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Encyclopedia > University of Kentucky

Coordinates: 38°02′N, 84°30′W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

University of Kentucky

Motto See Blue in everything you do
Established 1865
Type Public
Endowment $831.8 million [1]
President Dr. Lee T. Todd, Jr.
Staff 11,546 [2]
Undergraduates 19,292 [2]
Postgraduates 7,090 [2]
Location Lexington, KY, USA
Campus Urban, 784 acres (3.17 km²) [2]
Athletics 21 varsity teams, called "Wildcats" [3]
Colors Blue and White [3]
Nickname Wildcats
Mascot "Blue", "The Wildcat", "Scratch" [3]
Affiliations Southeastern Conference
Website www.uky.edu

The University of Kentucky, also referred to as UK, is a public, co-educational university located in Lexington, Kentucky. Founded in 1865, [4] the university is the largest in the Commonwealth by enrollment, with 27,209 students.[2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Lee T. Todd, Jr. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Nickname: Location in the Commonwealth of Kentucky Coordinates: , Country United States State Kentucky Counties Fayette Government  - Mayor Jim Newberry (D) Area  - City  285. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ...

Contents

History

John Bowman founded the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Kentucky, a publicly chartered department of Kentucky University, after receiving federal support through the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act in 1865.[4] The first degree of the land-grant university was awarded in 1869, and James Kennedy Patterson became the first president of the university in that same year. In 1878, A&M separated from Kentucky University, which is now Transylvania University.[citation needed] For the new school, the city of Lexington donated a 52 acre (210,000 m²) park and fair ground, which became the core of UK's present campus. [citation needed] The modern campus covers 784 acres (3.17 km²).[2] Morrill Act redirects here. ... 1865 (MDCCCLXV) is a common year starting on Sunday. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Statue of President Patterson which sits in the main courtyard in front of Patterson Office Tower. ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Transylvania University is a private liberal arts college related by covenant to the Christian Church (Disciples of Christ) located in Lexington, Kentucky, with approximately 1,100 students. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ...


The college was initially for men only, but women were admitted beginning in 1880.[4] The first female degree recipient was Belle Gunn in 1888.[4] The school's first women's dormitory, Patterson Hall, constructed in 1904, was the first building constructed apart from the main campus; residents had to cross a swamp, where the Student Center now resides, to reach central campus. Today, Patterson Hall is the oldest still-existing university dormitory on campus.[citation needed] Year 1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... For the toll-free telephone number see Toll-free telephone number Year 1888 (MDCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ...


The school's name was changed to State University, Lexington, Kentucky in 1908, then to the University of Kentucky in 1916.[4] In 1910, the university's Agricultural Extension Service was founded and was one of the first in the United States;[5] it became a model for the federally mandated programs that were required beginning in 1914.[5] In 1918, the university's three engineering schools were consolidated into one. The Department of Education became the College of Education in 1923, followed by the founding of the College of Commerce, today's Gatton College of Business and Economics, in 1925.[5] Four years later, the university awarded its first doctoral degree. [5] Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Friday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Gatton College of Business and Economics is a college of the University of Kentucky. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...


The University of Kentucky became racially integrated in 1949 when Lyman T. Johnson, an African American, won a lawsuit to be admitted to the graduate program.[4] Undergraduate classes desegregated in 1954. [citation needed] Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lyman Tefft Johnson (June 12, 1906 – October 3, 1997)[1] was an American educator and influential leader of racial desegregation in Kentucky. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Ground was broken for the Albert B. Chandler Hospital in 1955, when Governor of Kentucky A. B. "Happy" Chandler recommended that the Kentucky General Assembly appropriate $5 million for the creation of the University of Kentucky College of Medicine and a medical center at the university.[6] This was completed after a series of studies were conducted that highlighted the health needs of the citizens, as well as the need to train more physicians for the state. In 1960, the College of Medicine and College of Nursing opened, followed by the College of Dentistry two years later.[5] Opened in 1962, the Albert B. Chandler Hospital along Rose Street at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky is a component of the University of Kentucky Hospital (UK HealthCare), encompassed within the Chandler Medical Center [1]. The 473-bed medical facility features the Markey Cancer Center, the Kentucky Children... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ... This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Albert Benjamin Happy Chandler, Sr. ... The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ...


On April 3, 1998, the largest university project at the time of completion opened.[7] The six-level William T. Young Library was constructed on south campus and is second only to Harvard University in the size of its book endowment and first among public universities.[8] Just nine-years later, on April 13, 2007, ground was broken for the Biological Pharmaceutical Complex Building, the largest planned academic building in the state of Kentucky, and one of the largest in the United States.[9] It complements the adjacent Biomedical Biological Science Research Building, and is expected to be part of the new university research campus.[10] Other recent announcements include the construction of the new $450 million Albert B. Chandler Hospital, which will be one of the largest projects in the state's history in terms of size and economic impact.[6] is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... William T. Young Library The William T. Young Library, located on the campus of the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, is named for William T. Young, a prominent local businessman, horse breeder, philanthropist and alumnus of the university, who began fundraising efforts with a donation of $5 million. ... Harvard redirects here. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... The Biological Pharmaceutical Complex Building is a proposed building at the University of Kentucky along South Limestone adjacent to the Biomedical Biological Science Research Building. ... The Biomedical Biological Science Research Building (BBSRB) is a five-story research facility for the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Opened in 1962, the Albert B. Chandler Hospital along Rose Street at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky is a component of the University of Kentucky Hospital (UK HealthCare), encompassed within the Chandler Medical Center [1]. The 473-bed medical facility features the Markey Cancer Center, the Kentucky Children...


As a land-grant university, UK is affiliated with several satellite institutions spread throughout the commonwealth. It formerly operated fourteen community colleges with more than 100 extended sites, centers and campuses, which were a part of the former University of Kentucky's Community College System (UKCCS), but in a major reorganization of the commonwealth's higher education system in 1997, the community colleges were placed under an independent governing board, the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). Nearby Lexington Community College, despite the 1997 reorganization of the community colleges, remained integrated with the university itself, but separated from UK in 2004 and became a part of KCTCS. The College of Engineering operates a satellite campus in Paducah, located on the campus of West Kentucky Community and Technical College. A community college is a type of educational institution. ... The UK Community College System (UKCCS) officially ended in 1999, when the community colleges were transferred to the newly created Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS), except for Lexington Community College, which remained with the University of Kentucky until 2004, when it was transferred to KCTCS. External Links UK... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... (KCTCS)Founded in 1997 by former Kentucky Governor Paul Patton to replace the University of Kentuckys Community College System, the system connects the states two-year colleges to make education readily available to Kentucky, and allows transfer of credits toward public universities for 4-year degrees. ... Bluegrass Community and Technical College (BCTC), located in Lexington, KY, is one of 16 two-year, open-admissions colleges of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System (KCTCS). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Paducah is a city in McCracken County, Kentucky at the confluence of the Tennessee River and the Ohio River. ... West Kentucky Community and Technical College is a community college within the Paducah, Kentucky. ...


Traditions

In 1892, the university adopted the signature blue and white as its official colors, but only after deciding upon blue and light yellow at the Kentucky-Centre College football game on December 19, 1891.[3] The particular shade of blue was determined from a necktie, which was used to demonstrate the color of royal blue. [3] Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Centre College is an accredited, private, four-year liberal arts college located in Danville, Kentucky, USA, a community of about 15,000 in Boyle County, approximately 35 miles (56. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


On October 9, 1909, "Wildcats" became converse with the university shortly after a football victory over Illinois University.[3] The then chief of the military department at the old State University, Commandant Carbusier, stated that the team had "fought like Wildcats." The nickname became more popular over the years and was eventually adopted by the university.[3] The mascot later originated during the 1976 academic year as a way to entertain the thousands of university fans at Commonwealth Stadium and Rupp Arena during athletic events. [3] is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Binomial name Felis silvestris Schreber, 1775 subspecies See text The Wildcat (Felis silvestris), sometimes Wild Cat or Wild-cat, is a small predator native to Europe, the western part of Asia, and Africa. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... A Corner of Main Quad The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC, U of I, or simply Illinois), is the oldest, largest, and most prestigious campus in the University of Illinois system. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Commonwealth Stadium is the name of two stadiums: Commonwealth Stadium - Edmonton, Alberta Commonwealth Stadium - University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Rupp Arena is an arena located in downtown Lexington, Kentucky, USA. It is the centerpiece of Lexington Center, a convention and shopping facility owned by an arm of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, Lexingtons consolidated city-county government. ...


On October 1, 2000, the new 859 area code was placed into effect.[11] The area code is also a mnemonic that spells out "UKY," short for the University of Kentucky. is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Area code 859 serves the state of Kentucky. ... A mnemonic (AmE [] or BrE []) is a memory aid. ...


Buildings

The university is home to numerous notable structures, such as Main Building, the oldest remaining building on campus, and Patterson Office Tower, the tallest. It is also home to several major construction projects, including the new Albert B. Chandler Hospital and the Biological Pharmaceutical Complex Building, which will be the largest academic building in the state.[9] The Patterson Office Tower. ... Main Buildings rear taken from the Patterson Office Tower. ... Opened in 1962, the Albert B. Chandler Hospital along Rose Street at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky is a component of the University of Kentucky Hospital (UK HealthCare), encompassed within the Chandler Medical Center [1]. The 473-bed medical facility features the Markey Cancer Center, the Kentucky Children... The Biological Pharmaceutical Complex Building is a proposed building at the University of Kentucky along South Limestone adjacent to the Biomedical Biological Science Research Building. ...


Academics

Completed in 1998, the William T. Young Library serves both the university campus and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
Completed in 1998, the William T. Young Library serves both the university campus and the Commonwealth of Kentucky.
The Main Building in the foreground and the Patterson Office Tower in the background.
The Main Building in the foreground and the Patterson Office Tower in the background.

The university features 16 colleges, a graduate school, 93 undergraduate programs, 99 master's degrees, 66 programs in Ph.D.'s and doctoral degrees, and four professional programs.[12] ImageMetadata File history File links WilliamtyounglibraryUK.JPG Summary Photo by Michal Cieraszynski Licensing This image is copyrighted. ... ImageMetadata File history File links WilliamtyounglibraryUK.JPG Summary Photo by Michal Cieraszynski Licensing This image is copyrighted. ... Located on the campus of the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, the William T. Young Library is named for a prominent philanthropist and alumnus of the university. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Main Buildings rear taken from the Patterson Office Tower. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate or graduate course of one to three years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...


Organizations

The College of Law is a college of the University of Kentucky located within Central Campus along South Limestone. ... This article should appear in one or more categories. ... The University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy is a College of pharmacy which, through a four-year curriculum, grants students a Pharm. ... Gatton College of Business and Economics is a college of the University of Kentucky. ... Patterson Office Tower, home of the school of diplomacy. ...

Libraries

The university is home to 15 campus libraries. Among them is the William T. Young Library, which houses the university's social sciences, humanities and life sciences collections, it also acts as a United States federal repository and a public library for the Commonwealth of Kentucky. Here are list of the libraries on campus: Located on the campus of the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, the William T. Young Library is named for a prominent philanthropist and alumnus of the university. ... A repository is a central place where data is stored and maintained. ... Librarians and patrons in a typical larger urban public library. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ...

  • Agricultural Information Center
  • Chemistry-Physics Library
  • Design Library
  • Distance Learning Library Services
  • Education Library
  • Geological Sciences Library
  • Law Library
  • Library Link at the Patterson Office Tower
  • Lucille Caudill Little Fine Arts Library and Learning Center
  • Mathematical Sciences Library
  • Medical Center Library
  • Shaver Engineering Library
  • Special Collections and Digital Programs
  • William T. Young Library

Located on the campus of the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, the William T. Young Library is named for a prominent philanthropist and alumnus of the university. ...

"Top 20 Plan"

In 1997, the Kentucky General Assembly formed a Compact with the university that mandates that it become a Top 20 public research university by 2020.[13] According to the Compact, states with Top 20 universities feature higher average household incomes, higher education attainments, healthier lives and more financial security.[14] As a result, fewer citizens live in poverty and as a result, fewer public dollars are spent on health care. [13] It would also spur technological advancements due to university-based research and increase the marketability of the state to investors. The Kentucky State Capitol Building in Frankfort, KY The Kentucky General Assembly, also called the Kentucky Legislature, is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Kentucky. ...


As part of the Top 20 plan, the university plans to,[13]

  1. Increase enrollment by 7,000 students to 34,000;
  2. Increase the state's highest graduation rate by 12% to 72%;
  3. Increase the number of faculty by 625 to total 2,500;
  4. Increase research expenditures by $470 million to total $768 million per year; and
  5. Increase the university's role in Kentucky's "schools, farms, businesses and communities."

The Top 20 plan has already produced results,[14]

  1. Total enrollment increased from 24,061 in 1996 to 26,440 in 2004, an increase of 2,379.
  2. The graduation rate increased from 48.1 percent in 1991 to 59.5 percent in 1998.
  3. Research expenditures increased from $124.8 million in 1996 to $297.6 million in 2003.[14] It dipped slightly to $274 million for 2005. [8] It is currently ranked 28th among public universities in sponsored research.[8]
  4. Endowment increased from $195.1 million in 1997 to $538.4 million in 2005.
  5. Increasing the university's six-year graduation rate from 60% in 2007 from 50.8% in 1998.[8]

In 2000, to help finance the Top 20 plan, the university launched The Campaign for the University of Kentucky, a $600 million fundraising effort that was used to "enhance facilities, academic programs, public service, and scholarships."[8] It passed that goal and the effort was raised to $1 billion. In March 2007, $1.022 billion was raised, month's before the fundraising effort was set to end.[15] Fundraising is the process of soliciting and gathering money or other gifts in-kind, by requesting donations from individuals, businesses, charitable foundations, or governmental agencies. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...


Although currently the university's undergraduate program is ranked 122nd in the nation, tied with the Catholic University of America, by U.S. News & World Report's college rankings,[16] by some measures the university already has top-20 programs in: The Catholic University of America The Catholic University of America (abbreviated CUA), located in Washington, DC, is unique as the national university of the Catholic Church and as the only higher education institution founded by the U.S. bishops. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

The 2005 Faculty Scholarly Activity Index ranked UK as a whole 19th in the nation among public research universities based on the scholarly activity of faculty.[17] Human heart and lungs, from an older edition of Grays Anatomy. ... Neurobiology is the study of cells of the nervous system and the organization of these cells into functional circuits that process information and mediate behavior. ... Counseling psychology is an application of the basic professional skills in psychology to a population that has been more located in schools rather than hospitals and clinics. ... Patterson Office Tower, home of the school of diplomacy. ... Educational psychology is the study of how humans learn in educational settings, the effectiveness of educational interventions, the psychology of teaching, and the social psychology of schools as organizations. ... Not to be confused with Etymology, the study of the history of words. ... Hispanic flag, not widely used. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Phytopathology (plant pathology) is the scientific study of plant diseases caused by pathogens (infectious diseases) and environmental conditons (non-infectiousness). ... The Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, is responsible for research, education and service programs in aging [1]. The program was founded in 1963 with the creation of the Council on Aging. ... “Surgeon” redirects here. ...


According to the Statewide Facilities Condition Assessment Report released on April 4, 2007, the University needs $12.5 billion to complete its 1997 mandate to become a top-20 institution.[22]


Athletics

The Kentucky cheerleaders at Rupp Arena performing the traditional "Big K" cheer during a basketball game. Seating Capacity of Rupp arena is 23,000.
The Kentucky cheerleaders at Rupp Arena performing the traditional "Big K" cheer during a basketball game. Seating Capacity of Rupp arena is 23,000.
Main article: Kentucky Wildcats

In the 1890s, students at the university scheduled football games with neighboring colleges.[23] In 1902, the basketball program began on campus, originally as a women's sport; [23] a men's team was added one year later. In 1930, then-high school coach Adolph Rupp was hired as a basketball coach for the university, and later guided the Wildcats to four NCAA crowns in 1948, 1949, 1951, and 1958.[23]. In 1950-51, University of Kentucky was one of the few schools to have players were arrested in the CCNY Point Shaving Scandal which brought down many schools from various institutions for taking money from gamblers. Players included Dale Barnstable, Ralph Beard, and Alex Groza. [3]. It also won a fifth championship under Joe B. Hall in 1978, another in 1996 under Rick Pitino, and its last under Orlando "Tubby" Smith in 1998.[23] The university also boasts a cross country national championship, eight championships in gymnastics, an Olympic medalist in track and field, and 15 national championships in cheerleading.[8] ImageMetadata File history File links RupparenaK.JPG Summary Photo by submitter Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... ImageMetadata File history File links RupparenaK.JPG Summary Photo by submitter Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Rupp Arena is an arena located in downtown Lexington, Kentucky, USA. It is the centerpiece of Lexington Center, a convention and shopping facility owned by an arm of the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government, Lexingtons consolidated city-county government. ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The CCNY Point Shaving Scandal was one of the first major college basketball point shaving gambling scandals. ... Ralph Beard was a member of Adolph Rupps Fabulous Five University of Kentucky basketball team. ... Alex John Groza (October 7, 1926 – January 21, 1995) was a basketball player who was banned from the NBA for life in 1951 for point shaving. ... Joe B. Hall Joe Beasman Hall, better known as Joe B. Hall (born November 30, 1928 in Cynthiana, Kentucky) was the head basketball coach at the University of Kentucky from 1972 to 1985. ... Rick Pitino (born September 18, 1952) is the head basketball coach at the University of Louisville. ... Orlando Tubby Smith (born June 30, 1951 in Scotland, Saint Marys County, Maryland) is the basketball coach at the University of Minnesota. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, gracefulness, and kinesthetic awareness, and includes such skills as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Youth Cheerleaders during a football halftime show. ...


On 22 March 2007, the school began looking for a new head basketball coach when Tubby Smith left for the University of Minnesota. On April 6, 2007, the school announced former Texas A&M and UTEP coach Billy Gillispie would be the new head basketball coach.[citation needed] is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Orlando Tubby Smith (born June 30, 1951 in Scotland, Saint Marys County, Maryland) has served as head coach at the University of Tulsa and the University of Georgia, and is currently in his tenth season as the head basketball coach at the University of Kentucky. ... This article is about the oldest and largest campus of the University of Minnesota. ... For the Irish football (soccer) player, see Billy Gillespie. ...


Athletic Programs: Baseball, Basketball, Cross Country, Football, Golf, Gymnastics, Ice Hockey (Privately Funded), Rifle, Soccer, Softball, Swimming & Diving, Tennis, Track, Volleyball


Media

The Electrical and Computer Engineering Department was the home and sponsor of one of the earliest college amateur radio stations in the United States. W4JP began continuous operation before World War I and persisted until amateur radio licenses were granted by the US Government. A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... W4JP is the callsign of the amateur radio station operated by the University of Kentucky Amateur Radio Club in room 553 of Anderson Hall (Kentucky). ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... This article describes the government of the United States. ...


The university is currently served by two independent FM stations. 91.3 FM WUKY is an Triple-A station and was the first university-owned FM radio station in the United States and Kentucky's first public radio station.[24] It's operations started on October 17, 1940 as WBKY out of Beattyville, although it moved five years later to Lexington.[24] In 1971, the station was one of the first to carry NPR's "All Things Considered" and helped debut National Public Radio. It only changed its call letters to WUKY in 1989 to better reflect its affiliation with the university. In 2007, it became the first Lexington radio station to broadcast in high-definition digital radio.[24] In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) conveys information over a carrier wave by varying its frequency. ... In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) conveys information over a carrier wave by varying its frequency. ... WUKY (91. ... Adult Album Alternative (also Triple-A, AAA, or adult alternative) is a radio format broadcast mostly on FM. A spin off of the Album-oriented rock format, its roots may have been established sometime during the 60s from what was called underground music and later progressive. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Beattyville is a city in Lee County, Kentucky, United States. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... NPR redirects here. ...


The second is 88.1 FM WRFL which has been in operation since 1988.[25] It is operated by students and broadcasts live 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and features music that is spread across most genres. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) conveys information over a carrier wave by varying its frequency. ... WRFL is a college radio station that broadcasts 24 hours a day at 250 watts from the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington, Kentucky at 88. ...


The campus is also served by the Kentucky Kernel, a student-run, financially independent daily newspaper. The official yearbook of the University of Kentucky is the Kentuckian. First published in 1906, it was preceded by at least one previous book, the Echo. Many former members of the staff have gone on to successful careers in journalism. One of the more notable is National Geographic photographer Sam Abell. As one of UK's student publications, the book is currently closely associated with the school's independent daily student newspaper. The Kentucky Kernel is the student newspaper of the University of Kentucky. ... For other uses, see Yearbook (disambiguation). ... The National Geographic Society was founded in the USA on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... Sam Abell (born 1945) is an American photographer known for his frequent publication of photographs in National Geographic. ...


Student life

The university offers seven main dining facilities, 23 residence halls, and numerous recreation facilities spread between three distinct campuses: north, south, and central. It is also home to more than 250 student-run organizations. The University of Kentucky offers numerous dining options, residence halls, and athletic facilities. ...


Campus safety

The university has suffered from a perception that the campus is unsafe. In a survey of 1000 female university students, conducted in spring 2004, 36.5% reported having been victims of rape, stalking, or physical assault while at the campus.[26][27] Campus law enforcement statistics do not bear out these numbers, however,[28] and it can be assumed either that many serious crimes go unreported or that the survey conclusions were erroneous. For other uses, see Stalking (disambiguation). ... Assault is a crime of violence against another person. ...


In response to the survey, University President Lee T. Todd, Jr. launched an initiative in September 2005 titled the Campus Safety Imperative, which included a quadrupling of annual expenditures on safety.[29] Todd specifically linked campus safety to the goal of becoming a top 20 public research institution, stating that "We will never make gains toward becoming a top-20 public research institution if our students are unsafe or if they lack a sense of physical security. It is part of our fundamental mission, then, to create a campus that provides a safe place to live, to work, and to learn."[27] Lee T. Todd, Jr. ...


Greek life

There are 19 sororities and 26 fraternities that serve the university. There are 16 sororities and 25 fraternities that serve the University of Kentucky in Lexington. ... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for... While the term fraternity can be used to describe any number of social organizations, including the Lions Club and the Shriners, fraternities and sororities are most commonly known as social organizations of higher education students in the United States and Canada but there are fraternities in the whole world (for...


Notable people

The university has been home to many notable people. This is a list of encyclopedic people associated with the University of Kentucky in the United States of America. ...

This is a list of Governors of Kentucky: See also Kentucky Categories: Lists of United States governors | Governors of Kentucky ... Ernest Lee Fletcher (born November 12, 1952) has served as governor of the Commonwealth of Kentucky since December 9, 2003. ... Lucas Kenneth Ray Lucas (born August 22, 1933), is an American politician. ... The House of Representatives is the larger of two houses that make up the U.S. Congress, the other being the United States Senate. ... A congressional district is an electoral constituency that elects a single member of a congress. ... The United States Senate is the upper house of the U.S. Congress, smaller than the United States House of Representatives. ... Addison Mitchell Mitch McConnell, Jr. ... Ashley Judd (born April 19, 1968) is an American actress. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ...

Controversy

Sponsored Benefits Plan

On January 12, 2007, the university's domestic partner benefits committee unanimously voted recommending domestic partner benefits, such as health insurance and employee education benefits, to same-sex and opposite-sex unmarried couples to help enhance the university's competitiveness in attracting top faculty and staff, part of the Top-20 plan.[30][31] The program stemmed from a work-life survey of university employees in 2005 and 2006, and led to several proposals to improve employee conditions that would affect 13,600 employees, of which 68 are same-sex partners, and 272 opposite-sex partners.[31][32] The estimated cost of the originaldomestic partner benefits program would be $633,000 annually, less than 1% of the university's $68.2 million annual health care budget;[33] 40% of which would be paid from the university's undesignated general funds; the remainder would have been from various grants, contracts, athletics, and hospital revenues.[30] is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Domestic partner or domestic partnership identifies the personal relationship between individuals who are living together and sharing a common domestic life together but are not joined in any type of legal partnership, marriage or civil union. ... Health insurance is a form of group insurance, where individuals pay premiums or taxes in order to help protect themselves from high or unexpected healthcare expenses. ...


The measure was supported by the Kentucky Fairness Alliance,[31] but opposed by the Family Trust Foundation and The Family Foundation of Kentucky.[34] It was also opposed by Republican Stan Lee, who filed a bill to ban domestic partner coverage at Kentucky's public universities,[35] and by Republican Vernie McGaha, who sponsored Senate Bill 152 to ban state and local governments, public and private colleges, and some quasi-government institutions[36] from offering domestic partner benefits.[37] Both bills were never passed. LGBT rights Around the world By country History · Groups · Activists Declaration of Montreal Same-sex relationships Marriage · Adoption Opposition · Discrimination Violence This box:      The Kentucky Fairness Alliance (KFA) is a Kentucky, USA gay rights organization formed in 1993. ... The Family Foundation of Kentucky is a non-profit organization based in Lexington. ...


University President Lee T. Todd, Jr. endorsed the benefits proposal on April 24, 2007.[31] It was slated to go into effect July 1, and the university would become the second public college in the state to offer such benefits,[30] however, Kentucky Attorney General Greg Stumbo, stated on June 1, 2007 that the package violates the constitutional definition of marriage.[38] On June 18, the Sponsored Benefits Plan, an amended plan that eliminates the conflict with the definition of marriage in the Kentucky Constitution, was announced to take effect on July 1, 2007. This plan uses no Commonwealth of Kentucky appropriated funds.[39] Lee T. Todd, Jr. ... is the 114th day of the year (115th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... In most common law jurisdictions, the Attorney General is the main legal adviser to the government, and in some jurisdictions may in addition have executive responsibility for law enforcement or responsibility for public prosecutions. ... Gregory D. Greg Stumbo is the Democratic Attorney General of the Commonwealth of Kentucky (2003 – present). ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marriage is an interpersonal relationship with governmental, social, or religious recognition, usually intimate and sexual, and often created as a contract, or through civil process. ... The Constitution of Kentucky is the document that governs the Commonwealth of Kentucky, United States. ...


Points of interest

For the stadium of the same name in Edmonton, Alberta, see Commonwealth Stadium (Edmonton). ... Memorial Coliseum is a 8,500-seat multi-purpose arena in Lexington, Kentucky. ... Memorial Hall Memorial Hall is a prominent building on the campus of the University of Kentucky. ... The University of Kentucky/Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government Arboretum (40 hectares or 100 acres) is located at the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, USA. It is open to the public from dawn to dusk every day of the year. ... The University of Kentucky Research and Education Center Botanical Garden, also known as the UK REC Botanical Garden, is a research farm and botanical garden for the University of Kentucky in Princeton, Kentucky. ... Located on the campus of the University of Kentucky in Lexington, Kentucky, the William T. Young Library is named for a prominent philanthropist and alumnus of the university. ...

External links

Official sites

University project sites

  • Guthrie, Kentucky - "District Regionalism" community created by the College of Design
  • African Cemetery No. 2, Lexington KY
  • Appalshop
  • KY Beef IRM (Integrated Resource Management)
  • The Comic Book Periodic Table of the Elements
  • UK Firefly Solar Powered Vehicle
  • UK Global English Research Project
  • Mathews Garden - native plants for teaching and research
  • Monte Verde (Chile): review of archaeological special report
  • North Central Regional Committee on Swine Nutrition
  • The Daily Aesthetic: leisure & recreation in Lexington's segregated park system
  • Geographic Information Science at UK

Guthrie is a city in Todd County, Kentucky, United States. ... District Regionalism is an architectural term used to describe the organization of cities in city planning. ...

References

  1. ^ Jester, Art. "UK reaches billion-dollar milestone in fund-raising", Lexington Herald-Leader, April 27, 2007. Retrieved on May 2, 2007. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f (2006) "Fact Booklet 2006-2007". {{{booktitle}}}, University of Kentucky. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h University of Kentucky Traditions and songs. University of Kentucky (2007-05-25).
  4. ^ a b c d e f History Briefs. University of Kentucky (2007-05-23).
  5. ^ a b c d e History Briefs. University of Kentucky (2007-05-23).
  6. ^ a b Nelson, Amanda. "Officials Break Ground on New UK Albert B. Chandler Hospital", University of Kentucky, 2007-05-30. 
  7. ^ Jester, Art and Holly E. Stepp. "Hub of the University", Herald-Leader, 1998-03-22. 
  8. ^ a b c d e f g h Stats-at-a-glance. University of Kentucky (2007-05-23).
  9. ^ a b Future of Pharmacy. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  10. ^ Biomedical/Biological Sciences Research Building. University of Kentucky (2006-11-17).
  11. ^ Stamper, John. "Area code changes to 859 April 1", Herald-Leader, 2000-03-31. 
  12. ^ Consolidated Financial Statements. University of Kentucky (2006-06-30).
  13. ^ a b c Todd, Lee T. "UK Reaching Top 20 Critical to Moving Kentucky Forward." University of Kentucky. February 28, 2007 [1].
  14. ^ a b c "Top 20 Business Plan Presentation" University of Kentucky 2005. February 28, 2007 [2].
  15. ^ "Surpassing the Goal", University of Kentucky. 
  16. ^ America's Best Colleges 2008 (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-16.
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h UK Ranks #1 in Hispanic Studies and Plant Pathology. University of Kentucky (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.Two College of Agriculture Departments Rank in Top 10 Nationally. usagnet.com (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  18. ^ a b c d e f g Medicine Departments Rank in NIH Top-20. University of Kentucky (2004). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  19. ^ Inside the Ivory Tower. foreignpolicy.com (2006). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  20. ^ Mitchell, Erica. "Grad programs rise in rankings", Kentucky Kernel, 2007-04-06. Retrieved on 2007-04-06. 
  21. ^ a b College of Medicine Facts. University of Kentucky (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-09.
  22. ^ Jester, Art. "Report: Kentucky needs $12.5 billion for university facilities by 2020", Herald-Leader [Lexington], 2007-04-07. Retrieved on 2007-04-03. 
  23. ^ a b c d History Briefs. University of Kentucky (2007-05-23).
  24. ^ a b c "About WUKY", WUKY. Retrieved on 2007-05-08. 
  25. ^ "About", WRFL. Retrieved on 2007-05-08. 
  26. ^ Women's Place Safety Imperative. University of Kentucky (2006). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  27. ^ a b UK President Announces Initiatives to Improve Women’s Safety. University of Kentucky (2004). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  28. ^ University of Kentucky Campus Safety and Security Report 2006. University of Kentucky (2006). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  29. ^ $1.25 Million Committed to Improving Campus Safety. University of Kentucky (2005). Retrieved on 2007-02-06.
  30. ^ a b c Jester, Art. "UK Closer to Partner Benefits". 
  31. ^ a b c d Jester, Art. "Todd backing partner benefits". 
  32. ^ "Summary of UK's Domestic Partner Benefits Proposal". 
  33. ^ "A fairer system - UK should approve domestic-partner benefits". 
  34. ^ Nelson, Richard (2007-02-19). Domestic partnership debate hits home. The Family Foundation of Kentucky. Retrieved on 2007-06-08.
  35. ^ Blackford, Linda. "UK Employees Receive Survey". 
  36. ^ Stamper, John. "Partner benefits bill called a charade". 
  37. ^ Stamper, John. "Partner benefits bill called a charade". 
  38. ^ "Attorney General Issues Opinion On Same-Sex Benefits", WLKY-TV, 2007-06-01. 
  39. ^ Boehnke, Megan and Art Jester. "UK alters plan for partner coverage", Herald-Leader, 2007-06-19. 

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Kentucky - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (976 words)
The University of Kentucky became racially integrated in 1949 when Lyman T. Johnson, a fl man, won a lawsuit to be admitted to the graduate program.
In 1997, the Kentucky General Assembly mandated that UK be among the top 20 public research universities in the nation by 2020.
The Kentucky's sports teams (nicknamed the Wildcats) include football, men's and women's basketball, women's volleyball, baseball, softball, men's and women's cross country, men's and women's swimming/diving, women's gymnastics, men's and women's soccer, men's and women's track and field (indoor and outdoor), men's and women's golf, men's and women's tennis, and the coeducational sport of rifle.
Kentucky State University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (456 words)
Kentucky State University (KSU, or less commonly, KYSU, to differentiate from Kansas State University) is a four-year institution of higher learning, located in Frankfort, Kentucky, the state's capital.
In 1902, the name of the school was changed to the Kentucky Normal and Industrial Institute for Colored Persons, which was changed again in 1926 to the Kentucky State Industrial College for Colored Persons.
In 1938, the school became known as the Kentucky State College for Negroes (the "for Negroes" was dropped in 1952).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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