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Encyclopedia > University of Leeds
University of Leeds
Parkinson Building
Motto et augebitur scientia (and knowledge will be increased)
Established 1831 - Leeds School of Medicine
1887 - Part of Victoria University
1904 - Royal charter granted
Type Public
Chancellor Melvyn Bragg, Lord Bragg of Wigton
Vice-Chancellor Professor Michael Arthur
Staff 7,581 [1]
Students 32,241 (undergraduate & postgraduate degree programmes), 32,062 (short courses) [1]
Location Leeds, England
Turnover £345 million (GBP) [1]
Colours       Green,       Red,
      Black and       Beige [2]
Affiliations Russell Group, WUN, Yorkshire Universities, White Rose Consortium, N8 Group
Website www.leeds.ac.uk
Image:Leeds-University-logo.gif

The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. It is a member of the Russell Group and is ranked in the top ten of UK universities for market share of research funding. Established in 1904, it is one of the six original civic universities, and in 2005 it was ranked second for the number of applications received.[3] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1440x941, 356 KB) Summary Parkinson Building, University of Leeds Image courtesy of Leeds City Council. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Leopold I 1831 (MDCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Leeds School of Medicine was set up on the 6th June 1831. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... This page is about the British Victoria University. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Michael Arthur. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... An undergraduate degree (sometimes called a first degree or simply a degree) is the most common and primary academic degree available and is normally studied at a higher education institution, such as a university. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Statistics Population: 726,000 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE297338 Administration Metropolitan borough: City of Leeds Metropolitan county: West Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: West Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (West Riding) Services Police force: West Yorkshire Police Fire and... Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... Look up Turnover in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... ISO 4217 Code GBP User(s) United Kingdom Inflation 2. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... The White Rose University Consortium is a partnership between three universities in Yorkshire, England - Leeds, Sheffield, and York. ... The N8 Group comprises eight research-intensive universities in the north of England. ... A website (or Web site) is a collection of web pages, typically common to a particular domain name or subdomain on the World Wide Web on the Internet. ... Image File history File links Leeds-University-logo. ... For a list of universities around the world, see Lists of colleges and universities Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Red Brick originally referred to the six civic British universities that were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and achieved university status before World War II. The civic university movement started in 1851 with Owens College, Manchester (now the University of Manchester), which became the...

Contents

History

The University's history is linked to the development of Leeds as an international centre for the textile industry and clothing manufacture in the Victorian era. Its roots stretch back to the early nineteenth century and it was one of six civic universities in industrial cities given royal charters at the beginning of the twentieth century. Prior to this wave of expansion in higher education, only four universities - Oxford, Cambridge, London and Durham - were established in England. Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her Ascension to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian Era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British industrial revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ... Red Brick originally referred to the six civic British universities that were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and achieved university status before World War II. The civic university movement started in 1851 with Owens College, Manchester (now the University of Manchester), which became the... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective sets of entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... Senate House, designed by Charles Holden home to the universitys central administration offices and its library The University of London, founded in 1836, is a federation of colleges which together constitute one of the worlds largest universities. ... Affiliations 1994 Group, European University Association, Association of MBAs, EQUIS, Universities UK, N8 Group, Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ...


Origins

An early view of the Great Hall, next to the Clothworkers' Court
An early view of the Great Hall, next to the Clothworkers' Court

In 1831, the Leeds School of Medicine was set up, serving the needs of the five medical institutions that had sprung up in the city. Then in 1874, the School was joined by the Yorkshire College of Science, intended to provide education for the children of middle-class industrialists and merchants. Financial support from local industry was crucial (there is a Clothworkers' Court at the University to this day). Image File history File links Great_hall. ... Image File history File links Great_hall. ... Leeds School of Medicine was set up on the 6th June 1831. ...


The College of Science was modelled on Owens College, Manchester, established in 1851 as a non-sectarian alternative to Oxford and Cambridge, where religious tests were applied and those outside the Church of England were not allowed to receive degrees or were barred from entry outright. Owens College, like the earlier University College London, applied no such tests and was open to Protestant Dissenters, Catholics and Jews. Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough, in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, North West England. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge, located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[1] in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... University College London, commonly known as UCL, or simply UC is one of the colleges that makes up the University of London. ... English Dissenters were dissenters from England who opposed State interference in religious matters and founded their own communities over the 16th to 18th century period. ...


While religious tests for students at Oxford and Cambridge ceased in the 1850s, northern colleges continued to promote themselves as offering a distinct type of teaching. They took pride in the progressive and practical nature of their scientific education; a field in which the ancient universities, with their focus on theological study, were felt to lag behind.


The Yorkshire College of Science began by teaching experimental physics, mathematics, geology, mining, chemistry and biology, and soon became well known as an international centre for the study of engineering and textile technology. When classics, modern literature and history went on offer a few years later, the Yorkshire College of Science became the Yorkshire College. In 1887, the College merged with the School of Medicine.


Victoria University and royal charter

Leeds was given its first university the following year when the Yorkshire College joined the federal Victoria University, which had begun life when Owens College was awarded a royal charter in 1880. Leeds now found itself in an educational union with close social cousins from Manchester and Liverpool. This page is about the British Victoria University. ...


Unlike Owens College, the Leeds section of the Victoria University had never barred women from its courses. However, it was not until special facilities were provided at the Day Training College in 1896 that women enrolled in significant numbers. The first female student to begin a course here was Lilias Annie Clark, who studied Modern Literature and Education.


The Victoria University was short-lived. Manchester and Liverpool were keen to establish independent universities, unhappy with the practical difficulties posed by maintaining a federal arrangement across broad distances. The University of Leeds was granted a royal charter as an independent body by King Edward VII in 1904. Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... Year 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ...


Present day

Leeds is a leading research institution, and a member of the Russell Group of Universities. In the most recent Research Assessment Exercise - that of 2001 - the University was placed seventh nationally for the number of top scoring researchers and eighth for 'research power' out of 173 institutions taking part in the exercise. Just under 800 researchers at the University were given ratings of 5* or 5, meaning that 70 per cent of the University's researchers were working at the highest level on projects of international importance. The University received the highest 5* grade, denoting work at the forefront of international research, in six subjects: Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, English, Town and Country Planning, Food Science, and Italian. [4] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is an exercise undertaken every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils (HEFCE, SHEFC, HEFCW, DELNI) to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions. ...


The University is committed to working with the private sector and invests heavily in realising the commercial potential of its academic developments. Leeds attracts the highest level of industrial funding of any university in the UK. craig is the fittest person ever causer is gr888 x The private sector of a nations economy consists of all that is outside the state. ...


The University’s educational partnerships have included providing formal accreditation of degree awards to Leeds Trinity & All Saints, although this is now establishing itself as a university in its own right. Trinity & All Saints is an accredited college of the University of Leeds offering degrees and diplomas in areas such as media, business, marketing, education, humanities, psychology and sport. ...


Leeds was ranked 9th in the top ten UK universities by research income (2003/04) with £107.7m. [citation needed]


In the Times Higher Education Supplement Rankings 2006, Leeds was placed 121st in the world, 50th in Europe and 19th in the United Kingdom. It was also ranked 55th in the world for Arts and Humanities. The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ...


The University has an excellent reputation for teaching and provides a wide range of courses for students. The Times Good University Guide 2005 ranked the University's School of English as the sixth best in the UK. The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1785, and under its current name since 1788. ...


During the 2005-2006 academic year, over 32,000 students were attached to 700 different first-degree programmes and 474 postgraduate degree programmes. Additionally, over 32,000 people were enrolled on short courses.[1] It has also developed expertise in more distinctive and rare specialist areas such as colour chemistry, fire science and aviation technology with pilot studies. Fire protection is the prevention and reduction of the hazards associated with fires. ...


In December 2004, financial pressures forced the University's governing body (the Council) to decide to close the Bretton campus (along with the University's other satellite site in Wakefield). Activities currently at Bretton will be moved to the main University campus in the summer of 2007 (allowing all current Bretton-based students to complete their studies there). There has been substantial opposition to the closure by the Bretton students.


In May 2006, the University began a process of re-branding itself to bring together its visual identity to produce one consistent look. A new logo was produced (shown above), based on that used during the centenary celebrations in 2004, to replace the combined use of the modified University Crest and the green and red logo containing the Parkinson Building (used since 2004). The University Crest will still be used in its original form for ceremonial purposes only. Individual department and service logos are also being phased out. Four university colours were also specified, being green (Pantone 3435), red (Pantone 187), black (Pantone Black) and beige (Pantone 9060).[5] It is intended for the re-branding to be complete by October 2007.


Campus

Location

The main campus is located 1 mile (1.6 km) north of the city centre of Leeds. It is within walking distance for both the city centre and Headingley, a popular residential area for students. The main entrance to the campus for visitors by car is on Woodhouse Lane (A660), near the Parkinson Building (also known as University tower). The Leeds city centre skyline at night The city centre of Leeds, England, can be separated roughly into four areas or quarters. ... Headingley Lane, Leeds Headingley is a suburb of the English city of Leeds in the county of Yorkshire. ...


In addition to the main campus, there are also satellite locations at Wakefield and Bretton Hall in West Bretton. The Bretton Hall site will close in summer 2007, with the department moving to a new building on the main campus. Statistics Population: 79,885 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SE335205 Administration Metropolitan Borough: City of Wakefield Metropolitan county: West Yorkshire Region: Yorkshire and the Humber Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: West Yorkshire Historic county: Yorkshire (West Riding) Services Police force: West Yorkshire Police Fire and... Bretton Hall Bretton Hall is a stately home in West Bretton in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near Wakefield. ... West Bretton is a village in the county of West Yorkshire, England, near Wakefield. ...


Facilities

The University Library is spread over six locations and holds, in total, 2.78 million books, 9,500 print and electronic journals, 850 databases and 6,000 electronic books.[6] The main arts, social sciences and law library is the Brotherton Library, located in the Parkinson Building. The main science, engineering and student library is the Edward Boyle Library, located in the centre of the campus. Medicine, dentistry and healthcare students are served by the Health Sciences Library, located in the Worsley building, and there is also a library at St James's University Hospital. There are also libraries located on the Bretton Hall and Wakefield campuses. St Jamess Hospital, Leeds, popularly known as Jimmys, is one of the United Kingdoms most famous hospitals. ...


There are 9,000 personal computers[1] available across the campus along with 150 Sun computers and servers, 8 high performance Sun servers and 256 supercomputers. There are 29 centrally-managed computer clusters of varying sizes spread across the different sites, along with others managed by specific departments. Five of these clusters are available 24 hours a day. Sun Microsystems, Inc. ...


The University has 1,230 acres (498 ha) of land, with the main campus taking up 98 acres (40 ha).[1]


The University's student union, Leeds University Union, includes numerous shops and bars and an award-winning nightclub, and is one of the largest student union operations in the UK. Leeds University Union (LUU) is the representative body for the students at the University of Leeds, England. ...


The University's Muslim Prayer Room is located in the Conference Auditorium building next to the Sports Hall and able to accommodate up to 300 people at any one time. The prayer room has undergone recent refurbishment after half a million pounds was allocated towards its development with joint efforts between Leeds University Union's Islamic Society, John Schless and the Vice-Chancellor Professor Michael Arthur.


Accommodation

There is accommodation provided in either catered or self-catered rooms, mostly reserved for first year undergraduate students but also for international students, postgraduates, staff and undergraduates who have been unable to find alternative accommodation.

Self Catered
Catered

Bodington Hall is the largest halls of accommodation that are owned by the University of Leeds. ... The Carr Mills halls of residence opened in 2006 and is currently the newest of University of Leeds student residences. ... Clarence Dock is student accommodation at the University of Leeds. ... Montague Burton is a self-catering hall of residence/flats at the University of Leeds near the Parkinson Building on Devon Rd, just off St Marks Rd. ... Bodington Hall is the largest halls of accommodation that are owned by the University of Leeds. ... Charles Morris Hall is a hall of residence at Leeds University. ...

Organisation

Faculties

The various schools, institutes and centres of the University are arranged into nine faculties, each with a dean, pro-deans and central functions:

  • Arts
  • Biological Sciences
  • Business
  • Education, Social Sciences and Law
  • Engineering
  • Environment
  • Mathematics and Physical Sciences
  • Medicine and Health
  • Performance, Visual Arts and Communication

Governance

The Court serves as a mechanism for the University’s accountability to the wider community and to stakeholders, making sure that the University is well managed, properly governed and responsive to public and local interests and concerns. It is made up of mainly lay members.


The Council is the governing body of the University, constituting of mainly lay members along with representatives of staff and students. It is responsible for the proper management and financial solvency of the University, with major policy decisions and corporate strategy being subject to its approval.


The Senate is the principal academic authority of the University. It oversees academic management and sets strategy and priorities, including the curriculum and maintenance of standards.


Chancellor

The Chancellor of the University acts as a ceremonial figurehead and sits on the University Court. The current Chancellor is Melvin Bragg, Lord Bragg of Wigton. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Melvyn Bragg, Baron Bragg, FRSL, FRTS (born 6 October 1939, in Wigton, Cumberland) is a British author and broadcaster. ...

George Frederick Samuel Robinson, 1st Marquess of Ripon (24 October 1827 - 9 July 1909) was a British politician who served in every Liberal cabinet from 1861 until his death forty-eight years later. ... The Duke of Devonshire As Governor General The Most Noble Victor Christian William Cavendish, 9th Duke of Devonshire (London May 31, 1868–May 6, 1938 Chatsworth House), was a Liberal Unionist Member of Parliament for West Derbyshire (1891-1908), Governor General of Canada (1916-1921), and Colonial Secretary (1922-1924). ... Edward Cavendish, 10th Duke of Devonshire The Most Noble Edward William Spencer Cavendish, 10th Duke of Devonshire (6 May 1895–26 November 1950), known as Marquess of Hartington (1908–1938), was Member of Parliament for West Derbyshire and a Minister in Winston Churchills wartime government. ... HRH The Princess Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood Princess Mary, Princess Royal and Countess of Harewood, Victoria Alexandra Alice Mary (25 April 1897 - 28 March 1965) was a member of the British Royal Family. ... The Duchess of Kent (Katharine Lucy Mary Windsor; born Worsley, 22 February 1933) is a member of the British Royal Family, the wife of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, a grandson of King George V and cousin of Queen Elizabeth II. The Duchess of Kent gained attention for her conversion...

Vice-Chancellor

The Vice-Chancellor of the University acts as the chief executive. The current Vice-Chancellor is Professor Michael Arthur, who was formerly Dean of the Faculty of Medicine, Health and Life Sciences at the University of Southampton. A number of former Vice-Chancellors have had buildings on the campus named after them. A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Michael Arthur. ...

Sir Michael Ernest Sadler (born July 3, 1861 - died October 14, 1943) was a British historian, educationalist and university administrator. ... Charles Richard Morris, Baron Morris of Grasmere KCMG (25 January 1898–30 May 1990) was a British Labour politician. ... Sir Roger Bentham Stevens (June 8, 1906 - February 20, 1980) was a British academic, diplomat and civil servant. ... Edward Charles Gurney Boyle, Baron Boyle of Handsworth CH PC (31 August 1923–28 September 1981) was a British Conservative politician. ... For Allan Wilson, the New Zealand molecular biologist, see Allan Wilson. ...

Notable people

This list of University of Leeds people is a selected list of notable past staff and students of the University of Leeds. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f University of Leeds (2006-11-16). About the University | Facts and figures. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  2. ^ University of Leeds (2006-05-09). Identity management | Web | Colour palette. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  3. ^ Universities & Colleges Admissions Service. HE Institution: Applications and Accepted Applicants 2005. Retrieved on 2007-01-02.
  4. ^ University of Leeds (2006-11-16). Research | Research Assessment Exercise 2001. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  5. ^ University of Leeds (2006-05-08). Identity management | Design guidelines | Core colour palette. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.
  6. ^ University of Leeds (2006-11-16). Study facilities | Library | Facts and figures. Retrieved on 2007-01-01.

2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... New UCAS logo, as of 2006 UCAS (Universities & Colleges Admissions Service, pronounced YOU-kass, IPA: ) is a clearing house for applications to almost all undergraduate degree programmes at British universities and colleges. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (129th in leap years). ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ... 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... November 16 is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 45 days remaining. ... 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD (or CE) era. ... January 1 is the first day of the calendar year in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. ...

External links

  • University of Leeds website
  • About the University
  • University re-brand
  • University centenary website
  • Leeds University Union website
  • Unipol Student Homes website
  • Leeds student life - BBC website
  • The Refectory venue guide & gig listings

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Leeds (346 words)
The University of Leeds (United Kingdom) is amongst the largest and most prestigious of British universities.
The various bodies that were to become the university were initially founded in the second half for the 19th century in response to the need to improve scientific education in the region, especially in the areas of cloth work and medicine.
Leeds is also a leading research institution, and a member of the Russell Group of Universities.
Leeds University Union: Information from Answers.com (1278 words)
Leeds University Union (LUU) is the representative body for the students at the University of Leeds, England.
Leeds Student was formed by the merger of the Leeds University Union newspaper (Union News) and the Leeds Metropolitan University Students Union newspaper, but in November 2005 the Leeds Met students voted to disaffiliate from Leeds Student citing under-representation as the reason.
Leeds University Union is run by a group of eight elected sabbatical officers known as The Executive Officers (or The Exec).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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