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Encyclopedia > University of London

University of London

Latin: Universitas Londiniensis

Established 1836
Type Public
Chancellor HRH The Princess Royal
Vice-Chancellor Sir Graeme Davies
Visitor The Lord President of the Council ex officio
Students 135,090 internal (2005-2006) [1]
40,000 external [2]
Location London, United Kingdom
Colours
                     
Website http://www.lon.ac.uk/

The University of London is a university based primarily in London. It is the second-largest university in the United Kingdom (after the Open University), with 135,090 campus-based students and over 40,000 in the University of London External System. Established by Royal Charter in 1836, the University includes some of the most prestigious colleges and institutes of higher education in the world. Graduates of the University of London may use the post-nominal letters 'Lond' (Londiniensis) after their degree abbreviations. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2576x1932, 1280 KB) I am the author. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1836 (MDCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... The Princess Anne, Princess Royal (Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise; born 15 August 1950), is a member of the British Royal Family and the only daughter of Elizabeth II. She is the seventh holder of the title Princess Royal, and is currently ninth in the line of succession to the British... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Sir Graeme Davies is a British academic who has served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of London since 2003. ... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ... Website http://www. ...

Contents

Overview

Senate House, the headquarters of the federal University of London

The University is a federal body made up of 31 affiliates (19 colleges and 12 institutes).[3] The nine larger colleges are Birkbeck, Goldsmiths, King's College London, the London Business School, the London School of Economics, Queen Mary, Royal Holloway, the School of Oriental and African Studies, and University College London. One of the best known colleges, Imperial College London, officially left the University of London during celebrations of its centenary on 9 July 2007.[4] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 2100 pixel, file size: 762 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 428 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1500 × 2100 pixel, file size: 762 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Senate House of the University of London Senate House, the administrative centre of the University of London, lies in the heart of Bloomsbury between the School of Oriental and African Studies to the north and the British Museum to the south. ... Birkbeck, University of London, sometimes referred to by its former name Birkbeck College or by the abbreviation BBK, is a College of the University of London. ... The Main Building The Ben Pimlott Building The Library Warmington Tower Goldsmiths, University of London (founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute, rebranded from Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2006[2]) is a constituent college of the University of London specialising in teaching of and research into... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Website http://www. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until 2000 Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter [1] and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ... University Logo Royal Holloway, University of London is a college of the University of London located in Egham, Surrey, England. ... The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is a specialist constituent of the University of London committed to the arts and humanities, languages and cultures and the law and social sciences concerning Asia, Africa, and the Near and Middle East. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


For most practical purposes, ranging from admission of students to negotiating funding from the government, the 19 constituent colleges are treated as individual universities. Within the university federation they are known as Recognised Bodies, with the authority to examine students and have the university award them degrees. Some colleges have recently obtained the power to award their own degrees and the University has amended its statutes to allow them to do so and remain in the university.


The twelve institutes, or Listed Bodies, within the University of London offer courses leading to degrees that are both examined and awarded by the University of London. Additionally, twelve universities in England, several in Canada and many in other Commonwealth countries (notably in East Africa) began life as associate colleges of the university offering such degrees. By the 1970s almost all of these colleges had achieved independence from the University of London. An increasing number of overseas academic institutes offer courses to support students registered for the University of London External Programme's diplomas and degrees although no accredidation from London for these schools exists other than the final examinations administered by the University of London which all pupils take. For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total...  Eastern Africa (UN subregion)  East African Community  Central African Federation (defunct)  geographic, including above East Africa or Eastern Africa is the easternmost region of the African continent, variably defined by geography or geopolitics. ... Website http://www. ...


Location

The University of London owns a considerable estate of 160 buildings centred on the Bloomsbury district of central London near the Russell Square tube station.[5] Some of the University's colleges have their main buildings on the estate. The Bloomsbury campus also contains eight Halls of Residence and Senate House, which houses the Senate House Library, the chancellor's official residence and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies. By 2008, almost all of the School of Advanced Study will be in Senate House and neighbouring Stewart House.[6] Bloomsbury is an area of central London between Holborn and Euston station, developed by the Russell family in the 17th and 18th centuries into a fashionable residential area. ... Russell Square is a London Underground station on Bernard Street, Bloomsbury, not far from the British Museum and Russell Square Gardens. ... The Senate House of the University of London Senate House, the administrative centre of the University of London, lies in the heart of Bloomsbury between the School of Oriental and African Studies to the north and the British Museum to the south. ... The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the worlds leading specialist institutions [] and the largest national centre in the UK for the study of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia. ... The School of Advanced Study is a listed organisation of the University of London. ...


The estate includes several properties outside Bloomsbury, including the University Marine Biological Station, Millport on the Isle of Cumbrae, a boathouse on the Chiswick embankment, a number of self-catering units further afield, which together house nearly 3,000 students, and the full premises of the University of London Institute in Paris. Great Cumbrae and other south-west coast islands Great Cumbrae (also known as Cumbrae or the Isle of Cumbrae) is the larger of the two islands known as The Cumbraes in the lower Firth of Clyde in western Scotland (at Grid reference NS169566). ... Great Cumbrae and other south-west coast islands Great Cumbrae (also known as Cumbrae or the Isle of Cumbrae) is an island in the lower Firth of Clyde, 4 Kilometers long by 2 Kilometers wide. ... For other uses, see Chiswick (disambiguation). ... The University of London Institute in Paris (abbreviated ULIP) is a remote college of the University of London located in Paris. ...


Many of the University's college and institutes are outside Bloomsbury: those normally own their own estates.


History

The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28. This building is now part of University College London, which today is one of the many constituent colleges and institutes of the University of London.
The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28. This building is now part of University College London, which today is one of the many constituent colleges and institutes of the University of London.

Founded in 1836, the University at first comprised just two colleges: University College London, which previously had no official chartered status and did not apply religious tests to its students, and King's College London, which had been chartered since 1829 and which admitted only members of the Church of England. Both King's (founded 1829) and University College London (founded 1826) pre-date the University of London, which initially served solely as an examining body for the constituent colleges. The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28. ... The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28. ... West India Import Dock, 1830. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The Church of England logo since 1998 The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ...


In 1858 the University expanded its role by offering the University of London External System to candidates outside of the colleges, the first of its kind in the country. A new headquarters at 6 Burlington Gardens, providing the university with exam halls and offices, was built to accommodate the new role. In 1878 the University set another first when it became the first university in the UK to admit women on equal terms with men. Four female students obtained Bachelor of Arts degrees in 1880 and two obtained Bachelor of Science degrees in 1881, again the first in the country.[7] Website http://www. ... The facade of the University of London building, later the Museum of Mankind. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ...


In 1898, in part as a response to criticisms of universities which merely served as centres for the administration of tests, and calls for research and education to be more central functions of universities, the first University of London Act was passed, reforming the University and giving it responsibility for monitoring course content and academic standards within its institutions. The monitoring was conducted through newly formed centralised faculties and Boards of Studies, and King's and UCL now became constituent parts of the University of London. A symbolic element to the new centralisation of the University was the fact that UCL property became property of the University of London.[8]

An illustration of 6 Burlington Gardens, home to the university administration from 1870 to 1899.
An illustration of 6 Burlington Gardens, home to the university administration from 1870 to 1899.

This significant expansion of role meant the University again needed more space, and so 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated in 1899. Shortly after the 6 Burlington Gardens was vacated the University went through a period of rapid expansion. Bedford College, Royal Holloway and the London School of Economics all joined in 1900, Goldsmiths College joined in 1904, Imperial College was founded in 1907, Queen Mary College joined in 1915, the School of Oriental and African Studies was founded in 1916 and Birkbeck joined in 1920. This rapid expansion meant that the University's new premises would prove insufficient by the 1920s, requiring yet another move. A large parcel of land in Bloomsbury near the British Museum was acquired from the Duke of Bedford and Charles Holden was appointed architect with the instruction to create a building "not to suggest a passing fashion inappropriate to buildings which will house an institution of so permanent a character as a University." This unusual remit may have been inspired by the fact that William Beveridge, having just become director of LSE, upon asking a taxi driver to take him to the University of London was met with the response "Oh, you mean the place near the Royal School of Needlework".[9] Holden responded by designing Senate House, the current headquarters of the university, and at the time of completion the second largest building in London.[10] Image File history File linksMetadata University_of_London_illustration_1867. ... Image File history File linksMetadata University_of_London_illustration_1867. ... The facade of the University of London building, later the Museum of Mankind. ... Bedford College was founded in London, England, in 1849 as a higher education college for the education of women. ... Affiliations 1994 Group University of London ACU AMBA Website http://www. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... The Main Building The Ben Pimlott Building Goldsmiths College, University of London (founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute) is a college of the University of London specialising in teaching of and research into creative, cultural and cognitive disciplines. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until 2000 Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter [1] and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ... The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is a specialist constituent of the University of London committed to the arts and humanities, languages and cultures and the law and social sciences concerning Asia, Africa, and the Near and Middle East. ... Birkbeck, University of London, sometimes referred to by its former name Birkbeck College or by the abbreviation BBK, is a College of the University of London. ... Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... The British Museum in London, England is one of the worlds greatest museums of human history and culture. ... The titles of Earl or Duke of Bedford were created several times in the peerage of England. ... Charles Henry Holden (12 May 1875 - 1 May 1960) was an English architect known for his designs of stations on the London Underground railway system. ... William Henry Beveridge, 1st Baron Beveridge (5 March 1879 – 16 March 1963) was a British economist and social reformer. ... The Royal School of Needlework was founded in 1872. ...


During the Second World War the colleges of the university (with the exception of Birkbeck) and their students left London in favour of safer parts of the UK, while Senate House was used by the Ministry of Information, with its roof becoming an observation point for the Royal Observer Corps. Though the building was hit by bombs several times it emerged from the war largely unscathed; rumour at the time had it that the reason the building had fared so well was that Adolf Hitler had planned to use it as his headquarters in London.[11] Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Minister of Information is a British government position that was created briefly during the First World War and again during the Second World War. ... The Royal Observer Corps (ROC) was, until stood down in 1991, a part of the UK Ministry of Defence. ... Hitler redirects here. ...


The latter half of the last century was less eventful, mostly characterised by expansion and consolidation within the university, with the most significant risk within the university being some of the larger colleges (most notably UCL, King's, LSE and Imperial) periodically putting forward the possibility of their departure from the university, though this usually only happened when the colleges were negotiating for more powers. On 9 December 2005, however, Imperial College became the first college to make a formal decision to leave the university. Its council announced that it was beginning negotiations to withdraw from the university in time for its own centenary celebrations, and in order to be able to award its own degrees. On 5 October 2006, the University of London accepted Imperial's formal request to withdraw from the federation.[1] Imperial became fully independent on 9 July 2007, as part of the celebrations of the college's centenary. The Times Higher Education Supplement announced in February 2007 that the London School of Economics, University College London and King's College London all plan to start awarding their own degrees, rather than degrees from the federal University of London as they have done previously, from the start of the new academic year (starting in Autumn 2007). Although this plan to award their own degrees does not amount to a decision to formally leave the University of London, the THES suggests that this 'rais[es] new doubts about the future of the federal University of London'. However, the University continues to grow and, in 2005, admitted the Central School of Speech and Drama. is the 343rd day of the year (344th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The Central School of Speech and Drama is a United Kingdom government funded higher education college in London. ...


Organisation

Most decisions affecting the constituent colleges and institutions of the University of London are made at the level of the colleges or institutions themselves. The University of London does retain its own decision-making structure, however, with a senate, responsible for matters of academic policy, and an estates committee, responsible for managing University of London property, underneath a council, which act as the primary executive body of the university. The council is made up of the chancellor (who does not attend meetings), the vice-chancellor, the heads of all the colleges and institutes of the University, 18 academics elected from the senate, five student representatives, various lay members (appointed by the council or the government) and various vice-chancellors of different departments.[12]


Recognised bodies

The constituent members of the University are divided as follows:

Birkbeck, University of London, sometimes referred to by its former name Birkbeck College or by the abbreviation BBK, is a College of the University of London. ... The Central School of Speech and Drama is a United Kingdom government funded higher education college in London. ... The Courtauld Institute of Art is a listed organisation of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art. ... The Main Building The Ben Pimlott Building The Library Warmington Tower Goldsmiths, University of London (founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute, rebranded from Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2006[2]) is a constituent college of the University of London specialising in teaching of and research into... Heythrop College is a college of the University of London situated in Kensington Square, Kensington, London. ... The Institute of Cancer Research is a college within the University of London. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Website http://www. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Categories: Stub | University of London | Schools of Medicine | Health in London ... Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until 2000 Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter [1] and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... Affiliations 1994 Group University of London ACU AMBA Website http://www. ... The Royal Veterinary College is the oldest and largest veterinary school in the United Kingdom. ... The School of Oriental and African Studies (commonly abbreviated to SOAS, pronounced [səuæs] or [səuæz]) is a constituent college of the University of London. ... The School of Pharmacy is an independent college of the University of London. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... St Georges, University of London (SGUL) is a specialist medical college of the University of London. ...

Listed bodies

The University of London Institute in Paris (abbreviated ULIP) is a remote college of the University of London located in Paris. ... The School of Advanced Study is a listed organisation of the University of London. ... The Institute of Advanced Legal Studies (IALS) is part of the School of Advanced Study of the University of London. ... The Institute of Commonwealth Studies was founded by the University of London in 1949 to promote academic study of the Commonwealth of Nations and its constituent countries. ... Not to be confused with the Institute for Historical Review, an American Holocaust denial organization. ... The Institute for the Study of the Americas was founded in August 2004 through a merger of the Institute of Latin American Studies (ILAS) with the Institute of United States Studies (IUSS), both of which had been founded in 1965 at 31 Tavistock Square. ... The Warburg Institute is a research institution associated with the University of London. ... Great Cumbrae and other south-west coast islands Great Cumbrae (also known as Cumbrae or the Isle of Cumbrae) is the larger of the two islands known as The Cumbraes in the lower Firth of Clyde in western Scotland (at Grid reference NS169566). ...

Former colleges

Some colleges of the University of London have been amalgamated into larger colleges or left the University of London. These include:

Bedford College was founded in London, England, in 1849 as a higher education college for the education of women. ... This article is about Regents Park in London. ... Chelsea College of Science and Technology had its origins as South-Western Polytechnic, which was opened at Manresa Road, Chelsea in 1895 to provide scientific and technical education to Londoners. ... Statue of Thomas More on Cheyne Walk. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Queen Elizabeth College (QEC) had its origins in the Ladies (later Womens) Department of Kings College London, opened in 1885. ... For other uses, see Kensington (disambiguation). ... Westfield College was a small college, based in Hampstead in North London, that was founded by Kathleen Chesney in 1882. ... For other places with the same name, see Hampstead (disambiguation). ... Wye College was founded in 1447 by John Kempe, the Archbishop of York, as a college for the training of priests. ... Wye College Wye is an historic village in Kent, England, located some 12 miles from Canterbury. ... For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Affiliations University Alliance Association of Commonwealth Universities European University Association Website http://www. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Affiliations University Alliance Association of Commonwealth Universities European University Association Website http://www. ... The Royal Postgraduate Medical School was an independent medical school in England. ... St Thomas Hospital Medical School in London was one of the oldest and most prestigious medical schools in the UK. It was part of St Thomas Hospital which was established in 1173. ... Kings College School of Medicine and Dentistry, is the medical and dental school of Kings College London. ... New College Londons history is entwined with that of Homerton College, now part of the University of Cambridge. ...

University colleges in the external degree scheme

A number of major British universities originated as university colleges teaching the degrees of the University of London External System.[2] After developing the ability to function fully, these colleges became independent institutions and eventually won their own Royal Charters. Website http://www. ...

The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... The University of Southampton is a university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south coast of Great Britain. ... University of Leicester seen from Victoria Park - Left to right: the Department of Engineering, the Attenborough tower, the Charles Wilson building. ...

Colleges in special relation

Between 1946 and 1970, the University entered into 'schemes of special relation' with university colleges in the Commonwealth of Nations. These schemes encouraged the development of independent universities by offering a relationship with the University of London. University colleges in these countries were granted a Royal Charter. An Academic Board of the university college negotiated with the University of London over the entrance requirements for the admission of students, syllabuses, examination procedures and other academic matters. During the period of the special relationship, graduates of the colleges were awarded University of London degrees. The Commonwealth of Nations as of 2006 Headquarters Marlborough House, London, UK Official languages English Membership 53 sovereign states Leaders  -  Queen Elizabeth II  -  Secretary-General Don McKinnon (since 1 April 2000) Establishment  -  Balfour Declaration 18 November 1926   -  Statute of Westminster 11 December 1931   -  London Declaration 28 April 1949  Area  -  Total... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ...


Some of the colleges which were in special relation are listed below, along with the year in which their special relation was established.

In 1970 the 'Schemes of Special Relation' were phased out. The University of the West Indies, also known as UWI, is an autonomous regional institution supported by and serving 16 countries and territories in the Caribbean - Anguilla, Antigua and Barbuda, The Bahamas, Barbados, Belize, the British Virgin Islands, the Cayman Islands, Dominica, Grenada, Jamaica, Montserrat, St. ... The University of Ibadan is Nigerias oldest university, and is located five miles (8 kilometres) from the centre of the major city of Ibadan in Western Nigeria. ... The University of Zimbabwe (UZ), is the first, largest and most complete university in Zimbabwe. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: no content If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... Makerere University is Ugandas premier institution of higher learning. ...


Academic Dress

Academic dress of the University of London describes the robes, gowns and hoods which are prescribed by the university for its graduates and undergraduates. ...

Student life

Some 135,090 students (approximately 5% of all UK students) attend one of the University of London's affiliated schools. Additionally, over 41,000 students follow the University of London External System.[13] Image File history File linksMetadata ULU_building. ... Image File history File linksMetadata ULU_building. ... University of London Union. ... A federated school, federated college or affiliated school is an educational institution which is independent in some respects, but is ultimately governed by a larger institution. ... Website http://www. ...


The ULU building on Malet Street (adjacent to Senate House) is home to the University of London Union, which acts as the student union for all University of London students alongside the individual college and institution unions. As well as representing students, the union plays host to a number of shops and bars (including a nightclub and live music venue), owns London Student (the largest student newspaper in Europe)[14] and offers its own gym and swimming pool for student use. Malet Street is a street in Bloomsbury, London (WC1), which runs between Torrington Place and the British Museum, parallel to Gower Street and Tottenham Court Road. ... University of London Union. ... A students union, student government, or student council is a student organization present at many colleges and universities, often with its own building on the campus, dedicated to social and organizational activities of the student body. ... London Student is the newspaper of the University of London Union. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The University also runs eight intercollegiate halls of residence, accommodating students from most of the colleges and institutions of the University: Halls of residence in British English (commonly referred to as halls, and to a lesser extent hall) are a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students, similar to dormitories in the United States. ...

Malet Street is a street in Bloomsbury, London (WC1), which runs between Torrington Place and the British Museum, parallel to Gower Street and Tottenham Court Road. ... Connaught Hall is a fully catered hall of residence owned by the University of London and situated on Tavistock Square, Bloomsbury, London, UK. It is an intercollegiate hall, and as such provides accommodation for full-time students at institutions such as Kings College London, University College London, Queen Mary... Tavistock Square Tavistock Square is a square in Bloomsbury, London. ... Hughes Parry Hall is one of eight intercollegiate halls of the University of London. ... International Hall is a hall of residence owned by the University of London and situated on Brunswick Square in the Bloomsbury district of London. ... Brunswick Square Brunswick Square is a public garden in Bloomsbury, City of Westminster, London. ... Nutford House was built in 1916 and was acquired by the University of London in 1949, after which it was expanded to take in five terraced houses in Brown Street, known as the Annexe and one house in Seymour Place. ...

Sports, clubs, and traditions

Though most sports teams are organised at the college level, ULU does run a number of sports clubs of its own, some of which (for example the basketball team) compete in BUSA leagues. The union also organises its own leagues for college teams to participate in. These leagues and sports clubs are supported by Friends of University of London Sport which aims to promote them. An ulu in the western Arctic style An ulu (Inuktitut syllabics: ᐅᓗ) is an Inuit womans all-purpose knife. ... This article is about the sport. ... The British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) is the governing body for United Kingdom. ...


ULU also organises a number of societies, ranging from Ballroom and Latin American Dance to Shaolin Kung Fu, and from the University of London Big Band to the Breakdancing Society. Ever since 1669, when Huang Zongxi first described Chinese martial arts in terms of a Shaolin or external school versus a Wudang or internal school,[1] Shaolin has been used as a synonym for external Chinese martial arts regardless of whether or not the particular style in question has any... ULU Big Band The University of London Big Band one of Londons busiest amateur jazz orchestras. ... A breakdancer performing a one-handed freeze (also known as a pike) in the streets of Paris. ...


University of London people

A portrait of Gandhi, age 21, at The Vegetarian (1891).
A portrait of Gandhi, age 21, at The Vegetarian (1891).

A number of famous individuals have passed through the University of London, either as staff or students, including 3 monarchs, 33 presidents or prime ministers, 54 Nobel laureates, 6 Grammy winners, 2 Oscar winners and 2 Olympic gold medalists. Staff and students of the university, past and present, have contributed to a number of important scientific advances, including the discovery of vaccines by Edward Jenner and Henry Gray author of Gray's Anatomy. In addition, the discovery of the structure of DNA (Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin), the discovery of penicillin (Alexander Flemming and Ernest Chain), the development of X-Ray technology (William Henry Bragg and Charles Glover Barkla), the formulation of the theory of electromagnetism (James Clerk Maxwell), the determination of the speed of light (Louis Essen), the development of antiseptics (Joseph Lister), the development of fibre optics (Charles K. Kao) and the invention of the telephone (Alexander Graham Bell). The following people spent time at the University of London as either teaching staff or students. ... Image File history File links Gandhi-1891. ... Image File history File links Gandhi-1891. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... This article treats the generic title monarch. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ... A prime minister is the most senior minister of cabinet in the executive branch of government in a parliamentary system. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, is awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Born May 17, 1749 Berkeley, Gloucestershire Died January 26, 1823 Berkeley, Gloucestershire Alma mater St Georges, University of London Academic advisor John Hunter Known for smallpox vaccine Edward Jenner, FRS, (May 17, 1749 – January 26, 1823) was an English country doctor who studied nature and his natural surroundings from... Henry Gray Henry Gray (1825?–1861) was an English anatomist and surgeon and also elected a Fellow of the Royal Society (FRS) at the extremely young age of 33. ... An illustration from the 1918 edition Henry Grays Anatomy of the Human Body (or Grays Anatomy as it has more commonly become known) is an anatomy textbook widely regarded as a classic work on human anatomy. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004) was an English molecular biologist, physicist, and neuroscientist, who is most noted for being one of the co-discoverers of the structure of the DNA molecule in 1953. ... Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins CBE FRS (15 December 1916 – 5 October 2004) was a New Zealand-born British molecular biologist, and Nobel Laureate who contributed research in the fields of phosphorescence, radar, isotope separation, and X-ray diffraction. ... Rosalind Elsie Franklin (25 July 1920 Kensington, London – 16 April 1958 Chelsea, London) was an English biophysicist and crystallographer who made important contributions to the understanding of the fine structures of DNA, viruses, coal and graphite. ... For the Japanese rock band, see Penicillin (band). ... Alexander Fleming Sir Alexander Fleming (August 6, 1881 – March 11, 1955) was a Scottish biologist and pharmacologist. ... Sir Ernst Boris Chain (June 19, 1906 – August 12, 1979) was a German-born Jewish British biochemist, and a 1945 co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his work on penicillin. ... In the NATO phonetic alphabet, X-ray represents the letter X. An X-ray picture (radiograph) taken by Röntgen An X-ray is a form of electromagnetic radiation with a wavelength approximately in the range of 5 pm to 10 nanometers (corresponding to frequencies in the range 30 PHz... Sir William Henry Bragg OM, Cantab, OKW (Westward, Cumbria, England July 2, 1862 – March 10, 1942) was an English physicist and chemist, educated at King Williams College, Isle of Man, and Trinity College, Cambridge. ... Charles Glover Barkla (June 7, 1877 – October 23, 1944) was a British physicist. ... Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist from Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. His most significant achievement was aggregating a set of equations in electricity, magnetism and inductance — eponymously named Maxwells equations — including an important modification (extension) of the Ampères... The speed of light in a vacuum is an important physical constant denoted by the letter c for constant or the Latin word celeritas meaning swiftness.[1] It is the speed of all electromagnetic radiation, including visible light, in a vacuum. ... Louis Essen (September 6, 1908 – August 24, 1997) was an English physicist whose most notable achievements were in the precise measurement of time and the determination of the speed of light. ... An antiseptic is a substance that kills or prevents the growth of bacteria on the external surfaces of the body. ... Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister (April 5, 1827-February 10, 1912) was a famous British surgeon who promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Infirmary. ... Fiber Optic strands An optical fiber in American English or fibre in British English is a transparent thin fiber for transmitting light. ... Charles Kuen Kao, Ph. ... For other uses, see Telephone (disambiguation). ... Alexander Graham Bell (3 March 1847 - 2 August 1922) was a Scottish scientist, inventor and innovator. ...


Notable political figures who have passed through the University of London include Romano Prodi, Junichiro Koizumi, Aung San Su Kyi, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, Mohsen Sazegara, John F. Kennedy and Mahatma Gandhi. In the arts field the university has produced the novelists Malcolm Bradbury, G. K. Chesterton, H. G. Wells and Arthur C. Clarke, many of the leading figures in the Young British Artists movement (including Ian Davenport, Tracy Emin and Damien Hirst) and musicians ranging from the conductor Sir Simon Rattle, the soprano Felicity Lott and both members of Gilbert and Sullivan to Mick Jagger, Elton John and members of the bands Coldplay, Suede, The Velvet Underground, Blur, Iron Maiden, Placebo, The Libertines and Queen. The University of London has also played host to film directors (Christopher Nolan, Derek Jarman) television presenter and Martial Arts expert Chris Crudelli, philosophers (Karl Popper, Roger Scruton), explorers (David Livingstone), West End Theatre producers (Dominic Madden), leading businessmen (Michael Cowpland, George Soros), pornographers (David Sullivan) and international terrorists (Carlos the Jackal). Prodi redirects here. ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ... Aung San Suu Kyi Daw Aung San Suu Kyi (ေအာင္ဆန္းဆုဳကည္) born June 19, 1945 in democracy activist in Myanmar. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... Dr. Mohsen Sazegara during an interview in Washington Institute for Near East Policy. ... John Kennedy and JFK redirect here. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. ... Gilbert Keith Chesterton (May 29, 1874–June 14, 1936) was an influential English writer of the early 20th century. ... Herbert George Wells (September 21, 1866 – August 13, 1946), better known as H. G. Wells, was an English writer best known for such science fiction novels as The Time Machine, The War of the Worlds, The Invisible Man, The First Men in the Moon and The Island of Doctor Moreau. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: Arthur C. Clarke Sir Arthur Charles Clarke, CBE (born 16 December 1917) is a British science-fiction author and inventor, most famous for his novel 2001: A Space Odyssey, and for collaborating with director Stanley Kubrick on the film of the same... The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living by Damien Hirst (1991). ... Ian Davenport (born 1966) is an English painter. ... Tracey Emin (born 1963) is an English artist, one of the so-called Young British Artists (YBAs). ... The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living by Damien Hirst (1991) Damien Hirst (born June 7, 1965) is an English artist and the most prominent of the group that has been dubbed Young British Artists (or YBAs). ... Simon Rattle recording Porgy and Bess with the London Symphony Orchestra at Abbey Road in 1988, aged 33. ... Dame Felicity Lott (born May 8, 1947) is an English soprano universally known as Flott. ... W. S. Gilbert Arthur Sullivan Gilbert and Sullivan refers to the Victorian era partnership of librettist W. S. Gilbert (1836–1911) and composer Arthur Sullivan (1842–1900). ... Sir Michael Phillip Mick Jagger (born July 26, 1943) is an English rock musician, actor, songwriter, record and film producer and businessman. ... Sir Elton Hercules[1] John CBE[2] (born Reginald Kenneth Dwight on 25 March 1947) is a five-time Grammy and one-time Academy Award-winning English pop/rock singer, composer and pianist. ... Coldplay are an English rock band. ... Suede (or The London Suede in the U.S.) were a popular and influential English rock band of the 1990s that helped start the Britpop musical movement of the decade. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Blur were an English rock band formed in Colchester in 1989. ... This article is about the band. ... Placebo are an alternative rock band currently consisting of Brian Molko and Stefan Olsdal. ... This article is about the band The Libertines. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, singer Freddie Mercury and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Christopher Nolan (born July 30, 1970) is an Academy Award nominated film director, writer and producer. ... Derek Jarman Derek Jarman (January 31, 1942 – February 19, 1994) was an English film director, stage designer, artist, and writer. ... Chris Crudelli (born August 1972)[1] is a martial artist and television presenter. ... Sir Karl Raimund Popper CH FRS FBA (July 28, 1902 â€“ September 17, 1994) was an Austrian and British[1] philosopher and a professor at the London School of Economics. ... Roger Vernon Scruton (born 27 February 1944) is a British philosopher. ... David Livingstone (19 March 1813 – 4 May 1873) was a Scottish Presbyterian pioneer medical missionary with the London Missionary Society and explorer in central Africa. ... West End theatre is a popular term for mainstream professional theatre in London, England, or sometimes more specifically for shows staged in the large theatres of Londons Theatreland. Along with New Yorks Broadway theatre, West End theatre is usually considered to represent the highest level of commercial theatre... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Michael Cowpland (born April 23, 1943) is a Canadian entrepreneur, businessman, and the founder and one-time president, chairman and CEO of Corel, a Canadian software company. ... Soros redirects here. ... David Sullivan is a Welsh pornography magnate and newspaper proprietor; he is owner of the Daily Sport and Sunday Sport. ... Ilich Ramírez Sánchez (born October 12, 1949) is a Venezuelan-born self-proclaimed leftist revolutionary and mercenary. ...


Chancellors

The Most Noble William Cavendish, 7th Duke of Devonshire (27 April 1808 —21 December 1891) (known previously as 2nd Earl of Burlington of the second creation), was the great-grandson of the 4th Duke of Devonshire and grandson of the 1st Earl of Burlington of the second creation, whom he... The Earl Granville Granville George Leveson Gower, 2nd Earl Granville KG , PC (11 May 1815 – 31 March 1891) was a British Liberal statesman. ... The Rt Hon. ... Farrer Herschell, 1st Baron Herschell (November 2, 1837 - March 1, 1899) was Lord Chancellor of Great Britain in 1886, and again from 1892 to 1895. ... John Wodehouse, 1st Earl of Kimberley (1826-1902), English statesman, was born on 7 January 1826, being the eldest son of the Hon. ... Archibald Primrose redirects here. ... Lord Beauchamp as Governor of New South Wales in 1899 William Lygon, 7th Earl Beauchamp KG, KCMG, PC, (February 20, 1872 – November 15, 1938), British politician, succeeded his father as Earl Beauchamp in 1891, and was mayor of Worcester at age 23. ... Major-General Alexander Augustus Frederick William Alfred George Cambridge, 1st Earl of Athlone, KG, GCB, GCMG, GCVO, DSO, PC, FRS, born His Serene Highness Prince Alexander of Teck (14 April 1874–16 January 1957), was a member of the British Royal Family, the younger brother of Queen Mary. ... Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon, later Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Angela Marguerite; 4 August 1900 – 30 March 2002), was the Queen Consort of King George VI of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 1936 until his death in 1952. ... The Princess Anne, Princess Royal (Anne Elizabeth Alice Louise; born 15 August 1950), is a member of the British Royal Family and the only daughter of Elizabeth II. She is the seventh holder of the title Princess Royal, and is currently ninth in the line of succession to the British... Princess Anne, the current Princess Royal Princess Royal is a style customarily (but not automatically) awarded by a British monarch to his or her eldest daughter. ... The 1981 University of London election for the position of Chancellor was called upon when the incumbent Chancellor, Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother announced in December 1980 that she was retiring from the position. ...

References

  1. ^ Combined total of Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-07-15. The individual totals are Birkbeck, University of London 19020, Central School of Speech and Drama 950, Courtauld Institute of Art 395, Goldsmiths, University of London 7615, Imperial College London 12665, Institute of Cancer Research 235, Institute of Education 7215, King's College London 21755, London Business School 1455, London School of Economics 8810, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine 975, Queen Mary, University of London 11625, Royal Academy of Music 730, Royal Holloway, University of London 7620, Royal Veterinary College 1610, School of Oriental and African Studies 4525, School of Pharmacy 1355, St George's, University of London 3785, University College London 21620, Central institutes & activities 430. Heythrop College is privately funded and does not appear in HESA statistics. It gives its total number of students as 700. Prospective Students. Heythrop College website. Retrieved on 2007-07-15. Imperial College London has left the University since the year 2005-2006.
  2. ^ About us. University of London External System website. Retrieved on 2007-07-15.
  3. ^ http://www.london.ac.uk/colleges_institutes
  4. ^ http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/ugprospectus/imperialprofile/originsanddevelopment
  5. ^ The Central University's Estate. University of London. Retrieved on 02 March 2007.
  6. ^ Redevelopment Project of Senate House and Stewart House. School of Advanced Study. Retrieved on 02 March 2007.
  7. ^ University of London:Brief history
  8. ^ Japanese Students at Cambridge University in the Meiji Era, 1868-1912: Pioneers for the Modernization of Japan, Noboru Koyama. Lulu Press, September 2004.
  9. ^ http://www.cityofsound.com/blog/2003/11/senate_house_un.html City of Sound
  10. ^ http://www.emporis.com/en/wm/bu/?id=110747 Emporis Buildings
  11. ^ http://www.c20society.org.uk/docs/building/senate.html The Twentieth Century Society
  12. ^ University of London: Council membership (PDF). Retrieved on 2006-10-24.
  13. ^ Cite error 8; No text given.
  14. ^ http://www.ulu.co.uk/content/index.php?page=9 London Student

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Birkbeck, University of London, sometimes referred to by its former name Birkbeck College or by the abbreviation BBK, is a College of the University of London. ... The Central School of Speech and Drama is a United Kingdom government funded higher education college in London. ... The Courtauld Institute of Art is a listed organisation of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art. ... The Main Building The Ben Pimlott Building The Library Warmington Tower Goldsmiths, University of London (founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute, rebranded from Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2006[2]) is a constituent college of the University of London specialising in teaching of and research into... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... The Institute of Cancer Research is a college within the University of London. ... The Institute of Education (IoE) is a postgraduate college and part of the University of London. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Website http://www. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Categories: Stub | University of London | Schools of Medicine | Health in London ... Queen Mary, University of London (QMUL) (until 2000 Queen Mary and Westfield College, University of London and still called that in its charter [1] and occasionally still abbreviated to QMW) is the fourth largest College of the University of London. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... Affiliations 1994 Group University of London ACU AMBA Website http://www. ... The Royal Veterinary College is the oldest and largest veterinary school in the United Kingdom. ... The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is a specialist constituent of the University of London committed to the arts and humanities, languages and cultures and the law and social sciences concerning Asia, Africa, and the Near and Middle East. ... School of Pharmacy The School of Pharmacy is a constituent college of the University of London. ... St Georges, University of London (SGUL) is a specialist medical college of the University of London. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... Heythrop College is a college of the University of London situated in Kensington Square, Kensington, London. ... Heythrop College is a college of the University of London situated in Kensington Square, Kensington, London. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... Website http://www. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 2 is the 61st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (62nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

See also

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... London has one of the largest concentrations of universities in the UK: In total there are 28 recognised universities and colleges in London, with a student population of well over 200,000. ... University of London Union. ... ULU Big Band The University of London Big Band one of Londons busiest amateur jazz orchestras. ... Academic dress of the University of London describes the robes, gowns and hoods which are prescribed by the university for its graduates and undergraduates. ... The Careers Group, University of London is a division of the central University of London notable for its long history and independent governance structure which answers to the University of London as a whole in the same way as the University of London Research Library Services. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of London - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1107 words)
The main offices of the University of London are at Senate House in Bloomsbury, which includes a substantial library and the official residence of the Chancellor (at present Princess Anne, the Princess Royal, who succeeded her grandmother Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother in the largely ceremonial post).
Besides UCL and King's, the most famous colleges are Imperial College London, the London School of Economics (LSE), St George's, University of London (SGUL), Queen Mary (QMUL), Royal Holloway (RHUL), Goldsmiths College, and the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS).
The Athlone Press was the publishing house of the University of London between 1949 and 1979 [1].
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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