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Encyclopedia > University of Manchester
The University of Manchester

Motto: Cognitio, sapientia, hvmanitas
(Knowledge, wisdom, humanity)
Established 2004 by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (established 1851) and UMIST (established 1824)
Chancellor: Anna Ford and Sir Terry Leahy
Vice-Chancellor: Prof Alan Gilbert
Staff: 10,407
Students: 40,420[1]
Undergraduates: 29,350[1]
Postgraduates: 11,075[1]
Location Manchester, England
Campus: Urban and Suburban
Colours: Blue, Gold, Purple
                                     
Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities
Website: http://www.manchester.ac.uk/

The University of Manchester is a university located in Manchester, England. With over 40,000 students studying 500 academic programmes, more than 10,000 staff and an annual income of nearly £600 million it is the largest single-site University in the United Kingdom and receives more applications from prospective students than any other university in the country, with more than 60,000 applications for undergraduate courses alone. According to the The Sunday Times, "Manchester has a formidable reputation spanning most disciplines, but most notably in the life sciences, engineering, humanities, economics, sociology and the social sciences".[2] University of Manchester Est 1824 logo (for the combined university formed in 2004) Images in this category are fair use logos under United States copyright law. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Anna Ford (born 2 October 1943 in Tewkesbury, Gloucestershire) is a retired British television presenter, best known as a newsreader. ... Sir Terry Leahy (born 28 February 1956) is the CEO of Tesco, the largest British supermarket chain. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Alan Gilbert, born in Brisbane on 11 September 1944, once a historian is now President and Vice Chancellor of the University of Manchester. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... The N8 Group comprises eight research-intensive universities in the north of England. ... The North West Universities Association is a representative body in the North West of England, intended to advance the development of the fifteen higher education establishments. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... The Association of Commonwealth Universities represents over 480 universities from Commonwealth countries. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... This article is about the City of Manchester in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ...


The present University was formed in 2004 by the dissolution of the Victoria University of Manchester (which was commonly known as the University of Manchester) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) and the subsequent formation of a single institution. The University of Manchester is a member of the Russell Group and was named University of the Year 2006. This followed the awarding by the inaugural Times Higher Education Supplement's University of the Year prize in 2005.[3] The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Sunday Times University of the Year is an annual award given to a British university by The Sunday Times. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ...

Contents

History

The University of Manchester coat of arms
The University of Manchester coat of arms
The university's Whitworth Hall. This archway was the inspiration for the logo of the Victoria University of Manchester
The university's Whitworth Hall. This archway was the inspiration for the logo of the Victoria University of Manchester

While the present University was formed in 2004, its constituent parts date from as early as 1824. The University's history is closely linked to Manchester's emergence as the world's first industrial city. John Dalton together with Manchester businessmen and industrialists established the Mechanics' Institute (later to become UMIST) in 1824 to ensure that workers could learn the basic principles of science. Similarly, John Owens, a Manchester textile merchant, left a bequest of £96,942 in 1851 for the purpose of founding a college for the education of males on non-sectarian lines. Owens College (to become the Victoria University of Manchester) was established and granted a Royal Charter in 1880 to become England's first civic university. It was initially housed in a building, complete with Adams staircase, on the corner of Quay Street and Byron Street which had been the home of the philanthropist Richard Cobden, and subsequently was to house Manchester County Court. UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1164 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1164 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a large university in Manchester in England. ... John Dalton John Dalton (September 6, 1766 – July 27, 1844) was an English chemist and physicist, born at Eaglesfield, near Cockermouth in Cumberland. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... John Owens (1790–1846), English merchant, was born in Manchester, England in 1790, the son of a prosperous merchant. ... Richard Cobden Richard Cobden (June 3, 1804 – April 2, 1865) was a British manufacturer and Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with John Bright in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League. ...


By 1905 the two institutions were a large and active force in the area, with the Mechanics' Institute, the forerunner of the modern UMIST, forming a Faculty of Technology and working alongside the Victoria University of Manchester. Before the merger, the Universities between them counted 23 Nobel Prize winners amongst their former staff and students. Manchester has traditionally been particularly strong in the sciences, with the nuclear nature of the atom being discovered at Manchester, and the world's first programmable electronic computer coming into being in the city. Famous scientists associated with the university including the physicists John Dalton, Niels Bohr, Ernest Rutherford, James Chadwick, Arthur Schuster, Hans Geiger, Ernest Marsden and Balfour Stewart. However, the university has also contributed in many other fields, and the mathematicians Paul Erdős and Alan Turing, the author Anthony Burgess, philosophers Ludwig Wittgenstein and Alasdair MacIntyre, the Pritzker Prize and RIBA Stirling Prize winning architect Norman Foster and the composer Peter Maxwell Davies all attended, or worked in, Manchester. Well-known figures among the current academic staff include author Martin Amis, computer scientist Steve Furber, literary critic Terry Eagleton. The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... John Dalton John Dalton (September 6, 1766 – July 27, 1844) was an English chemist and physicist, born at Eaglesfield, near Cockermouth in Cumberland. ... Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 – 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a nuclear physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics. ... Sir James Chadwick, CH (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate who is best known for discovering the neutron. ... Sir (Franz) Arthur (Friedrich) Schuster FRS (September 12, 1851 - October 17, 1934) was a versatile physicist known for his work in spectroscopy, electrochemistry, optics, X-radiography and the application of harmonic analysis to physics. ... Johannes (Hans) Wilhelm Geiger (September 30, 1882 – September 24, 1945) was a German physicist. ... Sir Ernest Marsden (1888 - 1970), was a British-New Zealand physicist. ... Balfour Stewart (November 1, 1828 - December 19, 1887), Scottish physicist, was born in Edinburgh, and was educated at the university of that city. ... Paul ErdÅ‘s (Hungarian: ErdÅ‘s Pál, in English occasionally Paul Erdos or Paul Erdös, March 26, 1913 – September 20, 1996), was an immensely prolific (and famously eccentric) Hungarian-born mathematician. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer. ... Anthony Burgess (February 25, 1917 – November 22, 1993) was a British novelist, critic and composer. ... Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein (IPA: ) (April 26, 1889 in Vienna, Austria – April 29, 1951 in Cambridge, England) was an Austrian philosopher who contributed several ground-breaking ideas to philosophy, primarily in the foundations of logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of language, and the philosophy of mind. ... Alasdair Chalmers MacIntyre (born January 12, 1929 in Glasgow, Scotland) is a philosopher primarily known for his contribution to moral and political philosophy but known also for his work in history of philosophy and theology. ... The Pritzker Architecture Prize is awarded annually by the Hyatt Foundation to honor a living architect. ... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ... Sir Peter Maxwell Davies, CBE (b. ... Photo of Martin Amis by Robert Birnbaum Martin Amis (born August 25, 1949) is an English novelist. ... Stephen Byram Furber was born in Manchester, England, in 1953. ... Terry Eagleton (born in Salford, Lancashire (now Greater Manchester), England, on February 22, 1943) is a British literary critic and philosopher. ...


University today

The Sackville Street Building, formerly known as UMIST Main building
The Sackville Street Building, formerly known as UMIST Main building

The newly merged University of Manchester was officially launched on 22 October 2004 when the Queen handed over the Royal Charter. It has the largest number of full time students in the UK, unless the University of London is counted as a single university. It teaches more academic subjects than any other British University. The President and Vice-Chancellor of the new University is Alan Gilbert, former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne. One of the stated ambitions of the newly combined university is to 'establish it by 2015 among the 25 strongest research universities in the world on commonly accepted criteria of research excellence and performance'.[4] Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 780 KB)UMIST main building on Whitworth Street Photograph taken by Lmno on 24 Sept 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 780 KB)UMIST main building on Whitworth Street Photograph taken by Lmno on 24 Sept 2004 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Sackville Street can refer to both a steet in central Manchester, England and a large, historic building on that street. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... Website http://www. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Alan Gilbert, born in Brisbane on 11 September 1944, once a historian is now President and Vice Chancellor of the University of Manchester. ... The University of Melbourne, is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. ...


The Times Higher World University Rankings 2007 ranked Manchester 30th in the world.[5] This followed the awarding by the inaugural Times Higher Supplement's University of the Year prize in 2005.[6] The Academic Ranking of World Universities 2007 published by the Institute of Higher Education of Shanghai Jiao Tong University ranked Manchester 5th in the UK, 9th in Europe and 48th in the world.[7] According to High Fliers Research Limited's survey, 'The Graduate Market in 2007', University of Manchester students are being targeted by more top recruiters for 2007 graduate vacancies than any other UK university students.[8] The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as the Times Higher or THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ...


Manchester has the largest total income of all UK universities, standing at £590 million as of 2005[9] but its deficit for the 2005/6 financial year stands at £20.6 million.[10]. Some 750 posts will go, with 1100 staff applying for redundancy[11]. Its research income of £200 million is the fifth largest of any university in the country. Despite its size The University of Manchester is divided into only four faculties, each sub-divided into schools: 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences consisting of the Schools of Medicine; Dentistry; Nursing, Midwifery and Social Work; Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences; and Psychological Sciences.
  • Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences consisting of the Schools of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Science; Chemistry; Computer Science; Earth, Atmospheric and Environmental Science; Physics and Astronomy; Electrical & Electronic Engineering; Materials; Mathematics; and Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering.
  • Faculty of Humanities includes the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures (a rather catchall title incorporating Archaeology; Art History; Classics and Ancient History; Drama; English and American Studies; History; Music; and Religions and Theology). The other Schools are Education; Environment and Development; Architecture; Informatics (formed from the UMIST Department of Computation); Languages, Linguistics and Cultures; Law; Social Sciences and the Manchester Business School.
  • Faculty of Life Sciences unusually consisting of a single school.

Manchester Medical School is the medical school of Manchester University. ... The School of Chemical Engineering and Analytical Sciences (CEAS) University of Manchester was formed by the merger in 2004 of the former UMIST departments of Chemical Engineering, and DIAS - the Department of Instrumentation and Analytical Sciences - and the Centre for Process Integration. ... The School of Computer Science at the University of Manchester is part of the Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences of the University of Manchester which teaches and researches Computer Science. ... The School of Physics and Astronomy, formed by the merger of the Departments of Physics at the Victoria University of Manchester and UMIST in 2004 when the universities merged to form the University of Manchester, is one of the largest and most active physics departments in the United Kingdom and... The School of Materials University of Manchester is unusual in that the Materials Science departments at UMIST and the Victoria University of Manchester were already joint before the merger of those two institutions in 2004. ... The School of Mathematics at the University of Manchester is one of the largest mathematics departments in the UK, with around 80 academic staff and an annual undergraduate intake of around 350 a year (including students studying mathematics with another subject) and around 200 postgraduate student. ... The Manchester School of Architecture (MSA) was formed in 1996 with the merger of the architecture departments of the University of Manchester and Manchester Metropolitan University. ... Manchester Business School (MBS) is the business and management school of the University of Manchester in England. ...

Campus and facilities

One Central Park

The Main Campus of the University consists of the roughly adjoining sites of the former UMIST campus, near Sackville Street, and the former main campus of the Victoria University of Manchester, in the vicinity of Oxford Road. The terms North Campus and South Campus (respectively) are sometimes used when making a distinction between the former sites, though the official status of these terms is unclear, and are not universally used. In addition there are a number of other university buildings located throughout the city, and throughout the further region, such as One Central Park and Jodrell Bank Observatory, the latter in the nearby county of Cheshire. The former is a collaboration between Manchester University and other partners in the region which offers office space to accommodate new start-up firms as well as venues for conferences and workshops.[12] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 228 pixelsFull resolution (874 × 249 pixel, file size: 182 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 228 pixelsFull resolution (874 × 249 pixel, file size: 182 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU... Sackville Street can refer to both a steet in central Manchester, England and a large, historic building on that street. ... The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... A county is generally a sub-unit of regional self-government within a sovereign jurisdiction. ... For other uses, see Cheshire (disambiguation). ...


Major projects

The atrium inside the new £38m Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre
The atrium inside the new £38m Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre
The flagship University Place building, under construction in October 2007, on the site of the former Maths Tower
The flagship University Place building, under construction in October 2007, on the site of the former Maths Tower

Following the merger, the University embarked on a £600 million programme of capital investment, to deliver eight new buildings and 15 major refurbishment projects by 2010, partly financed by an asset sale [13]. These include: Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (479x645, 149 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (479x645, 149 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The atrium of the Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (1,600 × 1,200 pixels, file size: 1. ... 2010 (MMX) will be a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • £60 m Flagship University Place building
  • £56 m Alan Turing Building: housing Mathematics, the Photon Sciences Institute and the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics.
  • £50 m Life Sciences Research Building
  • £38 m Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre (MIB)
  • £33 m Life Sciences and Medical and Human Sciences Building
  • £31 m Humanities Building - now officially called the "Arthur Lewis Building"
  • £20 m Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre (WMIC)
  • £18 m Re-location of School of Pharmacy
  • £17 m John Rylands Library, Deansgate
  • £13 m Chemistry Building
  • £10 m Functional Biology Building

This article is about the Alan Turing Building in Manchester, there is another building of the the same name at QinetiQ in Malvern. ... The Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory, part of the Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics The Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, at the University of Manchester, UK, consists of the Jodrell Bank Observatory and the academics based in the Alan Turing Building in Manchester. ... The atrium of the Manchester Interdisciplinary Biocentre. ... Exterior of the Wolfson Molecular Imaging Centre. ... The John Rylands Library (inaugurated October 1899) is a collection of historic books and manuscripts in Manchester, England. ...

John Rylands University Library

The University's library, the John Rylands University Library, is the largest non-legal deposit library in the UK, as well as being the country's third-largest academic library after those of Oxford and Cambridge.[14] The oldest part of the library, founded in memory of John Rylands by his wife Enriqueta Augustina Rylands as an independent institution, is situated in a Victorian Gothic building on Deansgate, Manchester city centre. This site houses an important collection of historic books and manuscripts, including the oldest extant New Testament document, Rylands Library Papyrus P52, the so-called St John's fragment. The Deansgate site has recently reopened to the public, following major improvements and renovations, including the construction of the pitched roof originally intended. The John Rylands University Library (JRUL) is the University of Manchesters library and information service. ... United States Library of Congress, Jefferson building A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a nation to serve as the pre-eminent repository of information for that country. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... John Rylands (February 7, 1801 - December 11, 1888) was a British weaver and entrepreneur. ... Enriqueta Augustina Rylands (May 31, 1843 - February 4, 1908) was the founder of the John Rylands Library, Manchester. ... ... The Manchester Evening News Head Office on Deansgate. ... City of Manchester. ... This article is about the Christian scriptures. ... John Rylands Library Papyrus P52, recto The Rylands Library Papyrus P52, also known as the St Johns fragment, is a papyrus conserved at the John Rylands Library, Manchester, UK. The front (recto) contains lines from the Gospel of John 18:31-33, in Greek, and the back (verso) contains...


Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics

The 76 m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory.

The Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics is a combination of the astronomical academic staff, situated in Manchester, and the Jodrell Bank Observatory near Goostrey, about ten miles (16 km) west of Macclesfield. The observatory boasts the third largest fully-movable radio telescope in the world, the Lovell Telescope, constructed in the 1950s. It has played an important role in the research of quasars, pulsars and gravitational lenses, and has played a role in confirming Einstein's theory of General Relativity. Download high resolution version (800x890, 173 KB) The 76. ... Download high resolution version (800x890, 173 KB) The 76. ... The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... , Goostrey is an an old farming village and civil parish within the Congleton borough of Cheshire, England. ... , Macclesfield is a market town in Cheshire, England with a population of about 50,688 (2001 census for Macclesfield urban sub-area). ... The 76m Lovell Telescope at Jodrell Bank Observatory. ... The introduction to this article provides insufficient context for those unfamiliar with the subject matter. ... It has been suggested that Radio pulsar be merged into this article or section. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... For a less technical and generally accessible introduction to the topic, see Introduction to general relativity. ...


Manchester Museum

"Stan" the T. rex at Manchester Museum on 4 November 2004 when he was first exhibited
Main article: Manchester Museum

The Manchester Museum provides access to about six million[specify] items sourced from around the world. Collections include butterflies and carvings from India, birds and bark-cloth from the Pacific, live frogs and ancient pottery from America, fossils and native art from Australia, mammals and ancient Egyptian craftsmanship from Africa, plants, coins and minerals from Europe, art from past civilisations of the Mediterranean, and beetles, armour and archery from Asia.[citation needed] The museum recently acquired a cast of a fossilised Tyrannosaurus rex called "Stan", which was unveiled on 4 November 2004. Download high resolution version (1128x1593, 129 KB)Stan the T rex at Manchester Museum. ... Download high resolution version (1128x1593, 129 KB)Stan the T rex at Manchester Museum. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Manchester Museum is owned by the University of Manchester. ... Binomial name Tyrannosaurus rex Osborn, 1905 Synonyms Manospondylus gigas Dynamosaurus imperiosus Dinotyrannus megagracilis Nanotyrannus lancensis? Tyrannosaurus (IPA pronunciation or ; from the Greek τυραννόσαυρος, meaning tyrant lizard) is a genus of tyrannosaurid theropod dinosaur. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Whitworth Art Gallery

The Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester
The Whitworth Art Gallery, Manchester
Main article: Whitworth Art Gallery

The Whitworth Art Gallery is home to collections of internationally famous British watercolours, textiles and wallpapers, as well as modern and historic prints, drawings, paintings and sculpture. A programme of temporary exhibitions runs throughout the year, with the Mezzanine Court serving as a venue for showing sculpture. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1730 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 1730 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Whitworth Art Gallery is an art gallery in Manchester, England, boasting about 31,000 items in its collection. ...


Contact Theatre

Main article: Contact Theatre

The University's Contact Theatre mostly stages live performances of modern works and participatory work for younger audiences. It is housed in a fortress-style building on the Oxford Road, with a unique energy-efficient system, using its high towers.[citation needed] The interior houses three performance spaces, a lounge bar and "Hot Air", a reactive public artwork, in the foyer space. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1234x1034, 750 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1234x1034, 750 KB) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Contact Theatre is a theatre owned by The University of Manchester. ... The Contact Theatre is a theatre owned by The University of Manchester. ...


Manchester Conference Centre

Owned and operated by the University, Manchester Conference Centre on Sackville Street offers conference facilities in its two theatres (seating up to 300) and 19 seminar rooms. The Manchester Conference Centre is located at the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology, which in 2004 merged with the University of Manchester. ... Sackville Street can refer to both a steet in central Manchester, England and a large, historic building on that street. ...


Old Quadrangle

The Old Quadrangle
The Old Quadrangle

The buildings around the old quadrangle date from the time of Owens College, and were designed in a Gothic style by Alfred Waterhouse (and his son Paul Waterhouse). Today, the museum continues to occupy one side (including the tower) and the grand setting of Whitworth Hall is used for the conferment of degrees. The old Christie Library now houses Christie's Bistro, and the remainder of the buildings are used by administrative departments. Main Quadrangle University of Manchester by Nick Higham. ... Main Quadrangle University of Manchester by Nick Higham. ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... The Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, has an ornate terracotta facade typical of high Victorian architecture. ... Paul Waterhouse, (d 1924), son and business partner of Alfred Waterhouse and father of Michael Waterhouse, all architects, designed buildings in England. ... The Manchester Museum is owned by the University of Manchester. ...


Chancellors Hotel and Conference Centre

Formerly named The Firs, the original house was built in 1850 for Sir Joseph Whitworth, by Edward Walters, who was also responsible for Manchester’s Free Trade Hall and Strangeways Prison. Whitworth used the Firs mainly as a social, political and business base, entertaining radicals of the age such as John Bright, Richard Cobden, William Forster and T.H. Huxley at the time of the Reform Bill of 1867. Whitworth, credited with raising the art of machine-tool building to a previously-unknown level, supported the new Mechanics Institute in Manchester – the birthplace of UMIST - and helped to found the Manchester School of Design. In 1882, the Firs was leased to C.P. Scott, Editor of the Manchester Guardian. After Scott's death the house became the property of Owens College, and was the Vice-Chancellor's residence until 1991. The old house now forms the western wing of Chancellors Hotel & Conference Centre at the University. The newer eastern wing houses the circular Flowers Theatre, six individual conference rooms and the majority of the 75 hotel bedrooms. Chancellors Hotel & Conference Centre Chancellors Hotel & Conference Centre (formerly named The Firs), is a Grade II listed[1] mansion in Fallowfield, Manchester, England. ... Sir Joseph Whitworth Sir Joseph Whitworth, Baronet (December 21, 1803 - January 22, 1887) was an English engineer and entrepreneur. ... The Free Trade Hall in Manchester, England, was for many years a focal point for public debate and cultural activity in the city. ... HM Prison Manchester is a British prison. ... John Bright John Bright (November 16, 1811–March 27, 1889), was a British Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with Richard Cobden in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League. ... Richard Cobden Richard Cobden (June 3, 1804 – April 2, 1865) was a British manufacturer and Radical and Liberal statesman, associated with John Bright in the formation of the Anti-Corn Law League. ... William Forster (Born Madras October 16, 1818; Died Edgecliff, October 30, 1882}. Premier of New South Wales October 27, 1859 to March 9, 1860. ... Thomas Huxley Thomas Henry Huxley F.R.S. (May 4, 1825 - June 29, 1895) was a British biologist, known as Darwins Bulldog for his defence of Charles Darwins theory of evolution. ... In the United Kingdom, the Reform Act could refer to various Acts Reform Act 1832 (The First Reform Act or The Great Reform Act), which abolished rotten boroughs and gave representation to previously unrepresented urban areas like Birmingham etc. ... Historically, Mechanics Institutes were educational establishments formed to provide adult education, particularly in technical subjects, to working people. ... UMIST Main Building on Whitworth Street The University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology (UMIST) was a university based in the centre of the city of Manchester in England (, ). It specialised in technical and scientific subjects and was a major centre for research. ... Charles Prestwich Scott (October 26, 1846 - January 1, 1932) was a British journalist, publisher and politician. ... The Guardian was also the name of a U.S. television series. ...


Residential campuses

Dalton Ellis Hall claims to be the oldest purpose built hall of residence in England
Dalton Ellis Hall claims to be the oldest purpose built hall of residence in England

Prior to merging, the two former universities had for some time been sharing their residential facilities. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 1. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The North Campus lies on the previous UMIST Campus, comprising five halls of residence central to the Sackville Street building (Weston, Lambert, Fairfield, Chandos, Wright Robinson), and several other halls within a 5-15 minute walk away, such as the Grosvenor group of halls and Whitworth Park. Sackville Street can refer to both a steet in central Manchester, England and a large, historic building on that street. ...


The Fallowfield Campus, situated 2 miles (3.2 km) south of the main university campus (the South Campus), is the largest of the university's residential campuses. The Owens Park tower lies at the centre of it, with Oak House being the other main hall of residence. Woolton Hall is also present on Fallowfield campus next to Oak house. Allen Hall is a traditional hall situated nearby equally classic Ashburne Hall. Richmond Park is a relatively recent addition to the campus. The Fallowfield Campus is the main residential campus of the University of Manchester, located 2 miles south of the university in Fallowfield, Manchester. ... Owens park in 1975, approximately ten years old Owens Park is a large hall of residence located in the Fallowfield district of the city of Manchester, England. ... Oak House is the largest Halls of Residence in the Fallowfield Campus and is owned by The University of Manchester. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


Victoria Park Campus, situated between Fallowfield and the South Campus, just off Rusholme, comprises several houses of residence. Among these are St Anselm Hall with Canterbury Court, Dalton-Ellis Hall (with Pankhurst Court), Hulme Hall (including Burkhardt House), St Gabriel's Hall and Opal Gardens Hall. Rusholme is a part of Manchester, in North West England, about two miles south of Manchester city centre. ... St Anselm Hall is a hall of residence in the Victoria Park campus of the University of Manchester, and is also one of, if not the only, male only halls of residence in the UK. St Anselm Hall was founded by the Church of England in 1907 and licensed by... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gabs is a small and friendly all-female hall of residence belonging to The University of Manchester with a caring and lively atmosphere situated within easy walking distance of The University. ...


Clubs and societies

The University's Boat Club is one of many Athletic Union Clubs that Manchester offers [3]

There are many different clubs and societies operating within the University of Manchester. Common areas include sports, hobbies, politics and religion. The University of Manchester website details the various societies in far greater depth than is present below. There are several fairs during the freshers period in which various clubs and societies promote themselves. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 298 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 317 pixel, file size: 54 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) i created this myself File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 298 pixelsFull resolution (850 × 317 pixel, file size: 54 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) i created this myself File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


Today the university can boast more than 80 health and fitness classes every whilst over 3000 students are members of the 42 various Athlethic Union Clubs. Generally, the sports societies in Manchester vary widely in their level and scope. Many of the more popular sports have several university teams as well as departmental teams which may be placed in a league against other teams from different departments/halls of residence within the university. Common teams include: Hockey, Rugby, Football, Basketball, Netball and Cricket. The Manchester Aquatics Centre, the swimming pool used for the Manchester Commonwealth Games is also on the campus. The Manchester Aquatics Centre is a public aquatic sports facility in Manchester, England. ... The 2002 Commonwealth Games were held in Manchester, England from July 25 to August 4, 2002. ...


Every year elite sportsmen and sportswomen at the university are selected for membership of the XXI Club, a society that was formed in 1932 and exists to promote sporting excellence at the university. Most members have gained a Full Maroon for representing The University and many have excelled at a British Universities or National level.


Hobbies has been used as an umbrella term to cover the huge range of other clubs and societies on offer. These vary hugely between areas like Languages, Nationalities, Wargames, Artsbased e.g. Anime and many more. If a particular society does not exist there is usually a mechanism by which it can be created.


There is a wide range of religious based societies and places of worship within the University. A religions fair is also held, where information is distributed about the different societies. There are large Christian, Muslim, Jewish, Hindu, Sikh, Buddhist and Bahá'í societies which hold regular events and meetings. For other uses, see Christian (disambiguation). ... There is also a collection of Hadith called Sahih Muslim A Muslim (Arabic: مسلم, Persian: Mosalman or Mosalmon Urdu: مسلمان, Turkish: Müslüman, Albanian: Mysliman, Bosnian: Musliman) is an adherent of the religion of Islam. ... For other uses, see Jew (disambiguation). ... This article discusses the adherents of Hinduism. ... Sikhism (IPA: or ; Punjabi: , , IPA: ), founded on the teachings of Guru Nanak Dev and nine successive gurus in fifteenth century Northern India, is the fifth-largest religion in the world. ... A statue of the Sakyamuni Buddha in Tawang Gompa, India. ... This article is about the generally recognized global religious community. ...


The university has also a strong Drama tradition and past students include Meera Syal, Adrian Edmondson, Rik Mayall and Ben Elton. The Drama Society holds a yearly drama festival, involving 13 plays in five theatres and over 120 students, as well as coordinating several independent student run productions. The Fringe Society in 2006 took twelve plays and over 70 students to the Edinburgh Fringe festival under the company name "Johnny Miller Presents". The company was awarded a ThreeWeeks Editors' Award, which honours the most talked about and exciting people and companies at the festival.[15] Meera Syal MBE (born Feroza Syal 27 June 1961 in Essington, near Wolverhampton, England) is a British comedienne, writer, playwright, singer, journalist and actress. ... Adrian Charles Edmondson (born 24 January 1957), sometimes credited as Ade Edmondson is an English actor, comedian, director and writer. ... Richard Michael Rik Mayall (born 7 March 1958) is an English comedian and actor. ... Benjamin Charles Elton (born 3 May 1959) is an English comedian, writer and director. ...


The University of Manchester Students' Union

The University of Manchester Students' Union is the representative body of students at the University of Manchester. There are now two Union buildings - the Steve Biko building inherited from the Victoria University of Manchester, and the Barnes Wallis building from UMIST. Manchester Academy, the Union's music venue, hosts bands most nights of the week.[citation needed] The student newspaper is called Student Direct. The radio station, Fuse FM, broadcasts twice-yearly on both FM and also over the internet. The University of Manchester Students Union (UMSU) is the representative body of students at the University of Manchester, England, and is the UKs largest students union. ... Steve Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977) was a noted anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s. ... Sir Barnes Neville Wallis, Kt, CBE, FRS, RDI, commonly known as Barnes Wallis, (26 September 1887 – 30 October 1979) was an English scientist, engineer and inventor. ... For other places with the same name, see Manchester Academy (disambiguation). ...


NHS hospitals

The University of Manchester's medical school is one of the largest in Europe,[citation needed] with over 400 medical students being trained in each of the clinical years and over 350 students in the pre-clinical/phase 1 years. Approximately 110 students who have completed pre-clinical training at the Bute Medical School (University of St Andrews) join the third year of the undergraduate medical programme each year. Affiliations University of St Andrews Website http://medicine. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ...


The University's Faculty of Medical and Human Sciences has links with a large number of NHS hospitals in the north west of England and maintains presences in its four base hospitals: Manchester Royal Infirmary (located at the southern end of the main university campus on Oxford Road), Wythenshawe Hospitals, Salford's Hope Hospital and the Royal Preston Hospital. All are used for clinical medical training for doctors and nurses. The National Health Service (NHS) is the publicly-funded healthcare system of the United Kingdom. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Hope Hospital is a large hospital in Salford, England, managed by the Salford Royal Hospitals NHS Trust. ... Lancashire Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust is one of the United Kingdoms thirty-two NHS Foundation Trusts. ...


The School of Pharmacy[4] at Manchester University also benefits from the University's links with the Manchester Royal Infirmary, Wythenshawe Hospitals and Salford's Hope hospital. All of the undergraduate pharmacy students gain hospital experience through these links and are the only pharmacy students in the UK to have an extensive course completed in secondary care [16]


Notable academic staff and alumni

Many notable and famous people have worked or studied at one or both of the two former institutions that merged to form the University of Manchester, including 23 Nobel prize laureates. Some of the best known include John Dalton (founder of modern atomic theory), George E. Davis (founded the discipline of Chemical Engineering), Bernard Lovell (a pioneer of radio astronomy), Alan Turing (one of the founders of computer science and artificial intelligence), Irene Khan (current secretary general of Amnesty International) and Robert Bolt (two times Academy Award winner and three times Golden Globe winner for screenwriting Lawrence of Arabia and Doctor Zhivago). Additionally, a number of politicians are associated with the university, including the first President of Israel, the current Presidents of Belize, Iceland and Trinidad and Tobago as well as several ministers among others in the United Kingdom, Malaysia, Canada and Singapore. Many famous people have worked or studied at the Victoria University of Manchester and the University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology institutions which merged in 2004 to form the University of Manchester. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... John Dalton John Dalton (September 6, 1766 – July 27, 1844) was an English chemist and physicist, born at Eaglesfield, near Cockermouth in Cumberland. ... George E. Davis (1850-1907) is regarded as the founding father of the discipline of Chemical Engineering. ... Chemical engineering is the branch of engineering that deals with the application of physical science (e. ... Sir Alfred Charles Bernard Lovell OBE PhD FRS (born 31 August 1913, Oldland Common, Bristol) is a British physicist and radio astronomer. ... The Very Large Array, a radio interferometer in New Mexico, USA Radio astronomy is a subfield of astronomy that studies celestial objects in the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician, and cryptographer. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... AI redirects here. ... Irene Zubaida Khan (born December 24, 1956 in Dhaka, East Pakistan) is the Secretary General of Amnesty International, a human rights organization. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Amnesty international Amnesty International (commonly known as Amnesty or AI) is an international non-governmental organization which defines its mission as to undertake research and action focused on preventing and ending grave abuses of the rights to physical and mental integrity, freedom of conscience... Robert Oxton Bolt (August 15, 1924 – February 12, 1995) was an English playwright and screenwriter. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ... The Golden Globe Awards are American awards for motion pictures and television programs, given out each year during a formal dinner. ... Thomas Edward Lawrence (August 16, 1888 – May 19, 1935), also known as Lawrence of Arabia, and (apparently, among his Arab allies) Aurens or El Aurens, became famous for his role as a British liaison officer during the Arab Revolt of 1916–1918. ... For other uses, see Doctor Zhivago (disambiguation). ...


Nobel prize winners

Chemistry

  • Ernest Rutherford (awarded Nobel prize in 1908), for his investigations into the disintegration of the elements and the chemistry of radioactive substances (He was the first to probe the atom).
  • Arthur Harden (awarded Nobel prize in 1929), for investigations on the fermentation of sugar and fermentative enzymes.
  • Walter Haworth (awarded Nobel prize in 1937), for his investigations on carbohydrates and vitamin C.
  • Robert Robinson (awarded Nobel prize in 1947), for his investigations on plant products of biological importance, especially the alkaloids.
  • Alexander Todd (awarded Nobel prize in 1957), for his work on nucleotides and nucleotide co-enzymes.
  • Melvin Calvin (awarded Nobel prize in 1961), for his research on the carbon dioxide assimilation in plants.
  • John Charles Polanyi (awarded Nobel prize in 1986), for his contributions concerning the dynamics of chemical elementary processes.
  • Michael Smith (awarded Nobel prize in 1993), for his fundamental contributions to the establishment of oligonucleiotide-based, site-directed mutagenesis and its development for protein studies.

Physics Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 – 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a nuclear physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics. ... Arthur Harden (October 12, 1865 – June 17, 1940) was an English biochemist. ... Sir Walter Norman Haworth (born Chorley, Lancashire March 19, 1883 – March 19, 1950) was a British chemist who is best known for his groundbreaking work on ascorbic acid (vitamin C) whilst working at Birmingham University. ... Sir Robert Robinson, (13 September 1886 – 8 February 1975), won the 1947 Nobel Prize in Chemistry [1] for his research on plant dyestuffs (anthocyanins) and alkaloids. ... Alexander Robertus Todd, Baron Todd (October 2, 1907 - January 10, 1997) was the 1957 Nobel Laureate in chemistry for his work on nucleotides and nucleotide co_enzymes. ... Melvin Calvin he had fun in bed Melvin Calvin (April 8, 1911 – January 8, 1997) was a chemist most famed for discovering the Calvin cycle (along with Andrew Benson), for which he was awarded the 1961 Nobel Prize in Chemistry. ... John Charles Polanyi (born January 23, 1929) is a Canadian chemist. ... Michael Smith, CC, OBC (April 26, 1932 – October 4, 2000) was a British-born Canadian biochemist who was the 1993 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry. ...

  • Joseph John (J. J.) Thomson (awarded Nobel prize in 1906), in recognition of the great merits of his theoretical and experimental investigations on the conduction of electricity by gases.
  • William Lawrence Bragg (awarded Nobel prize in 1915), for his services in the analysis of crystal structure by means of X-rays.
  • Niels Bohr (awarded Nobel prize in 1922), for his fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics.
  • Charles Thomson Rees (C. T. R.) Wilson (awarded Nobel prize in 1927), for his method of making the paths of electrically charged particles visible by condensation of vapour.
  • James Chadwick (awarded Nobel prize in 1935), for the discovery of the neutron.
  • George de Hevesy (awarded Nobel prize in 1943), for his work on the use of isotopes as tracers in the study of chemical processes.
  • Patrick M. Blackett (awarded Nobel prize in 1948), for developing cloud chamber and confirming/discovering positron.
  • Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (awarded Nobel prize in 1951), for his pioneer work on the transmutation of atomic nuclei by artificially accelerated atomic particles.
  • Hans Bethe (awarded Nobel prize in 1967), for his contributions to the theory of nuclear reactions, especially his discoveries concerning the energy production in stars.
  • Nevill Francis Mott (awarded Nobel prize in 1977), for his fundamental theoretical investigations of the electronic structure of magnetic and disordered systems.

Physiology and Medicine Sir Joseph John Thomson Sir Joseph John Thomson (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940), often known as J. J. Thomson, was an English physicist, the discoverer of the electron. ... Sir William Lawrence Bragg CH, FRS, (31 March 1890 – 1 July 1971) was an Australian physicist who shared the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1915 with his father Sir William Henry Bragg. ... Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. ... Charles Thomson Rees Wilson CH (February 14, 1869 – November 15, 1959) was a Scottish physicist. ... Sir James Chadwick, CH (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate who is best known for discovering the neutron. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... George Charles de Hevesy (born as Hevesy György, also known as Georg Karl von Hevesy) (August 1, 1885 in Budapest – July 5, 1966) was a Hungarian chemist who was important in the development of the tracer method where radioactive tracers are used to study chemical processes, e. ... Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, Baron Blackett (November 18, 1897—July 13, 1974) was a British experimental physicist known for his work on cloud chambers, cosmic rays, and paleomagnetism. ... See also: John Cockroft (politician) Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (May 27, 1897 - September 18, 1967) was a British physicist. ... Hans Albrecht Bethe (pronounced bay-tuh; July 2, 1906 – March 6, 2005), was a German-American physicist who won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1967 for his work on the theory of stellar nucleosynthesis. ... Sir Nevill Francis Mott (September 30, 1905 – August 8, 1996) was a British physicist. ...

  • Archibald Vivian Hill (awarded Nobel prize in 1922), for his discovery relating to the production of heat in the muscle. One of the founders of the diverse disciplines of biophysics and operations research.
  • Sir John Sulston (awarded Nobel prize in 2002), for his discoveries concerning 'genetic regulation of organ development and programmed cell death'. In 2007 it was announced that Sulston will join Manchester's Faculty of Life Sciences and will chair Institute of Science, Ethics and Innovation.[17]

Economics Archibald Vivian Hill CH CBE (September 26, 1886–June 3, 1977) was a British physiologist, one of the founders of the diverse disciplines of biophysics and operations research. ... John E. Sulston received his degree as a chemist at Cambridge, UK, but devoted his scientific life to biological research, especially in the field of molecular biology. ...

  • John Hicks (awarded Nobel prize in 1974), for his pioneering contributions to general economic equilibrium theory and welfare theory.
  • Sir Arthur Lewis (awarded Nobel prize in 1979), for his pioneering research into economic development research with particular consideration of the problems of developing countries.
  • Joseph E. Stiglitz (awarded Nobel prize in 2001), for his analyses of markets with asymmetric information. Currently, Professor Joseph E. Stiglitz heads the Brooks World Poverty Institute (BWPI) at the University of Manchester.
Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

For other persons named John Hicks, see John Hicks (disambiguation). ... Sir William Arthur Lewis (January 23, 1915 - June 15, 1991) was a British economist well known for his contributions in the field of economic development. ... Joseph Stiglitz (born February 9, 1943) is an American economist and a member of the Columbia University faculty. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

"Obit."

It is unusual; i know; to write a obituary, before someone, or something is dead; however in this case, i feel that there is a warrented case for writing it now, for all to see. The staff & students, having been caught performing a Nazi-Eugenics program, "World-Wide", via the Internet; & are now, positively determined to take the whole world with them; straight into the Malthusian Catastrophe. The most open worldly symptom of their "Eurocentric Revolution" is the pure lunacey of people such as Al Gore; & a more extreme form of Global Warming; "Thinking"! "I"; however; think this has more to do with a certain *Al Gore; & his ownership of shares in Apple Computers; & a certain bit of Nazi academic, blackmail; & this, in turn, has led him to be the Nazi academic backdoor-boy of the 21st century; oh; & its got free £1550 Apple laptops, for every European student; that wants one. National Socialism redirects here. ... Eugenics is the self-direction of human evolution: Logo from the Second International Eugenics Conference [7], 1921, depicting it as a tree which unites a variety of different fields. ... Malthusian catastrophe, sometimes known as a Malthusian check, Malthusian crisis, Malthusian dilemma, Malthusian disaster, Malthusian trap, or Malthusian limit is a return to subsistence-level conditions as a result of agricultural (or, in later formulations, economic) production being eventually outstripped by growth in population. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Apple Computer, Inc. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... This article is about the fruit. ... A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ...

  • By the by; "I" am the main victim of the Manchester University-Nazi fraud; "Mr. Simon Jon Winterbottom, of , 45 Delta Close, Royton, Oldham, OL2-5DR; & "I" have been hammered by them since 1974; & "I" have to say; "For what the deviants at the "University City", have on Al Gore; "Trust me"; "I" would say; "Publish; & be dammed"; for they are truly; "The City of the Nazi-dammed"".

So yes; Al Gore there has been a victim; its me; & as for; Starbucks-Mike; or Brad; or what the fuck he calls himself; call George W Bush-{Only you can; "I" am, only the enemy of the state of UK; & as a result of them}-& tell him, what it is, that, "He" thinks he has on you; & then, "I", can have a few careful words with him, Mike; or Brad; & do it; without the fear that "The, "University City"; "Crime Syndicate"", will force, armed police, to kill me; for having the nerve, to front up one of their own. "Its grotty, but its how it is, when a University is a law to itself". & their is also the point that; Bill Clinton visited Tatton Park just after 9-11; & if they {Criminal security concerns} got him tipsy; & he talked; let us say loosely; then you; & he, both; have the Nazi scum; over a barrel; so from one none-Nazi, to hopefully another; "Get off your back-side; & tie them up". The reason for me writing this, this way, is simple; "I" am a bit of a; Anne Frank, persona, at this point; for "I" am stuck, against my free will, in EU-Nazi held, Europe; fighting against the most simple prison, devised by man; that of the compltely totalitarian; European-Thought Police; "The Public"; & as far as the Manchester Evening News; & George Orwell & 1984; & Animal Farm are concerned; they, have turned out to be more of a prophetic New Labour-Mission Statement; rather than a warning from the past; apt, considering his real name was Eric Blair; & his father ran the ministry's Opium-India arm in the closing days of the Raj. In short ever since "I" recovered from the hammering that they gave me; in specific "1997-2003 Aug"; "I", have had to toil against the public, to form a coherent formula, for their "M-O"; in other words; who; what; where; & why. The "who" is fairly simple; most of the planet; as the American writers call it, "Liberal Harmogany"; something that Jeremy Paxman refuses to entertain, for he wares their glasses; & no doubt; takes his quota of the "Jewish Mafia-Mandrake; & Opium-Jus"; "This Utopian-Equilibrium. "What", is a world being forced into a Malthusian Catastrophe. "Where", is Global. As for the "why"; well, Charles Galton Darwin-NPL; & his Royal Society-buddies; thought that; for the world to survive, in some form; decks needed to be swabbed. This ment; Hegelian thought; replacing faith; & a drastic re-org of society; as in back to the old days; as in; old Greek. Gods; Jade Goody; & Mother; & Slaves. How do they plan to do it; public are numb; & are on drugs & everything is being given to them on a platter; in return for the favour of being a "Totalitarian, Thought Police"; & then, they go into society; & rid it, of none-EU-Nazi individuals. As a money laundering formula, they are putting "Black-Euro", through; "Shit"; in return for the public's £50k per year intimidation money, they give "The University City"; all the family information; as in everything that they know; & knew; but as a result of the current-"Tits Up-Situ", they can no longer understand. It is, then stored, in "The Masters of Enterprise"; "Halls of Records-Colin Reader", program; & if the powers that be looked; they would find this practice all over Europe; & Africa. In other words; a bit of the two, bi-two; is going on. The holders of the information then become Gods; & the public are mere drones to be then cut off & enslaved, by the Socialist International; which is, as everyone knows; but very few care as long as the Mandrake; & Opium, keep on coming; a mere cover for The Nazi Party. The Celebs will then become mere fillers; in between the Nazi paymasters; & the drugged up; loved up; Public. University of Manchester Motto: Cognitio Sapientia Hvmanitas Knowledge, wisdom, humanity. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... Look up trust in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... This article is about the former Vice President of the United States. ... For other meanings of the name Starbuck, see Starbuck. ... Look up Mike, mike in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Brad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001 and re-elected in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. ... Look up Mike, mike in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Look up Brad in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... We dont have an article called Tatton Park Start this article Search for Tatton Park in. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Annelies Marie Anne Frank ( ) (June 12, 1929 – early March, 1945) was a European Jewish girl (born in Germany, stateless since 1941, but she claimed to be Dutch as she grew up in the Netherlands) who wrote a diary while in hiding with her family and four friends in Amsterdam during... National Socialism redirects here. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A European is primarily a person who was born into one of the countries within the continent of Europe. ... OBrien (seen here played by André Morell in the 1954 television adaption), a secret Thought Police agent The Thought Police (thinkpol in Newspeak) is the secret police in George Orwells dystopian novel Nineteen Eighty-Four. ... The Manchester Evening News is an English daily newspaper published each week day evening and on Saturdays. ... Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903 [1] [2] – 21 January 1950), better known by the pen name George Orwell, was an English author and journalist. ... This article is about the year. ... For other uses, see Animal Farm (disambiguation). ... New Labour is an alternative name of the British political Labour Party. ... Look up mission statement in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... George Orwell George Orwell was the pen name of British author Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903–21 January 1950). ... This article is about the drug. ... In many Indian languages, Raj literally means Prince or Royalty though is often used to mean something more like the English term of empire and as such is often used in reference to the Mughal Raj and the British Raj: the period of direct colonial rule of India by the... Jeremy Dickson Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is an English BBC journalist, news presenter and author. ... Mandrake may refer to: The plant Mandrake The Harry Potter mandrake plant. ... This article is about the drug. ... Jus could be: Another spelling for the Latin word for justice, ius (iuris n. ... See Utopia (disambiguation) for other meanings of this word Utopia, in its most common and general meaning, refers to a hypothetical perfect society. ... Look up equilibrium in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Malthusian catastrophe, sometimes known as a Malthusian check, Malthusian crisis, Malthusian dilemma, Malthusian disaster, Malthusian trap, or Malthusian limit is a return to subsistence-level conditions as a result of agricultural (or, in later formulations, economic) production being eventually outstripped by growth in population. ... The adjective global and adverb globally imply that the verb or noun to which they are applied applies to the entire Earth and all of its species and regions. ... Sir Charles Galton Darwin. ... NPL can stand for: the National Physical Laboratory in the UK; the Netscape Public License; the National Puzzlers League; the Nauru Pacific Line, located in Nauru; a Non Performing Loan (Financial Theory) the Northern Premier League (in English soccer); the Norwegian Premier League (in Norwegian soccer); any of the programming... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (August 27, 1770 - November 14, 1831) was a German philosopher born in Stuttgart, Württemberg, in present-day southwest Germany. ... Gods can refer to: Plurality of Gods (see polytheism); Postulated preternatural beings (see deity); The upper levels of a theatre (see the gods); A 1991 video game (see Gods (video game)); A sixties rock band (see The Gods (band)). An internet term, common among usenet veterans, for those who engage... Jade Cerisa Lorraine Goody[2] (born 5 June 1981) is a British reality television celebrity, who became famous after appearing on the Channel 4 reality show Big Brother in 2002 when she was 21 years old. ... Mom and Mommy redirect here. ... The Buxton Memorial Fountain, celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, London. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... Colin Reader is an English geologist with an interest in Ancient Egypt and is also secretary of The Manchester Ancient Egypt Society. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... A world map showing the continent of Africa Africa is the worlds second-largest and second most-populous continent, after Asia. ... Gods can refer to: Plurality of Gods (see polytheism); Postulated preternatural beings (see deity); The upper levels of a theatre (see the gods); A 1991 video game (see Gods (video game)); A sixties rock band (see The Gods (band)). An internet term, common among usenet veterans, for those who engage... The official symbol of Socialist International. ... Mandrake may refer to: The plant Mandrake The Harry Potter mandrake plant. ... This article is about the drug. ... The National Socialist German Workers Party (German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei [â–¶]), better known as the NSDAP or the Nazi Party was a political party that was led to power in Germany by Adolf Hitler in 1933. ... National Socialism redirects here. ... General public redirects here. ...


References

  1. ^ a b c Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  2. ^ Manchester unites to target world league. Sunday Times. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  3. ^ University of the Year. The University of Manchester. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  4. ^ Towards 2015. The University of Manchester. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  5. ^ World University Rankings. The Times Higher Education Supplement (2007). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  6. ^ University of the Year. The University of Manchester. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  7. ^ Top 500 World Universities. Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2007). Retrieved on 2007-09-10.
  8. ^ Most wanted students. The University of Manchester. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  9. ^ Finances. The University of Manchester. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  10. ^ see section 3(b) of Minutes of the senate meeting, 7 Feb. 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-18.
  11. ^ Manchester Evening News, 30 Oct. 2007 Job cuts may hit world class bid. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  12. ^ http://www.conference.manchester.ac.uk/meetingmanchester/meetingandaccommodationfacilities/onecentralpark/
  13. ^ Manchester Evening News 31 July 2007 Cash-strapped uni sells assets. Retrieved on 2007-10-04.
  14. ^ The claim aboutthe size is supported by the now defunct page: google cache [1] , however the currentwebsite does notmake the claim [2], accessed 07/10/2007
  15. ^ The ThreeWeeks Editors Awards 2006. Edinburgh Festival Fringe (2006-08-28). Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  16. ^ http://www.pharmacy.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/history/
  17. ^ http://www.manchester.ac.uk/aboutus/news/display/index.htm?id=125409

Coordinates: 53°27′56″N, 2°14′01″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Manchester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3902 words)
The University of Manchester in Manchester, England, was formed by the merger of the Victoria University of Manchester (commonly known as the University of Manchester before the merger) and UMIST (University of Manchester Institute of Science and Technology) on 1 October 2004.
The President and Vice-Chancellor of the new University is Alan Gilbert, former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Melbourne.
Wikispectus - a wiki prospectus for the University of Manchester
Victoria University of Manchester - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2038 words)
The Victoria University of Manchester (VUM) was a university in Manchester in England.
In 1903, the University's college in Liverpool left the Victoria University to become the independent University of Liverpool and Leeds followed in 1904 to become the University of Leeds.
On March 5, 2003 it was announced that the University was to merge with UMIST on October 1 2004, to form the largest conventional university in the UK.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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