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Encyclopedia > University of East Anglia

University of East Anglia The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a leading campus university located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, founded as part of the British Governments New Universities programme in the 1960s. ...

Motto Do different
Established 1963
Type Public
Chancellor Sir Brandon Gough
Vice-Chancellor Professor Bill MacMillan
Visitor The Lord President of the Council ex officio
Students 14,740 [1]
Undergraduates 11,120 [1]
Postgraduates 3,620 [1]
Location Norwich, Norfolk, UK
Campus 320 acres
Affiliations 1994 Group
Association of Commonwealth Universities
Website www.uea.ac.uk

The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a leading campus university located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, founded as part of the British Government's New Universities programme in the 1960s. The university is a member of the 1994 Group of leading research-intensive universities. Image File history File links Uea_logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Sir Brandon Gough, born 1937, is Chancellor of the University of East Anglia. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Bill Macmillan, born 1950, is Vice-Chancellor at the University of East Anglia. ... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Norwich (pronounced IPA: ) is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... The 1994 Group is a coalition of smaller research-intensive universities founded to defend their interests after the larger research-intensive universities founded the Russell Group. ... The Association of Commonwealth Universities represents over 480 universities from Commonwealth countries. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links Uea_logo2. ... A campus university is a British term for a University situated on one site - with student accommodation, teaching and research facilities, and leisure activities all together. ... Norwich (pronounced IPA: ) is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ... For alternative meanings see: Norfolk (disambiguation) Norfolk (pronounced NOR-fk) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The United Kingdom is a unitary state and a democratic constitutional monarchy. ... The 1994 Group is a coalition of smaller research-intensive universities founded to defend their interests after the larger research-intensive universities founded the Russell Group. ...


Academically, it is one of the most successful universities founded in the 1960s, consistently ranking amongst Britain's top higher education institutions; 19th in the Sunday Times University League Table 2006 [2], and joint first for student satisfaction among mainstream English universities, in the 2006 National Student Survey [3]. Furthermore, the university was ranked 57th in Europe, and one of the top 200 universities in the world, in the 2006 World University Rankings undertaken by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.[4] The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... The National Student Survey is a survey, launched in 2005,[1] of all final year degree students at institutions in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Contents

History and overview

Earlham Hall, home to the University of East Anglia's School of Law.

UEA admitted its first students in 1963 in temporary accommodation in Earlham Hall, on the western edge of the city of Norwich about 3 miles from the city centre, while a prefabricated "University Village" was built nearby and used until the early 1980s. The permanent campus was built on the adjacent Earlham Golf Course, principally to a design by Sir Denys Lasdun. Image File history File links 247917_3a00fec7. ... Image File history File links 247917_3a00fec7. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Sir Denys Lasdun (8 September 1914-11 January 2001) was an eminent English architect of the 20th century, particularly associated with the Modernist design of the Royal National Theatre on Londons South Bank of the River Thames. ...


The UEA campus exhibits some interesting architectural features: the main teaching building takes the form of a continuous wall running approximately west-east. The early student residences built in the 1960s take the form of distinctive "ziggurats", but financial cutbacks by the early 1970s meant that the full original plan for building ziggurat residences had to be abandoned, and replaced by the less inspiring north-south wall of Waveney Terrace (which was demolished in 2006). This latter residence quickly gave rise to a popular and enduring urban legend on campus that the design had been based on that of a European prison. UEA also took over the former RAF/US Air Force barracks at Horsham St. Faith airfield, and used them as residences. This outpost of campus life was formally known as "Fifers Lane" from the road it stood on, but was called "Horsham" or simply "Fifers" by its residents. It developed its own unique style of student life. Being adjacent to extant army accommodation, the on-site general shop was a branch of the NAAFI. It also reputedly featured its own ghost, the "headless airman". Fifers Lane eventually closed in 1994, when further residences, again in an advanced architectural style, were built on campus. Dur-Untash, or Choqa Zanbil, built in 13th century BC by Untash Napirisha and located near Susa, Iran is one of the worlds best-preserved ziggurats. ... An urban legend or urban myth is similar to a modern folklore consisting of stories often thought to be factual by those circulating them. ... “RAF” redirects here. ... Seal of the Air Force. ... Horsham St. ... The NAAFI (Navy, Army and Air Force Institutes) (pronounced NAFF-ee) is a non-profit retaining organization created by the British government in 1921 to run recreational establishments needed by the Armed Forces, and to sell goods to servicemen and their families. ...


In the mid-1970s, extraction of gravel in the valley of the River Yare, which runs to the south of the campus, resulted in the university acquiring its own 'Norfolk Broad' or lake (known as simply 'The Broad'). At more or less the same time, a bequest of tribal art and C.20th painting and sculpture, by artists such as Francis Bacon and Henry Moore, from the Sainsbury supermarket family resulted in the construction of the striking Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts at the western end of the main teaching wall, one of the first major works of architect Norman Foster. In 2001 the campus gained an extensive new sports facility called the "Sportspark", built thanks to a £14.5 million grant from the Sport England Lottery Fund, and a purpose-built theatre. Because of the 1960s design, the university suffers in regard to providing access needs to all students, even though attempts have been made to improve facilities within the campus, the university's listed 1960s buildings are by law unadaptable. The River Yare is a river on the Suffolk Broads in The Broads National Park in England. ... The Norfolk Broads are the northern part of The Broads National Park. ... Francis Bacon (28 October 1909 – 28 April 1992) was an Irish figurative painter. ... Reclining Figure (1951) outside the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, is characteristic of Moores sculptures, with an abstract female figure intercut with voids. ... J Sainsbury plc is the parent company of Sainsburys Supermarkets Ltd, commonly known as Sainsburys, which is a chain of supermarkets in the United Kingdom. ... The Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts is an art gallery and museum located on the campus of the University of East Anglia, Norwich in the United Kingdom. ... The restored Reichstag in Berlin, housing the German parliament. ...


Other notable features of the UEA campus are "The Square", a central outdoor meeting place flanked by concrete steps; "The Blend", a cafe/coffee shop, "Zest" a student canteen and "The Street" which features a 24-hour launderette, the Union Food Outlet, Union Paper Shop, Union Post Office, a newly refurbished espresso bar, "DolcHe Vita", branches of NatWest, HSBC and Barclays Bank and a Waterstone's book shop. The Classic NatWest logo National Westminster Bank Plc, trading as NatWest, is a commercial bank in the United Kingdom, part of the Royal Bank of Scotland Group. ... HSBC Bank plc is a Clearing Bank in the United Kingdom, and is one of the Big 4 high street banks. ... Barclays Bank headquarters One Churchill Place, Canary Wharf Barclays plc (LSE: BARC, NYSE: BCS, TYO: 8642 ) is the fourth largest bank in the United Kingdom. ... Gower Street branch Waterstones Piccadilly branch, Europes largest bookshop Waterstones is a United Kingdom based chain of bookshops. ...


UEA has had notable successes in terms of courses taught. Malcolm Bradbury for many years taught in the School of English and American Studies and his 1975 novel The History Man is believed to be based on his experiences there, satirising as it does life and work in a modern 1960s-built University campus. The German emigre novelist W. G. Sebald taught in the School of Literature until his untimely death, from a car accident, in 2001. The Climate Research Unit in the School of Environmental Sciences was an early centre of work on climate warming. Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. ... The History Man (1975) is a campus novel by British author Malcolm Bradbury set in 1972 in the fictional seaside town of Watermouth in the South of England. ... W.G. Sebald W. G. (Winfred Georg Maximilian) Sebald (May 18, 1944, Wertach im Allgäu–December 14, 2001, Norfolk, United Kingdom) was a writer and academic. ...


As at 1 December 2004, the university had 10,689 undergraduate students, 1,949 postgraduate taught students, and 1,054 postgraduate research students, giving a total of 13,692 students, of whom 73% were full-time students, 10.4% came from outside the European Union, and 63% were female. As at 31 July 2005 the university employed 2445 staff (including 517 academic staff, 368 research staff, 469 secretarial and clerical staff, 146 technical staff, and 287 administrative, senior library and computing staff). In the year ending 31 July 2005 the university's income was £124,161,000, and its expenditure was £120,040,000. (Statistics from the 2004-05 Annual Review). is the 335th day of the year (336th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Union of UEA Students

Main article: Union of UEA Students

Connected to both "The Street" and "The Square" is one of the most popular Union venues: the "Union Pub and Bar" which underwent a massive extension and refurbishment at the cost of £1.2 million in 2002. The pub took over "Breakers", a rather low-rent eatery with a scrapyard theme which was briefly turned into an unpopular pasta place. Other bars include "The Hive" (which, due to efforts from the Student Union, was refurbished for the start of the 2004/05 year), and the "Graduate Students Club". In the same building is The LCR, known in full as either The Large [1] or Lower [2] Common Room. The LCR is home to weekly campus discos, as well as the many touring gigs. The students' union also run "The Waterfront" venue off campus in Norwich's King Street. The Union of UEA Students is the students union of the University of East Anglia. ... The Union of UEA Students is the students union of the University of East Anglia. ...


The UEA Union has a large range of services on offer for its students including a large selection of sports clubs and societies. These range from football and rugby clubs to a newer range of environmental societies such as 'The Campus Sustainability Initiative' who aim to set up a fund for environmental projects on campus called 'The Sustainability Initiative Fund'. Aside from the independent student newspaper Concrete, there is a thriving student media across a range of areas. In the 1970s, there was a highly successful student newspaper named Phoenix, which rose from the ashes of the original Concrete, that ran for several years. Livewire, the campus radio station, which transmits to air on 1350AM in the vicinity of the university as well as broadcasting on the internet, was established in 1989. Nexus UTV, the campus television station broadcasting news, documentaries, comedy shows and various other types of programming, shows regularly in the bar and is one of the oldest still-running student television stations in the country, having been established in 1968. In 2007 Union Council voted to oppose the National Union of Students (N.U.S.) No platform policy which bans extremists such as the B.N.P. and Hizb-ut Tahrir from standing in N.U.S. elections. This puts the Union at odds with the leadership of the N.U.S. The Sustainability Initiative Fund is a pioneering project set up by students at the University of East Anglia aimed at providing interest free capital for projects that will make the university campus more sustainable. ...


Recent developments

Colman House opened in September 2004, creating accommodation for 400 students. The latest residences, Britten, Victory, Kett, Browne, and Paston Houses, were built around the Waveney Terrace area and were opened in September and October 2005. Half of Waveney Terrace was demolished in September 2005, and replaced with the first half of Britten House; the remaining demolition was completed in September 2006, with the second half of Britten House opening for the 2007 academic year. The residences are named after Benjamin Britten, Horatio Nelson's ship HMS Victory, Robert Kett, Sir Thomas Browne and the Paston family who wrote the Paston Letters. Britten House is a hall of residence in the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK, named after East Anglian composer Benjamin Britten. ... Edward Benjamin Britten, Baron Britten, OM CH (November 22, 1913 Lowestoft, Suffolk - December 4, 1976 Aldeburgh, Suffolk) was a British composer, conductor, and pianist. ... Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... HMS Victory is a 104-gun ship of the line of the Royal Navy, built between 1759 and 1765. ... Robert Kett (or Ket) (d. ... Sir Thomas Browne (October 19, 1605 - October 19, 1682) was an English author of varied works that disclose his wide learning in diverse fields including medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. ... The Paston Letters, are an invaluable collection of letters and papers, consisting of the correspondence of members of the Paston family, and others connected with them, between the years 1422 and 1509, and also including some state papers and other important documents. ...


A new building for the School of Nursing and Midwifery (NAM) opened in February 2006; adjacent to the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, it is named after Edith Cavell. The new campus Health and Community Centre, comprising the University Health Centre, a Laundrette and a Nursery for pre-school aged children, was also completed in 2006. Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital is a National Health Service teaching hospital situated along the B1108 on the southwestern outskirts of Norwich, Norfolk. ... Edith Cavell Edith Louisa Cavell (December 4, 1865–October 12, 1915) was a British World War I nurse and humanitarian. ...


The 2002 Medical School (MED) is already being expanded to provide more lecture space and research labs. Anticipated completion is in June 2007.


Norfolk and Suffolk Terraces are undergoing internal refurbishment in keeping with their Listed Building status; Suffolk Terrace was completed in the summer of 2006, with completion for Norfolk Terrace scheduled for 2008. The Forth Bridge, designed by Sir Benjamin Baker and Sir John Fowler, opened in 1890, and now owned by Network Rail, is designated as a Category A listed building by Historic Scotland. ...


Future developments

INTO@ UEA is a partnership project being undertaken by INTO, Espalier and the UEA. The building will be situated between the main car park and the Health & Community Centre and will provide teaching, living, eating & social space for approximately 350 international students. The students will spend a year at INTO getting used to the British university system and culture before hopefully entering the University system at UEA. The project is anticipated to start in January 2007. Work to connect the site to electrical and other services was completed in the summer of 2006.


In partnership with the University of Essex, and with the support of Suffolk County Council, the East of England Development Agency, Ipswich Borough Council, Suffolk College, and the Learning and Skills Council, UEA has secured £15 million funding from the Higher Education Funding Council for England with the aim of creating a new campus in the Waterfront area of Ipswich, called University Campus Suffolk (UCS). The University of Essex rules is a British plate glass university. ... Suffolk (pronounced ) is a large historic and modern non-metropolitan county in East Anglia, England. ... For other uses, see Ipswich (disambiguation). ... The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom which distributes funding to Universities and Colleges of Higher and Further Education in England since 1992. ... For other uses, see Ipswich (disambiguation). ... University Campus Suffolk is an educational institution located in the county of Suffolk, United Kingdom that will welcome its first students in September 2007. ...

UEA Campus panorama.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 70 pixelsFull resolution (2828 × 247 pixel, file size: 151 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by myself in 2002 by the Broad in the grounds of the University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK with a Canon Digital Ixus. ...

Notable alumni

Academia

Sir Paul M. Nurse, FRS, (b. ... The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ), as designated in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, are awarded for physics, chemistry, physiology or medicine, literature, and peace. ... A biochemist is a scientist trained and dedicated to producing results in the discipline of biochemistry. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Paul Wellings was born in Nottingham and educated at Lancaster Royal Grammar School and the universities of London, Durham and East Anglia. ... Affiliations 1994 Group N8 Group Association of MBAs North West Universities Association Website http://www. ... Note: This article is about the British Geneticist. ... Obe can mean: Obe, in Afghanistan Ebenezer Obe, a Nigerian musician. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... Gerald Gazdar is a linguist and computer scientist. ...

Politics

Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, PC (born 13 March 1954), is a British Labour Party politician and life peer, currently serving as Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council. ... Leader of the House of Lords is a function in the British government that is always held in combination with a formal Cabinet position, most often Lord President of the Council, Lord Privy Seal or Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster. ... Categories: People stubs | 1960 births | Members of the Privy Council | Peers ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Caroline Louise Flint (born 20 September 1961 in Twickenham, England) is a British politician. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Minister of State is a title borne by officials in certain countries governed under the parliamentary system. ... Public health is concerned with threats to the overall health of a community based on population health analysis. ... Iain Dale is a British Conservative politician and pundit, broadcaster and owner of Politicos Bookstore and Publishing. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... The term Blogger may refer to: A blogger, someone who maintains a weblog. ... 18 Doughty Street is a planned Internet-based political TV station that is due for launch on 10 October 2006. ... Ivor Robert Stanbrook (13 January 1924 – 18 February 2004) was a British Conservative politician who served as Member of Parliament for Orpington from 1970–1992. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... (John) Douglas (Wilson) Carswell (born 3 April 1971) British politician. ... The Conservative Party (officially the Conservative and Unionist Party) is the second largest political party in the United Kingdom in terms of sitting Members of Parliament (MPs), the largest in terms of public membership, and the oldest political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Harwich is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... Rosalind Carol Scott, Baroness Scott of Needham Market (born 10 August 1957) is a British politician and currently the Liberal Democrat Spokesperson for Communities and Local Government The daughter of Kenneth Vincent and Carol Leadbeater, she was educated at Whitby Grammar School and Kent School. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Mark Seddon (born 1962) is the New York-based United Nations correspondent for Al Jazeera English and formerly a British journalist and activist in the Labour Party. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Roger Davison is a Liberal Democrat councillor for Sheffield City Council representing Ecclesall ward. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Lord Mayor of Sheffield is a ceremonial post held by a member of Sheffield City Council. ... Dr. Rihab Taha Dr. Rihab Rashid Taha al-Azawi, nicknamed by the media Doctor Germ, is an English-educated Iraqi microbiologist who worked in Saddam Husseins biological weapons program. ... ...

Literature

Kazuo Ishiguro (カズオ・イシグロ Kazuo Ishiguro, originally 石黒一雄 Ishiguro Kazuo, born November 8, 1954) is a British author of Japanese origin. ... The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... Ian McEwan CBE (born June 21, 1948) is a British novelist. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... Christopher Catherwood is a British author internationally based in Cambridge, England and Richmond, Virginia. ... Tash Aw (born Aw Ta-Shii) is a Malaysian-born writer living in London, England. ... The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in... Rose Tremain is an author and academic. ... The Whitbread Book Awards are among the United Kingdoms most prestigious literary awards. ... Naomi Alderman is a British author and novelist. ... Tracy Chevalier (born in Washington, DC in October of 1962) is a historical novelist whose career began with the book The Virgin Blue but who became well known with a book on the creation of the painting Girl with a Pearl Earring by Vermeer. ... Toby Litt is an English writer, born in Bedford in 1968. ... Simon Scarrow is a UK-based author, born in Nigeria. ... Hwee Hwee Tan was born in Singapore in 1974. ... Saturday Night Lives! book cover John Anderson Fraser (born June 5, 1944) is an award-winning Canadian journalist, author, and Master or chief administrative officer of Massey College, a self-governing interdisciplinary graduate college affiliated with the University of Toronto. ... John Boyne (born April 30, 1971) is an Irish novelist. ... The novelist Andrew Miller was born in 1960 in Bristol. ... Larissa Lai is a Calgary, Alberta based writer and cultural organizer. ... Panos Karnezis (1967- ) is a greek writer. ... Andrew Jefford (born 1956) is an English journalist, radio presenter and author of books on wine. ... Todd Swift (born 8 April 1966) is a Canadian poet based in the United Kingdom. ... Sid Kipper is the nom de plume of Chris Sugden, a Norfolk humorist. ... Stephen Finucan is a Canadian author. ... David Almond is a British childrens writer who has penned several novels, each one to critical acclaim. ... Anne Enright (born 11 October 1962 in Dublin) is a Booker Prize-winning Irish author. ... The Man Booker Prize for Fiction, also known as the Man Booker Prize, or simply the Man Booker, is one of the worlds most important literary prizes, and awarded each year for the best original novel written by a citizen of the Commonwealth or the Republic of Ireland in...

Media

Suits you Sir Mark Williams (left) with Paul Whitehouse (right) The Fast Show For the motor vehicle and aircraft painter, see Paul Whitehouse (painter). ... The Fast Show is a BBC comedy sketch show programme that ran for four series from 1994 to 2000. ... Charlie Higson (born, 1958 in Frome, Somerset) is an English actor and producer, an author, television writer and a comedian. ... The Fast Show is a BBC comedy sketch show programme that ran for four series from 1994 to 2000. ... David Cummings (sometimes credited as Dave Cummings) is a British musician and scriptwriter. ... The Fast Show is a BBC comedy sketch show programme that ran for four series from 1994 to 2000. ... Arthur Smith Arthur Smith (born Brian Smith in 1954) is an English alternative comedian and writer. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Pirates of the Caribbean is a multi-billion dollar Walt Disney franchise encompassing a theme park ride, a series of films and spinoff novels as well as numerous video games and other publications. ... John Rhys-Davies (born May 5, 1944) is an English actor best known for his supporting roles as the charismatic Arab excavator Sallah in the Indiana Jones films, and the dwarf Gimli in The Lord of the Rings trilogy (in which he also voiced the towering Ent, Treebeard). ... This article is about the novel. ... Timothy Charles Robert Noel Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland, Graf von Bentinck (June 1, 1953— ) is a British actor and inventor, known as Tim Bentinck. ... The Right Honourable Timothy Charles Robert Noel Bentinck, 12th Earl of Portland (born 1 June 1953) is a British actor and inventor, usually known as Tim Bentinck. ... Geraint Vincent Geraint Vincent is a newsreader and sports reporter for ITN. He provided a significant portion of ITV News on-site coverage from the 2006 FIFA World Cup in Germany. ... ITV News is the name of the news broadcasts on British TV network ITV. It has one of the largest television audiences for news in the UK. It is produced by Independent Television News (ITN), and was more commonly known simply as ITN until 1999. ... Selina Scott (right) with Diana, Princess of Wales (Private Eye, 31 December 1982) Selina Scott (b. ... Asheem Singh is a screenwriter for film and television. ... Jonathan Powell (born 1947) is a British television producer and executive. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 1. ... Jane Root (born May 18, 1957) was the controller of BBC Two from 1999 until 2004, when she left to work for Discovery Networks in the United States. ... For the BBC radio station, see BBC Radio 2. ... Jenny Abramsky (born 7 October 1946) is Director of BBC Audio and Music. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Simon Nicholls (born 14th December 1977, in London) is a Radio and TV comedy producer at the BBC. Simon grew up in Oxford and was educated at Christ Church Cathedral School (Oxford) and St Edwards School (Oxford) before reading Law at the University of East Anglia. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Darren Bett (born Scunthorpe, North Lincolnshire) is a weatherman for the BBC, broadcasting on British television and radio. ... Since the 2005 relaunch, a new glass globe has been the logo for BBC Weather and is shown at the beginning and end of all weather forecasts. ... BBC Weather forecaster, appearing regularly on BBC One, BBC News 24, BBC Radio 4 and BBC World. ... Since the 2005 relaunch, a new glass globe has been the logo for BBC Weather and is shown at the beginning and end of all weather forecasts. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Rebecca Lowe (born 11 November 1980) is a sports reporter and presenter for the BBC. // Lowe graduated with a 2:1 BA Honours Degree in Drama from the University of East Anglia in 2002. ... Susanne Manning was a contestant on the second series of Pop Idol in the UK. She was known for her husky voice and caused the most headlines out of all the contestants at the time. ... Colin Griffiths (born 16 August 1983) is an English comedian, DJ, VJ and writer. ... This article is about the original U.S. music television channel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Bloc Party are an English indie rock band. ... Nina Conti (born London) is an English actress, comedian and ventriloquist. ... James Frain (born March 14, 1968) is a British stage and screen actor. ... Greg James (born Gregory James Alan Milward, December 17, 1985) is an British disc jockey from Bishops Stortford, Hertfordshire. ...

Business

(Christopher) John William Ward (born 21 June 1942) is an economist, an opera administrator and former trade union leader. ... Ed Sellers (1983 - ) is a British businessman and entrepreneur most notable for creating the Good To Go Tour, a British multi-artist package tour that features a mix of established acts from the American Punk/Rock/Ska/Pop genre and rising UK bands. ... Layo & Bushwacka! is the pseudonym of DJs Layo Paskin and Matthew Benjamin. ...

Other

Benedict Allen (born 1960) is a British explorer. ... Lieutenant General Sir Robert Fulton KBE September 2006 Sir Robert Fulton is a British Royal Marines career military officer. ... The Royal Marines (RM) are the marines and amphibious infantry of the United Kingdom and, along with the Royal Navy and Royal Fleet Auxiliary, form the Naval Service [2]. They are also the United Kingdoms amphibious force and specialists in mountain and Arctic warfare. ... John Armine Wodehouse, 5th Earl of Kimberley (born 1951) was the only child of John Wodehouse, 4th Earl of Kimberley and Carmel Maguire, daughter of Mickey Maguire, welterweight champion of Australia. ... John Armine Wodehouse, 5th Earl of Kimberley (born 1951) was the only child of John Wodehouse, 4th Earl of Kimberley and Carmel Maguire, daughter of Mickey Maguire, welterweight champion of Australia. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Rear Admiral Neil Morisetti is a senior British Royal Navy officer. ...

Notable academics

Christopher Bigsby Christopher Bigsby is a British literary analyst and novelist, with more than forty books to his credit. ... American studies or American civilization is an interdisciplinary field dealing with the study of the United States. ... Malcom Bowie is Master of Christs College, Cambridge Categories: Substubs ... Sir Malcolm Stanley Bradbury (September 7, 1932 – November 27, 2000) was a British author and academic. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... John Charmley (born 1955) is a British diplomatic historian and a professor of modern history at the University of East Anglia, where he is head of the school of history. ... Amit Chaudhuri (b. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... For the football player of the same name see Mike Douglass (football player). ... An Urban planner is a professional who works in the field of urban planning. ... Terms like SOSE (Studies of Society & the Environment) not only refer to social sciences but also studies of the environment. ... Anthony Edward Dyson (November 28, 1928 - July 30, 2002) was a British literary critic, university lecturer, and gay rights campaigner Educated at Pembroke College, Cambridge, his academic career began in 1955 when he was appointed as Assistant Lecturer in English Literature at the University of North Wales, Bangor. ... Professor Richard Evans (born 1947) is a British historian of Germany. ... Ian Gibson (born 26 September 1938) is a politician in the United Kingdom. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Norwich North is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Garry L. Hagberg is an author, professor, philosopher, and jazz musician. ... Richard Hodges Richard Hodges OBE, FSA (born September 29, 1952) is a contemporary British archaeologist whose work primarily concerns trade and economics during the early part of the Middle Ages. ... Patricia Lesley Hollis, Baroness Hollis of Heigham (born 24 May 1941) is a Labour member of the House of Lords. ... The Labour Party is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... Hubert H. Lamb was an English climatologist who founded the Climatic Research Unit at the University of East Anglia. ... Climatology is the science that studies climates and investigates their phenomena and causes. ... The Climatic Research Unit is a component of the University of East Anglia. ... Philip D. Jones (1952-) is a climatologist at the University of East Anglia, notable for maintaining of the time series of the instrumental temperature record [1]; this work figured prominently in the IPCC TAR SPM [2]. He is director of the Climatic Research Unit and a Professor in the School... The Climatic Research Unit is a component of the University of East Anglia. ... Ludmilla Jordanova is a Professor of Modern History at the Kings College London. ... Paul Kennedy can refer to: Paul Kennedy a professor of history at Yale University who is known for his study of the history of international relations. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      International relations (IR), a branch of political science, is the study of foreign affairs and global issues among states within the international system, including the roles of states, inter-governmental organizations (IGOs), non-governmental organizations (NGOs), and multinational corporations (MNCs). ... Grand strategy is military strategy considered at the level of the movement and use of an entire nation state or empires resources. ... Michael George Laskey (born 15 August 1944) is a poet and editor, Chairman of The Poetry Trust. ... Dr Paul Magrs (pronounced Mars; born November 1969 in England, United Kingdom) is a Senior Lecturer in English Literature and Creative Writing at Manchester Metropolitan University, where he began work in 2004 having formerly taught at the University of East Anglia. ... Andrew Motion, FRSL, (born October 26, 1952) is an English poet, novelist and biographer who is the current Poet Laureate. ... A Poet Laureate is a poet officially appointed by a government and often expected to compose poems for State occasions and other government events. ... Julian Myerscough (born 1962 in Bolton, Lancashire) is a writer, record producer (of reissues of Edwardian music hall) and broadcaster and contributor for BBC Radio 4. ... old Radio 4 logo BBC Radio 4 is a UK domestic radio station which broadcasts a wide variety of spoken-word programmes including news, drama, comedy, science and history. ... Professor Shirley Pearce CBE is Vice-Chancellor of Loughborough University, a position she has held since January 2006. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Loughborough University is located in the market town of Loughborough, Leicestershire in the East Midlands of England. ... David Stephen Pearl (born 11 August 1944) is a British lawyer and member of the Judicial Appointments Commission. ... For the fish called lawyer, see Burbot. ... Brian Runnett was educated in Liverpool. ... Lorna Sage (born Hanmer, North Wales in 1943; died London in 2001), was a Welsh accademic, as well as an award winning Literary critic and author, known widely for her contribution to the consideration of womens writing. ... W.G. Sebald W. G. (Winfred Georg Maximilian) Sebald (May 18, 1944, Wertach im Allgäu–December 14, 2001, Norfolk, United Kingdom) was a writer and academic. ... This article needs to be wikified. ... The University of Exeter (usually abbreviated as Exon. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Professor Peter Trudgill (pronounced [ˈtɹʌd. ... Sociolinguistics is the study of the effect of any and all aspects of society, including cultural norms, expectations, and context on the way language is used. ... Angus Frank Johnstone Wilson (August 11, 1913-1991) was a British novelist and short story writer. ... Dr John James Wymer, (5 March 1928 - 10 February 2006) was a British archaeologist and one of the leading experts on the Palaeolithic period. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... The Paleolithic or Palaeolithic – lit. ... Solly Zuckerman, Baron Zuckerman OM KCB FRS (May 30, 1904 - April 1, 1993) was a UK public servant, zoologist, and scientific advisor. ... A bureaucrat is a member of a bureaucracy, usually within an institution of the government. ... Zoology (Greek zoon = animal and logos = word) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  2. ^ The Sunday Times 2006 University League Table. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  3. ^ The University of East Anglia has been ranked joint first for student satisfaction among full-time mainstream English universities.. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.
  4. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities conducted by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 2007-04-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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University of East Anglia

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University of East Anglia and David Yellen Teachers' College, Israel, Institutional Review Reports,March 1999 (7056 words)
The University may wish to consider the necessity of reviewing both the assignment of responsibilities for monitoring the programme and the sources of information needed for those responsibilities to be undertaken with the thoroughness that the University's stated policy requires.
The University may wish to consider the advisability both of implementing the formal instructions governing the assessment of course work and dissertations in the appendix to the agreement, and also of clarifying the University's own expectations regarding the monitoring of course work and dissertations, and the manner in which translations are to be made.
The University was pleased to note the comments made by auditors in paragraph 48 concerning the quality of staff and students' work at the College and the recognition that the University had made a contribution to the academic environment at the College.
The University of East Anglia (UEA) Student Exchange Partner, University of Otago, New Zealand (1043 words)
UEA is a dynamic place to live and study with an enthusiastic atmosphere and willingness to explore new ideas.
UEA offer semester or year programmes of study in a range of humanities, social science and science subjects as well as a large range of courses aimed at preparing you for your professional career.
East Anglia's landscape and huge skies have always inspired artists, and the region is steeped in tradition and history.
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