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Encyclopedia > University of Geneva

University of Geneva
Université de Genève

Latin: Schola Genevensis

Established 1559
Type Public university
Rector Prof. Jacques Weber
Students 14,685
Location Geneva, Switzerland
Affiliations Coimbra Group
LERU
EUA
Website http://www.unige.ch

The University of Geneva (Université de Genève) is a university in Geneva, Switzerland. It was founded by John Calvin in 1559. Initially a theological seminary, it also taught law. It remained heavily theological into the 17th century, at which point it began adding other disciplines as it became a center for Enlightenment scholarship. In 1873 it dropped its religious associations and acquired the secular status of University. Today The University of Geneva is the second largest university in Switzerland and it plays a leading role in many fields–its location in Geneva gives it a prime location for diplomatic and international affairs studies, and it is also considered among the top scientific research universities in Europe, making notable discoveries in planetary science and genetics, among other fields. It pursues three missions: teaching (classes are, in general, taught in French), research, and service to the wider community. Seal of the University of Geneva. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The word rector (ruler, from the Latin regere) has a number of different meanings, but all of them indicate someone who is in charge of something. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Geneva (pronunciation //; French: Genève //, German:   //, Italian: Ginevra //, Romansh: Genevra) is the second most populous city in Switzerland (after Zürich), and is the most populous city of Romandy (the French-speaking part of Switzerland). ... John Calvin (July 10, 1509 – May 27, 1564) was a French Protestant theologian during the Protestant Reformation and was a central developer of the system of Christian theology called Calvinism or Reformed theology. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... A seminary or theological college is a specialized and often live-in higher education institution for the purpose of instructing students (seminarians) in philosophy, theology, spirituality and the religious life, usually in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Planetary science, also known as planetology or planetary astronomy, is the science of planets, or planetary systems, and the solar system. ... DNA, the molecular basis for inheritance. ...


It is a member of the Coimbra Group and the LERU. In 2006, it was revealed that several professors were suspected of fraud. A full investigation revealed that some of them claimed travel expenses for trips which never happenend, while others failed to inform the University that they were receiving salaries from other bodies than the University, even though they are legally required to do so and give a share of these salaries back to the University. One of the professors suspected was vice-rector of the University, which prompted the rector and the vice-rectors to resign as of 1 August 2006. As of July 2006, a full investigation is in progress. Founded in 1985 and formally constituted by Charter in 1987, the Coimbra Group is a network of European universities which gathers 39 of the older universities, including Oxford, Cambridge, Salamanca, Bristol, Leuven/Louvain, Montpellier, Uppsala, Göttingen, Heidelberg, Jagiellonian, Dublin, Bologna, Siena, Leiden, Coimbra, Barcelona and Granada. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

University of Geneva
University of Geneva

In an article published on August 13, 2006 by the American magazine Newsweek, the University of Geneva was ranked the 32nd best global university in the world, the London School of Economics coming in 34th position and Brown University in 56th. Schools were evaluated on some of the measures used in well-known rankings published by Shanghai Jiao Tong University and the Times Higher Education Survey. Fifty percent of the score came from equal parts of three measures used by Shanghai Jiatong: the number of highly-cited researchers in various academic fields, the number of articles published in Nature and Science, and the number of articles listed in the ISI Social Sciences and Arts & Humanities indices. Another 40 percent of the score came from equal parts of four measures used by the Times: the percentage of international faculty, the percentage of international students, citations per faculty member (using ISI data), and the ratio of faculty to students. The final 10 percent came from library holdings (number of volumes). Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 1. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE) is a specialist constituent college of the University of London. ... Brown University is a private university located in Providence, Rhode Island. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... Nature is one of the most prominent scientific journals, first published on 4 November 1869. ... Science is the journal of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). ...


Before 2005, the University applied the French education model with some minor differences. The academic degrees were the Demi-Licence, Licence, DEA / DESS, Doctorate. The University now follows the requirements of the Bologna process. A degree is any of a wide range of awards made by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... In France, a DEA (diplôme détudes approfondies, or diploma of advanced studies) is a former postgraduate degree. ... The purpose of the Bologna process is to create the European higher education area by making academic degree standards and quality assurance standards more comparable and compatible throughout Europe. ...


The University of Geneva, comprising the following nine Faculties :

  • 1- Faculty of Sciences
  • 2- Faculty of Medicine
  • 3- Faculty of Arts
  • 4- Faculty of Economics and Social Sciences + HEC department
  • 5- Faculty of Law
  • 6- Faculty of Protestant Theology
  • 7- Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences
  • 8- School of Translation and Interpretation
  • 9- Institute of Architecture

The University has also developed its continuing education programme over the past few years, having more than 100 programmes for people who are employmed. Moreover, students at the University, profiting from its close relations with the Graduate Institute of International Studies, the Graduate Institute of Development Studies, and the Ecumenical Institute at Bossey, may attend courses at these institutes. Hautes Etudes Commerciales may refer to several French-language business schools, which are commonly referred to as HECs. ...


Interfaculty Centers:

  • Institute for Reformation History
  • Computer Science Department
  • University Centre of Human Ecology and Environmental Sciences
  • University Centre for Study of Energy Problems
  • The European Institute of the University of Geneva
  • Interfaculty Center of Gerontology
  • Interfaculty Center for Affective Sciences

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Canton of Geneva - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (614 words)
The Canton of Geneva is the westernmost canton or state of Switzerland, surrounded on almost all sides by France and centered around the city of Geneva.
As of 2005 the population of the canton is 438,483.
From 1584 Geneva was an "everlasting ally" of the Swiss Confederation.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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