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Encyclopedia > University of Chicago
The University of Chicago

Motto: Crescat scientia; vita excolatur (Latin for "Let knowledge grow from more to more; and so be human life enriched.")[1]
Established: 1890 by John D. Rockefeller
Type: Private nondenominational coeducational
Endowment: US $6.2 billion[2]
President: Robert Zimmer
Faculty: 2,168
Staff: 14,772 employees (includes Medical Center)
Undergraduates: 4,901
Postgraduates: 9,820
Location: Chicago, Illinois
Campus: Urban, 211 acres (850,000 m²)
Colors: Maroon and White            
Nickname: Maroons
Mascot: Phoenix
Athletics: NCAA Division III UAA
Website: www.uchicago.edu
The University of Chicago Logo

The University of Chicago is a private university located principally in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. Incorporated in 1890 by the American Baptist Education Society, the school has traditionally dated its founding to July 1, 1891, when William Rainey Harper became President and first member of the faculty; the oil magnate John D. Rockefeller is officially designated "Founder." The University of Chicago held its first classes on October 1, 1892.[3] Chicago was one of the first universities in the United States to be conceived as a combination of the American interdisciplinary liberal arts college and the German research university. University of Chicago may refer to: The University of Chicago, an elite private university located in the Hyde Park neighborhood of Chicago. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... One thousand million (1,000,000,000) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Robert Zimmer, Jr. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (140,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The University of Chicagos intercollegiate sports teams are called the Maroons (after the color), and they compete in the NCAAs Division III. They are primarily members of the University Athletic Association and were co-founders of the Big Ten Conference in 1895. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... This article is about the Chicago community area. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Rainey Harper ( 1856- 1906) Noted academic; organizer and first President of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. ... John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ...


Affiliated with 81 Nobel Prize laureates, the University of Chicago is widely regarded as one of the world's foremost universities. Historically, the university is noted for the unique undergraduate core curriculum pioneered by Robert Hutchins in the 1930s, and for influential academic movements such as the Chicago School of Economics, the Chicago School of Sociology, and the Law and Economics movement in legal analysis. The University of Chicago was the site of the world's first man-made self-sustaining nuclear reaction. It is also home to the Committee on Social Thought, an interdisciplinary graduate research program, and to the largest university press in the United States.[4] The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia Universitys Columbia College. ... Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899, Brooklyn, New York – May 17, 1977, Santa Barbara, California) was an educational philosopher, a president (1929–1945) of the University of Chicago and its chancellor (1945–1951). ... The Chicago school of economics is a school of thought favoring free-market economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago in the middle of the 20th century. ... In sociology and, later, criminology, the Chicago School (sometimes described as the Ecological School) refers to the first major body of works emerging during the 1920s and 1930s specialising in urban sociology, and the research into the urban environment by combining theory and ethnographic fieldwork in Chicago, now applied elsewhere. ... Law and economics, or economic analysis of law is an approach to legal theory that applies methods of economics to law. ... In nuclear physics, a nuclear reaction is a process in which two nuclei or nuclear particles collide to produce products different from the initial particles. ... The Committee on Social Thought, one of several PhD-granting committees at the University of Chicago, was started in 1941 by the historian John U. Nef along with economist Frank Knight, anthropologist Robert Redfield, and University President Robert Maynard Hutchins. ...

Contents

Campus

Hyde Park campus

The Midway Plaisance, with several towers of the Main Quadrangle.
The Midway Plaisance, with several towers of the Main Quadrangle.

The University of Chicago is principally located seven miles (11 km) south of downtown Chicago, in the Hyde Park and Woodlawn neighborhoods. The campus is bisected by Frederick Law Olmsted's Midway Plaisance, a large linear park created for the 1893 World's Fair. While the bulk of the campus is located north of the Midway, some of the professional schools are located south of the Midway. The quadrangles of the main campus feature a botanical garden and neo-Gothic buildings constructed mostly out of limestone in the late 19th century. The tallest building is Rockefeller Chapel, designed by Bertram Goodhue. Buildings of the original quadrangles were deliberately patterned after the layouts of Oxford University and Cambridge University. Mitchell Tower, for example, is a smaller-sized reproduction of Oxford's Magdalen Tower,[5] and the University Commons, Hutchinson Hall, is a duplicate of Oxford's Christ Church Hall.[6] Image File history File links MidwayView1. ... Image File history File links MidwayView1. ... Midway Plaisance is a linear park located near Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois approximately 5 miles from the downtown Loop area. ... The Loop is what locals call the historical center of downtown Chicago. ... This article is about the Chicago community area. ... Woodlawn, located in the South Side of Chicago, Illinois, USA, is one of 77 well defined Chicago community areas. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... Midway Plaisance is a linear park located near Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois approximately 5 miles from the downtown Loop area. ... World Columbian Exposition, Chicago, 1893 The World Columbian Exposition (also called The Chicago Worlds Fair), a Worlds fair, was held in Chicago in 1893 to celebrate the 400th anniversary of Christopher Columbuss discovery of the New World. ... Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Gothic Revival architecture. ... For other uses, see Limestone (disambiguation). ... The carillon tower of the Rockefeller Chapel. ... Goodhue by Lee Lawrie, holding the Rockefeller Chapel, Chicago, Illinois Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue (April 28, 1869–April 23, 1924) was a renowned American architect celebrated for his work in neo-gothic design. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... Magdalen Tower, as seen from nearby Founders Tower Magdalen Great Tower is a bell tower in Oxford, England. ... Interior of Hutchinson Hall Hutchinson Hall at the University of Chicago is modelled, nearly identically, on the hall of Christ Church, one of Oxford Universitys constituent colleges. ... and of the Christ Church College name Christ Church Latin name Ædes Christi Named after Jesus Christ Established 1546 Sister college Trinity College, Cambridge Dean The Very Revd Christopher Andrew Lewis JCR president Laura Ellis Undergraduates 426 GCR president Tim Benjamin Graduates 154 Location of Christ Church within central Oxford...


Contemporary buildings have attempted to complement the style of the original architecture. Notable examples include the Laird Bell Law Quadrangle by Eero Saarinen, the School of Social Service Administration by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and the Robie House by Frank Lloyd Wright. The largest modern addition is the Regenstein Library, designed by architect Walter Netsch and constructed on the grounds of the former Stagg Field, the site of the world's first nuclear reaction. Saarinens Gateway Arch frames The Old Courthouse, which sits at the heart of the city of Saint Louis, near the rivers edge. ... Ludwig Mies van der Rohe born Maria Ludwig Michael Mies (March 27, 1886 – August 17, 1969) was a German architect. ... The Frederick C. Robie House or simply the Robie House is a Registered Historic Place in the city of Chicago, Illinois. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher from Oak Park, Illinois. ... The Joseph M. Regenstein Library is the main library of the University of Chicago, named after industrialist and philanthropist Joseph Regenstein. ... Walter Netsch (1920-) is a German-American architect based in Chicago. ... Stagg Field was a stadium in Chicago, Illinois. ... The Metallurgical Laboratory or Met Lab at the University of Chicago was part of the World War II–era Manhattan Project, created by the United States to develop an atomic bomb. ...


The Hyde Park campus is also home to the Oriental Institute, an internationally renowned archeology museum and research center for ancient Near Eastern studies. The Institute is housed in an unusual Gothic and Art Deco building designed by the architectural firm Mayers Murray & Phillip. The Museum has artifacts from digs in Egypt, Israel, Syria, Turkey, Iraq, and Iran. Notable possessions include the famous Megiddo Ivories, various treasures from Persepolis, the old Persian capital, a 40-ton human-headed winged lamassu from Khorsabad, the capital of Sargon II, and a monumental statue of King Tutankhamun. The Art-Deco doors of the Oriental Institute, sculpture by Ulric Ellerhusen Head of a bull that once guarded the entrance to the Hundred-Column Hall in Persepolis The Oriental Institute (OI), established in 1919, is the University of Chicagos archeology museum and research center for ancient Near Eastern... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... The Near East is a term commonly used by archaeologists and historians, less commonly by journalists and commentators, to refer to the region encompassing the Levant (modern Israel, Jordan, Syria and Lebanon), Anatolia (modern Turkey), Mesopotamia (Iraq and eastern Syria), and the Iranian Plateau (Iran). ... The western facade of Reims Cathedral, France. ... Asheville City Hall. ... The architectural firm of Mayers Murray & Phillip was the successor of Goodhue Associates after Bertram Goodhues unexpected death in 1924. ... The Megiddo Ivories are thin carvings in ivory found at the tel of Megiddo in modern-day Israel. ... This article is about the ancient city. ... Anthem SorÅ«d-e MellÄ«-e Īrān Â² Capital (and largest city) Tehran Official languages Persian Demonym Iranian Government Islamic Republic  -  Supreme Leader  -  President Unification  -  Unified by Cyrus the Great 559 BCE   -  Parthian (Arsacid) dynastic empire (first reunification) 248 BCE-224 CE   -  Sassanid dynastic empire 224–651 CE   -  Safavid dynasty... In Akkadian mythology the shedu were a type of demons, but they were demons of a benevolent nature, protective spirits of the houses, palaces and cities. ... Khorsabad (Khursabad), village in Iraq, 15 km northeast of Mosul, with well-preserved ruins of the large, rectangular Dur-Sharrukin. ... Sargon II (right), king of Assyria (r. ... King Tut redirects here. ...


Across the street from the Oriental Institute is the Seminary Co-op bookstore, located in the basement of the Chicago Theological Seminary. The Co-op stocks the largest selection of academic volumes in the United States.[7] Seminary Cooperative Bookstores, Inc. ... Chicago Theological Seminary is an ecumenical seminary of the United Church of Christ. ...

A recent two billion dollar campaign has brought unprecedented expansion to the campus, including the unveiling of the Max Palevsky Residential Commons, the Gerald Ratner Athletics Center, a new hospital and a new science building. The Jules and Gwen Knapp Center for Biomedical Discovery, a ten-story medical research center, as well as further additions to the medical campus are currently under construction.[8] In the next stage of its campaign, the university plans to revamp and consolidate residence halls, some of which are far from campus and aging poorly. A new residence hall south of the midway is expected to open in September 2009.[9] Download high resolution version (1007x661, 769 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Download high resolution version (1007x661, 769 KB)This is a file from the Wikimedia Commons, a repository of free content hosted by the Wikimedia Foundation. ... The Frederick C. Robie House or simply the Robie House is a Registered Historic Place in the city of Chicago, Illinois. ... Frank Lloyd Wright (June 8, 1867 – April 9, 1959) was an American architect, interior designer, writer, educator, and philosopher from Oak Park, Illinois. ... The Gerald Ratner Athletics Center is a $51 million state-of-the-art athletics facility within the University of Chicago campus in the Hyde Park neighborhood. ...


Satellite campuses

The University of Chicago also maintains a number of facilities apart from its main campus. The university's Graduate School of Business maintains campuses in Singapore, London and in downtown Chicago, while the Paris Center, a campus located on the left bank of the River Seine in Paris, hosts various undergraduate and graduate study programs. The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, also known as Chicago GSB, is one of the world’s leading business schools and the second oldest in the United States. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The left bank of a river is the bank on the left when looking in the direction of flow towards the sea. ... This article is about the river in France; it should not be confused with the Senne, a much smaller river that flows through Brussels. ... This article is about the capital of France. ...


The university's Yerkes Observatory, constructed in 1897 and located in Williams Bay, Wisconsin, is home to the largest refracting telescope ever built.[10] Although Yerkes was never able to match the observation conditions afforded by the mountaintop location of its main competitor, the Lick Observatory, the telescope was a leader in astrophysics. Yerkes was the first telescope to determine the spiral structure of the Milky Way Galaxy and the first to observe carbon in stellar spectra. 1897 photo of the 102 cm (40 inch) refractor at the Yerkes Observatory. ... Williams Bay is a village located in Walworth County, Wisconsin. ... Paris 1900 exposition refractor. ... The Lick Observatory is an astronomical observatory, owned and operated by the University of California. ... The Milky Way (a translation of the Latin Via Lactea, in turn derived from the Greek Galaxia Kuklos; or simply the Galaxy) is a barred spiral galaxy in the Local Group, and has special significance to humanity as the location of the solar system, which is located near the Orion... High resolution spectrum of the Sun showing thousands of elemental absorption lines (fraunhofer lines). ...


History

Much of the information below is adapted from the University of Chicago's official website.


Founding

The University of Chicago was founded by the American Baptist Education Society and oil magnate John D. Rockefeller, who later called it "the best investment I ever made."[11] The University's founding was part of a wave of university foundings that followed the American Civil War. Incorporated in 1890, the University has dated its founding as July 1, 1891, when William Rainey Harper became its first president. The first classes were held on October 1, 1892, with an enrollment of 594 students and a faculty of 120, including eight former college presidents.[12] John Davison Rockefeller, Sr. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... William Rainey Harper ( 1856- 1906) Noted academic; organizer and first President of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Westward migration, population growth, and industrialization had led to an increasing need for elite schools away from the East Coast, especially schools that would focus on issues vital to national development. Though Rockefeller was urged to build in New England or the Mid-Atlantic region of the United States, he ultimately chose Chicago. His choice reflected his strong desire to realize Thomas Jefferson's dream of a natural meritocracy's rise to prominence, determined by talent rather than familial heritage. Rockefeller's early fiscal emphasis on the physics department showed his pragmatic, yet deeply intellectual, desires for the school. Regional definitions vary from source to source. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States of America, located in the northeastern section of the country, includes the following states and district: Delaware Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Washington, D.C. West Virginia Virginia These areas provided the young United States with heavy industry and served as... Thomas Jefferson (13 April 1743 N.S.–4 July 1826) was the third President of the United States (1801–09), the principal author of the Declaration of Independence (1776), and one of the most influential Founding Fathers for his promotion of the ideals of Republicanism in the United States. ...


Though founded under Baptist auspices, the University of Chicago has never had a sectarian affiliation. The school's traditions of rigorous scholarship were established primarily by Presidents William Rainey Harper and Robert Maynard Hutchins. Chicago opened its door to women and minorities from the very beginning, a time when they seldom had access to other leading universities. It was the first major university to enroll women on an equal basis with men,[13] as well as the first major, predominantly white university to offer a black professor a tenured position, in 1947.[14] Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is... William Rainey Harper (1856-1906) Noted academic; organizer and first President of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...

Ryerson Physical Laboratory, located on the Main Quadrangles.
Ryerson Physical Laboratory, located on the Main Quadrangles.

Unlike many other American universities at the time (with the notable exception of Johns Hopkins University), the University of Chicago revolved around a number of graduate research institutions, following Germanic precedent. The College of the University of Chicago remained quite small compared to its East Coast peers until around the middle of the 20th century. Image File history File links UChicago_Spring. ... Image File history File links UChicago_Spring. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Responsibility for educational oversight in Germany has to lie primarily with the states while the federal government only has a minor role. ... Many offices and classes of the College are located in the heart of the campus. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


As a result, the graduate population of the university dwarfs the undergraduate population 2:1 to this day, while the university's undergraduate student body remains the third smallest amongst the top 10 national universities. The student-to-faculty ratio is 4:1, one of the lowest amongst national universities, and all faculty members are required to teach undergraduate courses.[15][16]


Presidency of Robert M. Hutchins

During his presidency, Robert Maynard Hutchins met with the president of rival Northwestern University to discuss the future of the two institutions through the Depression and the looming war. Hutchins concluded that, in order to secure the future of both universities, it was in the best interest of both for the two campuses to merge as the "Universities of Chicago", with Northwestern's campus serving as the site for undergraduate education and the Hyde Park campus serving as the graduate studies campus. President Hutchins' vision for what he hoped would become the preeminent university in the world was eventually undermined by Northwestern University's board of trustees, a result that Hutchins called "one of the lost opportunities of American education."[17] Northwestern University (NU) is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university with campuses located in Evanston, Illinois and downtown Chicago. ... For other uses, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ...


Starting in the 1930s, the university conducted a more successful experiment on the college. To make the university a preeminent undergraduate academic institution, administrators decided to implement President Hutchins' philosophy of Secular Perennialism. This led to the innovation of the common core, an educational strategy in which students read original source materials rather than textbooks, and discuss them in small groups using the Socratic method rather than a lecture approach.[18] The common core is still an important feature of Chicago's undergraduate education. In addition to pioneering this new undergraduate curriculum, the university took steps to eliminate "distractions" such as varsity sports, fraternities, and religious organizations. This attracted free-thinkers such as Carl Sagan and Kurt Vonnegut to the university. The university succeeded in eliminating all varsity sports for 20 years and all but five fraternities (Alpha Delta Phi, Delta Upsilon, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, and Psi Upsilon), although three of the eliminated fraternities were re-chartered in the 1980's (Alpha Epsilon Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, and Sigma Phi Epsilon). Perennialists believe that one should teach the things of everlasting importance to all people everywhere. ... The common core is the University of Chicagos implementation of the Great books program for its college. ... Socratic Method (or Method of Elenchus or Socratic Debate) is a dialectic method of inquiry, largely applied to the examination of key moral concepts and first described by Plato in the Socratic Dialogues. ... Freethought is a philosophical viewpoint that holds that beliefs should be formed on the basis of science and logical principles and not be comprised by authority, tradition, or any other dogma. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ...


Science at Chicago

In addition to its contributions to higher education, the University of Chicago made significant contributions to 20th century science. In 1909 Professor Robert Millikan performed the historic oil-drop experiment in the Ryerson Physical Laboratory on the university campus.[19] This experiment allowed Millikan to calculate the charge of an electron and paved the way for the theory of quantum mechanics in the 1940s. The American Physical Society now designates Ryerson Laboratory a historic physics site.[20] The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868 – December 19, 1953) was an American experimental physicist who won the 1923 Nobel Prize for his measurement of the charge on the electron and for his work on the photoelectric effect. ... The purpose of Robert Millikan and Harvey Fletchers oil-drop experiment (1909) was to measure the electric charge of the electron. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... For a generally accessible and less technical introduction to the topic, see Introduction to quantum mechanics. ...


As part of the Manhattan Project, University of Chicago chemists, led by Glenn T. Seaborg, began to study the newly manufactured radioactive element plutonium. The George Herbert Jones Laboratory was the site where, for the first time, a trace quantity of this new element was isolated and measured in September 1942. This procedure enabled chemists to determine the new element's atomic weight. Room 405 of the building was named a National Historic Landmark in May 1967.[21] This article is about the World War II nuclear project. ... Glenn Theodore Seaborg (April 19, 1912 – February 25, 1999) won the 1951 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discoveries in the chemistry of the transuranium elements,[1] contributed to the discovery and isolation of ten elements, developed the actinide concept and was the first to propose the actinide series which led... This article is about the radioactive element. ... The George Herbert Jones Laboratory, at 5747 S. Ellis Avenue, Chicago, Illinois, is a facility building of the University of Chicago. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ...

Henry Moore's Atomic Energy on the site of the first self sustained nuclear chain reaction.
Henry Moore's Atomic Energy on the site of the first self sustained nuclear chain reaction.

On December 2, 1942, scientists achieved the world's first self-sustained nuclear reaction at Stagg Field on the campus of the university under the direction of professor Enrico Fermi. A sculpture by Henry Moore marks the spot, now deemed a National Historic Landmark, where the nuclear reaction took place. Stagg Field has since been demolished to make way for the Regenstein Library. Reclining Figure (1951) outside the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, is characteristic of Moores sculptures, with an abstract female figure intercut with voids. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Metallurgical Laboratory or Met Lab at the University of Chicago was part of the World War II–era Manhattan Project, created by the United States to develop an atomic bomb. ... Stagg Field was a stadium in Chicago, Illinois. ... Fermi redirects here. ... Reclining Figure (1951) outside the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, is characteristic of Moores sculptures, with an abstract female figure intercut with voids. ... This article or section needs additional references or sources to improve its verifiability. ... The Joseph M. Regenstein Library is the main library of the University of Chicago, named after industrialist and philanthropist Joseph Regenstein. ...


In addition to its groundbreaking work in physics, the University of Chicago is recognized for numerous other important scientific discoveries.[22] These include A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...

Radiocarbon dating is the use of the naturally occurring isotope of carbon-14 in radiometric dating to determine the age of organic materials, up to ca. ... Willard Frank Libby (December 17, 1908 – September 8, 1980) was an American chemist, famous for his role in the development of radiocarbon dating, a process which revolutionised archaeology. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... For other uses, see jet stream (disambiguation). ... Rapid eye movement (REM) is the stage of sleep during which the most vivid (though not all) dreams occur. ... Liver transplantation is the replacement of a diseased liver with a healthy liver allograft. ... The experiment The Miller-Urey experiment (or Urey-Miller experiment) was an experiment that simulated hypothetical conditions present on the early Earth and tested for the occurrence of chemical evolution. ... For other uses, see Agent Orange (disambiguation). ... An herbicide is used to kill unwanted plants. ... Combatants Republic of Vietnam United States Republic of Korea Thailand Australia New Zealand The Philippines National Front for the Liberation of South Vietnam Democratic Republic of Vietnam People’s Republic of China Democratic Peoples Republic of Korea Strength US 1,000,000 South Korea 300,000 Australia 48,000...

1950s–1980s

In the early 1950s, student applications declined as a result of increasing crime and poverty in the Hyde Park neighborhood. In response, the university became a major sponsor of a controversial urban renewal project for Hyde Park, which profoundly affected both the neighborhood's architecture and street plan. For details of this urban renewal effort, see Hyde Park. Urban Renewal redirects here. ... This article is about the Chicago community area. ...

The Rockefeller Chapel, the tallest structure on campus.
The Rockefeller Chapel, the tallest structure on campus.

In 1955, the University of Chicago became the birthplace of improvisational comedy with the formation of the undergraduate comedy troupe, the Compass Players.[24] Image File history File links Rockefeller_Chapel. ... Image File history File links Rockefeller_Chapel. ... The carillon tower of the Rockefeller Chapel. ... Improvisational comedy (also called improv) is comedy that is performed with a little to no predetermination of subject matter and structure. ... The Second City is a long-running improvisational comedy troupe based in the Old Town area of Chicago, Illinois, with offshoot troupes in other cities, most notably Toronto. ...


In 1959, the university’s literary journal the Chicago Review, edited by Irving Rosenthal and Paul Carroll, published excerpts from William S. Burroughs’ experimental novel Naked Lunch. The material appeared in the Spring 1958 edition. The university was criticized for publishing fiction deemed obscene by a columnist in the Chicago Daily News and suppressed the Winter 1959 issue, which contained more material from the Naked Lunch manuscript. The university administration fired Rosenthal and Carroll, who regarded the university's attempt at suppressing Naked Lunch as censorship.[25] Paul Carroll was an American poet and the founder of the Poetry Center of Chicago. ... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: William S. Burroughs William Seward Burroughs II (February 5, 1914) — August 2, 1997; pronounced ), more commonly known as William S. Burroughs, was an American novelist, essayist, social critic, painter and spoken word performer. ... Naked Lunch is a novel by William S. Burroughs. ... Obscenity has several connotations. ... For other uses, see Censor. ...


The University experienced its share of student unrest during the 1960s, beginning in 1962, when students occupied President George Beadle's office in a protest over the University's off-campus rental policies. In 1969, more than 400 students, angry about the dismissal of a popular professor, Marlene Dixon, occupied the Administration Building for two weeks. After the sit-in ended, when Dixon turned down a one-year reappointment, 42 students were expelled and 81 were suspended, [26] the most severe response to student occupations of any American university during the student movement.[27] A few months later, junior professor and SDS founder Richard Flacks was attacked in his office by an unknown assailant, and nearly beaten to death.[28]


In 1978, Hanna Holborn Gray, then the provost of Yale University, became President of the University of Chicago, the first woman ever to serve as the president of a major research university. Hanna Holborn Gray (born 1930), is a historian of political thought in the Renaissance and Reformation, and an American educator. ... Yale redirects here. ...


1990s–present

Max Palevsky Residential Commons
Max Palevsky Residential Commons

In 1990, the Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR) was created after the passage of the Chicago School Reform Act that decentralized governance of the city's public schools. Researchers at the University of Chicago joined with researchers from Chicago Public Schools and other organizations to form CCSR with the imperative to study this landmark restructuring and its long-term effects. Since then CCSR has undertaken research on many of Chicago's school reform efforts, some of which have been embraced by other cities as well. Thus, CCSR studies have also informed broader national movements in public education. Chicago Public Schools, commonly abbreviated as CPS by local residents and politicians, is a school district that controls over 600 public elementary and high schools in Chicago, Illinois. ... Education reform is a plan or movement which attempts to bring about a systematic change in educational theory or practice across a community or society. ...


In 1999, then-President Hugo Sonnenschein announced plans to relax the university's famed core curriculum, reducing the number of required courses from 21 to 15. When The New York Times, The Economist, and other major news outlets picked up this story, the university became the focal point of a national debate on education. The National Association of Scholars, for example, released a statement saying, "It is truly depressing to observe a steady abandonment of the University of Chicago's once imposing undergraduate core curriculum, which for so long stood as the benchmark of content and rigor among American academic institutions."[29] The changes were ultimately implemented, but the controversy led to Sonnenschein's resignation in 2000. Hugo F. Sonnenschein is a prominent American economist and educational administrator. ... The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia Universitys Columbia College. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ...


In 2006, the University of Chicago's Oriental Institute became the center of controversy when U.S. federal courts ruled to seize and auction its valuable collection of ancient Persian artifacts, the proceeds of which would go to compensate the victims of a 1997 bombing in Jerusalem that the United States claims was funded by Iran. The ruling threatens the university's invaluable collection of ancient clay tablets held by the Oriental Institute since the 1930s but officially owned by Iran. The Oriental Institute (OI) is the University of Chicagos archeology museum and research center for ancient Near Eastern studies. ... The United States federal courts are the system of courts organized under the Constitution and laws of the federal government of the United States. ... Chicagos Persian heritage crisis (تاراج سرمايه باستانی ايران در شيکاگو in Persian) refers to a threat to seize invaluable Persian antiquities kept at the University of Chicago by the United States federal courts and also a threat to numerous other Persian antiquities kept in the Field museum in Chicago. ... For other uses of this term see: Persia (disambiguation) The Persian Empire is the name used to refer to a number of historic dynasties that have ruled the country of Persia (Iran). ... On February 4, 1948, as the conflict over the coming partition of Palestine grew, three car bombs arranged by Arab irregulars exploded on Ben Yehuda Street, a main avenue in Jewish Jerusalem, killing 52 Jewish civilians and leaving 123 injured. ... Small tablets made out of clay were used from late 4th millennium BC onwards as a writing medium in Sumerian, Mesopotamian, Hittite, and Minoan/Mycenaean civilizations. ...


In 2007, the University of Chicago received an anonymous alumni donation of $100 million. The donation will be used as the cornerstone of a $400 million undergraduate student aid initiative. Beginning in the fall of 2008, students will be eligible for enhanced financial aid packages called Odyssey Scholarships, which will eliminate student loans entirely among students whose annual family income is less than $60,000 and will eliminate half the student loan packages among students whose annual family income is between $60,000 and $75,000. The College expects nearly a quarter of the entire College population to benefit from the program.[30]


Academics

Jones and Kent Halls covered in snow on the central quads.
Jones and Kent Halls covered in snow on the central quads.

Image File history File links Snowy_UChicago. ... Image File history File links Snowy_UChicago. ...

Specific programs

The University of Chicago's economics department is particularly well-known. In fact, an entire school of thought (the Chicago School of Economics) bears its name. Led by Nobel Prize laureates such as Milton Friedman, Ronald Coase, George Stigler, Gary Becker, Robert Lucas, James Heckman, Robert Fogel, and Roger Myerson, the university's economics department has played an important role in shaping ideas about the free market.[31] The Chicago School of Economics is also famous for applying economic principles to every aspect of human life, as demonstrated by University of Chicago Professor Steven Levitt in his best-selling book, Freakonomics. Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... The Chicago school of economics is a school of thought favoring free-market economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago in the middle of the 20th century. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... Ronald Harry Coase (b. ... George Joseph Stigler (1911 - 1991) was a U.S. economist. ... Gary Stanley Becker (born December 2, 1930) is an economist and a Nobel laureate. ... Robert Emerson Bob Lucas, Jr. ... James Heckman (born April 19, 1944) is an economist at the University of Chicago. ... Robert William Fogel (born July 1, 1926) is an American economic historian and scientist, and winner (with Douglass North) of the 1993 Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel. ... Roger Bruce Myerson (born March 29, 1951) is an American economist and co-winner, with Leonid Hurwicz and Eric Maskin, of the 2007 Nobel Prize in Economics for having laid the foundations of mechanism design theory. ... A free market is an idealized market, where all economic decisions and actions by individuals regarding transfer of money, goods, and services are voluntary, and are therefore devoid of coercion and theft (some definitions of coercion are inclusive of theft). Colloquially and loosely, a free market economy is an economy... The Chicago school of economics is a school of thought favoring free-market economics practiced at and disseminated from the University of Chicago in the middle of the 20th century. ... Steven Levitt Steven Levitt (born May 29, 1967) is prominent American economist best known for his work on crime, in particular on the link between legalized abortion and crime rates. ... Freakonomics: A Rogue Economist Explores the Hidden Side of Everything is a 2005 book by University of Chicago economist Steven Levitt and New York Times journalist Stephen J. Dubner that has been described as melding pop culture with economics. ...


The university is also known for creating the first sociology department in the United States, which later gave birth to the Chicago School of Sociology. Scholars affiliated with this school are considered pioneers in the field and include Albion Small, George Herbert Mead, Robert E. Park, W. I. Thomas, and Ernest Burgess.[32] Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the scientific or systematic study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social interaction, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... In sociology and, later, criminology, the Chicago School (sometimes described as the Ecological School) refers to the first major body of works emerging during the 1920s and 1930s specialising in urban sociology, and the research into the urban environment by combining theory and ethnographic fieldwork in Chicago, now applied elsewhere. ... Albion Woodbury Small (May 11, 1854 - 1926) founded the first Department of Sociology in the USA at the University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois in 1892. ... George Herbert Mead (February 27, 1863 – April 26, 1931) was an American philosopher, sociologist and psychologist, primarily affiliated with the University of Chicago, where he was one of several distinguished pragmatists. ... Robert Ezra Park (February 14, 1864–February 7, 1944) was an American urban sociologist, one of the main founders of the original Chicago School of sociology. ... W.I. and D.S. Thomas wrote several watershed articles on the influence of social situations on individual behavior. ... Ernest W. Burgess (May 16, 1886 - December 27, 1966) was an urban sociologist at the University of Chicago. ...


The university is home to several committees for interdisciplinary scholarship, the most famous of which is the Committee on Social Thought. One of several Ph.D-granting committees at the university, it was started in 1941 by University of Chicago president Robert Maynard Hutchins along with historian John U. Nef, economist Frank Knight, and anthropologist Robert Redfield. The committee is interdisciplinary, but it is not centered on any specific topic. Since its inception, the committee has drawn together noted academics and writers to "foster awareness of the permanent questions at the origin of all learned inquiry".[33] Members of the committee have included Hannah Arendt, T. S. Eliot, David Grene, Leo Strauss, Allan Bloom, Friedrich von Hayek, Leon Kass, Mark Strand, Wayne Booth, Joseph Rutherford Hicks, and J.M. Coetzee.[33] The Committee on Social Thought, one of several PhD-granting committees at the University of Chicago, was started in 1941 by the historian John U. Nef along with economist Frank Knight, anthropologist Robert Redfield, and University President Robert Maynard Hutchins. ... Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899, Brooklyn, New York - May 17, 1977, Santa Barbara, California) was a philosopher. ... Frank Hyneman Knight (November 7, 1885 - April 15, 1972) was an important economist of the twentieth century. ... Robert Redfield (1897-1958) was an American anthropologist and ethnolinguist. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... David Grene (1913-2002) was a professor of classics at the University of Chicago from 1937 until his death. ... Leo Strauss (September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973), was a German-born Jewish-American political philosopher who specialized in the study of classical political philosophy. ... Allan Blooms translation and interpretation, Second edition 1991. ... Friedrich von Hayek Friedrich August von Hayek (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an economist and social scientist of the Austrian School, noted for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against a rising tide of socialist and collectivist thought in the mid... Leon Kass Leon Kass (born February 12, 1939) is an American bioethicist, best known as a leader in the effort to stop human embryonic stem cell and cloning research as former chair of the Presidents Council on Bioethics from 2002–2005. ... Mark Strand (born April 11, 1934) is an American poet, born in Canada. ... Wayne C. Booth (February 22, 1921 - October 10, 2005) is an American literary critic. ... J.M. Coetzee John Maxwell Coetzee (pronounced coot-SEE-uh) is a South African author. ...


The Council on Advanced Studies in the Social Sciences and Humanities administers over seventy interdisciplinary workshops, which provide a forum for graduate students, faculty, and visiting scholars to present scholarly work in progress. The council is composed of faculty from the Social Sciences and Humanities divisions and the Divinity School who set policy for the council and approve new workshops for funding. The focus of the workshops varies depending on the interests of the student and faculty participants, but tend to focus on a thematic, geographic, temporal area of study.[34]


In 1983, the University of Chicago implemented the University of Chicago School Mathematics Project, a comprehensive mathematics program for students from kindergarten through twelfth grade. Today, an estimated 3.5 to 4 million students in elementary and secondary schools in every state and virtually every major urban area are now using UCSMP materials.[35] The University of Chicago School Mathematics Project (UCSMP) was founded in 1983 at the University of Chicago with the aim of upgrading mathematics education in elementary and secondary schools throughout the United States. ...


Divisions and schools

Eckhart Hall, located on the East Quadrangles.
Eckhart Hall, located on the East Quadrangles.

The University of Chicago currently maintains twelve units: the College, four divisions of graduate research, six professional schools, and the Graham School of General Studies. The University of Chicago also operates the Library, the Press, the Lab Schools, and the Hospitals. Image File history File links Eckhart_Hall. ... Image File history File links Eckhart_Hall. ... The College is the sole undergraduate institution and one of the oldest components of the University of Chicago, emerging contemporaneously with the university at large in 1892. ...


Faculty and students at the adjacent Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago also collaborate closely with the university.[36] Although formally unrelated, the National Opinion Research Center (NORC) is also located on the campus, and many faculty members and graduate students hold research appointments at NORC. In 2003 Toyota opened the Toyota Technological Institute at Chicago, jointly with the University of Chicago. ... The National Opinion Research Center (NORC),established in 1941, is one of the largest and highly respected national social research organizations in the United States. ...


The university also operates the University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (from day care through high school, founded by John Dewey and considered one of the leading preparatory schools in the United States), the Hyde Park Day Schools (for the learning disabled of otherwise exceptional ability), and the Orthogenic School (a residential treatment program for those with behavioral and emotional problems).[37] The university also administers two unaffiliated public charter schools on the South Side of Chicago. The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (also Lab School and abbreviated UCLS; the upper classes are nicknamed U-High) is a private, co-educational day school in Chicago, Illinois. ... Day care is the care of a child during the day by a person other than the childs parents or legal guardians, often someone outside the childs immediate family. ... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... A university-preparatory school or college-preparatory school (usually abbreviated to preparatory school, college prep school, or prep school) is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... In the United States, a charter school is a school that is created via a legal charter. ... The Victory Monument in the Black Metropolis-Bronzeville District is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. ...


The University of Chicago Press is the largest university press in the country.[4] It publishes a wide array of scholarly and academic texts, including the influential Chicago Manual of Style, as well as several academic journals, including Critical Inquiry. The University of Chicago Press is the largest university press in the U.S. It is operated by the University of Chicago and publishes a wide variety of academic titles, including The Chicago Manual of Style, dozens of academic journals including Critical Inquiry, and a wide array of texts covering... A university press is an academic, nonprofit publishing house that is typically affiliated with a large research university. ... The Chicago Manual of Style (CMS) is a highly regarded style guide for American English, dealing with questions of style, manuscript preparation, and, to a lesser degree, usage. ... Critical Inquiry is a peer-reviewed journal in the humanities published out of the University of Chicago. ...


The University of Chicago's library system is also one of the largest in the country. The university's Regenstein Library is committed to providing physical, "browsable" access to print books in a single location, rather than relying on offsite storage as many libraries do. In 2005, funding was approved for the construction of a 308,000-square-foot (28,600 m²) addition to the library to accommodate an expansion of its collection. When the expansion is complete, the Regenstein will contain the largest browsable collection of print volumes in the United States.[38] The university expects to finish construction by winter of 2009.[39] The "Reg", as it is commonly called by students, is noted for its exceptional breadth and depth of material. In its 2007 rankings, the Princeton Review ranked it among the top college libraries in the country.[40] The Joseph M. Regenstein Library is the main library of the University of Chicago, named after industrialist and philanthropist Joseph Regenstein. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


The John Crerar Library is recognized as one of the best libraries in the country for research and teaching in the sciences, medicine, and technology and maintains more than 1.3 million volumes in the biological, medical and physical sciences as well as collections in general science and the philosophy and history of science, medicine, and technology.[41] Students in the College have access to all of the university’s special libraries, including the D’Angelo Law Library, Yerkes Observatory Library for astronomy and astrophysics, the Social Service Administration Library, and the Eckhart Library for mathematics and computer science.[16] The John Crerar Library at the University of Chicago is recognized as one of the best libraries in the country for research and teaching in the sciences, medicine, and technology. ...


Chicago also operates a number of off-campus scientific research institutions, including the Argonne National Laboratory, part of the United States Department of Energy's national laboratory system. The university also owns and operates the Oriental Institute and has a stake in the Apache Point Observatory in Sunspot, New Mexico. It is also a founding member of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation. Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. ... The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... The Oriental Institute (OI) is the University of Chicagos archeology museum and research center for ancient Near Eastern studies. ... The Apache Point Observatory is located in the Sacramento Mountains in Sunspot, New Mexico (USA) 18 miles south of Cloudcroft. ... Sunspot is an area in the Sacramento Mountains in Otero County, New Mexico, 18 miles south of Cloudcroft, New Mexico. ... Official language(s) None Spoken language(s) English 68. ... The Committee on Institutional Cooperation, established in 1958, is a consortium of twelve universities (the eleven members of the Big Ten Conference and the University of Chicago) committed to advancing academic excellence by promoting and coordinating collaborative activities and sharing resources. ...


In February 2006, the University of Chicago announced its bid for a U.S. Department of Energy contract to obtain complete management rights to the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, which maintains the Tevatron, the world's highest-energy particle accelerator. Fermilab is currently one of the world's preeminent centers for research in the fields of elementary particle physics and astrophysics.[42] On November 1, 2006, the Department of Energy announced that the Fermi Research Alliance, LLC (FRA), led by the University of Chicago, would manage Fermilab for five years starting January 1, 2007. The FRA is a partnership between the Universities Research Association (URA) and the University of Chicago. Based on its performance, the FRA may be entitled to renew this contract without competition for up to 20 years. The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is a Cabinet-level department of the United States government responsible for energy policy and nuclear safety. ... Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory located in Batavia near Chicago, Illinois is a U.S. Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics, operated for the Department of Energy by the Universities Research Association (URA). ... Tevatron is a circular particle accelerator (or synchrotron) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in Batavia, Illinois. ... Particle physics is a branch of physics that studies the elementary constituents of matter and radiation, and the interactions between them. ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

Divisions

  • Biological Sciences
  • Humanities
  • Physical Sciences
  • Social Sciences

Schools

Other Academic Institutions
The College is the sole undergraduate institution and one of the oldest components of the University of Chicago, emerging contemporaneously with the university at large in 1892. ... The University of Chicago Divinity School is a graduate institution at the University of Chicago dedicated to the training of academics and clergy across religious boundaries. ... The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, also known as Chicago GSB, is one of the world’s leading business schools and the second oldest in the United States. ... The Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies is one of the nations leading graduate schools devoted to public policy research, analysis, and training. ... The University of Chicago Law School, having recently celebrated its centennial in the 2002-2003 school year, has established itself as a high profile part of the University of Chicago. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration (SSA) is one of the worlds leading school’s for the training of social worker’s, ranking 3rd (US News) and 1st according to the (Gourman Report). ...

Title VI Area Centers
Aerial photo of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. ... Aerial view of the Fermilab site. ... The University of Chicago Laboratory Schools (also Lab School and abbreviated UCLS; the upper classes are nicknamed U-High) is a private, co-educational day school in Chicago, Illinois. ... The University of Chicago Hospitals are a set of hospitals located in Chicago, Illinois. ... 1897 photo of the 102 cm (40 inch) refractor at the Yerkes Observatory. ...

  • Center for Middle Eastern Studies
  • Center for International Studies
  • Center for Latin American Studies
  • Center for East Asian Studies
  • Center for South Asian Studies
  • Center for Russian and Eastern European Studies

The Center for Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Chicago is a National Resource Center for the study of a region extending from Morocco in the West to Kazakhstan in the East. ...

Undergraduate college

Buildings such as these within the main quadrangle epitomize the neo-Gothic architecture that is present throughout the campus.
Buildings such as these within the main quadrangle epitomize the neo-Gothic architecture that is present throughout the campus.


The College of the University of Chicago grants Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science degrees in 52 majors and 14 minors in the biological, physical, and social sciences, as well as in the humanities and interdisciplinary areas. A major may provide a comprehensive understanding of a well-defined field, such as anthropology or mathematics, or it may be an interdisciplinary program such as African and African-American studies, environmental studies, biological chemistry, or cinema and media studies. A full list of offered majors and minors is available within the college's main article. Many offices and classes of the College are located in the heart of the campus. ... Image File history File links AQuadBuilding1. ... Image File history File links AQuadBuilding1. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ... Many offices and classes of the College are located in the heart of the campus. ...


Undergraduate students must undergo a rigorous core curriculum, the goal of which is to impart an education that is both timeless and a vehicle for interdisciplinary debate. Students must take courses designed to foster critical skills in a broad range of academic disciplines, including history, literature, science, mathematics, writing, and critical reasoning. Core curriculum classes at Chicago contain no more than 25 students and are generally led by a full-time professor (as opposed to a teaching assistant).[43] Currently, 15 courses are required in addition to tested foreign language proficiency if no Advanced Placement or International Baccalaureate examinations are used for exemption (a reduction of six quarter credits may be achieved via this method). The Core Curriculum was originally developed as the main curriculum used by Columbia Universitys Columbia College. ... A teaching assistant (TA) is a junior scholar employed on a temporary contract by a college or university for the purpose of assisting a professor by teaching students in recitation or discussion sessions, holding office hours, grading homework or exams, supervising labs (in science and engineering courses), and sometimes teaching...


While the science curriculum has largely followed the intellectual evolution of its respective fields, the requisite humanities and social science sequences now have several variants that encompass non-Western, non-canonical, and critical theory texts.[44] The majority of undergraduate courses are small, discussion-based seminars, and undergraduate students routinely take their upper-level courses alongside graduate students. A seminar is, generally, a form of academic instruction, either at a university or offered by a commercial or professional organization. ...


First-year students are assigned to one of 38 houses through the university's house system. House sizes range from 25 to 100 members but typically consist of no more than 70 students. The house system serves as the focal point of university life, and each house offers amenities such as kitchens, common areas, and study rooms. A significant portion of the undergraduate student body, however, lives off-campus, and relocation amongst the houses is not uncommon. The House System is a traditional feature of British schools, similar to the collegiate system of a university. ...


Rankings and reputation

The entrance to Mandel Hall, a Victorian-style theater that acts as a concert and assembly venue for students.
The entrance to Mandel Hall, a Victorian-style theater that acts as a concert and assembly venue for students.

Comprehensively, the University of Chicago is ranked: 9th among world universities and 8th among universities in North America by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University,[45] 7th among world universities and 4th in North America by the Times Higher Education Supplement on the basis of peer review,[46][47][48] and 20th among "global" universities by Newsweek on the basis of scholarly achievements and "international diversity".[49] Image File history File links UChicago_Door. ... Image File history File links UChicago_Door. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


The 2008 edition of U.S. News and World Report ranks the undergraduate program 9th among national universities (tied with Columbia University).[50] Meanwhile, in its 2007 publication, "The Best 361 Colleges", the Princeton Review ranked the University of Chicago 1st in the country in the category of "best overall academic experience for undergraduates," the ranking being retired in 2008. Such performance, measured over time, has led Newsweek to note that the College is viewed as a "powerhouse" amongst the old guard of elite schools [3]. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Alma Mater Columbia University is a private university in the United States and a member of the Ivy League. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


As for professional schools, in 2007 rankings the Graduate School of Business ranges from 5th in the country[51] to 1st in the country [4]. US News ranks the School of Law 6th (tied with University of Pennsylvania), [52] the Harris School of Public Policy 7th in policy analysis[53] as well as 7th in social policy,[54] the School of Medicine 15th in the country,[55] and the School of Social Service Administration 3rd. The University of Chicago Divinity School, which offers both academic and ministerial training, is ranked #1 in faculty quality out of all U.S. doctoral programs in religious studies by the National Research Council [5]. The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, also known as Chicago GSB, is one of the world’s leading business schools and the second oldest in the United States. ... The University of Chicago Law School, having recently celebrated its centennial in the 2002-2003 school year, has established itself as a high profile part of the University of Chicago. ... This article is about the private Ivy League university in Philadelphia. ... The Irving B. Harris Graduate School of Public Policy Studies is one of the nations leading graduate schools devoted to public policy research, analysis, and training. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The University of Chicago Divinity School is a graduate institution at the University of Chicago dedicated to the training of academics and clergy across religious boundaries. ...


Nevertheless, the University's strong emphasis on research is reflected in the doctoral level performance of its four non-professional graduate divisions. According to the National Research Council the school was ranked within the United States at: 8th in “arts & humanities,” 11th in “biological sciences,” 7th in “physical sciences and mathematics,” and 5th in “social and behavioral sciences.[6]” In aggregate, 18 programs ranked in the top ten in the nation, the 7th strongest showing[7].-1...


The university operates the University of Chicago Hospitals, which was ranked the 14th best hospital in the country by U.S. News and World Report.[56] It is the only hospital in Illinois ever to be included in the magazine's "Honor Roll" of the best hospitals in the United States.[57] The University of Chicago Hospitals are a set of hospitals located in Chicago, Illinois. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...


Further, the university has also been an incubator for several prominent business ventures, with the world’s first management consultancy, McKinsey & Company,[58] software giant Oracle, and the United States first international corporate law firm, Baker and McKenzie,[59] all having been founded by University of Chicago alumni. McKinsey & Company is a global management consulting firm that focuses on solving issues of concern to senior management in large corporations and organizations. ... Oracle Corporation (NASDAQ: ORCL) is one of the major companies developing database management systems (DBMS), tools for database development, middle-tier software, enterprise resource planning software (ERP), customer relationship management software (CRM) and supply chain management (SCM) software. ... Baker & McKenzie is an international law firm, providing legal advice and services to companies. ...


The University is also ranked first among colleges with fewer than 5,000 students for sending students to the Peace Corps. [60].


Faculty and alumni

Presidents

The quadrangles during wintertime.
The quadrangles during wintertime.

For each president, the University of Chicago commissions a large portrait that is hung in Hutchinson Commons, located in the Reynolds Club, one of the university's central buildings. The presidents of the University of Chicago have been: Image File history File links Snowy_UChicago2. ... Image File history File links Snowy_UChicago2. ...

  1. William Rainey Harper, 1891-1906
  2. Harry Pratt Judson, 1906-1923
  3. Ernest DeWitt Burton, 1923-1925
  4. Max Mason, 1925-1928
  5. Robert Maynard Hutchins, 1929-1951
  6. Lawrence A. Kimpton, 1951-1960
  7. George W. Beadle, 1961-1968
  8. Edward H. Levi, 1968-1975
  9. John T. Wilson, 1975-1978
  10. Hanna Holborn Gray, 1978-1993
  11. Hugo F. Sonnenschein, 1993-2000
  12. Don Michael Randel, 2000-2006
  13. Robert J. Zimmer, 2006-present

William Rainey Harper ( 1856- 1906) Noted academic; organizer and first President of the University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois. ... Harry Pratt Judson (1849 - 1927) was a U.S. educator and historian. ... Ernest DeWitt Burton (1856–1925) was an American biblical scholar, born in Granville, Ohio. ... Charles Max Mason (born October 26, 1877 in Madison, Wisconsin, died March 23, 1961 in Claremont, California) was an American mathematician. ... Robert Maynard Hutchins (January 17, 1899, Brooklyn, New York - May 17, 1977, Santa Barbara, California) was a philosopher. ... ... Beadle won a Nobel Prize in 1958 George Wells Beadle (October 22, 1903 - June 9, 1989) was an American scientist in the field of genetics. ... Edward H. Levi Edward Hirsch Levi (June 26, 1911 – March 7, 2000) was an American academic leader, scholar, and statesman. ... ... Hanna Holborn Gray (born 1930), is a historian of political thought in the Renaissance and Reformation, and an American educator. ... Hugo F. Sonnenschein is a prominent American economist and educational administrator. ... Don Michael Randel is the twelfth and current president of the University of Chicago. ... Robert J. Zimmer. ...

Notable faculty and alumni

According to the official website of the Nobel Foundation, there have been 16 Nobel Prizes awarded to persons of research or on faculty at the university at the time of the award announcement, placing the university behind only Harvard(31), Stanford(18) and MIT(17) [8]. A total of 65 other Nobel Laureates have once been affiliated with the university as students, faculty, visiting professors, or researchers (or some combination of these). Together, the total of 81 laureates is the fourth highest claimed amongst all universities worldwide. For details, see Nobel Prize laureates by university affiliation. The following is a list of people affiliated with the University of Chicago, including alumni, current and former faculty members, students, and others. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ... The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ...


In addition, many Chicago alumni and scholars have won the Fulbright awards[9], see the University’s news service report and, since its inception in 1904, 44 have matriculated as Rhodes Scholars. [10] Fulbright redirects here. ... 1904 (MCMIV) was a leap year starting on a Friday (see link for calendar). ... For alternate uses, see Number 44. ... Rhodes House in Oxford, designed by Sir Herbert Baker. ...

A view of Harper Memorial Library from the Midway Plaisance.
A view of Harper Memorial Library from the Midway Plaisance.

Notable faculty and alumni of the University of Chicago include: political theorist Hannah Arendt; former U.S. Attorneys General John Ashcroft, Ramsey Clark, and Edward H. Levi; current U.S. Senator Barack Obama (D-IL); former Vice President of Taiwan and the Kuomintang Lien Chan; current Governor of New Jersey and former U.S. Senator Jon Corzine (D-NJ); current judges on the U.S. Court of Appeals Richard Posner, Frank Easterbrook, and Douglas Ginsberg; current U.S. Supreme Court justices Antonin Scalia and John Paul Stevens; former U.S. Deputy Secretary of State and former head of the World Bank Paul Wolfowitz; Nobel Prize-winning economists Gary Becker, Milton Friedman, Friedrich Hayek, and Robert Lucas; current Governor of the Bank of Japan Masaaki Shirakawa; acclaimed Nobel Prize-winning writers Saul Bellow and J.M. Coetzee; novelists Kurt Vonnegut, Ralph Ellison, Philip Roth, and Thornton Wilder; Nobel Prize-winning modernist poet and dramatist T. S. Eliot; essayist, award-winning novelist, film maker, poet, and activist Susan Sontag; Nobel Prize-winning physicists Albert Michelson, Robert Millikan, Arthur Compton, and Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar; Nobel Prize-winning physicist and developer of the first nuclear reactor Enrico Fermi; astronomer and pioneer of physical cosmology Edwin Hubble; astronomer and highly successful science popularizer Carl Sagan; prominent philosophers Allan Bloom, Martha Nussbaum, Robert Pippin, Rudolph Carnap, Leszek Kolakowski, Paul Ricoeur, Jean-Luc Marion, and Leo Strauss; internet celebrity Tucker Max; influential philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer John Dewey; philosopher, mathematician, and Nobel Prize-winning writer Bertrand Russell; mathematician André Weil; Nobel-prize winning molecular biologist and co-discoverer of the structure of DNA James Watson; dancer and choreographer Katherine Dunham; composer Philip Glass; historian Francois Furet; Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Seymour Hersh; New York Times columnist David Brooks; Academy Award-winning film director Mike Nichols; Pulitzer Prize-winning film critic Roger Ebert; balloonist and priest Jeannette Piccard; banker and internationalist David Rockefeller; influential anthropologist Marshall Sahlins.[61][62] Image File history File linksMetadata Harper_Midway. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Harper_Midway. ... Midway Plaisance is a linear park located near Lake Michigan in Chicago, Illinois approximately 5 miles from the downtown Loop area. ... Hannah Arendt (October 14, 1906 – December 4, 1975) was a German Jewish political theorist. ... John David Ashcroft (born May 9, 1942) is an American politician who was the 79th United States Attorney General. ... William Ramsey Clark (born December 18, 1927) is a lawyer and activist. ... Edward H. Levi Edward Hirsch Levi (June 26, 1911 – March 7, 2000) was an American academic leader, scholar, and statesman. ... “Barack” redirects here. ... The Kuomintang of China (abbreviation KMT) [1], also often translated as the Chinese Nationalist Party, is a political party in the Republic of China (ROC), now on Taiwan, and is currently the largest political party in terms of seats in the Legislative Yuan, and the oldest political party in the... Dr. Lien Chan Lien Chan (連戰, in pinyin: Lián Zhàn) (born August 27, 1936, in Xian) is a Taiwanese politician. ... Jon Stevens Corzine (born January 1, 1947) is the Governor of New Jersey. ... Richard Allen Posner (born January 11, 1939, in New York City) is currently a judge on the United States Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit. ... Frank Hoover Easterbrook (born 1948) has been a judge on the United States Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals since 1985. ... Douglas Howard Ginsburg (born May 25, 1946) is the Chief Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit. ... Antonin Gregory Scalia (born March 11, 1936[1]) is an American jurist and the second most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ... Paul Dundes Wolfowitz (born December 22, 1943) is a visiting scholar at the American Enterprise Institute, working on issues of international economic development, Africa and public-private partnerships. ... Gary Stanley Becker (born December 2, 1930) is an economist and a Nobel laureate. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... Friedrich August von Hayek, CH (May 8, 1899 in Vienna – March 23, 1992 in Freiburg) was an Austrian-born British economist and political philosopher known for his defense of liberal democracy and free-market capitalism against socialist and collectivist thought in the mid-20th century. ... Robert Emerson Bob Lucas, Jr. ... Saul Bellow, born Solomon Bellows, (Lachine, Quebec, Canada, June 10, 1915 – April 5, 2005 in Brookline, Massachusetts) was an acclaimed Canadian-born American writer. ... J.M. Coetzee John Maxwell Coetzee (pronounced coot-SEE-uh) is a South African author. ... Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. ... Ralph Ellison (March 1, 1913[1] – April 16, 1994) was a scholar and writer. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey[1]) is a famous American novelist. ... Image:Thorntonwilderteeth. ... For other persons named Thomas Eliot, see Thomas Eliot (disambiguation). ... Image needed Susan Sontag (January 16, 1933 – December 28, 2004) was an American essayist, novelist, filmmaker, and activist. ... Albert Abraham Michelson. ... Robert Andrews Millikan (March 22, 1868 – December 19, 1953) was an American experimental physicist who won the 1923 Nobel Prize for his measurement of the charge on the electron and for his work on the photoelectric effect. ... Arthur Holly Compton (September 10, 1892 – March 15, 1962) won the Nobel Prize in Physics (1927) for discovery of the Compton effect named in his honor. ... Chandrasekhar redirects here. ... Fermi redirects here. ... Edwin Powell Hubble (November 20, 1889 – September 28, 1953) was an American astronomer. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Allan Blooms translation and interpretation, Second edition 1991. ... Martha Nussbaum Martha Nussbaum (born Martha Craven on May 6, 1947) is an American philosopher with a particular interest in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, political philosophy and ethics. ... Rudolf Carnap (May 18, 1891 - September 14, 1970) was a German philosopher. ... Photograph of Leszek Kolakowski. ... Paul RicÅ“ur (February 27, 1913 Valence France – May 20, 2005 Chatenay Malabry France) was a French philosopher best known for combining phenomenological description with hermeneutic interpretation. ... Jean-Luc Marion (b. ... Leo Strauss (September 20, 1899 – October 18, 1973), was a German-born Jewish-American political philosopher who specialized in the study of classical political philosophy. ... Tucker Max is an American fratire writer known for chronicling his sexual and drunken exploits on his website, Tuckermax. ... John Dewey (October 20, 1859 – June 1, 1952) was an American philosopher, psychologist, and educational reformer, whose thoughts and ideas have been greatly influential in the United States and around the world. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ... André Weil (May 6, 1906 - August 6, 1998) (pronounced [1]) was one of the greatest mathematicians of the 20th century, whether measured by his research work, its influence on future work, exposition or breadth. ... There is more than one person with the name James Watson: James Watson, participant in the Battle of the Little Bighorn James Watson, author of the novel Talking in Whispers James Watson, U.S. Senator from New York (1797-1801) James Watson, painter of 77 portraits held by the U... Katherine Dunham in 1956 Katherine Mary Dunham (22 June 1909 – 21 May 2006) was an African-American dancer, choreographer, songwriter, author, educator and activist who was trained as an anthropologist. ... Philip Glass (born January 31, 1937) is a three-times Academy Award-nominated American composer. ... François Furet (27 March 1927 - 12 July 1997) is an influential French historian who attacked the way the French Revolution is interpreted by Marxist historians. ... Seymour Myron Sy Hersh (born April 8, 1937 Chicago) is an American Pulitzer Prize winning investigative journalist and author based in Washington, DC. He is a regular contributor to The New Yorker magazine on military and security matters. ... David Brooks (b. ... Mike Nichols (born Michael Igor Peschkowsky) is an Academy Award winning movie director of films such as The Graduate and Whos Afraid of Virginia Woolf?. He was born on November 6, 1931 in Berlin, to a Jewish Russian family. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... Jeannette Ridlon Piccard (5 January 1895 – 17 May 1981) was an American aeronaut who pioneered balloon flight, a teacher, scientist and priest. ... David Rockefeller, Sr. ... Marshall Sahlins (born 1930) is a prominent American anthropologist. ...


Notable fictional faculty and alumni of the University of Chicago include: Harry Burns and Sally Albright (played by Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan) of the 1989 film When Harry Met Sally...(which begins at the University of Chicago); Indiana Jones (played by Harrison Ford) of the Indiana Jones series as well as his professor Abner Ravenwood; Robert and Hal (played by Anthony Hopkins and Jake Gyllenhaal) of the 2005 film Proof, which takes place at the University of Chicago; Jack McCoy (played by Sam Waterston), one of the two main characters in the long-running television series Law & Order; Nathan Zuckerman, Pulitzer-prize winner Philip Roth's literary alter ego; Dr. Josh Keyes (played by Aaron Eckhart) of the 2003 film The Core; Eddie Kasalivich (played by Keanu Reeves) of the 1996 film Chain Reaction; and Brandon Shaw and Philip Morgan (played by John Dall and Farley Granger) of Alfred Hitchcock's 1948 film Rope, based on the infamous University of Chicago duo Leopold and Loeb; Michael Armstrong, played by Paul Newman in the 1966 Hitchcock film "Torn Curtain." Dr. Lawrence Green (played by Jeremy Piven) of the 2003 film "Runaway Jury"; Bryan Woodman (played by Matt Damon) of the 2005 film Syriana; Kate Forster (played by Sandra Bullock) of the 2006 film "The Lake House;" and Gil Grissom (played by William Peterson), the lead forensic scientist in the CBS television series CSI. In Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance, a book by Robert Pirsig, Phaedrus pursues a graduate degree in philosophy, as Pirsig did in actuality; Chicago student Ann Varrick played by Lara Harris in No Man's Land; Chicago student Dan Lynch played by George Newbern who states that Elizabeth Shue is the best looking girl on campus in Adventures in Babysitting. For the American political commentator, see William Kristol. ... Meg Ryan (born November 19, 1961) is an American actress who specializes in romantic comedies but has also worked in other film genres. ... When Harry Met Sally. ... This article is about the fictional character. ... For the silent film actor, see Harrison Ford (silent film actor). ... This article is about the fictional character. ... For the composer, see Antony Hopkins. ... Jacob Benjamin Gyllenhaal[1] (born December 19, 1980) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor. ... Proof is a 2005 film starring Anthony Hopkins, Gwyneth Paltrow, Jake Gyllenhaal, and Hope Davis. ... John James Jack McCoy is a fictional character in the television drama Law & Order, created by Michael Chernuchin and played by Sam Waterston since 1994. ... Samuel Atkinson Waterston (born November 15, 1940) is an Oscar nominated American actor noted particularly for his portrayal of Jack McCoy on the long-running NBC television series Law & Order. ... This article is about the original television series. ... Nathan Zuckerman is a fictional character who has appeared as the narrator or protagonist of (and often functions as an alter ego in) many of Philip Roths dozen or so works of fiction published since the late 1970s. ... Philip Milton Roth (born March 19, 1933, Newark, New Jersey[1]) is a famous American novelist. ... Aaron Edward Eckhart (born March 12, 1968) is a Golden Globe-nominated American film actor. ... The Core (2003) is a science fiction disaster film very loosely based on the novel Core by Paul Preuss. ... Keanu Charles Reeves (pronounced ; born September 2, 1964) is a Canadian actor. ... Chain Reaction is a 1996 film starring Keanu Reeves, Rachel Weisz, Morgan Freeman and Fred Ward. ... John Dall (born May 26, 1918 in New York, New York; died January 15, 1971 in Hollywood, California) was an American actor. ... Actor Farley Granger Farley Granger (born July 1, 1925) is an American actor. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Rope (1948) is an Alfred Hitchcock classic film notable for its single location covered in what appeared to be just a few continuous shots. ... Nathan Leopold (left) and Richard Loeb (center) under arrest Nathan Freudenthal Leopold, Jr. ... This article is about the American actor and race team owner. ... Jeremy Samuel Piven (born July 26, 1965)[1] is a two-time Emmy Award-winning and Golden Globe-nominated American actor. ... This article is about the film. ... Matthew Paige Matt Damon (born October 8, 1970) is an American screenwriter and actor. ... Syriana is a 2005 Academy Award-winning geopolitical thriller film written and directed by Stephen Gaghan. ... Sandra Annette Bullock (born July 26, 1964) is a German-American film actress. ... The Lake House is a 2003 novel by James Patterson, a sequel to When the Wind Blows. ... Gilbert Gil Grissom, Ph. ... Robert Maynard Pirsig (born September 6, 1928) is a popular American novelist. ...

Image File history File links Enrico Fermi, Italian-American physicist, received the 1938 Nobel Prize in physics for identifying new elements and discovering nuclear reactions by his method of nuclear irradiation and bombardment. ... Fermi redirects here. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Milton Friedman (July 31, 1912 – November 16, 2006) was an American Nobel Laureate economist and public intellectual. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (444 × 600 pixel, file size: 147 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Black people University of Chicago Barack... “Barack” redirects here. ... Image File history File linksMetadata John_Paul_Stevens,_SCOTUS_photo_portrait. ... John Paul Stevens (born April 20, 1920) is currently the most senior Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States. ...

Athletics

The "Wishbone C" logo used by the university.
The "Wishbone C" logo used by the university.

Chicago's sports teams are called the Maroons, and their colors are maroon and white. They participate in the NCAA's Division III as members of the University Athletic Association (UAA). At one point, the University of Chicago's football teams (nicknamed the Monsters of the Midway at the time) were among the best in the country, winning seven Big Ten Conference titles from 1899 to 1924, including a national championship in 1905 while playing at the old Stagg Field.[63] The University is also one of only a few schools to be undefeated in football against Notre Dame.[64] In 1935, Chicago's Jay Berwanger was the winner of the first-ever Heisman Trophy, now on display in Ratner Athletic Facility. Reportedly the trophy had been used as a door stop until installation at Ratner. The following year, Berwanger also became the first player to be drafted by the National Football League, although he decided not to play professional football. Image File history File links UChicago_Maroons. ... The University of Chicagos intercollegiate sports teams are called the Maroons (after the color), and they compete in the NCAAs Division III. They are primarily members of the University Athletic Association and were co-founders of the Big Ten Conference in 1895. ... Maroon is a color related to dark red. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The University Athletic Association (UAA) is an athletic conference which competes in the National Collegiate Athletic Associations (NCAA) Division III. Member teams are located in Georgia, Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Ohio and New York. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... Stagg Field was a stadium in Chicago, Illinois. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ... John Jay Berwanger (March 19, 1914 - June 26, 2002) was an American football player born in Dubuque, Iowa. ... Heisman redirects here. ... NFL redirects here. ...


However, the university, a founding member of the Big Ten Conference, de-emphasized varsity athletics in 1939 when it dropped football and withdrew from the league in 1946.[65] The University maintains an academic affiliation with the Big Ten schools through the Committee on Institutional Cooperation, a consortium of one Northeastern and eleven Midwestern research universities. In 1969 it reinstated football as a Division III team, continuing to play its home games at the new Stagg Field. The Maroon football team has won the University Athletic Association (UAA) championship in 1998, 2000, and 2005. Having founded the UAA with Washington University in St. Louis, the Chicago football team has an intense rivalry with the Wash U football team for the traveling trophy known as the "Founder's Cup". There are several other prominent athletic teams at the University, among them swimming and track have preformed excellently, with the Swim Team finishing 5th in the 2008 UAA championships. For other uses of the term Big Ten see Big Ten (disambiguation). ... The Committee on Institutional Cooperation, established in 1958, is a consortium of twelve universities (the eleven members of the Big Ten Conference and the University of Chicago) committed to advancing academic excellence by promoting and coordinating collaborative activities and sharing resources. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Washington University redirects here. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...


The school's mascot is the Phoenix, chosen in honor of the city of Chicago's rebirth after the Great Chicago Fire, and also in honor of the Old University of Chicago, which dissolved due to financial reasons (making the current University of Chicago the second university to carry the name). The gargoyle has become an unofficial mascot of the university, owing to the ubiquitous statues of gargoyles that adorn many of the buildings on campus. Chicago's fight song is Wave the Flag, which was written in 1929. For other mythic firebirds, see Fire bird (mythology). ... Artists rendering of the fire, by John R Chapin, originally printed in Harpers Weekly The Great Chicago Fire was a conflagration that burned from Sunday October 8 to early Tuesday October 10, 1871, killing hundreds and destroying about four square miles in Chicago, Illinois. ... The University of Chicago, now known as the Old University of Chicago, was a Baptist college founded in 1857 by Stephen Douglas. ... Gargoyles redirects here. ... Wave the Flag (For Old Chicago) is the fight song for the University of Chicagos athletic teams, the Maroons. ...


Student organizations

Notable extracurricular groups include the the University's Model United Nations Team, one of the top two teams on the college circuit and the successful of the University's academic teams. In addition to competing, the team also hosts its own college-level conference, ChoMUN, and a high school level conference, MUNUC. University of Chicago College Bowl Team, which has won 118 tournaments and 15 national championships, leading both categories internationally. The Chicago Debate Society has had a top four team at the American Parliamentary Debate Association's National Championship tournament for four out of the past five years. In addition, the college Mock Trial Team has placed in the top ten nationally five out of the past six years and is currently ranked 7th among all programs nationally by the American Mock Trial Association. Churchill College - Cambridge plays York on University Challenge, a televised quizbowl programme. ... The American Parliamentary Debate Association (APDA) is the oldest intercollegiate parliamentary debating association in the United States, and one of two in the nation overall, the other being the National Parliamentary Debate Association (NPDA). ...


The Chicago Society, an undergraduate student organization that brings world leaders to speak on campus, is the University's spearhead organization in bringing major speakers to campus. Chicago Society's most famous event titled "China and the Future of the World" held in the spring of 2006 consisted of a two-day symposium on China's rapid political, economic, and social development and its impact on the world. For the symposium, Chicago Society brought in numerous high-ranking American and Chinese government officials including Wang Guangya, the Chinese ambassador to the UN; Christopher Hill, head of the American delegation in the North Korea six-way talks; and Peter Rodman, U.S. Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs. Chicago Society (founded 2001) is a recognized student organization at the University of Chicago. ... Wang Guangya (王光亚) (b. ... John Edward Christopher Hill (February 6, 1912 _ February 23, 2003) was an English Marxist historian and the author of many history textbooks. ... Peter W. Rodman (born November 24, 1943 in Boston). ...


The university's independent student newspaper is the Chicago Maroon. Founded in 1892, the same year the university was founded, the newspaper is published every Tuesday and Friday.[66] An independent arts-and-features alt-weekly, the Chicago Weekly, is published every Thursday and profiles events in Hyde Park and surrounding South Side communities. Chicago Business, published by students in the Graduate School of Business, was founded in 1978. Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ... The Chicago Maroon is the independent student newspaper of the University of Chicago with a circulation of 7,500. ... The Chicago Weekly is a student-written alternative weekly at the University of Chicago that promotes arts and culture on the South Side of Chicago through coverage and criticism. ... This article is about the Chicago community area. ... The University of Chicago Graduate School of Business, also known as Chicago GSB, is one of the world’s leading business schools and the second oldest in the United States. ...

The University's Reynolds Club, the student center.
The University's Reynolds Club, the student center.

The University of Chicago's University Theater is one of the oldest student-run theatre organizations in the country, involving as many as 500 members of the university community, producing 30 to 35 shows a year, and selling on the order of 10,000 tickets. It also operates Off-Off Campus, one of the University's improv comedy troupes, started in 1986 by Bernard Sahlins, one of the founders of Second City.[67] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1944 × 2592 pixel, file size: 1. ... Improvisational comedy (also called improv or impro) is comedy that is performed with a little to no predetermination of subject matter and structure. ... Second City redirects here. ...


About 8-10% of the undergraduate student body participates in Greek life.[11] There are many fraternities and sororities that have established histories with Chicago, including Alpha Delta Phi, Alpha Epsilon Pi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Delta Upsilon, Lambda Phi Epsilon, Lambda Upsilon Lambda, Phi Delta Theta, Phi Gamma Delta, Psi Upsilon, and Sigma Phi Epsilon (fraternities), as well as Alpha Omicron Pi, Delta Gamma, and Kappa Alpha Theta (sororities).[68] In addition, Alpha Phi Omega, a co-ed national community service fraternity, exists on campus.[69] The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Delta Kappa Epsilon (ΔΚΕ; also pronounced D-K-E or Deke) was founded at Yale College in 1844 by 15 men of the sophomore class who, upon hearing that some but not all of them had been invited to join the two existing societies (Alpha Delta Phi and Psi Upsilon), instead... Delta Upsilon (ΔY) is one of the oldest international, all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities and is the first non-secret fraternity ever founded. ... ΛΦΕ (Lambda Phi Epsilon, also known as Lambdas, LPhiE, LFE) is a nationally-recognized Asian-interest fraternity based in the United States. ... La Unidad Latina, Lambda Upsilon Lambda Fraternity, Incorporated was established on February 19, 1982 in order to address the shortcomings of academic institutions in meeting and addressing the needs of Latino students in higher education. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 107 chapters and 9 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Psi Upsilon (ΨΥ, Psi U) is the fifth oldest college fraternity, founded at Union College in 1833. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Alpha Omicron Pi (ΑΟΠ, AOII) is an international womens fraternity that was founded on January 2, 1897 at Barnard College on the campus of Columbia University in New York. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ...


During the school year, Greek organizations usually throw house parties every weekend, and Alpha Delta Phi hosts "Bar Night" every Wednesday. Along with large parties held off-campus by such groups as the ultimate frisbee team, the Greek organizations are an important part of the school's party scene. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


WHPK, a student-run and University-owned radio station, broadcasts out of the Reynolds Club on the university campus. DJ "JP Chill" has had a rap and hip hop show on WHPK since 1986. It was one of the earliest rap shows in the country and the first in Chicago.[70] WHPK 88. ... A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... DJ or dj may stand for Disc jockey, dinner jacket The DeadJournal website, or Djibouti. ... Rapping is one of the elements of hip hop and the distinguishing feature of hip hop music; it is a form of rhyming lyrics spoken rhythmically over musical instruments, with a musical backdrop of sampling, scratching and mixing by DJs. ... Hip hop music is a style of music which came into existence in the United States during the mid-1970s, and became a large part of modern pop culture during the 1980s. ... For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ...


The Law School is home to one of the three founding chapters of the conservative Federalist Society, and to the 'Antient and Honourable Edmund Burke Society', a conservative debating organization. It is also home to the Edwin F. Mandel Legal Aid Clinic and a large chapter of the progressive American Constitution Society for Law and Policy. The University of Chicago Law School, having recently celebrated its centennial in the 2002-2003 school year, has established itself as a high profile part of the University of Chicago. ... The American Constitution Society for Law and Policy (ACS) is an organization to promote a progressive understanding of the United States Constitution. ...


Traditions

  • Summer Breeze - The university's annual summer carnival and concert. Past musicians who have performed at Summer Breeze include The Roots, Spoon, Wilco, Eminem, Kanye West, Run DMC, They Might Be Giants, Method Man, Moby, Fuel, Nas, Jurassic 5, U2, Talib Kweli, The Violent Femmes, OK Go, Mos Def, and George Clinton.[71]
  • Shake Day - Milkshakes sell for only one dollar every Wednesday at the Reynolds Club.[71] The Einstein Bros. Bagels franchise was allowed to open on campus only after agreeing to adhere to this tradition.
  • Midnight Breakfast - A midnight breakfast is held during every "finals week" of the academic year, attracting students and faculty members alike.[72]
  • Track Team Streak - One night before "finals week," the University of Chicago track team streaks through the Regenstein Library.
  • O-Week - Every year since 1934, the University of Chicago has set time aside before classes begin to provide an introduction to the University for all new students.[73]
  • Kuviasungnerk/Kangeiko - A festival celebrating Chicago in the winter. Often referred to as Kuvia, it entails a variety of events, including ice sculpting, hot chocolate get-togethers, musical performances, faculty fireside discussions, and a rigorous program of early morning exercise (kangeiko, a Japanese tradition of winter training) that culminates in a yoga-influenced "salute to the sun", performed outdoors in freezing temperatures just before the sun rises. [74]
  • The Great Latke-Hamantash Debate - Annually since 1946, a debate is held, mainly between faculty members, not (but nearly) all of whom are Jewish, about the relative merits of latkes and homentashn, the Jewish delicacies associated with Hanukkah and Purim, respectively. The lectures are a great opportunity for ordinarily serious scholars to crack jokes in a mock-serious tone. The best were collected in a book edited by Ruth Fredman Cernea.[75]
  • Virginio Ferrari's Dialogo and May Day. On May Day, students and residents of Hyde Park assemble near Pick Hall to watch the shadow cast by Virginio Ferrari's sculpture. Student legend holds that a hammer and sickle, like that of the flag of the former Soviet Union will be cast on the sidewalk at noon on this date. In fact, the shadow produces a sickle very much like that of the flag and also an object in the position of the hammer but whose shape is not quite so loyal a copy of the flag. [12] [76]
  • Polar Bear Run - Every year a group of students select the coldest day of the winter quarter and volunteers run, preferably naked, from one end of the college campus (Harper building) to the gates in front of the Regenstein Library.
  • Campus folklore - According to a common superstition among university students, stepping on University Seal (located in the main lobby of the Reynolds Club) as an undergraduate will prevent the student from graduating in four years.[77] Another common myth about the university is that nearly 50% of its students marry each other. Finally, if two students kiss on the bridge over the pond inside the main gates of the campus, it is said they will be destined to be wed to each other.

Note: For the 1972 famous album of duo Seals and Crofts, see Summer Breeze (album) For the eponymous famous song, see Summer Breeze (song). ... The Roots, also variously known as The Legendary Roots Crew, The Fifth Dynasty, The Square Roots and The Foundation, are an influential, Grammy-winning hip-hop band based out of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, famed for a heavily jazzy sound and live instrumentation. ... For other uses, see Spoon (disambiguation). ... This article is about the music group. ... Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), better known as Eminem or Slim Shady, is a Grammy and Academy Award-winning American rapper, record producer and actor from the Detroit, Michigan area. ... Kanye Omari West (pronounced /kɑnjɛj/) (born June 8, 1977) is an American record producer and rapper who rose to fame in the mid 2000s. ... Run-DMC is a hip hop crew founded by Jason Jam Master Jay Mizell that included Joseph Run Simmons and Darryl DMC McDaniels. ... This article is about the musical group. ... This article is about Method Man. ... Moby (born Richard Melville Hall, September 11, 1965) is an American songwriter, musician and singer. ... For other uses, see Fuel (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Nas (disambiguation). ... Jurassic 5 was a six- and then later five-piece hip hop group formed in 1994. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Talib Kweli Greene (born October 3, 1975), better known as Talib Kweli, is an American MC from Brooklyn, New York. ... The Violent Femmes are a rock and roll band, originally forming in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in the early 1980s. ... This article or section may contain too much repetition. ... Dante Terrell Smith (born December 11, 1973), better known by his stage name Mos Def, is an American rapper and actor. ... For other persons named George Clinton, see George Clinton (disambiguation). ... Einstein Bros. ... The Great Latke-Hamantash Debate, held annually at the University of Chicago since 1946,[1] is a humorous academic debate about the relative merits and meanings of these two items of Jewish cuisine. ... Potato pancakes or latkes (sometimes spelled latkas) are a dish made predominantly of grated potatoes fried in oil. ... Three homentashn A hamantash (also spelled hamentasch, homentash, homentasch, (h)umentash, pluralized with -en or -n; Yiddish המן־טאַש) is a cookie in Ashkenazi Jewish cuisine recognizable for its three-cornered shape. ... Grand Rabbi Israel Abraham Portugal of Skulen Hasidism lighting Hanukkah lights Hanukkah (‎, alt. ... Purim (Hebrew: פורים Pûrîm lots, related to Akkadian pūru) is a Jewish holiday that commemorates the deliverance of the Jewish people of the ancient Persian Empire from Hamans plot to annihilate them, as recorded in the Biblical Book of Esther (Megillat Esther). ... Viriginio Ferrari is an Italian sculptor, born in Verona and based in Chicago from the middle of the 1960s. ...

Doc Films

Main article: Doc Films
Julius Rosenwald Hall
Julius Rosenwald Hall

Doc Films, founded in 1932 (originally the Documentary Film Group), is the oldest student film society in the country. In Vanity Fair's "Film Snob's Dictionary", Doc Films is described as: "Hard-core beyond words and lay comprehension, the society is populated by 19-year olds who have already seen every film ever made, and boasts its own Dolby Digital-equipped cinema and an impressive roster of alumni that includes snob-revered critic Dave Kehr."[78] Doc Films, or the Documentary Film Group, is on record with the Museum of Modern Art in New York as the longest running student-film group in the United States, founded in 1929 at the University of Chicago. ... American actress Demi Moore, on a typical Vanity Fair cover (August, 1991) Vanity Fair is a glossy American glamour magazine monthly that offers a mixture of articles based on sensational exaggerations, jet-set and entertainment-business personalities, politics, and lies. ...


During the school year, Doc Films screens a different film on every night of the week. Foreign films and documentaries are typically screened on weekdays, while recent, mainstream selections are shown on weekends. Occasionally, Doc Films screens works that have not yet been released to the general public, such as American Gangster, Corpse Bride and Brokeback Mountain. A foreign film is a film from a foreign country. ... Documentary film is a broad category of visual expression that is based on the attempt, in one fashion or another, to document reality. ... Tim Burtons Corpse Bride is a 2005 Academy Award-nominated stop-motion-animation film based loosely on a 19th century Russian-Jewish folktale version of an older Jewish story and set in a fictional Victorian era England. ... This article is about the motion picture. ...


Doc Films has hosted many Hollywood luminaries as guests, including Alfred Hitchcock (Psycho, Vertigo, The Birds), Fritz Lang (Metropolis), and Woody Allen (Annie Hall, Manhattan). In November 2005, director Ang Lee and producer James Schamus visited the University of Chicago to screen the film Brokeback Mountain a month before its American debut, and to participate in a question-and-answer session with students.[79] In January 2007, film director Darren Aronofsky (Requiem for a Dream, Pi) presented a screening of his film The Fountain to students and afterwards, likewise, participated in a question-and-answer session. Most recently, Robert Redford screened Lions for Lambs and held a question and answer session after the screening. ... Sir Alfred Joseph Hitchcock KBE (August 13, 1899 â€“ April 29, 1980) was an iconic and highly influential British-born film director and producer who pioneered many techniques in the suspense and thriller genres. ... Psycho is a 1960 suspense/horror film directed by auteur Alfred Hitchcock from the screenplay by Joseph Stefano about a psychotic killer. ... For other uses of the word, see Vertigo. ... The Birds is a 1963 horror film by Alfred Hitchcock, loosely based on the short story The Birds by Daphne du Maurier. ... Friedrich Christian Anton Fritz Lang (December 5, 1890 – August 2, 1976) was an Austrian-German-American film director, screenwriter and occasional film producer, one of the best known émigrés from Germanys school of Expressionism. ... For other uses, see Metropolis (disambiguation). ... Woody Allen (born Allen Stewart Konigsberg; December 1, 1935) is a three-time Academy Award-winning American film director, writer, actor, jazz musician, comedian and playwright. ... Annie Hall is a 1977 romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a script he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. ... Manhattan is a 1979 romantic comedy film. ... This is a Chinese name; the family name is Li (李) Ang Lee (Chinese: ; pinyin: ) (born October 23, 1954) is an Academy Award-winning film director from Taiwan. ... James Allan Schamus is an American Academy Award nominated, BAFTA Award winning film producer and screenwriter, noted for his work on critically acclaimed independent films such as Safe, The Brothers McMullen and the Academy Award winning film Brokeback Mountain. ... This article is about the motion picture. ... Darren Aronofsky (born February 12, 1969 in Brooklyn, New York) is an American film director, screenwriter and film producer. ... Requiem for a Dream is a 2000 film adaptation of a 1978 novel of the same name. ... Ï€ (or Pi) is a 1998 American psychological thriller directed by Darren Aronofsky. ... The Fountain is a 2006 science fiction/fantasy film directed by Darren Aronofsky that follows three interwoven narratives that take place in the age of conquistadors, the modern-day period, and the far future. ... Robert Redford (born Charles Robert Redford, Jr. ... Lions for Lambs is a new drama film scheduled to be released in 2007 starring Tom Cruise and Meryl Streep. ...


Scavenger Hunt

The annual University of Chicago Scavenger Hunt is a multi-day event in which large teams compete to obtain all of the notoriously esoteric items on a list. Held every May since 1987, it is considered to be the largest scavenger hunt in the world.[80] Established by student Chris Straus, the "Scav Hunt", as it is known among University students, has become one of the university's most popular traditions and has typically pushed the boundaries of absurdity. Qwazy Quad Rally, Scav Hunt 2005, item #38. ... Qwazy Quad Rally, Scav Hunt 2005, item #38. ... A scavenger hunt is a game in which individuals or teams seek to find a number of specific items, or perform tasks, as given in a list. ...


Each year, the scavenger hunt list includes roughly 300 items, each with an assigned point value. The items vary widely and may involve performances, large-scale constructions, and long-distance travel. Teams are generally expected to fall well short of completing half of the list and instead compete for total points earned. The more difficult and time-consuming items earn more points. Notable past items include: a passport stamped by all members of the axis of evil, a nuclear reactor, a Calvinball tournament, a ninja muffin and a cell phone marching band. For more information regarding the Scavenger Hunt, see its official website. For Microsoft Corporation’s “universal login” service, formerly known as Microsoft Passport Network, see Windows Live ID. For other types of travel document, see Travel document. ... For other uses, see Axis of evil (disambiguation). ... Core of a small nuclear reactor used for research. ... Calvin and Hobbes is a comic strip written and illustrated by Bill Watterson, following the humorous antics of Calvin, an imaginative six-year-old boy, and Hobbes, his energetic and sardonic – albeit stuffed – tiger. ... Jiraiya, ninja and title character of the Japanese folktale Jiraiya Goketsu Monogatari. ... Motorola T2288 mobile phone A mobile phone is a portable electronic device which behaves as a normal telephone whilst being able to move over a wide area (compare cordless phone which acts as a telephone only within a limited range). ... An American college marching band on the field (Kansas State University) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching and other movements  â€“ with their musical performance. ...


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Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 178th day of the year (179th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 165th day of the year (166th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 208th day of the year (209th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 40th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Times Higher Education Supplement. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with The Times Higher Education Supplement. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 219th day of the year (220th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 162nd day of the year (163rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Gallery

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixels Full resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 907 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Harper Library at the University of Chicago from across the Midway Plaisance. ... Image File history File links Chicago_sunset. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (768x1024, 702 KB) Licensing I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links ChicagoTrees. ... Image File history File links ChicagoNew3. ... Image File history File links Harper_Library. ... Image File history File links Harper_Towers. ... Image File history File links ChicagoSchool. ...

External links

Official pages

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Chicago Portal
  • Official website
  • Map of the university campus
  • A Student Prospectus – A viewbook for prospective students of the College.
  • Legends, Myths, and Facts – A student primer describing the university.
  • Experience Chicago – A student guide to the city of Chicago.
  • The University of Chicago Virtual Tour – A virtual tour of the campus.
  • The University of Chicago Marketplace – An online marketplace for students and faculty, similar to Craig's List.
  • Prospective Students Advisory Committee website – FAQ about the school and information on overnight visits.
  • University of Chicago Housing & Dining System – Discusses on-campus housing and dining options.
  • Council on Advanced Studies
  • University of Chicago Student Government

Image File history File links Portal. ... Screenshot of craigslist. ...

Student publications

  • Chicago Maroon – Independent student newspaper.
  • Chicago Weekly – Independent student alternative weekly.
  • Chicago Review – Literary magazine published through the Humanities Division.
  • The Midway Review – Independent student journal of political and cultural thought.
  • Chicago Shady Dealer – Student humor newspaper.

Recent cover of Portland, Oregons Willamette Week An alternative weekly is a type of weekly newspaper that eschews comprehensive coverage of general news in favor of opinionated reviews and columns, investigations into edgy topics and magazine-style feature stories highlighting local people and culture. ...

Notable articles

  • New York Times Article: "University of Chicago Comes to a Fork in the Road" – Article about proposed changes in the undergraduate core curriculum. First published in the December 28, 1998 edition of the New York Times.
  • Washington Post Article: "The Question Can Be a Revelation" – Article about the unique essay questions posed by the University of Chicago, in addition to several other schools. First published in the July 6, 2006 edition of the Washington Post.
  • Chicago Tribune Article: "Rated X on campus" – Article about Vita Excolatur, the sex magazine published by University of Chicago undergraduate students. First published in the July 13, 2006 edition of the Chicago Tribune.
  • Freakonomics Blog Entry: "All Roads Really Do Lead to the University of Chicago" – Short entry about one of many unrecorded contributions the University of Chicago has made to daily life.

is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // The Chicago Tribune is a major daily newspaper based in Chicago, Illinois and owned by the Tribune Company. ...

Other resources

  • Chicago Maroon blog – From the editors of the Chicago Maroon.
  • The University of Chicago Magazine blog – From The University of Chicago Magazine.
  • The University of Chicago wiki – Articles about the University of Chicago.
  • University of Chicago is at coordinates 41°47′23″N 87°35′59″W / 41.789611, -87.599639 (University of Chicago)Coordinates: 41°47′23″N 87°35′59″W / 41.789611, -87.599639 (University of Chicago)
For other uses, see Chicago (disambiguation). ... The culture of Chicago, Illinois, is known for various forms of performing arts, such as improvisational comedy, and music, such as Chicago blues and soul. ... Municipal Flag of the City of Chicago The municipal flag of Chicago consists of two blue horizontal stripes on a field of white, each stripe one-sixth the height of the full flag, and placed slightly less than one-sixth of the way from the top or bottom, respectively. ... Chicago, looking North from State and Washington Streets This article is about the history of Chicago, Illinois. ... Night view of the top of The Chicago Board of Trade Building at 141 West Jackson, an address that has twice housed Chicagos tallest building Chicago Landmark is a designation of the Mayor of Chicago and the Chicago City Council for historic buildings and other sites in Chicago, Illinois. ... The neighborhoods of Chicago are less well-defined than Chicagos seventy-seven Community Areas. ... Buckingham Fountain, donated to Chicago in 1927 by Kate Buckingham Anish Kapoors Cloud Gate (commonly known as The Bean) at Chicagos Millennium Park. ... Chicago Public Schools, commonly abbreviated as CPS by local residents and politicians, is a school district that controls over 600 public elementary and high schools in Chicago, Illinois. ... Not to be confused with the Chicago Theatre, aka Chicago Theater, built in 1921, a theater at 175 North State Street The Auditorium Theatre. ... Image File history File links Municipal_Flag_of_Chicago. ... Chicagoland redirects here. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Chicago Med Ctr: For Medical Professionals (587 words)
University of Chicago Aeromedical Network (UCAN): UCAN is the air medical service of the University of Chicago Hospitals.
Managed Care: The University of Chicago Hospitals have developed relationships with many managed care organizations and is committed to delivering high-quality, cost-effective services to enrollees.
Medicine on the Midway: Medicine on the Midway is a publication for alumni, faculty, students and friends of the University of Chicago Biological Sciences Division and Pritzker School of Medicine.
University of Chicago - College Closeup (1815 words)
In addition to the undergraduate liberal arts college, the University of Chicago is composed of four graduate divisions, six graduate professional schools, the extensive library system, the Graham School of General Studies, the Laboratory Schools, and the University of Chicago Press.
Chicago’s undergraduate curriculum is designed to give students the opportunity to fully participate in the intellectual life of a world-renowned research university.
One of the strengths of the University of Chicago is that the campus maintains excellent academic facilities that serve the community as a whole.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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