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Encyclopedia > University of Connecticut

University of Connecticut

Motto Robur
(Latin, "Oak, Strength")
Established 1881
Type Public, Land Grant
Endowment US $300 million
President Michael J. Hogan
Faculty University System: 4,274
UConn Medical Center:4,528
Undergraduates 20,525
Postgraduates 7,558
Location Storrs, CT, USA
Campus Urban, Rural, and Suburban.
Storrs and regional campuses, 4,104 acres (16.62 km²)
Farmington:UConn Health Center, 162 acres (.655 km²)
Total, 4,266 acres (17.27 km²)
Colors National Flag Blue and White            
Nickname Huskies
NCAA Division 1A
UConn Athletics
Mascot Jonathan the Husky
Website www.uconn.edu

The University of Connecticut is the State of Connecticut's land-grant university. It was founded in 1881 and serves more than 27,000 students on its six campuses, including more than 9,000 graduate students in multiple programs. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or especially academic institutions. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Michael Hogan is an American academic who on August 1, 2007 was named as the 14th president of the University of Connecticut, succeeding Philip Austin who held the post 11 years. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Storrs, Connecticut - Near the Hawley Armory Gymnasium Storrs is a census-designated place and part of the town of Mansfield, Connecticut located in eastern Tolland County. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Incorporated 1645 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Kathleen Eagen  - Council chairman Michael Clark Area  - City 74. ... Addition is one of the basic operations of arithmetic. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


UConn's main campus is in Storrs, Connecticut. The university's outgoing president is Dr. Phillip E. Austin; on August 1, 2007, it was announced that Dr. Michael J. Hogan, noted historian and provost of the University of Iowa, would replace him. Storrs, Connecticut - Near the Hawley Armory Gymnasium Storrs is a census-designated place and part of the town of Mansfield, Connecticut located in eastern Tolland County. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The 13th president of the University of Connecticut (UConn). ... is the 213th day of the year (214th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... Michael Hogan is an American academic who on August 1, 2007 was named as the 14th president of the University of Connecticut, succeeding Philip Austin who held the post 11 years. ... A historian is an individual who studies history and who writes on history. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or U of I, is a major national research university located on a campus in Iowa City, Iowa, USA, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ...


A Public Ivy, UConn is one of the founding institutions of the Hartford, Connecticut/Springfield, Massachusetts regional economic and cultural partnership alliance known as New England's Knowledge Corridor. It is accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Nickname: Location in Hampden County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Hampden County Settled 1636 Incorporated 1852 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Charles Ryan (D) Area  - City  33. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... New Englands Knowledge Corridor constitutes an economic and cultural partnership between the Connecticut River cities of Springfield, Massachusetts, Hartford, Connecticut, and surrounding towns. ... Accredition organization in New England. ...

Contents

Campuses

The main university campus is located in Storrs, Connecticut, which is a division of the Town of Mansfield, approximately 28 miles (45 km) east of Hartford, the state's capital. It is situated between North Eagleville Road and South Eagleville Road. The Storrs Road (CT Route 195) cuts through the campus from north to south. The UConn main campus is located north of Eastern Connecticut State University on CT Route 195. Storrs, Connecticut - Near the Hawley Armory Gymnasium Storrs is a census-designated place and part of the town of Mansfield, Connecticut located in eastern Tolland County. ... Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... Mansfield is a town in Tolland County, Connecticut, United States. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... Eastern Connecticut State University is a public university in Willimantic, Connecticut. ...


In addition to the main campus in Storrs, there are five regional campuses: Avery Point (in Groton), the Greater Hartford campus (West Hartford), Stamford, Torrington, and Waterbury. Waterfront of Groton, Connecticut looking upriver Groton is a town located on the Thames River in New London County, Connecticut. ... Motto: Where City Style meets Village Charm Coordinates: , NECTA Region Incorporated 1854 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager James Francis  - Town council Scott Slifka, Mayor Art Spada, Deputy Mayor Shari Cantor Barbara Carpenter Charles Coursey Maureen K. McClay Mark C. Sinatro Carolyn Thornberry Joseph Verrengia Area  - City 58. ... Nickname: Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Region Settled 1641 Incorporated (city) 1893 Consolidated 1949 Government  - Type Mayor-Board of representatives  - Mayor Dannel Malloy (Dem) Area  - City 134. ... Nickname: Location within the state of Connecticut Coordinates: , NECTA Torrington Region Litchfield Hills Incorporated (town) 1740 Incorporated (city) 1923 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Ryan J. Bingham Area  - City 104. ... Nickname: Motto: Quid Aere Perennius (What Is More Lasting Than Brass) Location in Connecticut Coordinates: , Country U.S. State NECTA Waterbury Region Central Naugatuck Valley Incorporated (town) 1686 Incorporated (city) 1853 Consolidated 1902 Government  - Type Mayor-board of aldermen  - Mayor Michael J. Jarjura Area  - City  28. ...


The University of Connecticut School of Law is located in Hartford, and the School of Medicine and the School of Dental Medicine are both located at the University of Connecticut Health Center in Farmington. There is a downtown Hartford branch that houses teaching and research facilities for the School of Business. The University of Connecticut School of Law is a public law school located in Hartford, Connecticut and is the only public law school in Connecticut and among only two in New England. ... the University of Connecticut Health Center is located on the site of the old OMeara farms in the Farmington Heights section of Farmington, Connecticut. ... Coordinates: NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Incorporated 1645 Government  - Type Council-manager  - Town manager Kathleen Eagen  - Council chairman Michael Clark Area  - City 74. ... When used by itself in a sentence, the term Hartford can refer to one of several places in the United States. ...


History

UConn was founded in 1881 as the Storrs Agricultural School. It was named after Charles and Augustus Storrs, two brothers who donated the land for the school as well as initial funding. Women began attending classes in 1891 and were officially admitted in 1893, when the name was changed to Storrs Agricultural College and it became Connecticut's land grant college. In 1899, the name changed again to Connecticut Agricultural College; in 1933, to Connecticut State College; and finally in 1939, to the University of Connecticut. Year 1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1893 (MDCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or especially academic institutions. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1940, the school was first divided into individual colleges and schools, reflecting its new university status. This was also the year that the School of Social Work and School of Nursing were first established. The graduate program was also started at this time, and existing schools of law and pharmacology were absorbed into the university. Ph.D.s have been awarded since 1949. Year 1940 (MCMXL) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full 1940 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Doctor of Philosophy (Ph. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


During the 1960s, the University of Connecticut Health Center was established in Farmington as a home for the new School of Medicine and School of Dental Medicine. John Dempsey Hospital was opened in Farmington at this time and has been operated by UConn ever since. The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... the University of Connecticut Health Center is located on the site of the old OMeara farms in the Farmington Heights section of Farmington, Connecticut. ...


In 1995, a state-funded program called UConn 2000 was passed by the Connecticut General Assembly and signed into law by then-Gov. John G. Rowland. This 10-year program set aside $1 billion ($1,000,000,000) to upgrade campus facilities, add faculty, and otherwise improve the university. An additional $1.3 billion was pledged by the State of Connecticut in 2002 as part of a new 10-year improvement plan known as 21st Century UConn. Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... The Connecticut General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... The following is a list of Governors of the State of Connecticut, from the Colonial period through present day. ... John Grosvenor Rowland (born May 24, 1957) was the Governor of Connecticut from 1995 to 2004. ... The United States dollar is the official currency of the United States. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... 21st Century UConn is the continuation of UCONN 2000 and is a billion dollar construction investment by the state of Connecticut to upgrade facilities at the University of Connecticut. ...


Academics

Funded by the UCONN 2000 program, the modern Chemistry Building opened in 1998; it is designed to resemble an old New England mill from the outside

UConn has repeatedly been ranked the top public university in New England by U.S. News and World Report, and is also ranked among the top 25 public research universities nationally. Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 1602 KB)University of Connecticut Chemistry Building. ... Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 1602 KB)University of Connecticut Chemistry Building. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into University of Connecticut. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


UConn offers 105 majors, eight undergraduate degrees,16 graduate degrees and five professional degree programs.[1] Students can choose from 64 different minors at UConn, including some areas of study that are not offered as formalized majors. Some areas of study offered formally only as minors at UConn include: Asian American Studies, Aquaculture, Bioinformatics, Criminal Justice, Film Studies, Human Rights, Middle Eastern Studies, Native American Studies, and Slavic & East European Studies.[2]


Bachelor's, master's, and doctoral programs are offered through the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences[3] College of Agriculture and Natural Resources[4] the College of Continuing Studies[5] the Graduate School[6] the Neag School of Education[7] the School of Allied Health[8] the School of Nursing[9] the School of Business[10] the School of Dental Medicine[11] the School of Medicine[12] the School of Engineering[13] Office of International Affairs[14] the School of Family Studies[15] the School of Social Work[16] the Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture[17] the School of Pharmacy[18] the School of Law, and the School of Fine Arts[19] The University of Connecticut School of Law is a public law school located in Hartford, Connecticut and is the only public law school in Connecticut and among only two in New England. ...


UConn is especially known for its programs in law, health care administration, dentistry, gifted and talented education, and family studies. The University of Connecticut School of Law and the University of Connecticut School of Business are two of the top-ranked public graduate schools of their kind in the nation, and the School of Fine Arts' puppetry department is the most influential in the United States. For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... A physician visiting the sick in a hospital. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... The University of Connecticut School of Law is a public law school located in Hartford, Connecticut and is the only public law school in Connecticut and among only two in New England. ... The University of Connecticut (UConn) School of Business was founded in 1941 with the mission to create and disseminate knowledge that significantly influences and enriches the students, the community of business scholars and the global world of business practice. ... A puppeteer is a person who manipulates a puppet or marionette, either by the use of strings, wires or their hands, for a stage production or film. ...


Admissions and rankings

The admission rate to the University of Connecticut is 51% and has been steadily decreasing, with about 21,000 students applying for undergraduate admission each year.[20] Approximately 40,000 prospective students tour the main campus in Storrs annually. UConn's retention rate is within the top 25 public universities in the nation, with 93% of students returning for their sophomore year.[21] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ...


According to the U.S. News & World Report's influential America's Best Colleges listings, the University of Connecticut is a "more selective" national university, placing it in the second out of five tiers of competitiveness when it comes to admissions standards.[22] The university is ranked 64 among all national universities, or those attracting students from throughout the United States, tying with the University of Iowa and Purdue University, and placing it well ahead of the other public national universities in New England.[23] Reflecting the university's national status, more than 10,500 out-of-state students apply for admission each year.[24] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The University of Iowa, also commonly called Iowa or U of I, is a major national research university located on a campus in Iowa City, Iowa, USA, on the banks of the Iowa River in East Central Iowa. ... Purdue redirects here. ...


UConn participates in the New England Board of Higher Education's Regional Student Program (NERSP), which allows students from the five other New England states to enroll at the university at a reduced out-of-state tuition rate if their intended major is not provided by one of their in-state universities.[25] Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ...


The university participates in an articulation agreement with the Connecticut Community Colleges (CCC) that allows students graduating with an Associate's degree to automatically transfer to UConn's Bachelor of General Studies program. A special articulation agreement with Manchester Community College allows graduating students with a 3.5 GPA or higher to enroll in UConn's College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.[26] Each year, more than 1,000 transfer students are admitted to the university.[27] An associate degree is an academic degree awarded by community colleges, junior colleges, business colleges and some bachelors degree-granting colleges and universities upon completion of a course of study usually lasting two years. ... A Bachelor of General Studies (BGS) degree is an undergraduate degree, offered by some universities in the Western world. ... The Manchester Community College is a college in Manchester, Connecticut, USA, founded in 1963. ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of...


Student life

Approximately 75% of all students, including many graduate students, live on campus. The university sponsors many events throughout the year for its student, and also oversees more than 300 student organizations available at UConn for both undergraduates and graduate students [1].


There is a wide variety of student organizations on campus, including fraternities and sororities, musical groups (including a cappella), and religious, athletic, political, cultural, business, military, artistic, and community service clubs. There are also student organizations set up with the intent of governing student life itself, such as the Student Union Board of Governors, the Undergraduate Student Government, the InterFraternity Council, the Panhellenic Council, and the various residence hall councils. The university also has a daily student-run newspaper, The Daily Campus, which is the largest student newspaper in the state of Connecticut. The Daily Campus, founded in 1896, is the student-run newspaper at the University of Connecticut that has a circulation run of 10,000 copies weekdays during the school year and twice during the summer. ...


As with most rural schools, most area activities are held on campus, though the university provides free bus transportation to many area events and also arranges frequent bus trips to Boston, Manhattan, and the Connecticut shoreline. Some students, however, express displeasure with the rural location of the campus, leading it to be ranked #13 on the 2005 Princeton Review list of schools with more to do on campus than off. “Boston” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Manhattan (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Spring Weekend

The annual Spring Weekend concert has attracted top artists and bands such as Third Eye Blind in 2000, Guster and Nelly in 2001, Rusted Root and Busta Rhymes in 2002, 50 Cent in 2003, Ludacris and Kanye West in 2004, Nas and Fabolous in 2005, OAR in 2006, and Dashboard Confessional, Reel Big Fish and The Starting line in 2007.[28] It is also known for sizable outdoor parties that typically draw well over 10,000 attendees, particularly at one of its parking lots (X-Lot) and the privately-owned Carriage House apartments, located less than a mile off campus.


Some of these parties have led to near-riot situations, characterized by incidents of property destruction and unruliness requiring a sizable police presence every year, thereby giving Spring Weekend a degree of local notoriety.[29] In order to give students more alternative options during that weekend, the Spring Weekend committee advertises all the events occurring for the UConn community.


Greek life

Since 2003, the University has taken much stronger steps towards producing a quality fraternity and sorority experience with the addition of university-operated Greek housing in the "Husky Village" area atop Horsebarn Hill and the hiring of a full time staff to deal with fraternity and sorority operations. Currently, 27 Greek organizations have chapters at UConn.[30] The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ...


Athletics

Main article: Connecticut Huskies
UConn Huskies athletic logo

The Connecticut Huskies, also known as the UConn Huskies, are the athletic teams of the University of Connecticut. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links New Big East Conference logo File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


UConn's sports teams, known as the Huskies, participate in the NCAA's Division I-A and in the Big East Conference, except for the men's hockey program, which competes in Atlantic Hockey, and women's hockey, which is a member of Hockey East. Many UConn athletes, including Damani Ralph, Ray Allen, Rebecca Lobo, and Dan Orlovsky, have gone on to success in professional sports. Husky is a general term for several breeds of dogs used as sled dogs. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Big East Conference is a collegiate athletics conference consisting of seventeen universities in the northeastern, southeastern and midwestern United States. ... Atlantic Hockey is a college athletic conference which operates in the northeastern United States. ... Hockey East is a college athletic conference which operates in New England. ... Damani Ralph (born November 6, 1980 in Kingston, Jamaica) is a Jamaican soccer player, who currently plays striker for the Chicago Fire of Major League Soccer. ... Not to be confused with Ray Alan or Allan Ray. ... Image:Rebeccalobo. ... Dan Orlovsky (born August 18, 1983 in Shelton, Connecticut) is a quarterback for the Detroit Lions of the National Football League. ...


Approximately 70% of all UConn student-athletes graduate from the university, and almost 50% maintain a 3.0 GPA. The women's lacrosse team had the second-highest team GPA in the country in 2004, and numerous UConn student-athletes, including former basketball star Emeka Okafor, have been named Academic All-Americans. In 2003, the football team was also honored for being one of only seven schools in the U.S. to graduate 80% or better of its members; it was the only public school on the list. This article is about evaluation of school work. ... The Dive Shot. Lacrosse is a team sport that is played with ten players (mens field), six players (mens box), or twelve players (womens field), each of whom uses a netted stick (the crosse) in order to pass and catch a hard rubber ball with the aim... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Chukwuemeka Ndubuisi Okafor, abbreviated as Emeka Okafor (born September 28, 1982, in Houston, Texas), is an American professional basketball player playing at power forward and center for the Charlotte Bobcats of the National Basketball Association. ...


UConn is best known for having its men's and women's basketball teams consistently ranked in or near the top 10 in the nation in their respective divisions. The men's team won the NCAA Division I title in 1999 and 2004, and the women won in 1995, 2000, 2002, 2003, and 2004. Because of the UConn basketball teams' success, along with its image as a party school, UConn has been called "a drinking school with a basketball problem." In addition to its basketball success, UConn is known for its championship soccer teams, which have the highest average attendance in the nation for both men's and women's teams. The men's team has been the national champion three times (1948, 1981, and 2000), while the women advanced to the NCAA National Championship title game in 2003. This article is about the year. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


UConn football moved up to Division I-A status in 2000 and became a full Big East member in 2004. The Huskies had their first bowl victory in the 2004 Motor City Bowl. Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A bowl game is a post-season college football game, typically at the Division I-A level. ... The Motor City Bowl is a major post-season college football bowl game certified by the NCAA that has been played annually since 1997. ...


Other intercollegiate sports offered are baseball, men's and women's track and field/cross country, field hockey, men's golf, women's rowing, softball, swimming and diving, tennis, and women's volleyball. This article is about the sport. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... The term cross-country, when used by itself, can refer to: Sports Cross-country running, a sport in which teams of runners compete to complete a course over open or rough terrain Cross-country skiing, a winter sport for skiing Fell running also known as hill running and mountain running... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... This article is about the sport. ... A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ...


University symbols

Until 1933, the mascot of UConn had been the Aggies. This was because of the agricultural nature of the University. In 1933, the University changed its name from Connecticut Agricultural College to Connecticut State College. To reflect this change, athletic teams were known as the Statesmen. In December 1934, the Husky was chosen as the mascot.[31] All UConn huskies are named Jonathan in honor of Jonathan Trumbull, and all but the first, a brown and white husky, have been white with one brown eye and one blue eye. The current "real" Jonathan is Jonathan XII; he is often seen greeting fans and eating dog biscuits at sporting events. Jonathan is one of the few university mascots in the nation to have been selected by students via a popular poll. Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full 1934 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Husky is a general term for several breeds of dogs used as sled dogs. ... Gov. ...


"Jonathan's" was the name of a fast food restaurant in the south end of the Student Union building until that section was closed for construction. A statue of Jonathan can also be found outside near the entrances to Gampel Pavilion and the natatorium. This statue, by artist Larry Waisele, was dedicated in 1995. Students are known to rub its nose for good luck.


The UConn fight song, officially titled UConn Husky but commonly called The Husky Fight Song, is one of the most recognizable in the country, due in large part to its frequent playing by the Pride of Connecticut during nationally televised sporting events. Written by Herbert France in the late 1940s, the lyrics to UConn Husky are as follows: A fight song is primarily a sports term, referring to a song associated with a team. ... // The year 1948 marked the formal beginning of the bands at the University of Connecticut. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

UConn Husky, symbol of might to our foe
Go, fight Connecticut / Connecticut, let's go (let's go!)
UConn Huskies,
Do it again for the white and blue
So go (fight!) - go (fight!) - go (fight!) - win
Connecticut, Connecticut U
C - O - N - N - E - C - T - I - C - U - T, Connecticut
Connecticut Huskies, Connecticut Huskies, Connecticut
C - O - N - N - U

(repeat)


A Macromedia audio presentation of UConn Husky is available on the UConn Alumni Association website.[32] A full history of the song can be found on the UConn Advance website.[33] Macromedia was an American graphics and web development software house headquartered in San Francisco, California producing such products as Macromedia Flash. ...


The colors of UConn are white and national flag blue, though small amounts of red often appear on athletic uniforms. The Pantone standard for the exact shade of blue used is #281. For the record label, see Pantone Music. ...


The visual symbol of the university is the oak tree. This is because the Latin word for oak, robur, also refers to moral and physical strength. The oak leaf appears on the university symbol and next to the word UConn on official letterhead. Species See List of Quercus species The term oak can be used as part of the common name of any of several hundred species of trees and shrubs in the genus Quercus (from Latin oak tree), and some related genera, notably Cyclobalanopsis and Lithocarpus. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


Facilities

Utilities

Because it is situated in a fairly rural area, the UConn campus at Storrs has facilities that allow it to be virtually self-sufficient. These include a waste treatment plant, a large natural gas generator which provides the entire campus with electricity, and a water filtration plant which is supplied by the nearby Mansfield Hollow reservoir. Like many UConn facilities, these three are also used for live research and as test environments for students who are engaged in related fields.


Libraries

The University of Connecticut Libraries form the largest public research collection in the state of Connecticut.


The main library is the Homer D. Babbidge Library at the Storrs campus, which underwent a $3 million renovation that was completed in 1998, making it then the largest public research library in New England.[34] The Storrs campus is also home to the university's Music and Pharmacy libraries, as well as the Thomas J. Dodd Research Center, home to the university's archives and special collections, including international, federal, and state document and manuscript collections. Each of the regional campuses also have their own libraries, including the Jeremy Richard Library at UConn-Stamford and the Trecker Library in West Hartford. These libraries are tied into the Babbidge library through a shared catalogue.


The Babbidge-based collection, which places UConn among the top 30 universities in the nation for both library holdings and funding, contains more than 2.5 million print volumes; approximately 2,500 current print periodicals; more than 35,000 unique electronic journals available through the eJournal locator;[35] 2.8 million units of microform; 180,000 maps at the Map and Geographic Information Center (New England's largest public map collection); thousands of electronic books; and an array of free electronic information sources. The UCL also license approximately 265 electronic search databases,[36] many of which contain the full-text of research journals, monographs, and historic documents.


The Lyman Maynard Stowe Library, which is housed at the University of Connecticut Medical Center, is one of eight federally-funded National Network of Libraries of Medicine libraries.[37] The University of Connecticut School of Law houses the School of Law Library at its campus in Hartford. The Stowe and Law libraries have catalogues separate from the Babbidge system, making the total library holdings of the University of Connecticut much higher than the 2.5 million print volumes of Babbidge.[38] The University of Connecticut School of Law is a public law school located in Hartford, Connecticut and is the only public law school in Connecticut and among only two in New England. ...


Additionally, UConn is the home of the Roper Center for Public Opinion Research, which is the world's most comprehensive survey and public opinion data library.[39]


In addition to their own libraries, UConn participates in outside library consortiums, including the New England Law Library Consortium. The Dodd Research Center has also formed a partnership with the African National Congress to share materials with South African scholars. For political parties with similar names in other countries, see Northern Rhodesian African National Congress and Zambian African National Congress. ...


Athletics

Gampel Pavillion: A prospective student tour group is shown the Women's Basketball championship banners

The most notable athletic facilities are: Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 1192 KB)University of Connecticut, Gampel Pavillion. ... Download high resolution version (2304x1536, 1192 KB)University of Connecticut, Gampel Pavillion. ...

Gampel Pavilion is a 10,167-seat multi-purpose arena in Storrs, Connecticut. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Hartford Civic Center Coliseum is an indoor arena in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Nickname: Location in Hartford County, Connecticut Coordinates: , Country State NECTA Hartford Region Capitol Region Named 1637 Incorporated (city) 1784 Consolidated 1896 Government  - Type Mayor-council  - Mayor Eddie Perez Area  - City  18. ... Rentschler Field is a stadium in East Hartford, Connecticut. ... East Hartford (41n47, 72w37 EST) is a town located in Hartford County, Connecticut. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...

Improvement projects

UConn 2000 was a public-private partnership to rebuild, renew and enhance the University of Connecticut from 1995 to 2005. It was paid for by the State of Connecticut, UConn's students, and private donations. UConn 2000 was enacted by the Connecticut General Assembly in 1995 and signed into law by Governor John G. Rowland. The construction projects were overseen by President Philip E. Austin. The legislature continued the construction investment through 21st Century UConn. Several projects resulted in financial problems and many of the new buildings had fire code violations. These problems were investigated by a special committee organized by Governor Jodi Rell. Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... John Grosvenor Rowland (born May 24, 1957) was the Governor of Connecticut from 1995 to 2004. ... The 13th president of the University of Connecticut (UConn). ... Connecticut welcome sign, updated with new governors name as Rell takes office on July 1, 2004 Mary Jodi Rell (born June 16, 1946) is a Republican politician who became the 72nd Governor of the U.S. state of Connecticut on July 1, 2004. ...


21st Century UConn is the continuation of UConn 2000 and is another billion dollar construction investment by the state of Connecticut to upgrade facilities at the University of Connecticut. It passed the Connecticut General Assembly and was signed into law by Governor Rowland in 2002. By the time of the project's completion, every building on campus will be either new or completely renovated. Official language(s) English Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Largest metro area Hartford Area  Ranked 48th  - Total 5,543[2] sq mi (14,356 km²)  - Width 70 miles (113 km)  - Length 110 miles (177 km)  - % water 12. ... The Connecticut General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of Connecticut. ... John Grosvenor Rowland (born May 24, 1957) was the Governor of Connecticut from 1995 to 2004. ...


Through these two programs, UConn's facilities, especially on the Storrs campus, have been dramatically improved. Some facilities, specifically those housing the chemistry department and the Student Union, have frequently been cited as among the most advanced in the nation. Money has also been put into the regional and satellite campuses, such as the new School of Business facility in downtown Hartford.


University people

The UConn seal This is a list of notable alumni and faculty from the University of Connecticut. ...

External links

References

  1. ^ Academic Programs and Degrees
  2. ^ Minors. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  3. ^ College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  4. ^ College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  5. ^ College of Continuing Studies. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  6. ^ Graduate School, University of Connecticut. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  7. ^ Neag School of Education. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  8. ^ School of Allied Health. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  9. ^ School of Nursing. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  10. ^ UConn School of Business. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  11. ^ School of Dental Medicine. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  12. ^ University of Connecticut School of Medicine. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  13. ^ School of Engineering. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  14. ^ Office of International Affairs. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  15. ^ School of Family Studies. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  16. ^ School of Social Work. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  17. ^ Ratcliffe Hicks School of Agriculture. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  18. ^ School of Pharmacy, University of Connecticut. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  19. ^ School of Fine Arts. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  20. ^ "University of Connecticut." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  21. ^ "Points of Pride, 2006-2007." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  22. ^ "America's Best Colleges: University of Connecticut." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  23. ^ "America's Best Colleges: National Universities." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  24. ^ "Points of Pride, 2006-2007." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  25. ^ "Future Students: New England Regional Student Program." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  26. ^ "Transfer Information." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  27. ^ "University of Connecticut: Admission." Acccessed August 3, 2007.
  28. ^ Spring weekend
  29. ^ Spring Weekend embarrassing from The Daily Campus. Retrieved on August 3, 2007.
  30. ^ http://www.greeklife.uconn.edu
  31. ^ A Piece of UConn History/From Aggies To Statesmen - 1933 - April 19, 2004. Retrieved on January19, 2007.
  32. ^ UConn Alumni Association - UConn Spirit. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  33. ^ A Piece of UConn History/UConn Husky Fight Song - April 5, 1999. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  34. ^ "UConn community fetes renovated library." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  35. ^ University of Connecticut Libraries/eJournal locator
  36. ^ University of Connecticut Libraries/Research Database Locator: Find Articles & More
  37. ^ "UConn School of Medicine." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  38. ^ "UConn Employee Handbook: Libraries." Accessed August 3, 2007.
  39. ^ "University of Connecticut-Storrs." Accessed August 3, 2007.

  Results from FactBites:
 
CampusChamps.com - University of Connecticut Athletics (685 words)
University of Connecticut sophomore Emeka Okafor has been chosen as the 2002-03 National Defensive Player of the Year by the National Association of Basketball Coaches (NABC), while UConn Head Coach Jim Calhoun has been selected to receive the prestigious Metropolitan Award from the NABC.
The University of Connecticut women’s lacrosse team was honored by the Intercollegiate Women’s Lacrosse Coaches Association for the team’s academic merit off the playing field.
Erin Rice of the University of Connecticut women's soccer team was chosen to represent UConn at the seventh annual NCAA Leadership Conference.
University of Connecticut - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2868 words)
The University of Connecticut, commonly known as UConn, is the State of Connecticut's land-grant university.
The main university campus is located in Storrs, Connecticut, which is a division of the Town of Mansfield, approximately 28 miles (45 km) east of Hartford, the state's capital.
During the 1960s, the University of Connecticut Health Center was established in Farmington as a home for the new School of Medicine and School of Dental Medicine.
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