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Encyclopedia > University of Canterbury

University of Canterbury
Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha

Motto Ergo tua rura manebunt (therefore may your fields remain [unto you])
(Virgil, Eclogues)
Established 1873
Type Public
Chancellor Robin Mann
Vice-Chancellor Roy Sharp
Students 17,779 total
Postgraduates 1,642 graduate
Location Christchurch, New Zealand
Campus Urban
Website http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/
This page is about the New Zealand university. The universities in Canterbury, England, are the University of Kent and Canterbury Christ Church University. The similarly-named, unaccredited institution is Canterbury University of the Seychelles.

The University of Canterbury (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha), New Zealand's second-oldest university, is located in the suburb of Ilam in the city of Christchurch, New Zealand. It offers degrees in Arts, Commerce, Child and Family Psychology, Education, Engineering, Fine Arts, Forestry, Law, Music, Social Work, Speech and Language Therapy, Science, Sports Coaching and Teaching. Coat of Arms for the University of Canterbury The full logo is here This work is copyrighted, and used with permission. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... The Eclogues is one of three major works by the Latin poet Virgil. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Christchurch (Māori: ) is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Affiliations University Alliance Association of Commonwealth Universities European University Association Website http://www. ... Canterbury Christ Church University is a new university based in Kent. ... Canterbury University The Canterbury University of today traces its history to the formation of The Canterbury College of Business Studies founded in England in 1974. ... Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Ilam is a leafy suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand, five kilometres west of the city centre. ... Christchurch (Māori: ) is the regional capital of Canterbury, New Zealand. ... Art education is the area of learning that is based upon the visual, tangible arts—drawing, painting, sculpture, and design in jewelry, pottery, weaving, fabrics, etc and design applied to more practical fields such as commercial graphics and home furnishings. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ... Psychology (from Greek: Literally knowledge of the soul (mind)) is both an academic and applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... A decidous beech forest in Slovenia. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... Professional social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... It has been suggested that Speech-Language Pathology, Speech pathology, Phoniatrics be merged into this article or section. ... Part of a scientific laboratory at the University of Cologne. ... In sports, a coach is an individual involved in the direction and instruction of the on-field operations of an athletic team or of individual athletes. ... In education, teachers are those who teach students or pupils, often a course of study or a practical skill. ...

Contents

Campus

The James Hight building at the University of Canterbury
The James Hight building at the University of Canterbury

The University has a 760,000 square metre main campus at Ilam, a suburb of Christchurch about 5 km from the city centre. Adjacent to the main campus is the University's College of Education, with its own sports fields and grounds. There are six libraries, with the Central Library (Māori: Te Puna Mātauraka o Waitaha) housed in the tallest building on campus, the 11-storey James Hight building. Download high resolution version (1024x768, 120 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 120 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Ilam is a leafy suburb of Christchurch, New Zealand, five kilometres west of the city centre. ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... Māori or Te Reo Māori, commonly shortened to Te Reo (literally the language) is an official language of New Zealand. ...


The University's College of Education maintains additional small campuses in Nelson, Tauranga and Timaru, and teaching centres in Greymouth, New Plymouth, Rotorua and Timaru. The University has staff in regional information offices in Nelson, Timaru, and Auckland. The City of Nelson is situated very close to the centre of New Zealand. ... Tauranga (population 109,100 — 2006 census) is the largest city of the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Timaru is a major port city in the southern Canterbury region of New Zealand, located 160 kilometres south of Christchurch and about 200 kilometres north of Dunedin on the eastern Pacific coast of the South Island. ... Greymouth is the largest town in the West Coast region on the South Island of New Zealand, and the seat of the Grey District Council. ... The 45 metre high Wind Wand on the New Plymouth waterfront New Plymouth is the port and main city in the Taranaki region on the west coast of the North Island of New Zealand. ... Rotorua is a city located on the southern shore of Lake Rotorua in the Bay of Plenty region of the North Island of New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Auckland (disambiguation). ...


There are six Halls of residence: Bishop Julius Hall, College House, Rochester and Rutherford Hall, and University Hall, Sonoda Christchurch Campus and Ilam Village. Halls of residence in British English (commonly referred to as halls, and to a lesser extent hall) are a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students, similar to dormitories in the United States. ... Bishop Julius Hall is an independent residential hall at the University of Canterbury. ... College House is a Hall of Residence associated with the University of Canterbury. ... Rochester and Rutherford Hall is a hall of residence closely located to Canterbury University in Christchurch, New Zealand. ...

The Science Lecture Theatre complex with the top of the Physics & Astronomy and Chemistry building in the background
The Science Lecture Theatre complex with the top of the Physics & Astronomy and Chemistry building in the background

There are four field stations that are administered by the Field Facilities Centre: Download high resolution version (1024x768, 91 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1024x768, 91 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...

  • Cass Field Station - Provides a wide range of environments - montane grasslands, scrub, riverbed, scree, beech forest, swamp, bog, lake, stream and alpine habitats can all be reached by day trips on foot
  • Kaikoura Field Station - Provides a wide range of environments - diverse marine habitats, alpine habitats, Kanuka forests, rivers, lakes
  • Harihari Field Station - Access to native forests, streams
  • Westport Field Station - study of the West Coast of New Zealand in particular mining

There is also an additional field Station run primarily by the University and its project partners in the Nigerian Montane Forests Project - this field station is on the Ngel Nyaki forest edge in Nigeria. The West Coast is one of the administrative regions of New Zealand, located on the west coast of the South Island, and is one of the more remote and most sparsely populated areas of the country. ...


The Department of Physics and Astronomy run their own field laboratory:

The Department of Physics and Astronomy is also involved in the Southern African Large Telescope. Mount John University Observatory (MJUO), New Zealands premier astronomical observatory, is situated at 1,031 meters (3,382) ASL atop Mount John at the northern end of the Mackenzie Basin in the South Island of New Zealand. ... Lake Tekapo is a small town located at the southern end of the lake of the same name in the inland South Island of New Zealand. ... Birdlings Flat is a settlement in Canterbury, close to the shore of Lake Ellesmere. ... For other uses, see Radar (disambiguation). ... Aerial photograph of Scott Base, Ross Island, Antarctica. ... Cracroft Caverns, also known as the Cashmere Caverns, are a series of large chambers in the Cashmere Hills of Christchurch, New Zealand. ... For other uses, see Laser (disambiguation). ... The Southern African Large Telescope (SALT) is a 10 metre (~32. ...

University of Canterbury logo

Image File history File links University_of_Canterbury_logo. ... Image File history File links University_of_Canterbury_logo. ...

Organisation

The Vice-Chancellor is Professor Roy Sharp, who has held this position since 2003. The governing body of the University is the Council. The Council Chair is the Chancellor, who in 2005 is Dr Robin Mann. Also on the council are representatives from the faculties, students and general staff. A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...


The University was restructured in 2004 into four Colleges and a School of Law, administering a number of schools and departments (though a number of departments are involved in cross teaching in numerous academic faculties). In 2007, a fifth College was added with the merging of the Christchurch College of Education into the University. The main constituents of the university structure are:

  • College of Arts, administering:
    • School of Classics and Linguistics
    • School of Culture, Literature and Society
    • School of Fine Arts 1966 Article
    • School of History
    • School of Languages and Cultures
    • School of Māori and Indigenous Studies
    • Centre for Music and Theatre & Film Studies
    • School of Philosophy and Religious Studies
    • School of Political Science and Communication
    • School Social Work and Human Services
    • School of Sociology and Anthropology
  • College of Business and Economics, administering:
    • Accounting, Finance, and Information Systems
    • Economics
    • Management
    • Management Science
    • National Centre for Research on Europe
  • College of Engineering, administering:
    • Civil Engineering
    • Chemical and Process Engineering
    • Computer Science and Software Engineering
    • Electrical and Computer Engineering
    • Mathematics and Statistics
    • Mechanical Engineering
    • Mechatronics Engineering
    • Natural Resources Engineering
    • School of Forestry
  • College of Science, administering:
    • School of Biological Sciences
    • Chemistry
    • Communication Disorders (formerly Speech and Language Therapy)
    • Geography
    • Geological Sciences
    • Physics and Astronomy
    • Psychology
  • College of Education, administering:
    • School of Educational Studies and Human Development
    • School of Māori, Social and Cultural Studies in Education
    • School of Literacies and Arts in Education
    • School of Sciences and Physical Education
  • School of Law

The above are administrative groups - Each College and the School of Law is headed by a Pro-Vice-Chancellor (PVC), who is responsible to the Vice-Chancellor for all activities of the Colleges/School. The PVCs are supported by a College Office providing financial, administrative, academic, and human resources advice to the PVC. Each College also has a College Manager, who acts as the day to day manager of the College. National Centre for Research on Europe The National Centre for Research on Europe is a multi-disciplinary research centre that brings together undergraduates, graduates, post-doctoral fellows and academics from a wide range of academic disciplines to research and study the European Union and Europe-related issues and topics. ... In a university, an assistant to a Vice-Chancellor is called a Pro-Vice-Chancellor (also Pro Vice-Chancellor or Deputy Vice-Chancellor). ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...


In addition to the administrative structure, there are seven faculties in the University: Humanities and Social Sciences, Commerce , Engineering and Forestry, Education, Science, Visual and Performing Arts, and Law. Each faculty consists of the teaching staff of the departments and schools which offer courses that may be part of the particular degree from that faculty. There are also student representatives on the various faculties.


The University is state funded.


Together with the New Zealand government, the University formed the UCi3 ICT Innovation Institute in 2006 to commercialize research and to encourage local high-tech industry. The cluster of technology companies around Christchurch has led to the area being dubbed the Silicon Plains. The UCi3 Innovation Institute is a partnership between the New Zealand government and the University of Canterbury. ...


Students and staff

As of 2007, there were a total of 17,779 students, with 1,642 being Post-Graduates and 1,422 being international students (students who are not New Zealand citizens or residents). There were 601 academic staff and 1,045 general staff. 2007 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The word citizen may refer to: A person with a citizenship Citizen Watch Co. ...


Student Association and Traditions

The University of Canterbury Students' Association (UCSA) is active on campus with its own radio station RDU and magazine Canta. They also run two bars, the 430 seat Ngaio Marsh Theatre, and several cafes around campus. The most popular on-campus bar is The Common Room (known as The Foundry until 2005). The University of Canterbury Students Association (UCSA) has been the elected representative body of the students of University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand since 1894. ... Established in 1930, Canta is the official magazine of the University of Canterbury Students Association (USCA) of the University of Canterbury. ... Ngaio Marsh DBE (April 23, 1895 - February 18, 1982), born Edith Ngaio Marsh was an author and theatre director from New Zealand. ...


There are several academic, sporting, recreational and cultural societies and clubs. The most prominent of these are the University of Canterbury Engineering Society (ENSOC), the Law Society (LAWSOC), the Commerce Society (UCom), as well as the largest non-faculty clubs such as CUBA (Canterbury University Boardriders' Association), CurrySoc, The Gentlemen's Club (The Gentlemen's Club), and KAOS (Killing As Organised Sport). The University of Canterbury Drama Society (Dramasoc) is famous for its 1942-1969 Shakespeare productions under Dame Ngaio Marsh, but regularly performs as an active student and alumni run Arts fixture in the small Christchurch theatre scene. There is also a similarly active Musical Society, MuSoc. The University of Canterbury Engineering Society Inc. ... The University of Canterbury Drama Society (DramaSoc) is a student performing arts club at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Ngaio Marsh DBE (April 23, 1895 - February 18, 1982), born Edith Ngaio Marsh was an author and theatre director from New Zealand. ...


One of the biggest student traditions is the Undie 500. This is an annual car rally from Christchurch to Dunedin run by ENSOC. The only stipulations are that the car must cost under $500, have a sober driver, and be road legal. Decorated Undie 500 vehicle (there is a van behind the facade). ... Dunedin (ÅŒtepoti in Maori) is the second-largest city in the South Island of New Zealand, and the principal city of the region of Otago. ... The University of Canterbury Engineering Society Inc. ... ISO 4217 Code NZD User(s) New Zealand, Cook Islands, Niue, Pitcairn Islands, Tokelau Inflation 2. ...


History

The university was established in 1873 in the centre of Christchurch as Canterbury College, the first constituent college of the University of New Zealand. It was the second institution in New Zealand providing tertiary level education, following the University of Otago which was established in 1869, and the fourth in Australasia. 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Christchurch (disambiguation). ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... The former University of New Zealand existed as New Zealands only degree awarding university from 1870 to 1961. ... The University of Otago (Māori: ) in Dunedin is New Zealands oldest university with over 20,000 students enrolled during 2006. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Australasia Australasia is a term variably used to describe a region of Oceania: Australia, New Zealand, and neighbouring islands in the Pacific Ocean. ...


It was created partly out of the efforts of the Canterbury Museum and Library and Christ's College, which were dissatisfied with the state of higher education in Canterbury.[1] In 1933, the name changed from Canterbury College to Canterbury University College. In 1957 its name was changed again to the present University of Canterbury. Christs College Christs College, Dining Hall, as seen from Rolleston Avenue Christs College, Canterbury is an independent, boys-only, Anglican secondary school in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Year 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ...


Until 1961, the University had been part of the University of New Zealand, and issued degrees in its name. In that year the federal system was dissolved and the University of Canterbury became an independent University issuing its own degrees. Upon the UNZ's demise, Canterbury Agricultural College became a constituent college of the University of Canterbury, becoming Lincoln College.PDF Lincoln College was made independent in 1990, becoming a full university. Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The former University of New Zealand existed as New Zealands only degree awarding university from 1870 to 1961. ... Lincoln University is New Zealands second newest university, formed in 1990 when Lincoln College, Canterbury was made independent of the University of Canterbury. ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Over the period 1961 - 1974, the university campus relocated from the centre of the city to its much larger current site in the suburb of Ilam. The neo-gothic buildings of the old campus are now the site of the Christchurch Arts Centre, a hub for arts, crafts and entertainment in Christchurch. Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the 1974 Gregorian calendar. ... Neo-gothic architecture is an American branch of the Gothic revival style that was imported from England in the 1830s. ... The Christchurch Arts Centre The Christchurch Arts Centre is a hub for arts, crafts and entertainment in Christchurch. ...


Coat of arms

The University inherited the arms of the former Canterbury College.


The "dead sheep" (actually a silver fleece) symbolises the pastoral pursuits of the province of Canterbury, while the plough on the base of the shield symbolises agriculture. The symbols from the at the top are (from left to right) Bishop's pall, an open book and a cross flory. The two crosses represent Canterbury's ecclesiastical connections. As it is an institution of learning, the University's coat of arms does not have a helmet, crest or mantling on its armorial bearings. A pall is a Y shaped heraldic charge. ... A cross is a geometrical figure consisting of two lines or bars intersecting each other at a 90° angle, dividing one or two of the lines in half. ... This article should be transwikied to wiktionary Ecclesiastical means pertaining to the Church (especially Christianity) as an organized body of believers and clergy, with a stress on its juridical and institutional structure. ...


Noted alumni and staff

Rita Angus (12 March 1908 - 27 January 1970) is a New Zealand painter. ... Rosemary Banks has been New Zealands Ambassador to the United Nations since 8 June 2005. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... Dr Donald Thomas Brash (born 24 September 1940), New Zealand politician, served as the Leader of the Opposition and parliamentary leader of the National Party, the countrys main Opposition party from 28 October 2003 to 27 November 2006. ... The Leader of the Opposition in New Zealand is the politician who, at least in theory, leads the Opposition bloc in the New Zealand Parliament. ... The Reserve Bank of New Zealand is the central bank of New Zealand. ... QC can stand for: Air Corridor IATA airline designator Quezon City, a highly urbanized city in the Republic of the Philippines. ... The Law Commission is an independent body set up by Parliament in 1965 to keep the law of England and Wales under review and recommend necessary reforms. ... Michael P. Collins received his B.E. from the University of Canterbury in New Zealand in 1964 and his Ph. ... The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... B. Jack Copeland is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Michael Cullen The Hon. ... Gerald Francis John Jack Dart OBE was a teacher, educational philosopher and playwright who was Headmaster of Ballarat Grammar School in Victoria, Australia from 1942 until 1970. ... Ballarat Grammar School is a grammar school in ballarat. ... Denis Dutton is a professor of philosophy at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. ... Stevan Treleaven Eldred-Grigg Born 1952 is the New Zealand author of nine novels, five history books and several short stories. ... Jock Hobbs (born Michael James Bowie Hobbs on 15 February 1960 in Christchurch) was a New Zealand rugby union player who was an All Blacks flanker who played in 21 tests between 1983 and 1986, with four tests as captain. ... Roy Patrick Kerr (1934- ) is a New Zealand born mathematician who is best known for discovering the famous Kerr vacuum, an exact solution to the Einstein field equation of general relativity, which models the gravitational field outside an uncharged rotating massive object, or even a rotating black hole. ... Euclid, Greek mathematician, 3rd century BC, as imagined by by Raphael in this detail from The School of Athens. ... “Einstein” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Black hole (disambiguation). ... Roger Kerr (b 1944) is the executive director of the New Zealand Business Roundtable, a free-market think-tank based in Wellington, New Zealand. ... The New Zealand Business Roundtable (NZBR), a market-oriented thinktank, operates from Wellington, New Zealand. ... For the American politician, see John A. Key. ... The New Zealand National Party (National or the Nats) currently forms the second-largest (in terms of seats) political party represented in the New Zealand Parliament, and thus functions as the core of the parliamentary Opposition. ... Helensville is a town in the northern North Island of New Zealand. ... Major-General Sir Howard Kippenberger, KBE CB DSO ED, (28 January 1897-1957) was a New Zealand soldier during World War II. // Early Life He was born in Ladbrooks, near Christchurch, the son of a schoolmaster who later became a farmer at Waimate. ... Jordan Luck was the lead singer and songwriter for the New Zealand rock band The Exponents. ... Euan MacLeod (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Dr Julie Maxton is the Registrar, that is head of administration, at Oxford University and a Fellow of University College, Oxford. ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... John McMillan was the Jonathan B. Lovelace professor of economics in Stanford Universitys Graduate School of Business and one of the worlds leading economic theorists and applied microeconomists. ... Sam Neill (born Nigel John Dermot Neill), DCNZM, OBE (born 14 September 1947) is a New Zealand-Australian film and television actor, and owner of the Two Paddocks winery in Central Otago. ... Sir Apirana Ngata Sir Apirana Turupa Ngata (3 July 1874 - 14 July 1950) was a prominent New Zealand politician and lawyer. ... This article is about the Māori people of New Zealand. ... Willam H. Pickering, JPL/NASA Photo Sir William Hayward Pickering ONZ KBE (December 24, 1910—March 15, 2004) was a New Zealand-American who headed Pasadena, Californias Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) for 22 years, retiring in 1976. ... For the singer/songwriter, see Jon Peter Lewis. ... Sir Karl Raimund Popper, CH, FRS, FBA, (July 28, 1902 – September 17, 1994), was an Austrian and British[1] philosopher and a professor at the London School of Economics. ... Philosophy of science is the study of assumptions, foundations, and implications of science, especially in the natural sciences and social sciences. ... Year 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 - 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a nuclear physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... The Christchurch Arts Centre The Christchurch Arts Centre is a hub for arts, crafts and entertainment in Christchurch. ... Feleti Sevele is the Acting Prime Minister of Tonga. ... List of Prime Ministers of Tonga: HRH Crown Prince Tevita Unga (1876–1880) Shirley W. Baker (1880–1890) Hon. ... Nick Smith (born 24 December 1964) is a member of the New Zealand Parliament, a former Cabinet minister, and a former deputy leader of the National Party. ... Kevin Tod Smith (March 16, 1963 - February 15, 2002) was a New Zealand actor best known for playing the God of War, Ares in the television programs Xena: Warrior Princess, Hercules: The Legendary Journeys and Young Hercules. ... Beatrice Muriel Hill Tinsley (1941 - March 23, 1981) was an astronomer and cosmologist whose research made fundamental contributions to our understanding of how galaxies evolve with time. ... For other uses, see Galaxy (disambiguation). ... The Supreme Court of New Zealand is the highest court of appeal in New Zealand, having formally come into existence at the beginning of 2004, and sitting for the first time on 1 July 2004. ... The University of Waikato is located in Hamilton and Tauranga, New Zealand, and was established in 1964. ...

See also


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