at the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor is a graduate school offering both a Master of Science in Information (MSI) and a Doctor of Information (Ph. ... The University of Michigan School of Music, Theatre & Dance is an undergraduate and graduate institution for the performing arts in the United States. ... // The School of Natural Resources and Environment [1] (SNRE) was originally founded as the School of Forestry in 1927. ... The University of Michigan School of Public Health is one of the professional graduate schools of the University of Michigan. ...


There are over 6,200 faculty members, 73 of whom are members of the National Academy, and 435 of whom hold an endowed chair in their discipline.[27] The university routinely has led in the number of Fulbright Scholars in the late 1990s and 2000s,[28][29][30][31][32] and has also matriculated 25 Rhodes Scholars.[33] The United States National Academies consist of four organizations: the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, the Institute of Medicine, and the National Research Council. ... Fulbright redirects here. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...


In one recent rankings summary, more than 70% of UM's 200 major programs, departments, and schools were ranked in the top 10 in the nation.[34] The 2008 U.S. News and World Report ranks UM 25th among all American universities and 3rd among public universities.[35] In its 2007 annual college rankings, The Washington Monthly ranks UM sixth nationally with criteria based on research, community service, and social mobility.[36] Newsweek International rates UM 11th globally based on "openness and diversity" as well as "distinction in research".[37] Similarly, the 2007 edition of the Fiske Rankings rates UM with "5 Stars"—reserved for only those universities of the highest academic quality. Furthermore, UM's academic reputation has led to its inclusion on Richard Moll's list of Public Ivies.[38] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... A public university is an institution of higher education that is funded by public means through a national or regional government. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Wren Building (College of William and Mary) Alumni Hall (Miami U) Sather Gate (UC Berkeley) Central Campus Diag (U of Michigan) Old Well (UNC-Chapel Hill) UT Tower (U of Texas) Williams Hall (U of Vermont) The Rotunda (U of Virginia) Public Ivy is a colloquialism for a state-funded...


A concern about academics at UM is the high level of educational expenses for a public institution, especially for out-of-state undergraduate students, who pay between US $31,301 and $36,352 annually for tuition alone. In 2005, out-of-state tuition at UM was the most expensive in the United States for a public college or university.[39] Conversely, in-state undergraduate students paid between US $10,447 and $14,442 annually.[40] Notwithstanding the quoted tuition levels, the university is attempting to increase financial aid availability to students. To that end, the university has built, as part of its larger university campaign, a greater than $1.4 billion endowment in order to support aid to students.[41][42][43] USD redirects here. ...


Research and endowment

Biomedical Science Research Building at the UM Medical School.
Biomedical Science Research Building at the UM Medical School.

The university is one of the founding members (1900) of the Association of American Universities, the nation's most significant consortium of research universities. The university manages one of the largest annual collegiate research budgets of any university in the United States, totaling about US $775 million per annum from 2004 to 2005, and US $797 million in 2006, and $823 million as of year end 2007.[44] The Medical School spent the most at over US $333 million, while the College of Engineering was second at more than $131 million.[44] UM also has a technology transfer office, which is the university conduit between laboratory research and corporate commercialization interests. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 169 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The University of Michigan Biomedical Science Building. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 169 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The University of Michigan Biomedical Science Building. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The North Campus Diag, looking towards (from right to left) the EECS Building, G.G. Brown, and H. H. Dow Building (hidden by trees) The University of Michigan College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ...


UM helped develop one of the first university computer networks (the Merit Network)[citation needed] and has made major contributions to the mathematics of information theory. Other major contributions included the precursor to the National Science Foundation computer networking backbone,[45] the virtual memory model, and computer databases. The university is also a major contributor to the medical field with the EKG, gastroscope, the announcement of Jonas Salk's polio vaccine, and the extracorporeal membrane oxygenation system or ECMO. The university's 13,000 acre (53 km²) biological station in the Northern Lower Peninsula of Michigan is one of only 47 Biosphere Reserves in the United States.[46] Not to be confused with information technology, information science, or informatics. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... A computer network is an interconnection of a group of computers. ... This article is about computing. ... “QRS” redirects here. ... In medicine (gastroenterology), esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) or upper endoscopy is a diagnostic endoscopic procedure that visualises the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract. ... Jonas Edward Salk (October 28, 1914 – June 23, 1995) was an American biologist and physician best known for the research and development of the first effective polio vaccine (the eponymous Salk vaccine). ... In intensive care medicine, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is a technique of providing oxygen to patients whose lungs are so severely diseased that they can no longer serve their function. ... The University of Michigan Biological Station is a research and teaching facility operated by the University of Michigan. ... Northern Michigan - or more properly Northern Lower Michigan - is a region of the U.S. state of Michigan, popular as a tourist destination, resort area, and vacation area. ... A biosphere reserve is an international conservation designation given by UNESCO under its Programme on Man and the Biosphere (MAB). ...


UM is home to the National Election Studies and the University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index. Political scientists and policy analysts use UM's Correlates of War project as a gauge of nations' relative global power and a barometer for the outbreak of war. The university is also home to major research centers in optics, reconfigurable manufacturing systems, wireless integrated microsystems, and social sciences. The University of Michigan Transportation Research Institute is located at the university, and support was recently given to the life sciences with the establishment of the Life Sciences Institute and the construction of associated facilities. Undergraduate students are able to participate in various research projects through the Undergraduate Research Opportunity Program (UROP) as well as the UROP/Creative-Programs.[47] The National Election Studies, carried out by the University of Michigan, is the leading academically-run national survey of voters in the United States, conducted after every federal election. ... The University of Michigan Consumer Sentiment Index is an consumer confidence index published monthly by the University of Michigan. ... The Correlates of War project is an academic study of the history of warfare. ... The top global powers usually have relatively high military budgets, reflecting their powerful military capabilities. ... For the book by Sir Isaac Newton, see Opticks. ... NSF Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated Microsystems In 2000, the University of Michigan joined with Michigan State University and Michigan Technological University to form the Engineering Research Center for Wireless Integrated MicroSystems (WIMS ERC). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... UROP is an acronym for Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program. ...


UM's financial endowment (the "University Endowment Fund") was valued at $5.65 billion in NACUBO's 2006 ranking.[1] It is the seventh largest endowment in the U.S. and the third-largest among U.S public universities, as well as the fastest growing endowment in the nation over the last 21 years.[48] The endowment is primarily used according to the donors' wishes, which include the support of teaching and research. In mid-2000, UM embarked on a massive fund-raising campaign called "The Michigan Difference," which aimed to raise $2.5 billion, with $800 million dollars designated for the permanent endowment.[49] Slated to run through December 2008, the university announced that the campaign had reached its target 19 months early in May 2007.[50] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... The following are lists of American institutions of higher education by endowment. ... The following are lists of American institutions of higher education by endowment. ...


Libraries and museums

Law School Library reading room
Law School Library reading room
See also: University of Michigan Library and Museums at the University of Michigan

The UM library system comprises 19 individual libraries with 24 separate collections—roughly 8.27 million volumes, growing at the rate of 177,000 volumes a year.[51] In the most recent academic year for which such figures are released (2005), the Association of Research Libraries (ARL) — using a variety of metrics — ranked UM's library system as one of the top academic library systems in the U.S.[52] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 309 KB) Template:PD self University of Michigan Law Library Interior, taken by Kashkin and given to public domain. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x960, 309 KB) Template:PD self University of Michigan Law Library Interior, taken by Kashkin and given to public domain. ... The Hatcher Graduate Library from the North side The Shapiro Library (The UGLi) The University of Michigan University Library in Ann Arbor, is one of the largest university library systems in the United States. ... The Ruthven Exhibit Museums Building on Central Campus, looking towards the northeast The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor is home to a number of museums, with a majority of them on Central Campus. ... The Hatcher Graduate Library from the North side The Shapiro Library (The UGLi) The University of Michigan University Library in Ann Arbor, is one of the largest university library systems in the United States. ... The Association of Research Libraries is an organization of research libraries in North America. ...


UM was the original home of the JSTOR database, which contains about 750,000 digitized pages from the entire pre-1990 backfile of ten journals of history and economics. The University recently initiated a book digitization program in collaboration with Google. As of August 31, 2006, UM has rolled out the first phase of the Google archive retrieval.[53] JSTOR®, begun in 1995, is an online system for archiving academic journals. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... This article is about the corporation. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Two prominent libraries, the Harlan Hatcher Graduate Library and the Shapiro Undergraduate Library (also called the UGLi, which is officially an acronym but was used by students as a reference to the building's uninspired appearance prior to its recent renovation), are on Central Campus and are connected by a skywalk. The Duderstadt Center on North Campus houses books on art, architecture, and engineering. The Duderstadt Center also contains multiple computer labs, video editing studios, and a 3D virtual reality room. North Campus is also home to the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library and the Bentley Historical Library. The Hatcher Graduate Library from the North side The Shapiro Library (The UGLi) The University of Michigan University Library in Ann Arbor, is one of the largest university library systems in the United States. ... In an urban setting, a skyway, catwalk, or skywalk, is a type of pedway consisting of an enclosed (or covered) bridge between two buildings. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... This Computer lab, called by Marling School for boys, is laid out in such a way as to reduce cabling clutter, and maximise space for workstations. ... A non-linear editing system (NLE) is a video editing (NLVE) or audio editing (NLAE) system which can perform random access on the source material. ... This article is about process of creating 3D computer graphics. ... This article is about the simulation technology. ... Gerald R. Ford Presidential Library is part of National Archives and Records Administrations presidential library system. ... The Bentley Historical Library is a historical library located on the University of Michigan North Campus in Ann Arbor. ...

The UM Museum of Art on Central Campus.
The UM Museum of Art on Central Campus.

The University of Michigan is home to a number of museums, whose focuses include archeology, anthropology, paleontology, zoology, dentistry, and art. The natural history public collections are housed at the University of Michigan Exhibit Museum of Natural History, which displays items from the collections of the paleontology, zoology, and anthropology museums. The Exhibit Museum also holds the largest display of dinosaur specimens in Michigan, as well as specimens of the state fossil, the mastodon (the only such display in the world containing adult male and female specimens: the Buesching and Owosso mastodons).[54] Another major university museum is the University of Michigan Museum of Art, with a permanent collection of European, American, Middle Eastern, Asian, and African items, and temporary exhibits on a wide variety of subjects. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 186 KB) Summary University of Michigan Art Museum. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 186 KB) Summary University of Michigan Art Museum. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... This article is about the social science. ... Paleontology, palaeontology or palæontology (from Greek: paleo, ancient; ontos, being; and logos, knowledge) is the study of prehistoric life forms on Earth through the examination of plant and animal fossils. ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... It has been suggested that List of U.S. state dinosaurs be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the prehistoric elephant-like animal. ...


Campus

Locations of the three main U-M campuses in Ann Arbor
Locations of the three main U-M campuses in Ann Arbor

The Ann Arbor campus is divided into four main areas: the North, Central, Medical, and South Campuses. The physical infrastructure includes more than 500 major buildings, with a combined area of more than 29 million square feet (664 acres or 2.69 km²).[55] The campus also consists of leased space in buildings scattered throughout the city, many occupied by organizations affiliated with the University of Michigan Health System. An East Medical Campus has recently been developed on Plymouth Road, with several university-owned buildings for outpatient care, diagnostics, and outpatient surgery. Image File history File links UM_AA.png Approximate locations of University of Michigan campuses in Ann Arbor, in relation to downtown and Briarwood Mall (in cyan). ... Image File history File links UM_AA.png Approximate locations of University of Michigan campuses in Ann Arbor, in relation to downtown and Briarwood Mall (in cyan). ...


In addition to the UM Golf Course on South Campus, the university operates a second golf course called "Radrick Farms Golf Course" on Geddes Road. The golf course is only open to faculty, staff, and alumni.[56] Another off-campus facility is the Inglis House, which the university has owned since the 1950s. The Inglis House is a 10,000 square foot (930 m²) mansion used to hold various social events, including meetings of the board of regents, and to host visiting dignitaries.[57] The university also operates a large office building called Wolverine Tower in southern Ann Arbor near Briarwood Mall. Another major facility is the Matthaei Botanical Gardens, which is located on the eastern outskirts of Ann Arbor. Matthaei Botanical Gardens (300 acres) are botanical gardens with a conservatory operated by the University of Michigan, and located at 1800 North Dixboro Road, Ann Arbor, Michigan. ...


All four campus areas are connected by bus services, the majority of which connect the North and Central Campuses. There is a shuttle service connecting the University Hospital, which lies between North and Central Campuses, with other medical facilities throughout northeastern Ann Arbor.[58] The Central and South Campus areas are contiguous, while the North Campus area is separated from them, primarily by the Huron River. Autobus redirects here. ... The Huron River is the name of three different rivers in Michigan. ...


Central Campus

Hill Auditorium, Burton Tower, and the Rackham Building
Hill Auditorium, Burton Tower, and the Rackham Building

Central Campus was the original location of UM when it moved to Ann Arbor in 1837. It originally had a school and dormitory building (where Mason Hall now stands) and several houses for professors on land bounded by North University Avenue, South University Avenue, East University Avenue, and State Street.[59] Because Ann Arbor and Central Campus developed simultaneously, there is no distinct boundary between the city and university, and some areas contain a mixture of private and university buildings. Central Campus is the location of the College of Literature, Science and the Arts, and is immediately adjacent to the medical campus. Most of the graduate and professional schools, including the Ross School of Business and the Law School, are on Central Campus. Ten of the buildings on Central Campus were designed by Detroit-based architect Albert Kahn between 1904 and 1936. The most notable of the Kahn-designed buildings are the Burton Memorial Tower and nearby Hill Auditorium.[60] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2880x2160, 1430 KB) Summary Own work Attribution required University of Michigan Campus: Hill Burton Rackham Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Michigan Metadata This... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2880x2160, 1430 KB) Summary Own work Attribution required University of Michigan Campus: Hill Burton Rackham Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Michigan Metadata This... Angell Hall, one of the major buildings housing the College of LS&A The University of Michigan College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, also known as the College of LS&A, is the liberal arts and sciences unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The Stephen M. Ross School of Business (previously known as the University of Michigan Business School) is the business school of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The University of Michigan Law School, located in Ann Arbor, is a unit of the University of Michigan. ... Albert Kahn designed Detroit Police Headquarters at 1300 Beaubien. ... // Burton Tower The Burton Memorial Tower The Burton Memorial Tower, located on Central Campus at the University of Michigan and housing a grand carillon, was built in 1936 as a memorial for University President Marion Leroy Burton (presidency: 1920-1925). ... Hill Auditorium in early spring. ...


North Campus

Much of North Campus has a modern architectural style.
Much of North Campus has a modern architectural style.

North Campus is the most contiguous campus, built independently from the city on a large plot of farm land — approximately 800 acres (3.25 km²) — that the university bought in 1952.[61] It is newer than Central Campus, and thus has more modern architecture, whereas most Central Campus buildings are classical or gothic in style. The architect Eero Saarinen, based in Birmingham, Michigan, created one of the early master plans for North Campus and designed several of its buildings in the 1950s, including the Earl V. Moore School of Music Building.[62] North and Central Campuses each have unique bell towers that reflect the predominant architectural styles of their surroundings. Each of the bell towers houses a grand carillon. ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 194 KB) Summary The University of Michigan North Campus, looking at the reflecting pool and fountain in front of the Lurie Engineering Center. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1024x768, 194 KB) Summary The University of Michigan North Campus, looking at the reflecting pool and fountain in front of the Lurie Engineering Center. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... Saarinens Gateway Arch frames The Old Courthouse, which sits at the heart of the city of Saint Louis, near the rivers edge. ... Birmingham is a city in Oakland County of the U.S. state of Michigan. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ...


North Campus houses the College of Engineering, the Schools of Music, Theater & Dance, and Art and Design, the Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning, and an annex of the School of Information. Each summer, the computer labs, and residence and dining halls of North Campus are used to host Camp CAEN, the College of Engineering's summer computer camp for high school students. The North Campus Diag, looking towards (from right to left) the EECS Building, G.G. Brown, and H. H. Dow Building (hidden by trees) The University of Michigan College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The University of Michigan School of Music is an undergraduate and graduate institution for the performing arts. ... The A. Alfred Taubman College of Architecture and Urban Planning (also Taubman College or TCAUP) is a nationally-renowned undergraduate and graduate institution for the built environment at the University of Michigan. ... Summer camp is a supervised program for children and/or teenagers conducted (usually) during the summer months in some countries. ... A Computer camp is a summer camp which focuses on computer instruction. ...


South Campus

South Campus is the site for the athletic programs, including major sports facilities, such as Michigan Stadium, Crisler Arena, and Yost Ice Arena. South Campus is also the site of the Buhr library storage facility (the collections of which are undergoing digitization by Google), the Institute for Continuing Legal Education, and the Student Theatre Arts Complex, which provides shop and rehearsal space for student theatre groups. The university's departments of public safety and transportation services offices are located on South Campus. Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Crisler Arena, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is the home arena of the mens and womens basketball teams of the University of Michigan. ... Yost Ice Arena (formerly Yost Fieldhouse) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, is the home of the University of Michigan varsity ice hockey team. ...


UM's golf course is located south of Michigan Stadium and Crisler Arena. It was designed in the late 1920s by Alister MacKenzie, the designer of Augusta National Golf Club in Augusta, Georgia (home of The Masters Tournament).[63] The course opened to the public in the spring of 1931. The University of Michigan Golf Course was included in a listing of top holes designed by what Sports Illustrated calls “golf’s greatest course architect.” The UM Golf Course’s signature No. 6 hole — a 310-yard (280 m) par 4, which plays from an elevated tee to a two-tiered, kidney-shaped green protected by four bunkers — is the second hole on the Alister MacKenzie Dream 18 as selected by a five-person panel that includes three-time Masters champion Nick Faldo and golf course architect Tom Doak. The listing of “the best holes ever designed by Augusta National architect Alister MacKenzie” is featured in SI’s Golf Plus special edition previewing the Masters in April 4, 2006. Perhaps the greatest golf course designer of all time. ... Augusta National Golf Club, located in the American city of Augusta, Georgia, is one of the most famous and exclusive golf clubs in the world. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ... This article is about the golf tournament. ... The first issue of Sports Illustrated, August 16, 1954, showing Milwaukee Braves star Eddie Mathews at bat in Milwaukee County Stadium. ... Personal Information Birth 18 July 1957 ) (age 49) Welwyn Garden City, England Height 6 ft 3 in (1. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Athletics

Main article: Michigan Wolverines

The University of Michigan's sports teams are called the Wolverines. They participate in the NCAA's Football Bowl Subdivision (formally Division I-A) and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except men's ice hockey, which is a member of the Central Collegiate Hockey Association. In seven of the past ten years, UM has finished in the top five of the NACDA Director's Cup, a ranking compiled by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to tabulate the success of universities in competitive sports. UM has finished in the top eleven of the Directors' Cup standings in each of the award's twelve seasons and has placed in the top six in each of the last eight seasons.[64] The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association, and womens water polo, which... For other uses, see Wolverine (disambiguation). ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... The NACDA Directors Cup is an award given annually by the National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics to the colleges and universities with the most success in collegiate athletics. ... The National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics is a professional organization for college and university athletic directors in the United States. ...

A football game at Michigan Stadium
A football game at Michigan Stadium

The UM football program ranks first in NCAA history in both total wins (860) and winning percentage (.745).[65] The team won the first Rose Bowl game in 1902, and has the longest current streak of consecutive bowl game appearances. The last year in which UM did not appear in a bowl was 1974, which was also the last season in which Big Ten teams other than the champion were not eligible for bowls; UM's last losing season was in 1967. The Wolverines have won a record 42 Big Ten championships, including five in the past decade. The program has eleven national championships, most recently in 1997,[66] and has produced three Heisman Trophy winners: Tom Harmon, Desmond Howard and Charles Woodson.[67] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 316 KB) [edit] Summary Saturday, September 2nd, 2006 vs. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1152x864, 316 KB) [edit] Summary Saturday, September 2nd, 2006 vs. ... Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Head coach Lloyd Carr 13th year, 121–40 Home stadium Michigan Stadium Capacity 107,501 - Field Turf Conference Big Ten First year 1879 Athletic director William C. Martin Website MGoBlue. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... Heisman redirects here. ... Thomas Dudley Harmon (September 28, 1919 - March 15, 1990) was a star player of United States college football, a sports broadcaster, and patriarch of a family of American actors. ... Desmond Howard (born May 15, 1970 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football wide receiver and kick returner in the NFL. He played for the Washington Redskins (1992-1994), Jacksonville Jaguars (1995), Green Bay Packers (1996, 1999), Oakland Raiders (1997-1998) and Detroit Lions (1999-2002). ... Charles Woodson (born on October 7, 1976 in Fremont, Ohio) is an American football cornerback for the Green Bay Packers. ...


Michigan Stadium is the largest college football-only stadium in the world, with an official capacity of more than 107,501 (the extra seat is said to be "reserved" for Fritz Crisler[68]) though attendance—frequently over 111,000 spectators—regularly exceeds the official capacity.[69] The NCAA's record-breaking attendance has become commonplace at Michigan Stadium, especially since the arrival of head coach Bo Schembechler. UM has fierce rivalries with many teams, including Michigan State, Notre Dame, and Ohio State, the latter of which has been referred to by ESPN as the greatest rivalry in American sports, along with the Notre Dame-USC and Army-Navy rivalries.[70] UM has all-time winning records against Michigan State University, University of Notre Dame, and Ohio State University.[71] Michigan Stadium, nicknamed The Big House, is the football stadium for the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... Herbert O. Fritz Crisler (born January 12, 1899 near Earlville, Illinois; died August 19, 1982) was a head football coach, best known for his tenure at the University of Michigan from 1938 to 1947. ... Glenn Edward Bo Schembechler (April 1, 1929 – November 17, 2006) was an American college football coach best known as the head coach at the University of Michigan, where he coached the Wolverines from 1969 until 1989. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Ohio. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... The Michigan-Ohio State rivalry is the intense rivalry between the University of Michigan and The Ohio State University football teams. ...


The men's ice hockey team, which plays at Yost Ice Arena, has won nine national championships, while the men's basketball team, which plays at Crisler Arena, has appeared in four Final Fours and won a national championship in 1989. However, the program became involved in a scandal involving payments from a booster during the 1990s. This led to the program being placed on probation for a four-year period. The program also voluntarily vacated victories from its 1992–1993 and 1995–1999 seasons in which the payments took place, as well as its 1992 and 1993 Final Four appearances. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Yost Ice Arena (formerly Yost Fieldhouse) in Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA, is the home of the University of Michigan varsity ice hockey team. ... NCAA sponsors a championship tournament in ice hockey. ... Game between Illinois State Redbirds & Ball State Cardinals, February 17, 2007 in an ESPN Bracketbuster contest. ... Crisler Arena, in Ann Arbor, Michigan, is the home arena of the mens and womens basketball teams of the University of Michigan. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ...


Through the 2004 Summer Olympic Games, 178 UM students and coaches had participated in the Olympics, winning medals in every Summer Olympics except 1896, and winning gold medals in all but four Olympiads. UM students have won a total of 116 Olympic medals: 54 gold, 27 silver, and 35 bronze.[72] (Redirected from 2004 Summer Olympic Games) The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ... Poster for the 1920 Summer Olympics in Antwerp. ... The University of Michigan features 24 varsity sports teams called the Wolverines, which compete in the NCAAs Division I and in the Big Ten Conference in all sports except mens ice hockey which competes in the NCAA D1 Central Collegiate Hockey Association, and womens water polo, which...


Student life

Residential life

Mosher-Jordan Residence Hall
Mosher-Jordan Residence Hall
See also: University of Michigan Housing

The University of Michigan has the sixth-largest campus housing system in the U.S. and the third-largest family housing operation, accommodating up to 12,562 people.[73] The residence halls are organized into three distinct groups: Central Campus, Hill Area (between Central Campus and the University of Michigan Medical Center) and North Campus. Family housing is located on North Campus and mainly serves graduate students. The largest residence hall has a capacity of 1,277 students, while the smallest accommodates 31 residents.[73] A majority of upper-division and graduate students live in off-campus apartments, houses, and cooperatives, with the largest concentrations in the Central and South Campus areas. The higher cost of living in Ann Arbor has prompted some students to live in nearby communities such as Ypsilanti or Plymouth. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2880x2160, 1514 KB) Summary Own work, attribution required Scott Kashkin MosherJordanUM.jpg Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Michigan Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2880x2160, 1514 KB) Summary Own work, attribution required Scott Kashkin MosherJordanUM.jpg Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of Michigan Metadata This file contains additional... Palmer Field with Couzens Hall (left) and Alice Lloyd Hall (right), two of the Hill Area residence halls. ... A housing co-operative is a legal entity, usually a corporation, that owns real estate, one or more residential buildings. ... Nickname: Motto: Pride. ... Plymouth is a city in Wayne County of the U.S. state of Michigan. ...


The residential system has a number of "living-learning communities" where academic activities and residential life are combined. These communities focus on areas such as research through the Michigan Research Community, medical sciences, community service and the German language.[74] The Michigan Research Community, usually housed in Mosher-Jordan Hall, is currently located in East Quadrangle (East Quad) due to renovations in its former building. The Residential College (RC), a living-learning community that is a division of the College of Literature, Science and the Arts, also has its principal instructional space in East Quad. In 2006, the university approved plans for a new residence complex for 550 students on the northern corner of Central Campus. When completed, this residence complex will comprise a second living-learning community.[75] // The Michigan Research Community, or the MRC[1], is a living-learning program at the University of Michigan. ... Community service refers to service that a person performs for the benefit of his or her local community. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... // The Michigan Research Community, or the MRC[1], is a living-learning program at the University of Michigan. ... The Residential College at the University of Michigan is a division of the University of Michigan College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LS&A) in Ann Arbor. ...


Groups and activities

Michigan Union on Central Campus
Michigan Union on Central Campus

There are more than 1150 student clubs and organizations at the university.[76] With a history of student activism, some of the most visible groups include those dedicated to causes such as civil rights and labor rights. Two of the most notable of these groups were Students for a Democratic Society, which recently reformed with a new chapter on campus as of February 2007, and the Weather Underground. Though the student body generally leans toward left-wing politics, there are also conservative groups, such as YAF, non-partisan groups such as the Roosevelt Institution, and religious groups like "JAAM" (Jewish Awareness America). Fraternities and sororities, many of which are located east of Central Campus, play a role in the university's social life. There are also several engineering projects teams, including the University of Michigan Solar Car Team, which placed first in the North American Solar Challenge four times and third in the World Solar Challenge three times.[77] Michigan Interactive Investments, the largest collegiate investing and finance organization in the United States, and the Michigan Economics Society are also affiliated with the university. The university also showcases many community service organizations and charitable projects, including the University of Michigan Dance Marathon[78], SERVE, PROVIDES, Circle K, The Detroit Project, Habitat for Humanity,[79] and Ann Arbor Reaching Out. Intramural sports are popular, and there are recreation facilities for each of the three campuses.[80] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 586 KB) Summary Color-corrected version of Media:Michigan Union. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x768, 586 KB) Summary Color-corrected version of Media:Michigan Union. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... Labor rights or workers rights are a group of legal rights and claimed human rights having to do with labor relations between workers and their employers, usually obtained under labor and employment law. ... For other uses, see Weatherman (disambiguation). ... Left wing redirects here. ... Official seal of Young Americans for Freedom. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The University of Michigan Solar Car Team is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... American Solar Challenge is a solar car race across North America. ... The Nuna 3 of the hattrick winning Dutch Nuna team The World Solar Challenge is a solar powered-car race over 3021 km through central Australia from Darwin to Adelaide. ... Michigan Interactive Investments (MII) is a business/investing/finance organization at the University of Michigan. ... The Detroit Project may refer to: // It tries getting Detroit to build cars and SUVs that get more MPG and jolting our leaders into taking action to reduce nuclear-fossil dependence. ... Official Habitat for Humanity logo Habitat for Humanity is an international, Christian, non-governmental, non-profit organization devoted to building quality, low-cost, affordable housing. ... Ann Arbor Reaching Out (also known as AARO) is a student-founded community service organization at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports teams organized within a school. ...


The Michigan Union and Michigan League are student activity centers located on Central Campus; Pierpont Commons is on North Campus. The Michigan Union houses a majority of student groups, including the student government. The William Monroe Trotter House, located east of Central Campus, is a multicultural student center operated by the university's Office of Multi-Ethnic Student Affairs.[81] The University Activities Center (UAC) is a student-run programming organization and is composed of 15 committees.[82] Each group involves students in the planning and execution of a variety of events both on and off campus. The Michigan Union is the student union for the University of Michigan. ...


The Michigan Marching Band, composed of over 350 students from almost all of UM's schools,[83] is the university's marching band. Being over 100 years old,[84] the band performs at every home game and travels to at least one away game a year. The student-run and led University of Michigan Pops Orchestra is another musical ensemble that attracts students from all academic backgrounds. It performs regularly in the Michigan Theater. The University of Michigan Men's Glee Club, founded in 1859, is a men's chorus comprised of over 100 members. Its eight member subset a cappella group, the University of Michigan Friars, which was founded in 1955, is the oldest currently running a cappella group on campus.[85] The Michigan Marching Band (or MMB) is University of Michigans Marching Band. ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ... The Michigan Pops Orchestra logo The Michigan Pops Orchestra is the only student run and directed orchestra at the University of Michigan. ... The Michigan Theater is a movie palace in Ann Arbor, Michigan. ... The University of Michigan Mens Glee Club is an all-male glee club (or choir) at the University of Michigan currently conducted by Paul Rardin. ... This article is about the vocal technique. ... The University of Michigan Friars are an all male singing a capella group formed at the University of Michigan in 1955. ...


The Michigan Daily is the student-run daily newspaper. Founded in 1890, The Daily is published five days a week during the normal academic year, and weekly during the spring and summer terms. Other student publications at the university include the conservative The Michigan Review, the progressive Michigan Independent, the Michigan Journal of Political Science, The Michigan Journal of Business, and the humor publications The Michigan Every Three Weekly and the Gargoyle. WCBN (88.3 FM) is a freeform radio station; WOLV-TV is a student-run television station that is primarily shown on the university's cable television system. The Michigan Daily is the daily student newspaper of the University of Michigan. ... The Michigan Review is the unofficial student affairs journal of the University of Michigan. ... The Michigan Journal of Political Science is published semiannually by undergraduates at the University of Michigan. ... Gargoyle Humor Magazine or The Gargoyle is the official student-run humor magazine for the University of Michigan. ... WCBN-FM is the student-run radio station of the University of Michigan. ... WOLV-TV is the student television station of The University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ...


Student government

Anti-Coke banner at the University of Michigan, February 2005. Coca-cola products were briefly banned on campus due to student groups pressure in 2006.
Anti-Coke banner at the University of Michigan, February 2005. Coca-cola products were briefly banned on campus due to student groups pressure in 2006.

Housed in the Michigan Union, the Michigan Student Assembly (MSA) is the central student government of the University. With representatives from each of the University's colleges and schools, the MSA represents students and manages student funds on the campus. The Michigan Student Assembly is a member of the statewide Association of Michigan Universities. In recent years MSA has organized airBus, a transportation service between campus and the Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport, and has led the university's efforts to register its student population to vote, with its Voice Your Vote Commission (VYV) registering 10,000 students in 2004. VYV also works to improve access to non-partisan voting-related information and increase student voter turnout.[86] MSA has also been successful at reviving Homecoming activities, including a carnival and parade, for students after a roughly eleven-year absence in October 2007.[87] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Student Assembly is a common name the legislative branch of many university student governments in the United States. ... Detroit Metropolitan Wayne County Airport (IATA: DTW, ICAO: KDTW), sometimes called Detroit Metropolitan Airport, Detroit Metro Wayne Airport, Metro Airport, or simply DTW, is a major airport in Romulus, Michigan, a suburb of Detroit. ... For other uses, see Homecoming (disambiguation). ...


There are student governance bodies in each college and school. The two largest colleges at the University of Michigan are the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LS&A) and the College of Engineering. Students in the LS&A are represented by the LS&A Student Government (LSA SG). The University of Michigan Engineering Council (UMEC) manages student government affairs for the College of Engineering. In addition, the students that live in the residence halls are represented by the University of Michigan Residence Halls Association. The North Campus Diag, looking towards (from right to left) the EECS Building, G.G. Brown, and H. H. Dow Building (hidden by trees) The University of Michigan College of Engineering is the engineering unit of the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. ...


A longstanding goal of some members of the student government is to create a student designated seat on the Board of Regents, the university's governing body. Such a designation would achieve parity with other Big Ten schools that have student regents. In 2000, students Nick Waun and Scott Trudeau ran for the board on the state-wide ballot as third-party nominees. Waun ran for a second time in 2002, along with Matt Petering and Susan Fawcett.[88] Although none of these campaigns has so far been successful, a recent poll shows that most students consider student activity fees to be taxation without representation on the board. Another poll conducted by the State of Michigan in 1998 concluded that a majority of Michigan voters would approve of such a position if the measure were put before them. A change to the board's makeup would require amending the Michigan Constitution.[89] The Michigan Constitution is the governing document of the state of Michigan. ...


Fight song

The University of Michigan's fight song, The Victors, was written by student Louis Elbel in 1898 following the last-minute football victory over the University of Chicago that clinched a league championship. The song was declared by John Philip Sousa as "the greatest college fight song ever written."[90] The song refers to the university as being the "Champions of the West". At the time, UM was part of the "Western Conference", which would later become the Big Ten Conference. Although mainly used at sporting events, the fight song can be heard at other events that UM competes in. President Gerald Ford had it played as his entrance anthem in preference over the more traditional Hail to the Chief during his term from 1974 to 1977.[91] The fight song is also sung during graduation commencement ceremonies. The university's alma mater song is The Yellow and Blue. A common rally cry is "Let's Go Blue!", written by former students Joseph Carl, a tuba player, and Albert Ahronheim, a drum major. For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ... The Victors is the fight song of the University of Michigan (UM). ... This article is being considered for deletion in accordance with Wikipedias deletion policy. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... John Philip Sousa (November 6, 1854 – March 6, 1932) was an American composer and conductor of the late Romantic era known particularly for American military marches. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Alma mater (disambiguation). ... A high school drum major uses hand gestures to lead his band. ...


Notable people and alumni

See also: List of University of Michigan faculty and staff, President of the University of Michigan, and Board of Regents of the University of Michigan

UM has more than 420,000 living graduates.[4] In addition to the late U.S. president Gerald Ford, the university has produced twenty-five Rhodes scholars[33] and 116 Olympic medalists,[72] seven Nobel Prize winners, and Fields Medal winner Stephen Smale. Several astronauts are alumni, including the all-UM crews of Gemini 4 and Apollo 15. UM's contribution to aeronautics also include aircraft designer Clarence "Kelly" Johnson of Lockheed Skunk Works fame, Lockheed president Willis Hawkins, F-16 designer Harry Hillaker, and Robert Hall, designer of the Granville Brothers Aircraft Gee Bee Model Z racer, test pilot and later vice president of Grumman. UM numbers among its matriculants sixteen billionaires, as well as a number of alumni who have founded or co-founded many companies and organizations, including Dr. J. Robert Beyster who founded Science Applications International Corporation in 1969[92] (see also: List of Entities Founded by University of Michigan alumni). There are more than 425,000 living alumni of the University of Michigan. ... The University of Michigan has 5,000 faculty members, which include National Academy members, and Nobel and Pulitzer Prize winners. ... The President of the University of Michigan is the principal executive officer of the University of Michigan. ... The Board of Regents of the University of Michigan is the legal corporation that controls the University of Michigan, comprising the campuses at Ann Arbor, Flint, and Dearborn. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... For other persons named Gerald Ford, see Gerald Ford (disambiguation). ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ... An Olympic medalist is the winner of a medal in one of the Olympic games. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... Stephen Smale (born July 15, 1930) is an American mathematician from Flint, Michigan, and winner of the Fields Medal in 1966. ... Gemini 4 (officially Gemini IV) was a 1965 manned space flight in NASAs Gemini program. ... Apollo 15 was the ninth manned mission in the Apollo program and the fourth mission to land on the Moon. ... Kelly Johnson participated in the design of the Lockheed L-10 Electra, testing a model of the design in the wind tunnel of the University of Michigan. ... Lockheed redirects here. ... A modern Skunk Works project leverages an older: LASRE atop the SR-71 Blackbird. ... Lockheed redirects here. ... Willis M. Hawkins (December 1, 1913 - September 28, 2004) was an aeronautical engineer for Lockheed for more than fifty years. ... The F-16 Fighting Falcon is a modern multi-role jet fighter aircraft built in the United States and used by dozens of countries all over the world. ... Robert Hall may refer to: Robert Hall (1764-1831), an English Baptist minister. ... Gee Bee R-1 Granville Brothers Aircraft was a aircraft manufacturer best known for the production of the Gee Bee line of air racers, which are synonymous with the Golden Age of Air Racing. ... The Grumman Aircraft Engineering Corporation, later Grumman Aerospace Corporation, was a leading producer of military and civilian aircraft of the 20th century. ... This is a list of business alumni from the University of Michigan. ... Dr. John Robert Beyster (born 1929, often styled J. Robert Beyster) is the founder and, until 2004, the CEO of Science Applications International Corporation. ... Science Applications International Corporation Science Applications International Corporation (usually known as SAIC) is the largest employee-owned research and engineering firm in the United States. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... List of Michigan Alumni List of University of Michigan faculty and staff List of University of Michigan arts alumni List of University of Michigan business alumni List of University of Michigan law and government alumni List of University of Michigan sporting alumni Categories: | ...


Notable writers who attended UM include playwright Arthur Miller, novelist Betty Smith, screenwriter Judith Guest, Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Theodore Roethke, authors Charles Major and Sandra Steingraber, Japanese literature translator Juliet Winters Carpenter and composer/author/puppeteer Forman Brown. In Hollywood, famous alumni include actor James Earl Jones; actresses Lucy Liu, Selma Blair, and Ruth Hussey; and filmmaker Lawrence Kasdan. Arthur Bob Miller (October 17, 1915 – February 10, 2005) was an American playwright and essayist. ... Betty Smith, née Elisabeth Wehner (December 15, 1896 - January 17, 1972), was an American author. ... Judith Guest (born March 29, 1936), in Detroit, Michigan) is an American novelist and screenwriter. ... Theodore Huebner Roethke (; RET-key) (May 25, 1908 – August 1, 1963) was a United States poet, who published several volumes of poetry characterized by its rhythm and natural imagery. ... Charles Major (born July 25, 1856; died February 13, 1913) was an American lawyer and novelist. ... Sandra Steingraber (1959 - ) is an America biologist and author in the tradition of Rachel Carson. ... Juliet Winters Carpenter is an award-winning translator of modern Japanese literature into English. ... The late Forman Brown (1901-1996) was one of the world leaders in puppet theatre in his day. ... American cinema has had a profound effect on cinema across the world since the early 20th century. ... James Earl Jones (born January 17, 1931) is an American Academy Award-nominated, Emmy- and Tony Award-winning actor of film and stage well known for his deep basso voice. ... Lucy Alexis Liu (Chinese: 劉玉玲 Liú Yùlíng, born December 2, 1968 in Queens, New York) is an Emmy Award-nominated American actress. ... Selma Blair (born June 23, 1972) is an American actress. ... Ruth Carol Hussey (October 30, 1911 – April 19, 2005) was an actress born in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Lawrence Kasdan (born 14 January 1949, Miami, Florida) is an American movie producer, director and screenwriter. ...


Other UM graduates include TV journalist Mike Wallace, Dana Jacobson and Steve Phillips of ESPN, Rich Eisen of the NFL Network, entrepreneur Eric Sadek, singer Joe Dassin, former House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt, professional golfer John Schroeder, Google co-founder Larry Page, conservative pundit Ann Coulter, assisted suicide advocate Jack Kevorkian, Weather Underground radical activist Bill Ayers,[93] activist Tom Hayden, Unabomber Theodore Kaczynski, architect Charles Moore, famous avant-garde painter Aethelred Eldridge, Mannheim Steamroller founder Chip Davis, the Swedish Holocaust hero Raoul Wallenberg, and Benjamin D. Pritchard, the Civil War general who captured Jefferson Davis.[94] Clarence Darrow, one of the leading attorneys in the U.S., attended the Law School at a time when many lawyers did not receive any formal education. Sanjay Gupta, a neurosurgeon and CNN medical correspondent, attended the UM School of Medicine. Randy Sklar and Jason Sklar were the hosts on ESPN Classic's Cheap Seats. Pop singer Madonna, professional baseball player Derek Jeter, and rock legend Iggy Pop attended but did not graduate. Professional wrestler Scott Steiner was a two-time All-American wrestler at UM and graduated with a degree in Education. Mike Wallace (born Myron Leon Wallace on May 9, 1918) is a former American game show host, television personality, and journalist. ... Dana Jacobson (born November 5, 1971) joined ESPN as an ESPNEWS anchor in December 2002 and soon became a regular anchor on the 6 p. ... Steve Francis Phillips (born on May 18, 1963) was the general manager of the New York Mets from 1997-2003. ... ESPN, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an American cable television network dedicated to broadcasting and producing sports-related programming 24 hours a day. ... Image:Eisen1. ... NFL Network is an American specialty channel owned and operated by the National Football League (NFL) and is also shown in Canada and Mexico. ... Joe Dassin Joseph Ira Dassin (November 5, 1938 – August 20, 1980) was a French-speaking American expatriate musician. ... Richard Andrew Dick Gephardt (born January 31, 1941) is senior counsel at the global law firm DLA Piper and a former prominent American politician of the Democratic Party. ... // John Schroeder (born November 12, 1945) is an American professional golfer who has played on the PGA Tour, Nationwide Tour and Champions Tour. ... For the music producer/manager, see Larry Page (British singer and manager). ... Ann Hart Coulter (born December 8, 1961)[1] is an American best-selling author, columnist and political commentator. ... Jack Kevorkian during his public appearance in January 2008 Jack Kevorkian (pronounced [1]) (born on May 26, 1928 [2]) is an American pathologist. ... The term Weather Underground may refer to: Weatherman (organization), a. ... Bill Ayerss mugshot after his 1968 arrest. ... Tom Hayden outside the 2004 Democratic National Convention Thomas Emmett Tom Hayden (born December 11, 1939) is an American social and political activist and politician, most famous for his involvement in the anti-war and civil rights movements of the 1960s. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Piazza dItalia, New Orleans Charles Willard Moore (October 31, 1925 in Benton Harbor, Michigan – December 16, 1993 in Austin, Texas) was an American architect, educator, writer, and winner of the AIA Gold Medal in 1991. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Mannheim Steamroller is an 18th century classical rock group founded by Chip Davis, and co-founded by Jackson Berkey, well-known for their modern recordings of holiday music (notably Christmas). ... Louis F. Chip Davis, Jr. ... Raoul Gustav Wallenberg (August 4, 1912 – July 16, 1947?)[1][2][3] was a Swedish humanitarian sent to Budapest, Hungary under diplomatic cover to rescue Jews from the Holocaust. ... Brev. ... For other uses, see Jefferson Davis (disambiguation). ... Clarence Seward Darrow (April 18, 1857 Kinsman Township, Trumbull County, Ohio - March 13, 1938 Chicago) was an American lawyer and leading member of the American Civil Liberties Union, best known for defending teenage thrill killers Leopold and Loeb in their trial for murdering 14-year-old Bobby Franks (1924) and... Sanjay Gupta (born October 23, 1969) is a first generation Indian-American physician and a contributing CNN senior health correspondent based in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Randy Sklar (born January 12, 1972 in St. ... Jason Sklar (born January 12, 1972 in St. ... ESPN Classic features reruns of famous sporting events, sports documentaries, and sports themed movies. ... Cheap Seats is a television program broadcast on ESPN Classic hosted by brothers Jason and Randy Sklar. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Derek Sanderson Jeter (born June 26, 1974 in Pequannock, New Jersey) is an American Major League Baseball player. ... James Newell Osterberg, Jr. ... Scott Carl Rechsteiner (born July 29, 1962) better known by his ring name Scott Steiner, is an American professional wrestler. ...


UM athletes have starred in the National Football League and National Basketball Association as well as other professional sports. Notable among recent players are Tom Brady of the New England Patriots and Chris Webber, who last played for the Golden State Warriors. Three players have won college football's Heisman Trophy, awarded to the player considered the best in the nation: Tom Harmon (1940), Desmond Howard (1991) and Charles Woodson (1997).[67] NFL redirects here. ... NBA redirects here. ... Thomas Edward Brady, Jr. ... City Foxborough, Massachusetts Other nicknames The Pats Team colors Nautical Blue, New Century Silver, Red, and White Head Coach Bill Belichick Owner Robert Kraft General manager Bill Belichick (de facto) Mascot Pat Patriot League/Conference affiliations American Football League (1960–69) Eastern Division (1960–69) National Football League (1970–present... For the Canadian-born former BBL basketball player, see Chris Webber (Canadian basketball player). ... The Golden State Warriors are a professional basketball team based in Oakland, California. ... Heisman redirects here. ... Thomas Dudley Harmon (September 28, 1919 - March 15, 1990) was a star player of United States college football, a sports broadcaster, and patriarch of a family of American actors. ... Desmond Howard (born May 15, 1970 in Cleveland, Ohio) is a former American football wide receiver and kick returner in the NFL. He played for the Washington Redskins (1992-1994), Jacksonville Jaguars (1995), Green Bay Packers (1996, 1999), Oakland Raiders (1997-1998) and Detroit Lions (1999-2002). ... Charles Woodson (born on October 7, 1976 in Fremont, Ohio) is an American football cornerback for the Green Bay Packers. ...


The university claims the only alumni association with a chapter on the moon, established in 1971 when the all-UM crew of Apollo 15 placed a charter plaque for a new UM Alumni Association on the lunar surface.[95] According to the Apollo 15 astronauts, several small UM flags were brought on the mission. However, no flag made it to the surface or was left there. The presence of a UM flag on the moon is a long-held campus myth.[96] This article is about Earths moon. ...


See also

The University of Michigan-Dearborn, located in Dearborn, Michigan, USA, is part of the University of Michigan system. ... The University of Michigan-Flint, located in Flint, Michigan, USA, is one of three campuses in the University of Michigan system. ... U of M is an abbreviation that can mean: any of several universities in the United States University of Maryland, College Park, most commonly called simply University of Maryland University of Memphis University of Miami University of Michigan (The University of Michigan claims U of M is its trademark) University...

Notes

  1. ^ a b Nelson, Gabe (October 23, 2007). "'U' endowment rises 25% to $7.1 bil". The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2007-10-23. 
  2. ^ A Brief Summary of the NRC Rankings. Texas A&M University (1997). Retrieved on 2007-09-29.
  3. ^ Comparing Black Enrollments at the Public Ivies. The Journal of Blacks in Higher Education (2005). Retrieved on 2007-10-13.
  4. ^ a b About the Association. University of Michigan Alumni Association (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  5. ^ America's Best Hospitals 2006: Honor Roll. US News and World Reports (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-18.
  6. ^ Sahadi, Jeanne (October 28, 2005). The 10 most expensive colleges. CNN/Money. Retrieved on 2005-02-21.
  7. ^ University of Michigan Affirmative Action Lawsuit. University of Michigan Documents Center (February 12, 2003). Retrieved on 2006-12-29. — a collection of news articles and other documents relating to affirmative action in college admissions.
  8. ^ Split Ruling on Affirmative Action. National Public Radio (June 23, 2003). Retrieved on 2007-10-13.
  9. ^ a b c Associated Press (January 11, 2007). University of Michigan Drops Affirmative Action for Now. The Washington Post. Retrieved on 2007-01-12.
  10. ^ Brubacher, John Seiler (July 1, 1997). Higher Education in Transition. Transaction Publishers, 187. ISBN 1-56000-917-9. 
  11. ^ Getting In (October 10, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-10-26.
  12. ^ Remarks of Senator John F. Kennedy. Peace Corps (October 14, 1960). Retrieved on 2007-10-26.
  13. ^ MMPEI. Michigan Memorial Phoenix Energy Institute (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  14. ^ a b University of Michigan Timelines — General University Timeline. Bentley Historical Library (April 2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  15. ^ Newman, Matthew (October 1995). Vietnam teach-in 30 years ago. Michigan Today. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  16. ^ A Decade of Dissent:Teach-Ins. Bentley Historical Library (September 29, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  17. ^ Holmes, Jake (April 6, 2007). Explained: Coleman's castle. The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  18. ^ Saini, Kjyot (March 25, 2005). GSIs walk out. The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  19. ^ Bruce C. Steele and Neal Broverman (August 29, 2006). College Made Easy. The Advocate. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  20. ^ University of Michigan-Enrollment by School and College, Gender, and Class Level For Term 1660 (Fall 2007) (September 24, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-24.
  21. ^ Undergraduate Admissions - Prospective Students. University of Michigan Office of Admissions (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  22. ^ University of Michigan — Ann Arbor: Freshman Class Profile. University of Michigan Office of Budget & Planning (January 17, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  23. ^ a b University of Michigan - Common Data Set 2004–2005 (Page 11). University of Michigan Office of Budget & Planning (August 16, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  24. ^ Undergraduate Admissions - Fast Facts. University of Michigan Office of Admissions (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  25. ^ Enrollment by Degree Type and School/College. UM News Service (2004). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  26. ^ America's Best Graduate Schools 2007 - Health: Social Work (Master's). US News and World Report (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  27. ^ The Top American Research Universities. The Center (University of Florida) (December 2004). Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  28. ^ U-M national leader for 2007-2008 Fulbright Scholars. University of Michigan News Services (October 22, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  29. ^ Fulbright fellowships: 29 U-M students awarded. University of Michigan News Services (November 14, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  30. ^ Seguine, Joel (November 15, 2004). 18 students receive Fulbright award. The University Record Online. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  31. ^ U-M: 29 Fulbright winners. University of Michigan News Service (June 11, 2004). Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  32. ^ Powell, Stephanie (September 17, 1996). 23 'U' Fulbright scholars to learn in foreign lands. The Michigan Daily Online. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  33. ^ a b Fiona Rose became the 24th Rhodes Scholar from UM on December 6, 1997. Joseph Jewell, a UM engineering student, became a Rhodes Scholar in 2004.
  34. ^ University of Michigan - Ann Arbor: Recent Rankings for Graduate & Professional Academic. University of Michigan (July 13, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-11-14. — an aggregation of rankings from sources such as U.S. News & World Reports and the National Research Council.
  35. ^ "America's Best Colleges 2008", U.S. News & World Report, August 17, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-17. 
  36. ^ "National Universities", The Washington Monthly, August 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-21. 
  37. ^ The Complete List: The Top 100 Global Universities. Newsweek International (August 13, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  38. ^ Moll, Richard. (1985). The Public Ivys: America's Flagship Undergraduate Colleges. New York: Viking Adult. ISBN 0-670-58205-0. 
  39. ^ Sahadi, Jeanne (October 28, 2005). The 10 most expensive colleges. CNN/Money. Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  40. ^ Academic Year Tuition and Fees for Full-Time Students. University of Michigan Office of Budget & Planning (July 19, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  41. ^ Kroll, Andy (March 3, 2008). 'U' defends financial aid endowment spending. The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  42. ^ Campaign Goals of UM School, Colleges, and Units. The University of Michigan Office of Development (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  43. ^ Serwach, Joe (August 14, 2006). M-PACT expansion replaces some loans with grants. The University Record Online. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  44. ^ a b Annual Report on Research, Scholarship and Creative Activity at the University of Michigan FY2006. UM Research (January 18, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  45. ^ Merit Network: History. Merit Network (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  46. ^ United States of America - Focal point for biosphere reserves. United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization (November 1, 2000). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  47. ^ Gregerman, Sandra (2005). "UROP is First". LSA Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-03-28. 
  48. ^ Keenan, Matthew (November 22, 2005). Yale Posts Highest Endowment Returns, Topping Stanford, Harvard. Bloomberg. Retrieved on 2007-03-27.
  49. ^ Campaign Goals - The Michigan Difference. The University of Michigan Office of Development (2005). Retrieved on 2005-12-30.
  50. ^ Gershman, Dave (May 18, 2007). U-M's Michigan Difference campaign hits goal. Ann Arbor News. Retrieved on 2007-05-18.
  51. ^ University of Michigan Libraries (January 11, 2005). Retrieved on 2005-09-19.
  52. ^ Martha Kyrillidou and Mark Young (2006). "ARL Statistics 2004–05 A Compilation of Statistics from the One Hundred and Twenty-three Members of the Association of Research Libraries". Association of Research Libraries. Retrieved on 2007-02-19. 
  53. ^ Frequently Asked Questions about MBooks at the University of Michigan. University of Michigan - University Library (August 10, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  54. ^ Scientists use manufacturing methods to reconstruct mastodon. University of Michigan News Service (April 4, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  55. ^ Environmental Stewardship at the University of Michigan. University of Michigan Occupational Safety and Environmental Health (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  56. ^ Welcome to Radrick Farms Golf Course. University of Michigan (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  57. ^ Duderstadt, Anne (2007). The Inglis House Estate at the University of Michigan. University of Michigan. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  58. ^ Bus Routes & Medical Center Parking Express Shuttles. University of Michigan Parking & Transportation Services (2005). Retrieved on 2007-05-27.
  59. ^ The Central Forty and The Diag (1837). University of Michigan History and Traditions Committee (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-29.
  60. ^ A Chronology of University of Michigan Buildings, 1840-1999. Bentley Historical Library (June 2002). Retrieved on 2007-05-27.
  61. ^ North Campus Tour. Michigan Engineering (2007). Retrieved on 2007-05-27.
  62. ^ Carter, Brian (2000). "Eero Saarinen-Operational Thoroughness A Way of Working". Dimensions Volume Fourteen. Retrieved on 2007-03-23. 
  63. ^ UM Golf Course. MGoBlue.com (2006). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  64. ^ Sports Academy Directors' Cup. National Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  65. ^ Official 2006 NCAA Divisions I-A and I-AA Football Records Book. National Collegiate Athletics Association (2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  66. ^ University of Michigan Football - National Championships. Bentley Historical Library (2002). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  67. ^ a b Heisman Winners. Heisman Trophy at Heisman.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-11-14.
  68. ^ Michigan Stadium. MGoBlue.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-06.
  69. ^ The Michigan Stadium Story - Once Again the Biggest House, 1998. Bentley Historical Library (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  70. ^ The 10 greatest rivalries. ESPN.com (January 3, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-03-23.
  71. ^ University of Michigan Football All-Time Records vs. Opponents. MGoBlue.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-12-05.
  72. ^ a b Michigan in the Olympics. Bentley Historical Library (September 28, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  73. ^ a b Housing Fact Sheet. University of Michigan Housing (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  74. ^ Michigan Learning Communities. UM Undergraduate Housing (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  75. ^ North Quad to feature study of media, information technology. University of Michigan News Service (January 26, 2005). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  76. ^ University of Michigan Student Organizations - Maize Pages. University of Michigan Student Assembly (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-31.
  77. ^ UMSolar - About Us. UM Solar Car Team (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  78. ^ University of Michigan Dance Marathon (2008). Retrieved on 2008-03-23.
  79. ^ UM Habitat for Humanity. UM Habitat for Humanity (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-14.
  80. ^ About Our Facilities. UM Department of Recreational Sports (January 22, 2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  81. ^ William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center. UM Campus Information Centers (May 9, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  82. ^ About UAC. University Activities Center (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  83. ^ Sections. The Michigan Marching Band (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  84. ^ History. The Michigan Marching Band (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  85. ^ Our History. The University of Michigan Friars (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  86. ^ About Voice Your Vote. University of Michigan MSA (2007). Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  87. ^ Shubert, Cathe (September 19, 2007). Homecoming parade, carnival to return. The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2008-04-06.
  88. ^ Regent candidates discuss tuition, health care issues at forum. The University Record Online (October 21, 2002). Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  89. ^ Holmes, Erin (September 8, 1998). Board of regents says no to MSA student regent campaign fee. The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2007-04-28.
  90. ^ Michael Hondorp, Fabrikant Alexis (January 1, 2005). University of Michigan College Prowler Off the Record. College Prowler, Inc, 118. ISBN 1-59658-163-8. 
  91. ^ Rozell, Mark J. (October 15, 1992). The Press and the Ford Presidency. University of Michigan Press, 38. ISBN 0-472-10350-4. .
  92. ^ Dr. J. Robert Beyster with Peter Economy, The SAIC Solution: How We Built an $8 Billion Employee-Owned Technology Company, John Wiley & Sons (2007) p.190-191
  93. ^ Ayers, Bill (2003). Fugitive Days: A Memoir. New York: Penguin Books. 
  94. ^ James J. Green, The Life and Times of General B. D. Pritchard (Allegan: Allegan County Historical Society, 1979), p. 2.
  95. ^ About the Association - Famous U-M Alumni. UM Alumni Association (2005). Retrieved on 2007-03-10.
  96. ^ Leah Graboski (March 28, 2006). Debunking the Moon Myth. The Michigan Daily. Retrieved on 2007-03-10.

is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 363rd day of the year (364th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 260th day of the year (261st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... December 17 is the 351st day of the year (352nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 286th day of the year (287th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 340th day of the year (341st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 225th day of the year (226th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 62nd day of the year (63rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 226th day of the year (227th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 86th day of the year (87th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 364th day of the year (365th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 147th day of the year (148th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 318th day of the year (319th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 339th day of the year (340th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 82nd day of the year (83rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 195th day of the year (196th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 22nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 294th day of the year (295th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Fiske, Edward B. (2004). Fiske Guide to Colleges 2005 (Twenty-first Edition). Naperville, IL: Sourcebooks, Inc. ISBN 1-4022-0229-6. 
  • Fleming, Robben W. (1996). Tempests into Rainbows: Managing Turbulence. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0-472-10674-0. 
  • Holtzer (editor), Susan. (1990). Special to the Daily: The 1st 100 Years of Editorial Freedom at the Michigan Daily. Caddo Gap Press. ISBN 0-9625945-2-0. 
  • Peckham, Howard H. (1994). The Making of The University of Michigan 1817–1992. Ann Arbor: The University of Michigan Press. ISBN 0-472-06594-7. 
  • Facts & Figures (2005). University of Michigan Office of Budget & Planning at sitemaker.umich.edu/obpinfo/facts___figures.

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