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Encyclopedia > University of Durham
Durham University
Logo of Durham University
Motto Fundamenta eius super montibus sanctis
her foundations are set upon the holy hills (from Psalm 86 in the Latin Psalter)
Established 1832
Chancellor Bill Bryson
Vice-Chancellor Sir Kenneth Calman
Location Durham, England
Students 11,021 undergraduate,
2,843 postgraduate (2003-4)
Endowment £ 32.8M (2003)
Member of 1994 Group, EUA, AMBA
Homepage www.dur.ac.uk

Durham University is a university in England. It was founded as the University of Durham by Act of Parliament in 1832 and granted a Royal Charter in 1837, making it England's third oldest University after Oxford and Cambridge (though other higher education institutions, such as University College London and King's College London, had existed previously without formal university status). Located in the city of Durham on the River Wear, it is one of England's leading research universities. The Chancellor of the University is Bill Bryson, appointed by the University's Convocation on 4 April 2005. The University was shortlisted for the Sunday Times University of the Year 2004. 2005 rebranded logo of the University of Durham. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... Latin is the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Psalms (Tehilim תהילים, in Hebrew) is a book of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh, and of the Old Testament of the Christian Bible. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Bill Bryson (born December 8, 1951) is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city in the north east of England. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... The 1994 Group is a coalition of smaller research-intensive universities founded to defend their interests after the larger research-intensive universities founded the Russell Group. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... AMBA is an international organisation that accredits mostly international elite business schools and MBAs, similar to the AACSB in the US. Among the schools accredited by AMBA are: University of Wales, Aberystwyth Ashridge University of Auckland University of Bath University of Birmingham Bocconi University University of Cambridge, The Judge Institute... A professor giving a lecture at the Helsinki University of Technology A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... University College London, commonly known as UCL, is one of the colleges that make up the University of London. ... Kings College London in London is the largest college in the federal University of London, with 21,500 registered students. ... City lights from space. ... Durham (IPA: locally, in RP) is a small city in the north east of England. ... The River Wear (pronounced Wee-er) is a river in the North East of England. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right) Englands location within the UK Official language English de facto Capital London de facto Largest city London Area  - Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 1st UK 49,138,831 377/km² Ethnicity... Chancellor (Latin: cancellarius), an official title used by most of the peoples whose civilization has arisen directly or indirectly out of the Roman empire. ... Bill Bryson (born December 8, 1951) is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. ... April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (95th in leap years). ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... The Sunday Times University of the Year is an annual award given to a British university by The Sunday Times. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


History

The coat of arms of Durham University
The coat of arms of Durham University

Download high resolution version (800x942, 59 KB)Coat of arms of the University of Durham, England. ... Download high resolution version (800x942, 59 KB)Coat of arms of the University of Durham, England. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...

Origins

The strong tradition of theological teaching in Durham gave rise to various attempts to form a university there, notably under King Henry VIII and Oliver Cromwell, who actually issued letters patent for the establishment of a college in 1657. However it was not until 1832, when Parliament passed an act allowing the Dean and Chapter of Durham to fund a new university, that the University actually came into being. The Act received Royal Assent and became law on 4 July 1832. The University's Royal Charter was granted on 1 June 1837 by William IV, with the first students graduating a few days later. Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Unfinished portrait miniature of Oliver Cromwell by Samuel Cooper, 1657. ... Letters Patent by Queen Victoria creating the office of Governor-General of Australia Letters patent are a type of legal document which is an open letter issued by a monarch or government granting a right, monopoly, title, or status to someone or some entity such as a corporation. ... Events January 8 - Miles Sindercombe, would-be-assassin of Oliver Cromwell, and his group are captured in London February - Admiral Robert Blake defeats the Spanish West Indian Fleet in a battle over the seizure of Jamaica. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... July 4 is the 185th day of the year (186th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 180 days remaining. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... In the United Kingdom and Canada a Royal Charter is a charter granted by the Sovereign on the advice of the Privy Council, which creates or gives special status to an incorporated body. ... June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (153rd in leap years), with 213 days remaining. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... William IV (William Henry dEste) (21 August 1765–20 June 1837) was King of the United Kingdom and of Hanover from 26 June 1830 until his death. ...


It was founded, as Oxford was also, with one college named University College, which moved into Durham Castle (previously the Bishop's palace) in 1837. University College, commonly known as Castle, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... Durham Castle is a Norman castle in the city of Durham in County Durham, England. ... 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...


19th century

In 1846, Bishop Hatfield's Hall (later to become Hatfield College) was founded, providing for the first time in any British university the opportunity for students to obtain affordable lodgings with fully-catered communal eating. Elsewhere, the University expanded from Durham into Newcastle in 1852 when the medical school there (established in 1834) became a college of the University. This was joined in 1871 by the College of Physical Sciences (renamed as the College of Science in 1884 and again as Armstrong College in 1904). St Cuthbert's Society was founded in 1888 to cater for non-resident students in Durham, while two teacher-training colleges — St Hild's for women, established in 1858, and The College of the Venerable Bede for men, established in 1839. These merged to form a mixed college (the College of St Hild and St Bede) in 1975. From 1896 these were associated with the University and graduates of St Hild were the first female graduates from Durham in 1898. Hatfield College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1871 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... St Cuthberts Society, commonly known as Cuths, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The College of St Hild and St Bede, commonly known as Hild Bede, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ...


For most of the 19th century, University of Durham degrees were subject to a religion test and could only be taken by members of the established church. This situation lasted until the Test Act of 1871. However, 'dissenters' were able to attend Durham and then receive degrees of the University of London, which were not subject to any religious test, on completing their course. The several Test Acts were a series of English penal laws that imposed various civil disabilities on Roman Catholics and nonconformists. ... Senate House, designed by Charles Holden home to the universitys central administration offices and its library The University of London is a federation of colleges which together constitute one of the worlds largest universities. ...


Following the grant of a supplemental charter in 1895 allowing women to receive degrees of the University, the Women's Hostel (St Mary's College from 1919) was founded in 1899. Also in 1899 the Durham Colleges Students' Representative Council (DCSRC) was founded to represent students at the Durham colleges (the Newcastle division having its own SRC). This was renamed as the Durham Students' Union in 1963. 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... St Marys College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Durham Students Unions building, Dunelm House A protest organised by Durham Students Union The Durham Students Union is a body, set up as the Durham Colleges Students’ Representative Council in 1899 and renamed in 1969, with the intention of representing and providing welfare and services for the students of... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


20th century

The Newcastle division of the University, in particular Armstrong College, quickly grew to outnumber the Durham colleges, despite the addition of two Anglican foundations: St Chad's College (1904) and St John's College (1909). A parliamentary bill proposed in 1907 would have fixed the seat of the University in Durham for only ten years, allowing the Senate to choose to move to Newcastle after this. This was blocked by a local MP, with the support of graduates of the Durham colleges, until the bill was modified to establish a federal university with its seat fixed in Durham. This reform also removed the University from the authority of the Dean and Chapter of Durham Cathedral, who had nominally been in charge of the University since its foundation. Thirty years after this, the Royal Commission of 1937 recommended changes in the constitution of the federal University, resulting in the merger of the two Newcastle colleges to form King's College. The term Anglican (from the Angles or English) describes those people and churches following the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... St Chads College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... St Johns College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Durham Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In countries that are members of the Commonwealth a Royal Commission is a major government inquiry into an issue. ... 1937 was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


After the Second World War, the Durham division began expanding rapidly. St Aidan's Society (St Aidan's College from 1965) was founded in 1947 to cater for non-resident women and the decision was made to expand onto Elvet Hill, vastly expanding the existing pure science provision in Durham, and adding applied science and engineering. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... St Aidans College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elvet Hill is situated on the south bank of the River Wear in the city of Durham, in County Durham, in England. ... // What is science? There are different theories of what science is. ... Licensure and Qualifications for the Practice of Engineering The Engineers Ring The Ritual of the Calling of an Engineer Engineering Disasters and Learning from Failure American Society of Engineering Education (ASEE) ASEE engineering profile (2003) PDF The Instititute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, Inc. ...


In 1947 the foundation stones for the new St Mary's College building on Elvet Hill was laid by Princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth II). The new building opened in 1952. In the same year, tensions surfaced again over the Durham-Newcastle divide, with a proposal to change the name of the University to the University of Durham and Newcastle. This motion was defeated in Convocation (the assembly of members of the University) by 135 votes to 129. Eleven years later, with the Universities of Durham and Newcastle upon Tyne Act, King's College became the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, leaving Durham based solely in its home city. 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Elvet Hill is situated on the south bank of the River Wear in the city of Durham, in County Durham, in England. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), styled HM The Queen (born 21 April 1926) is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and... 1952 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... A Convocation is a group of people formally assembled for a special purpose. ... The University of Newcastle upon Tyne is located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north of England. ...


By this time, the Elvet Hill site was well established, with the first of the new colleges, Grey College (named after the second Earl Grey, who was the Prime Minister when the University was founded) being founded in 1959. Expansion up Elvet Hill continued, with Van Mildert College (1965), Trevelyan College (1966) and Collingwood College (1972) all being added to the University. Grey College can refer to: Grey College, University of Durham, England Grey College, Bloemfontein, South Africa This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845), a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Van Mildert College, commonly known as Mildert, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Trevelyan College, commonly known as Trevs, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... Collingwood College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ...


These were not the only developments in the University, however. The Graduate Society, catering for postgraduate students, was founded in 1965 (renamed Ustinov College in 2003) and the Roman Catholic seminary of Ushaw College, which had been in Durham since 1808, was licensed as a hall of residence in 1968. By 1990 the last male-only college became mixed, leaving St Mary's as the only single-sex college; St. Mary's, however, will have its first mixed undergraduate intake in 2005. Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Ustinov College, is a postgraduate college of the University of Durham in England. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Roman Catholic Church, most often spoken of simply as the Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with over one billion members. ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students in religion, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... Ushaw College is a Roman Catholic seminary, founded at Douai in France in 1568, which moved to Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham in England in 1808 and became a Licensed Hall of the University of Durham in 1968. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


Queen's Campus, Stockton

In 1992 a joint venture between the University and the University of Teesside saw the Joint University College on Teesside of the Universities of Durham and Teesside (JUCOT) established at Stockton-on-Tees, 23 miles south of Durham. 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Teesside - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ...


This was initially intended to grant joint degrees validated by both institutions (BAs and BScs). However, Teesside, which had only become a university in 1992, had difficulties in taking on its responsibilities for the college and Durham took full control of the new college in 1994. A Bachelor of Arts (B.A. or A.B., from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus) is an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or program in the arts and/or sciences. ... BSC is an abbreviation for: Bachelor of Science - ususally written BSc (academic degree) Barcelona Supercomputing Center Base Station Controller (part of a GSM mobile phone network) BSC-protocol - standard for computer communication developed by IBM The British Society of Cinematographers Birmingham-Southern College - Birmingham-Southern College basic - represents theoretical exact... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1994 was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International year of the Family. ...


A programme of integration with Durham began, leading to the college becoming University College, Stockton (UCS) in 1996 — a college of the University of Durham and the only college with teaching responsibilities. 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Further integration lead to the campus being renamed the University of Durham, Stockton Campus (UDSC) in 1998, removing teaching responsibilities from the College. In 2001, two new colleges, John Snow and George Stephenson, after the physician and the engineer) were established at Stockton, replacing UCS, and the new medical school (which operates in association with the University of Newcastle upon Tyne) took in its first students — the first medics to join Durham since 1963. In 2002, her golden jubilee year, the Queen granted the title "Queen's Campus" to the Stockton site. 1998 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year of the Ocean. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... John Snow College is a college of the University of Durham in England, and one of two located at Queens Campus in Stockton-on-Tees, 37 km (23 miles) south of the city of Durham itself. ... George Stephenson College is a college of the University of Durham in England, and one of two located at Queens Campus in Stockton-on-Tees, 37 km (23 miles) south of the city of Durham itself. ... Dr. John Snow The English physician John Snow (March 15, 1813–June 16, 1858) was a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene, and a pioneer of epidemiology. ... George Stephenson. ... Medical school generally refers to a tertiary educational institution (or part of such an institution) which is involved in the education of future medical practitioners (medical doctors). ... The University of Newcastle upon Tyne is located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north of England. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Alternative meaning: The Golden Jubilee diamond A Golden Jubilee is a celebration held to mark a 50th anniversary. ... Queen Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), styled HM The Queen (born 21 April 1926) is the Queen regnant of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and...


Durham today

In recent years, the University has maintained its strength. One study even ranked it 7th in the English-speaking world (only behind Oxford and Cambridge in the UK, and ahead of institutions such as Yale) in a study of scientific citations carried out by the University of Hong Kong in 2000, while the UK Research Assessment Exercise in 2001 rated Durham research as averaging a 5 rating — "international excellence in more than half of the research activity submitted and attainable levels of national excellence in the remainder". The Teaching Quality Assessments carried out by the Quality Assurance Agency have rated Durham at an average of 22.2/24 in 2003, well above the UK average of 21.6. Durham University Business School's MBA was ranked 61st in the world by the Economist in 2003 and 82nd in the Financial Times in 2004. In the 2004 university league tables, Durham was ranked 8th (The Times), 11th (The Sunday Times) and 12th (The Guardian). The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world, with one of the most selective entry requirements in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Yale (disambiguation). ... The University of Hong Kong (HKU) (Traditional Chinese: 香港大學; Simplified Chinese: 香港大学; pinyin: XiānggÇŽng Dàxué) is an English-language medium university and the oldest tertiary institution in Hong Kong SAR. Its motto is the Latin phrase Sapientia et Virtus (明德格物), meaning wisdom and virtue or sometimes cited as Foresight & Social... This article is about the year 2000. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... The Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA) was established in 1997 to provide an integrated quality assurance service for United Kingdom higher education. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Master of Business Administration (MBA) is a tertiary degree in business management. ... Front cover of UK edition, May 7, 2005 The Economist is a weekly news and international affairs publication of The Economist Newspaper Limited in London. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom. ... The Sunday Times is the name of several Sunday newspapers. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


Durham remains one of only a few universities to have won University Challenge twice, with victories in 1977 and 2000, and the Durham University Centre of Cricketing Excellence is one of only three (the others being Oxford and Cambridge) to play first-class matches. Durham was ranked 5th across all sports by the British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) in 2005. It is also the current BUSA rowing champion, keeping the title won in 2004. Since 1975 the university has played host to the Durham Drama Festival. University Challenge is a long-running British television quiz show. ... 1977 was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1977 calendar). ... This article is about the year 2000. ... First-class cricket matches are those of at least three days length in which both teams have two innings each, involving either international teams or the highest division of domestic competition. ... The British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) is the governing body for United Kingdom. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Durham Drama Festival is an open-access drama festival held annually in Durham, UK. Founded in 1975 by Durham University Theatre as the One Act Festival, the event has grown in scope and size over the previous three decades and adopted its current name and format in 2003. ...


In 2002 the University announced that a new college, to open in 2006, will be built on the Elvet Hill site. It is commonly (though unofficially) known as Howlands College. 2002 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Howlands College is the unofficial name of the newest college at the University of Durham, due to open in September 2006. ...


In 2005 the University unveiled a rebranded logotype and renamed itself as 'Durham University', claiming that this reflected a more contemporary and less elitist outlook. The news was poorly received among many academic and student members of the university, with Van Mildert JCR going as far as boycotting the new name and logo. However, the official name of the institution remains the University of Durham and the official coat of arms is unchanged. 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... This article or section should include material from logo design, discuss it at Talk:Logo design A logotype, commonly known as a logo, is the graphic element of a trademark or brand, which is set in a special typeface/font, or arranged in a particular, but legible, way. ...


Chancellors of the University

Until 1909, the University was nominally governed by the Dean and Chapter of Durham Cathedral. Following the University of Durham Act, 1908 the University has, like most other British universities, been headed by a Chancellor. 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Durham Cathedral - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1912 is a leap year starting on Monday. ... George William Kitchin - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... Link title1913 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Henry George Percy, 7th Duke of Northumberland, KG, PC (29 May 1846 - 14 May 1918) was a British politician. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... John George Lambton was the 3rd Earl of Durham and grandson of famous British statesman and colonial administrator, John Lambton, 1st Earl of Durham. ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... Alan Ian Percy, 8th Duke of Northumberland (17 April 1880–August 23, 1930 was the son of Henry Percy, 7th Duke of Northumberland and Lady Edith Campbell. ... 1931 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... 1949 is a common year starting on Saturday. ... Charles Stewart Henry Vane-Tempest-Stewart, 7th Marquess of Londonderry (1878_1949) had careers in both Irish and British politics. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Macaulay Trevelyan (February 16, 1876 – 1962) was an English historian, son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan and great-nephew of Thomas Macaulay. ... 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1969 calendar). ... Lawrence Lumley was the 11th Earl of Scarbrough. ... 1971 is a common year starting on Friday (click for link to calendar). ... 1980 is a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Malcolm Ian Macdonald (born January 7, 1950, Fulham, England) was an English footballer always known as Supermac. Born in Fulham, London, Macdonald started out as a full back before switching to centre forward. ... 1981 is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Margot Fonteyn (18 May 1919-21 February 1991) was a leading British ballet dancer of her time. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov (born Peter Alexander von Ustinov) (April 16, 1921 – March 29, 2004) was a British-born and raised actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Bill Bryson (born December 8, 1951) is a best-selling American author of humorous books on travel, as well as books on the English language and on scientific subjects. ...

Colleges

Durham is the only British university apart from Oxford and Cambridge to operate a collegiate structure in that all the colleges at Durham are "listed bodies" under the Education Reform Act, 1988, "recognised by the UK authorities as being able to offer courses leading to a degree of a recognised body". This is same legal status as the colleges of Oxford and Cambridge and the constituent institutions of the University of Wales, and sets Durham colleges apart from those at the universities of Kent, Lancaster, and York, which have no legal standing. However, unlike at Oxford and Cambridge, there is no teaching at Durham colleges. The colleges dominate the residential, social, sporting, and pastoral functions within the university, and there is heavy student involvement in their operation. 1988 is a leap year starting on a Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of Wales, or Prifysgol Cymru in Welsh, is a federal university founded in 1893. ...


Formal dinners (known as "formals") are held at many colleges; gowns are often worn to these events. There is a great deal of intercollegiate rivalry, particularly in rowing and other sporting activities. There is also rivalry between the older colleges of the Bailey and the newer colleges of the Hill. The academic dress of the University of Durham is based fairly strongly on that of Oxford. ... Rowing refers to several forms of physical activity: For rowing boats in general, see Watercraft rowing. ...


List of colleges

Most of the colleges located in Durham itself can be grouped into two areas of the city. Bailey colleges are those located on the "peninsula" formed by a meander of River Wear, and Hill colleges are on Elvet Hill on the other side of the river. The Queen's Campus is 23 miles south of Durham, on the outskirts of Stockton-on-Tees. Stockton-on-Tees is an industrial town and port on the River Tees in north-eastern England. ...


Bailey colleges

Hatfield College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1846 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... -1... Events June 12 - Peasants Revolt: In England rebels arrive at Blackheath. ... St Chads College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The term Anglican (from the Angles or English) describes those people and churches following the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... 1904 is a leap year starting on a Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... St Cuthberts Society, commonly known as Cuths, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1888 is a leap year starting on Sunday (click on link for calendar). ... St Johns College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1919 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 - March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. Born in 1489 at Nottingham, Cranmer was educated at Jesus College, Cambridge and became a priest following the death of his first wife. ... John Wesley was an 18th century theologian, preacher and the founder of the Methodist denomination of Protestant Christianity. ... University College, commonly known as Castle, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1832 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Hill colleges

Collingwood College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... Grey College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1959 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Charles Grey, 2nd Earl Grey, (March 13, 1764 - July 17, 1845), a British Whig statesman and Prime Minister. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... 1830 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1834 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Howlands College is the unofficial name of the newest college at the University of Durham, due to open in September 2006. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elvet Hill is situated on the south bank of the River Wear in the city of Durham, in County Durham, in England. ... St Aidans College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1947 was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... St Marys College is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... January 7 is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ... Trevelyan College, commonly known as Trevs, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... George Macaulay Trevelyan (February 16, 1876 – 1962) was an English historian, son of Sir George Otto Trevelyan and great-nephew of Thomas Macaulay. ... 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1957 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Van Mildert College, commonly known as Mildert, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... William Van Mildert (1765–1836) was the last Prince-Bishop of Durham (1826–1836), and one of the founders of the University of Durham. ... 1826 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ...

Elsewhere in Durham

  • Ustinov College (1965) — The postgraduate college, known as the Graduate Society until 2003 when it was renamed after Sir Peter Ustinov, Chancellor of the University (19922004). Its main offices are on Old Elvet in the centre of the city, and, while it has accommodation on the Howland's site on Elvet Hill, it also has a site at Parson's Field site at the end of Old Elvet, so is neither a Bailey College nor truly a Hill College.
  • College of St Hild and St Bede (1975) — Geographically speaking, neither Bailey nor Hill (though closer to the former); the name arises from the merger of two single-sex teacher-training colleges, St Hild's College (female, founded 1858) and The College of the Venerable Bede (male, founded 1839).

Ustinov College, is a postgraduate college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1965 was a common year starting on Friday (link goes to calendar). ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... 2003 is a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Sir Peter Alexander Ustinov (born Peter Alexander von Ustinov) (April 16, 1921 – March 29, 2004) was a British-born and raised actor, writer, dramatist and raconteur. ... 1992 is a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Elvet Hill is situated on the south bank of the River Wear in the city of Durham, in County Durham, in England. ... The College of St Hild and St Bede, commonly known as Hild Bede, is a college of the University of Durham in England. ... 1975 was a common year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1975 calendar). ... 1858 is a common year starting on Friday. ... 1839 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...

Ushaw

Ushaw College is a Roman Catholic seminary, founded at Douai in France in 1568, which moved to Ushaw Moor, four miles west of Durham in England in 1808 and became a Licensed Hall of the University of Durham in 1968. ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... A seminary is a specialized university-like institution for the purpose of instructing students in religion, often in order to prepare them to become members of the clergy. ... Douai is a city and commune in the north of France in the département of Nord, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Events March 23 - Peace of Longjumeau ends the Second War of Religion in France. ... Ushaw Moor is a village in County Durham, in England. ... 1808 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1968 was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...

Queen's Campus, Stockton

George Stephenson College is a college of the University of Durham in England, and one of two located at Queens Campus in Stockton-on-Tees, 37 km (23 miles) south of the city of Durham itself. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... George Stephenson. ... John Snow College is a college of the University of Durham in England, and one of two located at Queens Campus in Stockton-on-Tees, 37 km (23 miles) south of the city of Durham itself. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Dr. John Snow The English physician John Snow (March 15, 1813–June 16, 1858) was a leader in the adoption of anaesthesia and medical hygiene, and a pioneer of epidemiology. ...

Constitution

The University holds the powers to award degrees under the Royal Charter of 1837, extended to include the power to award degrees to women under the Supplementary Charter of 1895. However, the rules governing how the University is consituted are to be found in the Statutes put in place by the Universities of Durham and Newcastle upon Tyne Act, 1963, and subsequently amended by the Privy Council. This sets out that: "The University shall be governed by a Visitor, Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, Convocation, Council, Senate, Boards of Faculties and Boards of Studies." 1837 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... 1895 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, especially in a monarchy. ...


Visitor

The Visitor for the University of Durham is the Bishop of Durham. The Visitor is the final arbiter of any dispute within the University, except in those areas where legislation has removed this to the law courts or other ombudsmen. Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Look up Ombudsman in Wiktionary, the free dictionary An ombudsman is an official, usually but not always appointed by the government, who is charged with representing the interests of the public by investigating and addressing complaints reported by individual citizens. ...


Chancellor

The Chancellor is the nominal head of the University. He or she is nominated by the Council and Senate and appointed by Convocation.


Vice-Chancellor

The Vice-Chancellor is the chief executive of the University. He or she also holds the positions of 'Warden of the Durham Colleges' and is appointed by the Council. The deputy to the Vice Chancellor is the Pro-Vice-Chancellor who also holds the position of 'Sub-Warden of the Durham Colleges' and deputises for the Vice-Chancellor. There may also be additional Pro-Vice-Chancellors.


Convocation

Convocation is the assembly of members of the University. It consists of the Chancellor, Vice-Chancellor, and Pro-Vice-Chancellors, all graduates, the teaching staff (lecturers, senior lecturers, readers, and professors), and the heads of colleges and licensed halls of residence. It meets once a year in order to hear the Vice-Chancellor's Address and to debate any business relating to the University. Its powers are limited to appointing the Chancellor (and even then, only on the nomination of Council and Senate) and the making of representations to the University on any business debated.


Council

Council is the executive body of the University. In addition to representatives from the University it includes the Dean of Durham Cathedral and representatives of the alumni, the Students' Union and the local councils. Its powers include establishing and maintaining colleges, and recognising non-maintained colleges and licensed halls of residence.


Senate

Senate is the supreme governing body of the University in academic matters. It nominates the Vice-Chancellor and Pro-Vice-Chancellors to Council, and recommends the establishment of Faculties and Boards of Studies. It is Senate that grants degrees, and has the authority to revoke them. It also regulates the use of academic dress of the University. The academic dress of the University of Durham is based fairly strongly on that of Oxford. ...


Colleges

The University is collegiate in structure. There are four different sorts of college: Maintained Colleges and Societies, Recognised Colleges, Licensed Halls of Residence, and Affiliated Colleges. Maintained Colleges are not financially independent of the University and their principals are appointed by Council. The colleges are represented on Council by the Dean of Colleges, chosen from among the principals.


The Recognised Colleges (St John's and St Chad's) and Licensed Halls (Ushaw) are financially independent of the University and have a greater degree of administrative independence than the Maintained Colleges. However, Council must approve the appointment of their principal and be notified of changes to their constitutions. There is also a requirement that they must be within County Durham. County Durham is a county in north-east England. ...


Affiliated Colleges (Codrington College, Barbados and, until 1967, Fourah Bay College, Sierra Leone) are overseas institutes that present their students for University of Durham examinations. They are not generally considered part of the collegiate structure of the University and are not listed as colleges in the University Calendar. Codrington College is an Anglican theological college in St. ... 1967 was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Faculties

The teaching departments of the University are divided into three faculties: Science, Arts and Humanities, and Social Sciences and Health. Each faculty has a Dean, a Deputy Dean and an Associate Dean. These, along with the heads of the departments in the faculty, the Vice-Chancellor, and the Pro-Vice-Chancellors, make up the Faculty Board for that faculty. Each department also has a Board of Studies consisting of the Dean and Deputy Dean of their faculty, the teaching staff of the department, and student representatives. // What is science? There are different theories of what science is. ... A precise definition of the arts can be contentious, but the following areas of activity are usually included: Art / Visual arts Architecture Crafts Dance Design / Graphic design Drawing Film Literature Music Painting Photography Pottery Sculpture Theater In academia, the Arts are usually grouped with or a subset of the Humanities. ... The humanities are a group of academic subjects united by a commitment to studying aspects of the human condition and a qualitative approach that generally prevents a single paradigm from coming to define any discipline. ... The Social Sciences are a group of academic and research disciples that study the human aspects of the world, that requires the application of the scientific method. ...


Notable alumni

Richard Adams OBE was founder of the Fair trade organisations Tearcraft and Traidcraft which are based in the North of England. ... Fair trade products shown at XI Unctad. ... Traidcraft is a leading fair trade organisation in the United Kingdom. ... George Alagiah anchorman of BBC TV News. ... John B. Williams (born 1977 in Maidenhead, London, England) is a drum and bass DJ from the UK. He is widely known for having very wild hair and his talent at producing cutting edge drum and bass tracks. ... Drum and bass (drum n bass, drumnbass, DnB, dnb) is an electronic music style. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... David J. Bellamy OBE (born 1933) is an English professor, botanist, author, broadcaster and environmental campaigner. ... Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... By natural environment is meant the environment of nature, in contrast to some other environment or external milieu that is man-made (and thus, not natural). Within the biosphere, there exists no straight-forward way to separate what belongs to the natural environment and what does not, partly for the... Crispin Blunt is the Conservative MP for Reigate. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the centre-right in the United Kingdom. ... David J. Bodycombe (born 1973) is a puzzle author and games consultant working in the UK, mainly on television and radio game shows (such as The Crystal Maze and X Marks the Spot), in newspapers (such as Metros Think Tank column) and many puzzle books. ... Gorden Kaye as René Artois Allo Allo! was a British sitcom that ran on BBC1 from 1984 to 1992. ... Manchester Uniteds emblem Manchester United F.C. (often abbreviated to Man United or just Man U, pronounced man-yoo) is an English football club based at Old Trafford in Greater Manchester. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... William Carling OBE (born December 12, 1965) is a former rugby player, and captain of England from 1988 to 1996. ... Rugby football, as a catch-all term, may refer to two related but separate team sports: rugby league and rugby union. ... The Right Honourable John Anderson Jack Cunningham, Baron Cunningham of Felling, PC, DL (born 4 August 1939) is a British Labour politician and was Member of Parliament for Copeland until 2005. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... Timothy Stephen Curtis (born Chislehurst, Kent on 15 January 1960) was an England Cricketer. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ... Hunter Davies was a profilic British author, journalist and broadcaster, born 7th January 1936 best known for his books about the Beatles. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism, the gathering and dissemination of information about current events, trends, issues and people. ... The word author has several meanings: The author of a book, story, article or the like, is the person who has written it (or is writing it). ... The Beatles (L-R, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, John Lennon), in 1964, performing on The Ed Sullivan Show promoting their first U.S. hit song, I Want To Hold Your Hand, and ushering in the British Invasion of American popular music. ... Rugby football, as a catch-all term, may refer to two related but separate team sports: rugby league and rugby union. ... For other persons named Jonathan Edwards, see Jonathan Edwards Jonathan David Edwards (born May 10, 1966 in London, England) is a former British triple jumper. ... The Olympic Games, or Olympics, is an international multi-sport event taking place every two years and alternating between Summer and Winter Games. ... The triple jump is an athletics (track and field) event, previously also known as hop, step and jump, whose various names describe the actions a competitor takes. ... Sir Harold Matthew Evans (born 1928) is a British-born journalist and writer. ... A journalist is a person who practices journalism, the gathering and dissemination of information about current events, trends, issues and people. ... The word author has several meanings: The author of a book, story, article or the like, is the person who has written it (or is writing it). ... Philip de Glanville (born 1 October 1968) is a former rugby union player who played at Centre for Bath and England. ... Rugby football, as a catch-all term, may refer to two related but separate team sports: rugby league and rugby union. ... Will Greenwood (born October 20, 1972 in Blackburn, Lancashire) is an English rugby union player. ... Rugby football, as a catch-all term, may refer to two related but separate team sports: rugby league and rugby union. ... Jane Patricia Griffiths is a United Kingdom politician and linguist. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters of an electoral district to a parliament; in the Westminster system, specifically to the lower house. ... Edward Hardy Ted Harrison is an artist born in 1926 in the North East of England. ... Paul Hawkins was a Formula One driver from Australia. ... For other meanings, see Hawkeye. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Lorraine Heggessey (born November 16, 1956) is the Controller of BBC One, the UKs oldest and frequently most-watched television channel. ... BBC One (or BBC1 as it was formerly styled) is the oldest television station in the world. ... Nasser Hussain (born March 28, 1968, Madras), Essex and England cricketer. ... Cricket is a team sport played between two groups of eleven players each. ... Sir Harold Jeffreys (22 April 1891 - 18 March 1989) was a mathematician, statistician, geophysicist, and astronomer. ... Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Mathematics Wikiquote has a collection of quotations by or about: Mathematics Look up Mathematics in Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikimedia Commons has more media related to: Mathematics Bogomolny, Alexander: Interactive Mathematics Miscellany and Puzzles. ... Geophysics, the study of the earth by quantitative physical methods, especially by seismic reflection and refraction, gravity, magnetic, electrical, electromagnetic, and radioactivity methods. ... Professor George Wilberforce Kakoma (born 1925) was a graduate of Trinity College of Music and Durham University who composed Oh Uganda, Land of Beauty, Ugandas national anthem. ... James Kirkup (b. ... Gabby Logan (nee Yorath, April 24, 1974) is a British television presenter. ... John Anthony McGuckin (born 1952) is an Orthodox Christian scholar, priest, and poet. ... The Right Honourable Marjorie Mo Mowlam (September 18, 1949 - August 19, 2005) was a British politician, former Secretary of State for Northern Ireland and Labour MP. Her personal charisma, reputation for plain speaking and successful fight against a brain tumour led her to be perceived by many as one of... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the Prime Minister. ... The Ford Motor Company (often referred to simply as Ford; sometimes nicknamed Fords or FoMoCo, (NYSE: F) is an automobile maker founded by Henry Ford in Detroit, Michigan, and incorporated on June 16, 1903. ... Tim Smit (born 1954) is a Netherlands-born business man, famous for his work on the Lost Gardens of Heligan and the Eden Project, both in Cornwall, England. ... The Eden Project is a project conceived by Tim Smit to construct and maintain a large-scale environmental complex on a property located about 8km from St Austell, Cornwall, in South West England. ... Andrew John Strauss (born in Johannesburg, South Africa on 2 March 1977) is an English cricketer. ... Sir Mike Tomlinson CBE is the chair of the Working Group for 14–19 Reform which has been commissioned by the British Government to look into reform of the syllabus and qualifications structure for 14–19 year-olds in the English education system. ... Arms of the Bishop of Durham The Bishop of Durham is the officer of the Church of England responsible for the diocese of Durham, one of the oldest in the country. ... Jeremy Vine (born May, 1965, Epsom, UK) is a current affairs presenter on BBC radio and television. ... Minette Walters (b. ...

External links

  • Durham University
  • Durham Students' Union

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