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Encyclopedia > University of Glasgow

University of Glasgow

Latin: Universitas Glasguensis

Motto Via, Veritas, Vita ("The Way, the Truth and the Life")
Established 1451
Type Public
Endowment £124.0 million[1]
Rector Mordechai Vanunu
Chancellor Professor Sir Kenneth Calman
Principal Sir Muir Russell
Staff 5,807[2]
Students 23,590 [3]
Undergraduates 18,810 [3]
Postgraduates 4,785 [3]
Location Glasgow, Scotland
Colours Graduate
                         

Master of Theology (MTh)
Image File history File linksMetadata Glasgow_Crest. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... // Events February 3 - Murad II, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire dies and is succeeded by his son Mehmed II. April 11 - Celje acquires market-town status and town rights by orders from the Celje count Frederic II. June 30 - French troops under the Comte de Dunois invade Guyenne and capture... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Mordechai Vanunu in the garden of St. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... Sir Muir Russell KCB DL FRSE is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A Masters degree which is typically earned after one has already completed a Master of Divinity or a Master of Theological Studies. ...

                             

Dentistry

                   

Nursing

                   
Affiliations Russell Group
Universitas 21
Website http://www.gla.ac.uk

The University of Glasgow (Scottish Gaelic: Oilthigh Ghlaschu) was founded in 1451, in Glasgow, Scotland. It is a renowned centre for teaching and research, with an international reputation, being one of the ancient universities of Scotland, the fourth oldest in the English-speaking world and amongst the largest, and most prestigious, seats of learning in the United Kingdom.[4][5] The University has recently risen to 81st place in the Times World University Rankings, climbing above St Andrews, making it one of only two institutions in Scotland to be placed inside the top 100.[6] In addition, Glasgow has recently been named the Sunday Times Scottish University of the Year, 2007/2008.[7] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... // Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... // Events February 3 - Murad II, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire dies and is succeeded by his son Mehmed II. April 11 - Celje acquires market-town status and town rights by orders from the Celje count Frederic II. June 30 - French troops under the Comte de Dunois invade Guyenne and capture... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... This article is about the country. ... The Ancient universities of Scotland are those universities founded during the medieval period, and comprise (list by year of being chartered): The University of St Andrews, founded 1411 by papal bull The University of Glasgow, founded 1451 by papal bull The University of Aberdeen, founded 1495 by papal bull (as... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ...


The University's main campus is on Gilmorehill in the leafy West End of Glasgow. The University also has a number of buildings elsewhere in the city, a facility at Loch Lomond as well as jointly operating the Crichton Campus in Dumfries with a number of other institutions. The Buccleuch St Bridge Devorgilla Bridge Overlooking Dumfries The Old Bridge House Dumfries ((IPA: ) pronounced dum-freece, not dum-fries) (Dùn Phris or Druim Phris in Scottish Gaelic, meaning either fort or ridge of the thicket respectively) is a former royal burgh and town with a population of around...

Contents

History

The University of Glasgow was founded in 1451 by a papal bull of Pope Nicholas V, at the suggestion of King James II, giving Bishop William Turnbull permission to add the university to the city's cathedral.[8] Its founding came about as a result of King James II's wish that Scotland have two Universities to equal Oxford and Cambridge of England. It is the second oldest university in Scotland (the oldest being the 1410-founded University of St Andrews), and the fourth oldest in the English-speaking world. The Universities of St Andrews, Glasgow and Aberdeen were ecclesiastical foundations, while Edinburgh was a civic foundation. // Events February 3 - Murad II, Sultan of the Ottoman Empire dies and is succeeded by his son Mehmed II. April 11 - Celje acquires market-town status and town rights by orders from the Celje count Frederic II. June 30 - French troops under the Comte de Dunois invade Guyenne and capture... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Nicholas V, né Tomaso Parentucelli (November 15, 1397 – March 24, 1455) was Pope from March 6, 1447, to his death. ... James II of Scotland (October 16, 1430 – August 3, 1460) was king of Scotland from 1437 to 1460. ... William Turnbull (born approx. ... This article is about the country. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ...


Glasgow has enjoyed a (usually friendly) rivalry with the University of St Andrews since its creation, and with the University of Edinburgh since the foundation of the latter in 1583. Of all the universities and tertiary education establishments in Scotland, only Glasgow offers a complete range of professional studies including law, medicine, dentistry, and engineering, combined with a comprehensive range of academic studies including science, social science, ancient and modern languages, literature, and history. St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... 1583 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. ...


The University buildings were originally not far from Glasgow Cathedral in the city's High Street area. By the late 17th century, they centred on two courtyards surrounded by walled gardens, with a clock tower which was one of the notable features of Glasgow's skyline, and a chapel adapted from the church of the former Dominican (Blackfriars) friary. This complex was one of the finest Renaissance buildings in Scotland, and its demolition, following the transferral of the University to its present site (in less 'rough' surroundings) was one of the worst acts of cultural vandalism in 19th century Scotland. Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... This article is about the country. ... Alternative meaning: Nineteenth Century (periodical) (18th century — 19th century — 20th century — more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 19th century was that century which lasted from 1801-1900 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the country. ...


Present Day and Current Reputation

The university is a member of the elite Russell Group of research-led British universities[9] and is a founding member of the organisation Universitas 21,[10] an international grouping of universities dedicated to setting world-wide standards for higher education. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... “British Universities” redirects here. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ...


The University has recently published its 'Building on Excellence' strategy for 2006-2010. The University's strategic plan sets out the ambition to be one of the best Universities in the world, by being an outstanding place for research, teaching and learning. The University aims to be recognised as one of the UK's top 10 universities (from its current ranking of 12th)[11], and as one of the world's top 50 research-intensive universities[12].


Glasgow has the fourth largest financial endowment among UK universities at £124m, and the fifth largest endowment per student, according to the Sutton Trust.[13] A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ...


As of February 2007, the University had almost 19,000 undergraduate and 5 000 postgraduate students.[3] Glasgow has a large (for the UK) proportion of 'home' students, with almost half of the student body coming from the Greater Glasgow area, an additional 39% from elsewhere in the UK, leaving 13% from elsewhere in the world. More recently the University has started to attract more overseas students, particularly from Asia. There are 6,000 staff, of whom 3 400 are researchers, bringing in £100M of research income (2005-6). Twenty-three subject areas, and 96% of staff were awarded 5 or 5* ratings in the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise (RAE).[14] The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is an exercise undertaken every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils (HEFCE, SHEFC, HEFCW, DELNI) to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions. ...


Recently, the University's teaching quality was independantly assessed to be among the top 10 in the United Kingdom, along with its reputation as a 'research powerhouse', whose income from annual research contracts also placing among the top 10 the UK, generating a total income of over £312,000,000 per year. [15]


The most recent rankings from the Times Higher Education Supplement, compiled by QS, and widely regarded as one of the most respected world university rankings, places Glasgow in the top 70 Worldwide for Arts, Humanities and Biological Sciences, as well as the top 100 for Social Sciences.[16] On top of this, recent statistics also show Glasgow to be among the top 20 in the UK for both entry standards, as well as the percentage of students who go on to gain first or upper second class honours degrees. These details are available to registered members on the THES website.[17]

The Western Quadrangle

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 119 KB) Brandon Davis, Photo of USCs West Quad. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1024x683, 119 KB) Brandon Davis, Photo of USCs West Quad. ...

Facilities

The university's initial accommodations were part of the complex of religious buildings in the precincts of Glasgow Cathedral. In 1460 the University received a grant of land from James, Lord Hamilton, on the east side of the High Street, immediately north of the Blackfriars Church, on which it had its home for the next four hundred years. In the mid-seventeenth century, the Hamilton Building was replaced with a very grand two-court building with a decorated west front facing the High Street. Over the following centuries, the university's size and scope continued to expand. It was a centre of the Scottish Enlightenment and subsequently of the industrial revolution, and its expansion in the High Street was constrained by the density of the burgeoning mercantile district. Glasgow Cathedral Glasgow Cathedral is a Church of Scotland cathedral in Glasgow. ... The Scottish Enlightenment was a period of intellectual ferment in Scotland, running from approximately 1740 to 1800. ... A Watt steam engine, the steam engine that propelled the Industrial Revolution in Britain and the world. ...


Consequently in 1870, it moved to a (then greenfield) site on Gilmorehill in the West End of the city (around three miles west of its prior location), enclosed by a large loop of the River Kelvin. Its accommodations there were a number of custom-made buildings, designed by Sir George Gilbert Scott in the Gothic revival style. The largest of these (now called the Gilbert Scott Building) echoed (on a far grander scale) the High Street campus's twin quadrangle layout. Between the two quadrangles Scott's son Oldrid built an open undercroft, above which is his grand Bute Hall (used for examinations and graduation ceremonies), and the buildings' signature Gothic bell tower. The sandstone cladding and Gothic design of the buildings' exterior belie the modernity of its Victorian construction — Scott's building is hung on a (then cutting-edge) riveted iron frame, with a lightweight wooden-beam roof. Greenfield land is a term used to describe a piece of undeveloped land, either currently used for agriculture or just left to nature. ... The Kelvin is Glasgows second river after the River Clyde. ... The chapel of St Johns College, Cambridge is characteristic of Scotts many church designs Sir George Gilbert Scott (July 13, 1811 – March 27, 1878) was an English architect of the Victorian Age, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches, cathedrals and workhouses. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Interior of Cologne Cathedral Interior of San Zanipolo, Venice, photo Giovanni dallOrto. ... Bell Tower is an office tower in Edmonton, Canada. ... Queen Victoria (shown here on the morning of her accession to the Throne, 20 June 1837) gave her name to the historic era The Victorian era of the United Kingdom marked the height of the British Industrial Revolution and the apex of the British Empire. ...


Even these enlarged premises could not contain the ever-growing university, which quickly spread across much of Gilmorehill. The 1930s saw the construction of the award-winning round Reading Room (it is now a grade-A listed building) and an aggressive programme of house purchases, in which the university (fearing the surrounding district of Hillhead was running out of suitable building land) acquired several terraces of Victorian houses and joined them together internally. The departments of Psychology, Computing Science, and most of the Arts Faculty continue to be housed in these terraces, though the University is constructing a new building for the Computing Science department. The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ...


More buildings were built beside the main buildings, filling the land between University Avenue and the river with natural science buildings and the faculty of medicine. The medical school spread into neighbouring Partick and joined with the Western General Infirmary. The growth and prosperity of the city, which had forced the university's relocation to Hillhead, again proved problematic when more real estate was required. The school of veterinary medicine, which was founded in 1862, moved to a new campus in the leafy surrounds of Garscube Estate on the edge of the city in 1954. The university later moved its sports ground and associated facilities to Anniesland (around two miles west of the main campus) and built student halls of residence in both Anniesland and Maryhill. Bilingual sign in Gaelic and English at Partick railway station, Glasgow. ...

The Main Building, from University Avenue
The Main Building, from University Avenue

The growth of tertiary education from the 1960s led the university to build numerous modern buildings across the hill, including several brutalist concrete blocks: the Mathematics building; the Boyd Orr building (a squat grey concrete tower housing lecture rooms and laboratories named after university graduate and Nobel Peace Prize winner John Boyd Orr); and the Adam Smith building (housing the social science faculty, named after university graduate Adam Smith). Other additions around this time, including the glass-lined library tower and the amber-brick geology building, were more in keeping with Gilmorehill's leafy suburban architecture. The erection of these buildings around 1968 also involved the demolition of a large number of houses in Ashton Road, and rerouting the west end of University Avenue to its current position. Image File history File links Glasgow_university_with_sno. ... Image File history File links Glasgow_university_with_sno. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... This article is about the construction material. ... John Boyd Orr, 1st Baron Boyd-Orr (September 23, 1880 – June 25, 1971) was a Scottish doctor, biologist and politician who received the Nobel Peace Prize for his scientific research into nutrition and his work with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). ... For other persons named Adam Smith, see Adam Smith (disambiguation). ...


The University's Hunterian Museum resides in the Gilbert Scott Building, and the related Hunterian Gallery is housed in buildings adjacent to the University Library.[18] The latter includes "The Mackintosh House", a rebuilt terraced house designed by, and furnished after, architect Charles Rennie Mackintosh. The University of Glasgows Hunterian Museum and Art Gallery is the oldest public museum in Scotland. ... For the chemist and inventor, see Charles Macintosh. ...


The university opened a campus in the town of Dumfries in Dumfries and Galloway. The Crichton campus, designed to meet the needs for tertiary education in an area far from major concentrations of population, is jointly operated by the University of Glasgow, the University of Paisley, Bell College, and the Open University. It offers a modular undergraduate curriculum, leading to one of a small number of liberal arts degrees, as well as providing the regions only access to postgraduate study.[19] The Buccleuch St Bridge Devorgilla Bridge Overlooking Dumfries The Old Bridge House Dumfries ((IPA: ) pronounced dum-freece, not dum-fries) (Dùn Phris or Druim Phris in Scottish Gaelic, meaning either fort or ridge of the thicket respectively) is a former royal burgh and town with a population of around... Dumfries and Galloway (Dùn Phris agus an Gall-Ghaidhealaibh in Gaelic) is one of 32 council areas of Scotland. ... The University of Paisley operates across three campus sites in the west and south-west of Scotland: Paisley, Ayr and Dumfries. ... Bell College is a higher education college based in Hamilton and Dumfries in Scotland. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ...


In October 2001 the century-old Bower Building (previously home to the university's botany department) was gutted by fire. The interior and roof of the building were largely destroyed, although the main facade remained intact. After a £10.8 million refit, the building re-opened to staff and students in November 2004.

Gilbert Scott Building, from Kelvingrove Park
Gilbert Scott Building, from Kelvingrove Park

The Wolfson Medical School Building, with its award-winning glass-fronted atrium, opened in 2002.[20] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 494 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1186 × 1439 pixel, file size: 178 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Sir George Gilbert Scott Building, seen from across Kelvingrove Park. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 494 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1186 × 1439 pixel, file size: 178 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Sir George Gilbert Scott Building, seen from across Kelvingrove Park. ... Glasgow Medical School is the medical school of the University of Glasgow, and offers a 5 year MBChB degree course. ...


The University Library, situated opposite the main building, is regarded as one of the best academic libraries in Europe, with the number of books alone topping two million. Situated over 12 floors, it also houses sections for periodicals, microfilms, special collections and rare materials, some of which are exhibited on the top floor. [21] In addition to the main library, subject libraries also exist for Chemistry, Dental Medicine, Veterinary Medicine, Education, and the faculty of Social Sciences, which are held in branch libraries around the campus. [22] In 2007, a state of the art section to house the library's collection of historic photographs was opened, funded by the Wolfson Foundation.[23]


The university is currently spread over a number of different campuses. The main one is the Gilmorehill campus, in Hillhead. As well as this there is the Vet School at the top of Maryhill Road, on the Garscube Estate. The University also operates a Dental School in the city centre, as well as the aforementioned Crichton campus in Dumfries, and in 2003 they opened their new Education Faculty Building (the St Andrews Building, replacing Bearsden's St Andrews Campus) in the Woodlands area of the city on the site of the former Queens College, which had in turn been bought by Glasgow Caledonian University, from whom the university acquired the site. Lilybank Gardens, a typical Hillhead terrace Hillhead is a residential and commercial area of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Maryhill is a residential district in the northwest of the City of Glasgow. ... Bearsden (pronounced Bears den []) is a suburb located in the northwestern outskirts of the city of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Woodlands Drive, a typical road in Woodlands Woodlands is a residential area in the west-end of Glasgow, Scotland. ... Glasgow Caledonian University is a University in Glasgow, Scotland. ...


As well as these teaching campuses the university has halls of residence in and around the North-West of the city, accommodating a total of approximately 3,500 students.[24] They have the Murano Street halls in Maryhill; the Wolfson halls, also in Maryhill, on the Garscube Estate; Queen Margaret halls, in Kelvinside; and Kelvinhaugh Gate, in Yorkhill. In recent years, Dalrymple and Horslethill halls in Dowanhill, Reith halls in North Kelvinside and the Maclay halls in Park Circus (near Kelvingrove Park), have closed and been sold, as the development value of such property increased. Kelvinside is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Yorkhill is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Dowanhill is an neighbourood situated in the West End of Glasgow. ... North Kelvinside (also referred to as North Kelvin) is a middle-class residential district of the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... Kelvingrove Park is one of the most popular parks in the city of Glasgow. ...


The university also has a large sports complex in their Garscube Estate, beside their Wolfson Halls and Vet School. This is a new facility. They sold their previous sports ground (Westerlands) which was in the Anniesland area of Glasgow. The university also has a boathouse situated on the River Clyde. It is out of here that Glasgow University Boat Club train. Anniesland is a district in the Scottish city of Glasgow. ... The River Clyde opening out at Newark Castle, Port Glasgow past Clydeport Ocean Terminal, Greenock, to the Firth of Clyde on the left, and to the right past Ardmore Point to the Gare Loch. ... This article may contain original research or unverified claims. ...

The University library tower and the Hunterian Art Gallery
The University library tower and the Hunterian Art Gallery
The University reading room
The University reading room

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 1564 KB) Summary The library at Glasgow University in Glasgow, Scotland Taken by user:Finlay McWalter on the 3rd of September 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: University of Glasgow Wikipedia:List of images/Places... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1712x2288, 1564 KB) Summary The library at Glasgow University in Glasgow, Scotland Taken by user:Finlay McWalter on the 3rd of September 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: University of Glasgow Wikipedia:List of images/Places... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 797 KB) Summary The reading room at the University of Glasgow in Glasgow, Scotland Taken by user:Finlay McWalter on the 3rd of September 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: University of Glasgow Wikipedia:List... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 797 KB) Summary The reading room at the University of Glasgow in Glasgow, Scotland Taken by user:Finlay McWalter on the 3rd of September 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: University of Glasgow Wikipedia:List...

Governance and administration

In common with the other Ancient universities of Scotland the University's constitution is laid out in the Universities (Scotland) Acts. These Act create a tripartite structure of bodies - the University Court (governing body), the Academic Senate (academic affairs) and the General Council (advisory). There is also a clear separation between governance and executive administration. The Ancient universities of Scotland are those universities founded during the medieval period, and comprise (list by year of being chartered): The University of St Andrews, founded 1411 by papal bull The University of Glasgow, founded 1451 by papal bull The University of Aberdeen, founded 1495 by papal bull (as... A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ... The General Council of an ancient university in Scotland is the corporate body of all graduates and senior academics of each university. ...


The University's constitution, academic regulations, and appointments are authoritatively described in the University calendar[25], while other aspects of its story and constitution are detailed in a separate 'history' document[26].


University Court

The governing body of the University is the University Court, which is responsible for contractual matters; employing staff; and all other matters relating to finance and administration. The Court takes decisions about the deployment of resources as well as formulating strategic plans for the university. The Court is chaired by the Rector (see below for more information), who is elected by all the matriculated students at the university. A University Court is the supreme governing body of an Ancient university in Scotland, analogous to a Board of Directors or a Board of Trustees The University Courts were established by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1858 and they are responsible for the finances and administration of each university. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... The matriculation ceremony at Oxford Matriculation, in the broadest sense, means to be registered or added to a list, from the Latin matrix. ...


Academic Senate

The Academic Senate (or University Senate) is the body which is responsible for the management of academic affairs, and the awarding of all degrees. The Senate consists of various academics and is chaired by the Principal of the university. The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ... The Academic Senate (in latin Senatus Academicus) is the supreme academic body for an Ancient university in Scotland and its members are all the Professors of each university, along with certain senior Readers, and a number of Senior Lecturers and Lecturers, and students representatives. ...


Committees

There are also a number of committees of both the Court and Senate that make important decisions and investigate matters referred to them. As well as these bodies there is a General Council made up of the university graduates that is involved in the running of the university. The graduates also elect the Chancellor of the university. A largely honorific post, the current Chancellor is Professor Sir Kenneth Calman, former Chief Medical Officer and current Vice-Chancellor of the University of Durham. This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... For other uses, see Chief Medical Officer. ... Durham University is a university in England. ...


Executive administration

Day to day management of the University is undertaken by the University Principal (who is also Vice-Chancellor) and the Secretary of Court. The current principal is Sir Muir Russell who replaced Professor Sir Graeme Davies in October, 2003. The current secretary of court is David Newall.[27] The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Sir Muir Russell KCB DL FRSE is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Glasgow, in Scotland. ... Sir Graeme Davies is a British academic who has served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of London since 2003. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


There are also several Vice-Principals, each with a specific remit. They, along with the Clerk of Senate, play a major role in the day to day management of the university.


Faculties

There are currently nine faculties at Glasgow University. They are A faculty is a division within a university. ...

The Veterinary School is perhaps one of Glasgow's most famous faculties, having produced the personalities of James Herriot (aka Alf Wight), Eddie Straiton ("The TV Vet"), Sir William Weipers, among many others and has the distinction of having its degree recognised not only by the UK, but also the USA, Australia, Canada, New Zealand, as well as most other countries in the world, an honour shared by only a handful of other institutions. The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... The ASCII codes for the word Wikipedia represented in binary, the numeral system most commonly used for encoding computer information. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Physical science is the branch of science including chemistry and physics, usually contrasted with the social sciences and sometimes including and sometimes contrasted with natural or biological science. ... Veterinary medicine is the application of medical, diagnostic, and therapeutic principles to companion, domestic, exotic, wildlife, and production animals. ... Herriot’s former surgery in Thirsk is now a tourist attraction. ... Eddie Straiton (born at Clydebank; died 2004 at age 87) known as the TV vet was a veterinarian in Staffordshire and Penkridge, an author, and a television host. ...


The Medical School is also one of Glasgow's greatest strengths. Traditionally considered one of the top schools in the UK, it placed first in The Times' 2004 ranking of UK university medical departments. Notable medical graduates include Professor Sir Kenneth Calman, former Chief Medical Officer, now the new Chancellor of the University of Glasgow; Professor David Barlow , Executive Dean of the Glasgow University Faculty of Medicine, one of the UK’s leading authorities on reproductive medicine and osteoporosis and was Nuffield Professor of Obstetrics & Gynaecology at the University of Oxford. Glasgow Medical School is the medical school of the University of Glasgow, and offers a 5 year MBChB degree course. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Obstetrics (from the Latin obstare, to stand by) is the surgical specialty dealing with the care of a woman and her offspring during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (the period shortly after birth). ... The shamefulness associated with the examination of female genitalia has long inhibited the science of gynaecology. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ...


Students

Unlike other universities in Scotland, Glasgow does not have a single students' association. Instead, representation and welfare services are provided by the Students' Representative Council and students may also join one of two students' unions which provide other services.[citation needed] Glasgow University Students Representative Council was founded on March 9, 1886 and recognised as the legal representative body for University of Glasgow students by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1889. ...


Neither of the University's students' unions are affiliated to the National Union of Students - membership has been rejected on a number of occasions, most recently in November 2006, on both economic and political grounds.[citation needed] Neither does the representative body take the form of a Students' Association, as it does at other Scottish universities. However, every student is automatically represented by the Glasgow University Students' Representative Council (SRC) and has the right to stand for election to this body and elect its members. The President of the SRC, along with one other SRC member, the Court Assessor, sit on the University Court and a number of SRC members sit on the Academic Senate (which also has the responsibility of overseeing student discipline). Each student has the right to opt out of being a SRC member, although this rarely happens. The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ... Glasgow University Students Representative Council was founded on March 9, 1886 and recognised as the legal representative body for University of Glasgow students by the Universities (Scotland) Act 1889. ... President is a title held by many leaders of nothing, companies, trade unions, universities, and countries. ...


Rector

See: Rector of the University of Glasgow
See: List of elections for Rector of the University of Glasgow

Students also elect a Rector (officially styled "Lord Rector") who holds office for a three year term and is legally entitled to chair the University Court. This position is in practice largely an honorary and ceremonial one, and has been held by political figures including William Gladstone, Benjamin Disraeli, Andrew Bonar Law, Robert Peel, Raymond Poincaré, Arthur Balfour, and 1970s union activist Jimmy Reid, and latterly by celebrities such as TV presenters Arthur Montford and Johnny Ball, musician Pat Kane, and actors Richard Wilson, Ross Kemp and Greg Hemphill. In the past, few Rectors have actually been present to perform the duties of their office, although in recent years there has been a trend to elect people on the expectation that they will be working rectors. Ross Kemp was asked to resign by the SRC (which he did) for what they felt was a failure to act as a working rector. In 2004, for the first time in its history, the University was left without a Rector as no nominations were received. When the elections were run in December, Mordechai Vanunu was chosen for the post,[28] even though he is unable to attend due to restrictions placed upon him by the Israeli government. The position of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow is elected every three years by the students at the University of Glasgow. ... The Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow is a position that is commonly elected every three years by the students of the university. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... The position of Lord Rector of the University of Glasgow is elected every three years by the students at the University of Glasgow. ... William Ewart Gladstone (29 December 1809 – 19 May 1898) was a British Liberal Party statesman and Prime Minister (1868–1874, 1880–1885, 1886 and 1892–1894). ... Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield (December 21, 1804 - April 24, British Conservative Prime Minister of the United Kingdom and author. ... Andrew Bonar Law (16 September 1858 – 30 October 1923) was a British Conservative Party statesman and Prime Minister. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Raymond Poincaré, President of the French Republic during the Great War. ... For the steel manufacturer, see Arthur Balfour, 1st Baron Riverdale. ... Jimmy Reid is a Govan born journalist and ex-trade union activist. ... Arthur Montford was a sports broadcaster on Scottish Television for several years. ... Johnny Ball circa 1998 - Birmingham Johnny Ball (born May 23, 1938) originally came from Bristol, spending his primary years there and later in his childhood moved to Bolton, Lancashire. ... Pat Kane (born Patrick Kane on 10 March 1964, in Glasgow) is a Scottish musician, and former member of Hue and Cry. ... Richard Wilson, OBE (born July 9, 1936) is a Scottish actor and theatre director, best known for playing Victor Meldrew in the popular BBC situation comedy One Foot in the Grave. ... Ross Kemp (born 21 July 1964) is a British actor who rose to prominence in the role of Grant Mitchell in the BBC soap opera EastEnders. ... Gregory Greg Hemphill[1] (born 1969[2][3]) is a Scottish comedian. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Mordechai Vanunu in the garden of St. ...

The Glasgow University Union's historic building at the bottom of University Avenue.
The Glasgow University Union's historic building at the bottom of University Avenue.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 782 KB) Summary Glasgow University Union in Glasgow, Scotland Taken by user:Finlay McWalter on the 3rd of September 2005 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2288x1712, 782 KB) Summary Glasgow University Union in Glasgow, Scotland Taken by user:Finlay McWalter on the 3rd of September 2005 Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not...

Student Unions and representation

In addition to the Students' Representative Council, students are commonly members of one of the University's two students' unions, Glasgow University Union (GUU) and the Queen Margaret Union (QMU).[29] A students union, student government, student leadership, student council, or students association is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ... The front aspect of Glasgow University Union Glasgow University Union (GUU) is one of the students unions operating at the University of Glasgow. ... This page is about one of the students unions at the University of Glasgow, and not the students union for Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. ...


Both unions are steeped in a long history. Historically the GUU was all-male, and the QMU was for female students. These are largely social and cultural institutions, providing their members with facilities for debating, dining, recreation, socialising, and drinking, and both have a number of meeting rooms available for rental to members. Postgraduate students, mature students and staff can join the Hetherington Research Club,[30] although postgraduates are entitled to join one of the student unions in addition to the Research Club. A lion drinking Cygnus olor (mute swan) drinking Drinking is the act of consuming a liquid through the mouth. ...


Glasgow has led the UK's university debating culture since 1953. The Glasgow University Union has won the World Universities Debating Championships five times, more than any other university or club in the series' multi-decade history. The front aspect of Glasgow University Union Glasgow University Union (GUU) is one of the students unions operating at the University of Glasgow. ... The World Universities Debating Championship is the highest-profile tournament in university debating. ...


Sporting affairs are regulated by the Glasgow University Sports Association (GUSA) (previously the Glasgow University Athletics Club). There are a large number of varied clubs, who regularly compete in BUSA competitions. Students who join one of the sports clubs, affiliated with the university such as GURFC, Glasgow University Shinty Club, and the Glasgow University Canoe Club, must also join GUSA. Glasgow University Rugby Football Club is a rugby football club formed in 1869 to promote buggery. ... Shinty teams which play University Shinty are clubs which play under the banner of a university. ...


Student clubs and societies

The University has an eclectic body of clubs and societies, ranging from the Glasgow University Penguin Society to the Living Marxism Student Society. The Glasgow University Engineering Society was once presided over by Percy Pilcher, giving it the claim to fame of having nearly been the birthplace of powered flight. Percy Sinclair Pilcher (January 1866 — 2 October 1899) was a British inventor and pioneer aviator who, in one of the big what if events of history, could well have become the first person to achieve controlled, powered, heavier-than-air flight well before the Wright brothers had he not been...


Student Theatre at Glasgow has been highly active on campus throughout its existence and the likelihood is that if you studied at Glasgow University during the later 20th century, particularly in the faculty of Arts, you will have come across one or more STaG productions.


Media

There is also an active student media scene at Glasgow University, part of, but editorially independent from, the SRC. There is a newspaper, the Glasgow University Guardian;[31] a magazine, Glasgow University Magazine (GUM);[32] a television station, Glasgow University Student Television (GUST);[33] and a radio station, Subcity.[34] In recent years, independent of the SRC, the Queen Margaret Union has published a fortnightly magazine, qmunicate,[35] and Glasgow University Union has produced the GUUi.[36] Guardian front page from March 2006 with stories on unfair bank charges and the death of a student. ... The first issue of Glasgow University Magazine (GUM) was published on 5 February 1889, aiming to keep students informed of news and events within the University, and to provide an outlet for student writing and illustrations. ... Glasgow University Student Television or GUST, is the student television station at the University of Glasgow. ... Subcity is a student internet radio station based at the University of Glasgow. ... This page is about one of the students unions at the University of Glasgow, and not the students union for Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh. ...


People

Notable alumni and faculty

See: List of Alumni and Faculty of the University of Glasgow and List of Professorships at the University of Glasgow

Famous scholars associated with the university include Lord Kelvin, Adam Smith, James Watt, John Logie Baird, Colin Maclaurin, Francis Hutcheson and Joseph Lister. In more recent times, the university boasts of having Europe's largest collection of life scientists. The following List of Alumni and Faculty of the University of Glasgow provides a selection of the well known people who have studied or taught at the University of Glasgow since its inception in 1451. ... Established Professorships at the University of Glasgow The title of the Professorship is followed by the date of foundation. ... William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, OM, GCVO, PC, PRS, FRSE, (26 June 1824 – 17 December 1907) was a British mathematical physicist, engineer, and outstanding leader in the physical sciences of the 19th century. ... For other persons named Adam Smith, see Adam Smith (disambiguation). ... For other persons named James Watt, see James Watt (disambiguation). ... Bust of John Logie Baird in Helensburgh. ... Colin Maclaurin Colin Maclaurin (February, 1698 - June 14, 1746) was a Scottish mathematician. ... Francis Hutcheson (August 8, 1694–August 8, 1746) was an Irish philosopher and one of the founding fathers of the Scottish Enlightenment. ... Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister (April 5, 1827-February 10, 1912) was a famous British surgeon who promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Infirmary. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ...


List of Chancellors

William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin memorial, University of Glasgow
William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin memorial, University of Glasgow

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixel Image in higher resolution (3504 × 2336 pixel, file size: 3. ... William Turnbull (born approx. ... Andrew de Durisdere or Andrew Muirhead († 1473) was a 15th century bishop of Glasgow. ... John Laing was a 15th century bishop of Glasgow. ... Robert Blackadder was a medieval Scottish cleric, diplomat and politician, who was abbot of Melrose, bishop-elect of Aberdeen and bishop of Glasgow; when the last was elevated to archiepiscopal status in 1492, he became the first ever archbishop of Glasgow. ... James Beaton, or Bethune (1473-1539), was a Scottish church leader, the uncle of Cardinal David Beaton. ... Gavin Dunbar († 1547) was a 16th century archbishop of Glasgow. ... James Beaton (* 1517; † April 24/25, 1603) was a 16th century archbishop of Glasgow. ... James Boyd (1888-1944), the son of a wealthy coal and oil family in Pennsylvania, was an American novelist. ... Robert Montgomery can refer to any of the following people: Robert Montgomery, American actor and director Robert Montgomery, 19th century English poet Robert Montgomery - Archbishop of Glasgow (1581-1585) This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ... William Erskine (8 November 1773 - 28 May 1852) was a Scottish orientalist and historian. ... Walter Stewart (d. ... John Spottiswoode (Spottiswood, Spotiswood or Spotswood) (1565 - November 26, 1639), Archbishop of St Andrews and historian of Scotland, eldest son of John Spottiswood, minister of Calder and superintendent of Lothian. ... James Law (d. ... Patrick J. Lindsay was a senior Irish politician. ... James Hamilton, 1st Duke of Hamilton by Daniel Mytens. ... John Thurloe (1616-1668) was a secretary to the council of state in Protectorate England and spymaster for Oliver Cromwell. ... William Cunningham (1610 - 1664), 8th Earl of Glencairn, was a Scottish nobleman. ... Alexander Burnet was Archbishop of St. ... Robert Leighton (1611-1684), son of Dr. Alexander Leighton, was a Scottish prelate. ... Alexander Burnet was Archbishop of St. ... Arthur Rose [Ross] (d. ... Sir Alexander Kirkland Cairncross (aka Alec Cairncross), brother of the spy John Cairncross and father of journalist Frances Cairncross, was born in Lanarkshire on February 11, 1911; died October 21, 1998. ... John Paterson (1744-1808) was a General in the Continental Army during the American Revolutionary War and a U.S. Congressman from New York. ... James Graham, 1st Duke and 4th Marquess of Montrose (April 1682–7 January 1742) was a Scottish aristocratic statesman in the early eighteenth century. ... James Graham (8 September 1755 - 30 December 1836), 3rd Duke of Montrose, was a Scottish nobleman and statesman. ... James Graham, 4th Duke of Montrose, KT (16 July 1799-30 December 1874) was a British politician. ... Sir William Stirling-Maxwell of Pollock (8 March 1818 - 15 January 1878), 9th Baronet, was an Scottish historical writer, politician and virtuoso. ... John Hamilton Dalrymple, 10th Earl of Stair (1819-1903) was a Scottish peer. ... William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin, OM, GCVO, PC, PRS, FRSE, (26 June 1824 – 17 December 1907) was a British mathematical physicist, engineer, and outstanding leader in the physical sciences of the 19th century. ... Archibald Primrose redirects here. ... Young Donald MacAlister - Senior Wrangler at Cambridge in 1877 Sir Donald MacAlister of Tarbert (1854-1934) physician, principal and vice-chancellor and, later, chancellor of the university of Glasgow Donald MacAlister was born in Perth, Scotland. ... Sir John Boyd Orr, 1st Baron Boyd-Orr (September 23, 1880 – June 25, 1971) was a Scottish doctor, biologist and politician who received the Nobel Peace Prize for his scientific research into nutrition and his work with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). ... Sir Alexander Kirkland Cairncross (aka Alec Cairncross), brother of the spy John Cairncross and father of journalist Frances Cairncross, was born in Lanarkshire on February 11, 1911; died October 21, 1998. ... Sir William Kerr Fraser GCB was Chancellor of the University of Glasgow until January 2006. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ...

List of Principals and Vice-Chancellors

William Taylor (1765-1836) was a scholar, polyglot, and translator of German romantic literature. ... Reverend Thomas Barclay (21 November 1849 - 5 October 1935) was a British missionary to Formosa (Taiwan). ... John Caird (1820 - 1898), theologian, born at Greenock and educated at Glasgow, entered the Church of Scotland, of which he became one of the most eloquent preachers. ... Young Donald MacAlister - Senior Wrangler at Cambridge in 1877 Sir Donald MacAlister of Tarbert (1854-1934) physician, principal and vice-chancellor and, later, chancellor of the university of Glasgow Donald MacAlister was born in Perth, Scotland. ... Alwyn Williams was Bishop of Durham from 1939-1952. ... Sir William Kerr Fraser GCB was Chancellor of the University of Glasgow until January 2006. ... Sir Graeme Davies is a British academic who has served as Vice-Chancellor of the University of London since 2003. ... Sir Muir Russell KCB DL FRSE is Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Glasgow, in Scotland. ...

References

  1. ^ http://www.gla.ac.uk/services/finance/statements/statement2006.htm
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ a b c d Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-04-05.
  4. ^ Education UK Profile, retrieved 20th June 2007
  5. ^ Education UK Profile, retrieved 20th June 2007
  6. ^ University of Glasgow - Newsdesk - Glasgow University climbs World University Rankings by 20 places, retrieved 15th October 2006
  7. ^ Glasgow University News, retrieved 26th September 2007
  8. ^ University of Glasgow - Who, Where and When, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  9. ^ The Russell Group Homepage, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  10. ^ Universitas 21 - Member Institutions, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  11. ^ [2]
  12. ^ University of Glasgow - Building on Excellence
  13. ^ The Sutton Trust - University Endowments, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  14. ^ University of Glasgow - Facts and Figures 2005 - Research, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  15. ^ http://www.gla.ac.uk/about/factsandfigures/
  16. ^ http://www.thes.co.uk/statistics/international_comparisons/2006/
  17. ^ http://www.thes.co.uk/statistics/university_performance/league_tables/2006/main.aspx
  18. ^ University of Glasgow - Facts and Figures 2005 - Visitors, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  19. ^ University of Glasgow, Crichton Campus, Dumfries
  20. ^ University of Glasgow - Wolfson Medical School Building, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  21. ^ http://www.gla.ac.uk/about/factsandfigures/
  22. ^ http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/exhibns/timeline/index.html
  23. ^ http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/exhibns/timeline/index.html
  24. ^ University of Glasgow - Facts and Figures 2005 - Accommodation, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  25. ^ University of Glasgow - University Calendar
  26. ^ Who, Where and When: The History & Constitution of the University of Glasgow
  27. ^ University of Glasgow - Facts and Figures 2005 - Senior officers, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  28. ^ BBC News - Vanunu elected university rector, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  29. ^ University of Glasgow - Facts and Figures 2005 - Student organisations and activities, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  30. ^ Hetherington Research Club, retrieved 02nd November 2006
  31. ^ Glasgow Guardian, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  32. ^ Glasgow University Magazine, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  33. ^ Glasgow University Student Television, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  34. ^ Subcity Radio, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  35. ^ QMU.org.uk - Qmunicate, retrieved 22nd April 2006
  36. ^ Glasgow University Union website, retrieved 22nd April 2006

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimapia satellite image

Coordinates: 55°52′19″N 4°17′15″W / 55.871940, -4.287586 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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