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Encyclopedia > University of Fort Hare

University of Fort Hare

Motto In lumine tuo videbimus lumen (In Thy light we shall see the light)
Established 1916
Type Public university
Vice-Chancellor Derrick Swartz
Students 6000
Location Alice, Eastern Cape, South Africa
Website http://www.ufh.ac.za/

Fort Hare University is located on the Tyhume river in a South African town known as Alice in English or as eDikeni in the local Xhosa language. It is in the Eastern Cape Province about 50 km west of King Williams Town (or eQonce) in a region that for a while was known as the "independent" Bantustan of Ciskei. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Alice, a town in South Africa, is named after Princess Alice, daughter of the British Queen Victoria. ... Capital Bhisho Largest city Port Elizabeth Premier Nosimo Balindlela Area - Total Ranked 2nd 169,580 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd 6,436,761 38/km² Languages Xhosa (83%) Afrikaans (9. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on a Web server, usually accessible via the Internet or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML, that is almost always accessible... Alice, a city in South Africa, is named after Princess Alice, daughter of the British Queen Victoria. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Xhosa (IPA: ) is one of the official languages of South Africa. ... The Eastern Cape is a province of South Africa. ... King Williams Town, a town of South Africa, in the Eastern Cape province and on the Buffalo River, 50 kilometers, 42 miles by rail or about 40 minutes motorway drive W.N.W. of the Indian Ocean port of East London. ... Map of the black homelands in South Africa as of 1986 Map of the black homelands in Namibia as of 1978 Bantustan is a territory designated as a tribal homeland for black South Africans and Namibians during the apartheid era. ... Ciskei Flag of Ciskei Ciskei was a Bantustan in the south east of South Africa. ...

Contents

The Fort

Originally, Fort Hare was a British fort in the wars between British and the Xhosa of the 19th century. Some of the ruins of the fort are still visible today. Missionary activity (James Stewart) led to the creation of a school for missionaries from which at the beginning of the 20th century the university resulted. Fortifications (Latin fortis, strong, and facere, to make) are military constructions designed for defensive warfare. ... The Xhosa (IPA ( )) people are peoples of Bantu origin living in south-east South Africa, and in the last two centuries throughout the southern and central-southern parts of the country. ... Two Mormon missionaries A missionary is traditionally defined as a propagator of religion who works to convert those outside that community; someone who proselytizes. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...


University

It is one of the oldest universities in Southern Africa and the first tertiary educational facility open to Africans in the whole of the continent. The university can count a number of famous people amongst its claimed alumni many of whom studied there during the period of white minority rule. Among these luminaries are some who never graduated but were expelled for their involvement in protests of one kind or another. Thus the list of so-called alumni as shown below is a merely a list of attendees. An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ... A dominant minority is a group that has overwhelming political, economic or cultural dominance in a country or region despite representing a small fraction of the overall population (a demographic minority). ... The luminaries were what traditional astrologers called the astrological planets which were the brightest and most important in the heavens, that is, the Sun; and the Moon The Sun and Moon were well-established rulers of the other planets, in accordance with the ancient doctrine of astrology of sect, which... Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ...


Anti-apartheid activity

In the struggle years there was much anti-apartheid activity, including the Black Consciousness Movement of Steve Biko. A few students became politically active and opposed the apartheid authorities who enjoyed the unqualified support of the Fort Hare authorities since it became a University in 1972. A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... The Black Consciousness Movement was a movement which called for non-violent black resistance to the Apartheid government in South Africa. ... Stephen Biko Stephen Bantu Biko (18 December 1946 – 12 September 1977) was a noted nonviolent anti-apartheid activist in South Africa in the 1960s and early 1970s. ...


Fort Hare past and present

Many forces have interacted in the Eastern Cape. Incoming Afrikaners and British met with Xhosa-speakers in the eighteenth century, and the long process of conflict, followed by the subordination and expropriation of the indigenous people, took place over more that one hundred years. An important British base at this time, named after a military officer, was Fort Hare, near which grew the small town of Alice. Capital Bhisho Largest city Port Elizabeth Premier Nosimo Balindlela Area - Total Ranked 2nd 169,580 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd 6,436,761 38/km² Languages Xhosa (83%) Afrikaans (9. ... Afrikaners are an ethnic group of Northwestern European ancestry and associated with Southern Africa and the Afrikaans language. ...


The process of colonization and expropriation was paradoxical. Brutal military conquest, and integration of the population into the colonial economy, was accompanied by the spread of Christianity. The missionaries who carried the new ideas were themselves part of colonial expansion, but brought with them a creed which was taken by Africans and forged into a tool for grappling with the challenges of the colonial world. The South African Native College, later the University of Fort Hare, was, ironically, founded in 1916 on the site of the earlier British military stronghold. The College originated from the sometimes uneasy alliance between the new class of educated African Christians, supported by a number of traditional Southern African leaders, and early twentieth-century white liberals, many of them clergy. It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Colonialism. ... Christianity percentage by country, purple is highest, orange is lowest Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch... In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism or a state or quality of this ideology. ... Clergy is the generic term used to describe the formal religious leadership within a given religion. ...


The religious tradition at the heart of Fort Hare’s origin, shared by black and white, stood at its best for ‘plain living and high thinking’, and for education that was undeniably Eurocentric. But it did not make the assumption, central to the Bantu Education implemented in South Africa from the 1950s, that black Africans required and deserve a different, inferior education. Eurocentrism is the practice, conscious or otherwise, of placing emphasis on European (and, generally, Western) concerns, culture and values at the expense of those of other cultures. ...


Fort Hare produced graduates, from South Africa and as far north as Kenya and Uganda, who knew they were as good as the best. Many went on to prominent careers in fields as diverse as politics, medicine, literature and art. Some politically-active alumni like Oliver Tambo, Nelson Mandela, Govan Mbeki, Robert Sobukwe and Mangosuthu Buthelezi in South Africa, Robert Mugabe and Herbert Chitepo in Zimbabwe, and Elius Mathu and Charles Njonjo in Kenya, are well known. But, to name examples, there are also, from South Africa, the poet Dennis Brutus, the Drum journalist Can Themba, the sculptor and painter Ernest Mancoba and the Xhosa author and scholar Archibald Campbell Jordan. The first black Zimbabwean medical doctor, Ticofa Samuel Parirenyatwa, and the historian, novelist and politician Stanlake Samkange, were among the many non-South Africans who spent formative years at Fort Hare. The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Politics is the process by which groups of people make decisions. ... medicines, see medication and pharmacology. ... Old book bindings at the Merton College library. ... The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844-1926). ... Oliver Reginald Tambo (27 October 1917 - 24 April 1993) was a South African anti-apartheid politician and a central figure in the African National Congress (ANC). ... Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA pronunciation: //) (born July 18, 1918) was the first President of South Africa to be elected in fully-representative democratic elections. ... Govan Archibald Mvuyelwa Mbeki (1910 - 2001) was a South African politician, and father of Thabo Mbeki, the current President of South Africa. ... Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe (5 December 1924 ; 27 February 1978) was a South African political dissident, who founded the Pan Africanist Congress in opposition to the Apartheid regime. ... Chief Mangosuthu (Gatsha)Ashpenaz Nathan Buthelezi (born August 27, 1928) is a South African Zulu leader, and leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) which he formed in 1975. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born on February 21, 1924) is the President of Zimbabwe. ... Herbert Witshire Chitepo (15th June, 1923 – 18th March, 1975) was a prominent Barrister in Southern Africa who was leader of ZANUs war to liberate Rhodesia from the white-minority government, led by Ian Smith. ... Charles Mugane Njonjo (born 1920) is a former Kenyan Attorney General (1963 – 1979), and Minister for Constitutional Affairs (1980 – 1983). ... Dennis Brutus, South African poet, graduate of Fort Hare college, formerly on the faculty of Northwestern University. ... China Drum were an English punk rock band. ... Daniel Canodoise Themba, (b. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ... Archibald Campbell Mzolisa Jordan, novelist, literary historian and intellectual pioneer of African studies in South Africa, was born on 30 October 1906 at the Mbokothwane Mission in the Tsolo district, Pondoland (later Transkei), as son of an Anglican Church minister. ... This article or section cites its sources but does not provide page references. ...


Though Fort Hare operated in an environment of racial segregation even before apartheid, the college contained the seeds of a more tolerant South Africa. It was as racially inclusive as it could be at the time, with Black, Coloured and Indian students; it had men and women students from the beginning; its mainly White staff included black academics like ZK Matthews and DDT Jabavu; students’ home languages ranged through Xhosa, Sotho, Zulu, Afrikaans and many others. The Rex Theatre for Colored People Racial segregation is characterized by separation of different races in daily life, such as eating in a restaurant, drinking from a water fountain, using a rest room, attending school, going to the movies, or in the rental or purchase of a home[1]. Segregation... A segregated beach in South Africa, 1982. ... A Masai man in Kenya Black people or blacks is a political, social or cultural classification of people. ... In the South African, Namibian, Zambian and Zimbabwean context, the term Coloured (also known as Bruinmense, Kleurlinge or Bruin Afrikaners in Afrikaans) refers to a heterogeneous group of people who posess some degree of sub-Saharan ancestry, but not enough to be considered Black under South African law. ... Whites redirects here. ... The Xhosa (IPA ( )) people are peoples of Bantu origin living in south-east South Africa, and in the last two centuries throughout the southern and central-southern parts of the country. ... The Sotho-speaking people have lived in southern Africa since around 15th century. ... Languages Zulu Religions Christian, African Traditional Religion Related ethnic groups Bantu Nguni Basotho Xhosa Swazi Matabele Khoisan The Zulu (South African English and isiZulu: amaZulu) are a South African ethnic group of an estimated 17-22 million people who live mainly in the province of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Look up Wiktionary:Swadesh lists for Afrikaans and Dutch in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The takeover of the college in 1959-60 by the National Party government put an end to these achievements. Fort Hare was transformed into an ethnic college for Xhosa speakers. Outspoken staff members were expelled and a new administration, conspicuously loyal to the government and intent on imposing its world-view, was installed. The campus grew over the next three decades, and student numbers rose, but Fort Hare was reduced to the level of “Bush Colleges’ that the government proceeded to institute in many homelands. In a parody of true academic maturity, Fort Hare became in 1970, self-governing and ‘independent’. With the creation of Ciskei in 1980, Fort Hare became the university of a microstate, recognized only by its fellow Bantustans and by South Africa’s minority government, a marked decline from its previous status as the greatest centre of black higher education in Southern and Eastern Africa. National Party or Nationalist Party can refer to several political parties, including: Australia - National Party of Australia, Nationalist Party of Australia Bangladesh - Bangladesh National Party, National Party, National Party (Manju), National Party (Naziur) Bohemia - National Party Britain - British National Party, Cornish Nationalist Party, Constitutional Movement Canada - National Party of Canada... Ciskei Flag of Ciskei Ciskei was a Bantustan in the south east of South Africa. ... Map of the black homelands in South Africa as of 1986 Map of the black homelands in Namibia as of 1978 Bantustan is a territory designated as a tribal homeland for black South Africans and Namibians during the apartheid era. ...


The values and traditions of Fort Hare were embattled after 1960. The apartheid state made a determined attack upon the institution and did immense damage. However, some continuities of its unique and proud historical traditions of non-racism, critical debate and aspiration towards educational excellence were never eliminated and these are now being nurtured and built upon


The tradition survived, firstly, amongst the students and a small but growing number of progressive academics. Many rejected the attempt to turn Fort Hare into an ethnic institution, and from various directions – political, religious and cultural – kept alive a spirit of opposition. In the 1960s various African National Congress and Pan Africanist Congress aligned organizations emerged and were quickly suppressed. Subsequently, Fort Hare became a stronghold of the Black Consciousness oriented South African Students’ Organisation. Later still, there were constant protests by students, brutally suppressed, against the Ciskei homeland regime. For political parties with similar names in other countries, see Northern Rhodesian African National Congress and Zambian African National Congress. ... PAC symbol The Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) (later the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania), was a South African liberation movement, that is now a minor political party. ...


The tradition survived, also, in the affection and loyalty of people towards Fort Hare, and, when the opportunity arose after 1990 when the apartheid-era administration was expelled, opted to work here. These included Sibusiso Bengu, the first black Vice Chancellor of the new dispensation, later Minister of Education and currently the University Chancellor; Makhenkesi Stofile, the Minister of Sport and Recreation; and Sipho Pityana, Registrar in the early 1990’s. It survived in the creation of a new Pan-Africanism and internationalism, with learners from Zimbabwe to Eritrea, and staff from all over Africa and the world. Many came because they knew of Fort Hare’s historical reputation and wanted to contribute to its newfound opportunities towards renaissance. It survives in the remarkable archival records at Fort Hare, made up of the papers of the ANC and other liberation movements in exile. The archives of the university itself record an extraordinary and sustained educational achievement, forming a corporate memory now being made accessible to scholars. Sibusiso Bengu (8 May 1934) is a South African politician. ... For political parties with similar names in other countries, see Northern Rhodesian African National Congress and Zambian African National Congress. ...


This tradition survived especially notably in the University’s determination, under dynamic new leadership since 1999, to pull back from the brink of institutional collapse, to refute any misconceived national attempt at higher education rationalization that would cause it to fade away or disallow its distinctive voice to be heard. To contemporary Fort Hare, it is important to acknowledge, record and question its history, and to extract the most liberating, enriching and valuable elements from its history as building blocks towards a radically modernized institution. In the process it is building on the real strengths of its historical inheritance, geographical locations, stakeholder constituencies and committed workforce, and does not rely on a nostalgic invocation of previous glory.


The university is redefining its role as the producer and disseminator of new knowledge, particularly focusing on its central place in the reshaping of post apartheid South Africa, and repositioning itself as empowerment agent in the political, economic, cultural and social revolution that is unfolding in the subcontinent and beyond. Its curriculum and research agenda is being tuned to resonate with the contextual social renaissance, both by stimulating it and by being responsive to it. At the same time it is utterly conscious of the need to engage and partner with the surrounding communities and region in a serving capacity and to extend into society at large through interesting new interconnections.


Following a decision by the Ministry of Education, the university has, since January 2004, been incorporating and integrating a new campus in the city of East London, formerly of Rhodes University, into UFH. This significant development in a new larger operating environment presents significant challenges as well as a set of strategic opportunities for the calculated expansion of UFH into new markets, enabling it to play a stimulating and catalytic role in the development of the city. Hence it is strategically planning to grow and develop programmes in a much wider student market and is re-profiling Fort Hare across the three campuses in Alice, Bhisho and East London. As the backbone to a new academic system, five new Faculties were being established in 2005-6. Over the next period significant expansion in the portfolio of academic and strategic programmes are foreseen. East London (Afrikaans: Oos-Londen, Xhosa: Imonti) is a city in southeast South Africa, situated in the Eastern Cape Province at 32. ... Rhodes University is one of South Africas oldest and most famous university institutions. ... Bhisho, formerly known as Bisho, is the capital of the Eastern Cape Province in South Africa. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ...


The University of Fort Hare is indeed more determined than ever before to be a worthy builder on its distinctive and illustrious past.


University of Fort Hare Strategic Plan 2000

The programme launched by Prof. Swartz was the UFH Strategic Plan 2000. The plan was meant to address the universities financial situation and academic quality standards simultaneously. The focus of the university was narrowed and consequently 5 faculties remained:

  • Education
  • Science and Agriculture
  • Social Sciences & Humanities
  • Management & Commerce
  • Faculty of Law

Further narrowing the focus, 14 institutes have been founded to deal with specific issues, such as the UNESCO Oliver Tambo Chair of Human Rights. Through their location the institutes have excellent access to poor rural areas, and consequently emphasis is placed on the role of research in improving quality of life and economic growth (and especially sustainable job creation). Among the outreach programmes, the Telkom Centre of Excellence maintains a "living laboratory" of 4 schools at Dwesa on the Wild Coast, which have introduced computer labs and internet access to areas that until 2005 did not even have electricity. The projects at Dwesa focus research on Information and Communication for Development (ICD). The Wild Coast can refer to: The Wild Coast, a coastal region of South Africas Eastern Cape Province The Wild Coast, a fictional region located in the World of Greyhawk campaign setting for the Dungeons & Dragons role-playing game. ... The term Information and Communication for Development (ICD) spans the full range of issues around information and communication for international development: from radio to the internet; content to delivery; and policy to practical application on the ground. ...


Notable alumni

Name DoB - DoD Notes
Z.K. Mathews 1901–1968 Lectured at Fort Hare from 1936 to 1959
Archibald Campbell Jordan 30 October 1906–1968 Novelist, pioneer of African studies
Govan Mbeki 1910–2001 South African politician
Yusuf Lule 1912–1985 Interim president of Uganda 1979
Cedric Phatudi 1912–1987 Chief Minister of Lebowa 1972–1987
Kaiser Matanzima 1915–2003 President of bantustan Transkei
Oliver Tambo October 27, 1917 - April 24, 1993 member, African National Congress- Expelled while doing his second degree.
Joshua Nkomo 1918 - July 1, 1999 Founder of the ZAPU.
Nelson Mandela July 18, 1918 - Former President of South Africa- - Expelled and later graduated from the University of the Witwatersrand.
Lionel Ngakane July 17, 1920 - November 26, 2003 South African filmmaker
Seretse Khama July 1, 1921 - July 13, 1980 First President of Botswana.
Julius Nyerere July 19, 1922 - October 14, 1999 President of Tanzania
Herbert Chitepo June 15, 1923 - March 18, 1975 ZANU leader
Robert Sobukwe 1924 - 27 February 1978 Founder of the Pan Africanist Congress
Robert Mugabe February 21, 1924 - President of Zimbabwe, attended 1949–1951
Kenneth Kaunda April 28, 1924 - First President of Zambia
Allan Hendrickse October 22, 1927 - March 16, 2005 Politician, preacher, and teacher
Mangosuthu Buthelezi August 27, 1928 - Leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party - Never graduated but transferred to University of Natal to study History and Bantu Administration; graduated to become leader of KwaZulu Bantustan in apartheid South Africa
Desmond Tutu October 7, 1931 - Archbishop, South African peace activist, Chaplain at Fort Hare in 1960
Frank Mdlalose 29 November 1931 - First premier of KwaZulu-Natal province
Ivy Matsepe-Casaburri 18 September 1937 - Communications Minister, South Africa
Manto Tshabalala-Msimang 9 October 1940 - Health Minister of South Africa
Chris Hani June 28, 1942 - April 10, 1993 Leader of the South African Communist Party - Expelled, later graduated from Rhodes University.
Makhenkesi Arnold Stofile December 27, 1944 - Sport Minister of South Africa
Sam Nolutshungu April 15, 1945 - August 12, 1997 South African scholar
Joseph Diescho born 1955 Namibian novelist
Bulelani Ngcuka May 2, 1954 - South Africa's former Director of Public Prosecutions

(Others, unknown DOB) Zachariah Keodirelang ZK Mathews (1901 - May 1968) was a prominent black academic in South Africa, lecturing at Fort Hare University, where many future leaders of the African contenent were his students. ... Archibald Campbell Mzolisa Jordan, novelist, literary historian and intellectual pioneer of African studies in South Africa, was born on 30 October 1906 at the Mbokothwane Mission in the Tsolo district, Pondoland (later Transkei), as son of an Anglican Church minister. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Govan Archibald Mvuyelwa Mbeki (1910 - 2001) was a South African politician, and father of Thabo Mbeki, the current President of South Africa. ... Yusuf Lule (1912 - 1985) was a Ugandan political figure. ... Also: 1979 by Smashing Pumpkins. ... Cedric Namedi Phatudi was the Chief Minister of Lebowa, one of the controversial South African bantustans. ... The Flag of Lebowa Lebowa was a bantustan located in the Transvaal in north eastern South Africa. ... Kaiser Daliwonga Matanzima (June 15, 1915 - June 15, 2003) was a former leader of the then-bantustan of Transkei in South Africa; He led Transkei to self-government in 1964 and to an internationally unrecognised indepedence in October, 1976. ... List of the Heads of State of Transkei Political Affiliation TNIP - Transkei National Independence Party See Also Bantustan Heads of Government of Transkei President of South Africa List of State Presidents of South Africa List of Prime Ministers of South Africa Governor-General of the Union of South Africa Apartheid... Oliver Reginald Tambo (27 October 1917 - 24 April 1993) was a South African anti-apartheid politician and a central figure in the African National Congress (ANC). ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (115th in leap years). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... For political parties with similar names in other countries, see Northern Rhodesian African National Congress and Zambian African National Congress. ... Joshua Mqabuko Nyongolo Nkomo (June 19, 1917 – July 1, 1999) was a Zimbabwean nationalist leader and revolutionary, a member of the Ndebele (or Matebele) ethnic group, and the leader and founder of the Zimbabwe African Peoples Union (ZAPU). ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... The Zimbabwe African Peoples Union was a political party in Zimbabwe. ... Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela (IPA pronunciation: //) (born July 18, 1918) was the first President of South Africa to be elected in fully-representative democratic elections. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Lionel Ngakane (July 17, 1920 - November 26, 2003) was a South African filmmaker. ... July 17 is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Seretse Khama KBE (July 1, 1921 - July 13, 1980) was the first President of Botswana. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... July 13 is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Julius Kambarage Nyerere (April 13, 1922 - October 14, 1999) was President of Tanzania, and previously Tanganyika, from the countrys founding in 1964 until his retirement in 1985. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ... is the 287th day of the year (288th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ... Herbert Witshire Chitepo (15th June, 1923 – 18th March, 1975) was a prominent Barrister in Southern Africa who was leader of ZANUs war to liberate Rhodesia from the white-minority government, led by Ian Smith. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Zimbabwe African National Union was a political party during the struggle for Rhodesias, ultimately Zimbabwes, independence, formed as a split from ZAPU. It won the 1980 elections under the leadership of Robert Mugabe, and eight years later merged again with Joshua Nkomos ZAPU to form Zanu... Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe (5 December 1924 ; 27 February 1978) was a South African political dissident, who founded the Pan Africanist Congress in opposition to the Apartheid regime. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... PAC symbol The Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) (later the Pan Africanist Congress of Azania), was a South African liberation movement, that is now a minor political party. ... Robert Gabriel Mugabe KCB (born on February 21, 1924) is the President of Zimbabwe. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Kenneth Kaunda Kenneth David Kaunda, commonly known as KK (born April 28, 1924) was the first President of Zambia (1964–1991). ... is the 118th day of the year (119th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Helenard Joe Hendrickse (popularly known as Allan Hendrickse) (22 October, 1927 - 16 March, 2005) was a South African politician, preacher, and teacher. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... March 16 is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chief Mangosuthu (Gatsha)Ashpenaz Nathan Buthelezi (born August 27, 1928) is a South African Zulu leader, and leader of the Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) which he formed in 1975. ... August 27 is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Inkatha Freedom Party (IFP) is a political party in South Africa. ... The University of KwaZulu-Natal is a university in the KwaZulu-Natal Province of South Africa. ... Flag of KwaZulu KwaZulu was a bantustan in South Africa, intended by the apartheid government as a semi-independent homeland for the Zulu people. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... October 7 is the 280th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (281st in leap years). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In Christianity, an archbishop is an elevated bishop. ... A peace activist is a political activist who strives for peace, and against war. ... Dr Frank Themba Mdlalose was the first premier of the newly renamed KwaZulu-Natal province in South Africa, after the African National Congress (ANC) won the countrys first all-inclusive general election in April 1994. ... November 29 is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This is a list of Premiers of KwaZulu-Natal Province: Note Acting Premier from 1 March 1997 to 19 March 1997. ... KwaZulu-Natal (often referred to as KZN) is a province of South Africa. ... Ivy Matsepe-Casaburri (born 18 September 1937) is a South African politician and has been the countrys Minister of Communications since 1999. ... September 18 is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years). ... 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... Manto Tshabalala-Msimang Dr. Manto Tshabalala-Msimang (9 October 1940 - ) is a a official idiot and the Health Minister of South Africa under the government of Thabo Mbeki (as of 2005). ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1942 calendar). ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... SACP symbol South African Communist Party (SACP) is a political party in South Africa. ... Rhodes University is one of South Africas oldest and most famous university institutions. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... 1944 (MCMXLIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ... Samuel Clement Nolutshungu (April 15, 1945 – August 12, 1997) was one of the foremost South African scholars, and an internationally acclaimed expert on South African politics. ... April 15 is the 105th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (106th in leap years). ... Year 1945and died 2007 (MCMXLV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar). ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1997 (MCMXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1997 Gregorian calendar). ... Professor Joseph Diescho (born April 10, 1955, Andara, Namibia) is a Namibian writer and political analyst. ... Bulelani T Ngcuka (2 May 1954 - ) was the first national Director of Public Prosecutions in South Africa, and is the husband of Deputy President of South Africa Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka. ... May 2 is the 122nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (123rd in leap years). ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Director of Public Prosecutions is the officer charged with the prosecution of criminal offences in several criminal jurisdictions around the world. ...

  • Tiyo Soga - religion, Vice-Chancellor of the University of South Africa
  • Prof. Nyameko Barney Pityana - religion
  • Prof. Loyiso Nongxa - science, Vice-Chancellor of the University of the Witwatersrand
  • K. Mokhele - science
  • Don Ncube - business
  • Prof. Wiseman Nkuhlu - business, economic advisor to President Thabo Mbeki, Head of NEPAD

See also: List of universities in South Africa In 2004 South Africa started reforming its higher education system, merging and incorporating small universities into larger institutions, and renaming all higher education institutions university (previously there had been several types of higher education institution). ...


External links

  • Official website
  • Promotional site
  • Some Fort Hare alumni
Flag of South Africa South African universities Mortarboard
Traditional universities
Cape Town | Fort Hare | Free State | KwaZulu-Natal | Limpopo | North-West
Pretoria | Rhodes | Stellenbosch | Western Cape | Witwatersrand


Comprehensive universities
Johannesburg | Nelson Mandela | Unisa | Venda | Walter Sisulu | Zululand

Universities of technology
Cape Peninsula | Central | Durban | Mangosuthu | Tshwane | Vaal Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Africa. ... In 2004 South Africa started reforming its higher education system, merging and incorporating small universities into larger institutions, and renaming all higher education institutions university (previously there had been several types of higher education institution). ... Image File history File links Graduation_hat. ... The University of Cape Town, abbreviated as UCT, is a public university located on the Rhodes Estate on the slopes of Devils Peak, in Cape Town in the Western Cape province of South Africa. ... The University of the Free State is situated in Bloemfontein, the capital of the Free State Province. ... It has been suggested that University of Durban-Westville be merged into this article or section. ... The University of Limpopo is a university in the Limpopo Province, South Africa. ... ÁÊã{} This page is a candidate for speedy deletion, because: theres no such thing: Northwest University is not hyphenated If you disagree with its speedy deletion, please explain why on its talk page or at Wikipedia:Speedy deletions. ... The University of Pretoria is a university in South Africa, with a total of about 38 499 students being enrolled in 2005. ... Rhodes University is one of South Africas oldest and most famous university institutions. ... Stellenbosch University (Afrikaans: Universiteit van Stellenbosch) is an internationally recognised university which is situated in the town of Stellenbosch, South Africa. ... The University of the Western Cape is a university located in the Belville suburb of Cape Town, South Africa. ... The University of the Witwatersrand (pronounced vit-vaters-rant, with flat vowels -- see South African English) is a leading South African university situated in Johannesburg. ... The University of Johannesburg came into existence on 1 January 2005 as the result of a merger between the former campuses of the Rand Afrikaans University, Technikon Witwatersrand, and some campuses of Vista University. ... Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) is a South African tertiary education institution with its main administration in the coastal city of Port Elizabeth. ... Note: UniSA can also refer to the University of South Australia. ... University of Venda, situated in the fast growing town of Thohoyandou on the southern slopes of the Soutpansberg Mountains, has repositioned itself in accordance with the social and economic needs of South Africa and the international community. ... Walter Sisulu University for Technology and Science is a university in the Eastern Cape Province,South Africa, which came into existence on 1 July 2005. ... The University of Zululand is designated as the only comprehensive institution of higher learning north of the uThukela River and plans are launched to add career-focused programmes to its curriculum. ... Cape Peninsula University of Technology was formed when the merger of Cape Technikon and Peninsula Technikon, in January 2005, occurred. ... Central University of Technology main campus is situated in Bloemfontein, while its distance-learning centre in Welkom serves students in the Goldfields area. ... The Durban University of Technology is a technical university in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. ... Mangosuthu Technikon is situated on the outskirts of Durban and overlooks the Indian Ocean. ... Tshwane University of Technology (TUT) is a higher education institution in South Africa that came into being through a merger of three technikons — Technikon Northern Gauteng, Technikon North-West and Technikon Pretoria. ... Vaal University of Technology has grown to be a formidable tertiary institution, in South Africa, drawing students from all over the country. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Andover - IAP - The African Studies Institute (764 words)
The University of Fort Hare is a historically fl university.
The university is the repository for the archives of the African National Congress, the Pan-Africanist Congress and the papers of Oliver Tambo, former chancellor of the university.
Fort Hare also has been chosen by UNESCO as one of five sites in Africa for an endowed Oliver Tambo Chair for Human Rights.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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