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Encyclopedia > University of Cambridge
University of Cambridge

Latin: Universitas Cantabrigiensis
Motto: Hinc lucem et pocula sacra
Literal translation: “From here, light and sacred draughts”. Non-literal: “From this place, we gain enlightenment and precious knowledge”.
Established: c. 1209
Type: Public
Endowment: £4.1 billion (2006, incl. colleges)[1]
Chancellor: HRH The Duke of Edinburgh
Vice-Chancellor: Professor Alison Richard
Staff: 8,614[2]
Students: 18,396[3]
Undergraduates: 12,018[3]
Postgraduates: 6,378[3]
Location: Cambridge, England
Colours:      Cambridge Blue[4]
     
Athletics: The Sporting Blue
Affiliations: Russell Group
Coimbra Group
EUA
LERU
IARU
Website: http://www.cam.ac.uk

The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world. It is regarded as one of the world's premier academic institutions. The name is sometimes abbreviated as Cantab. in post-nominals, a shortened form of Cantabrigiensis (an adjective derived from Cantabrigia, the Latinised form of Cambridge). Download high resolution version (1181x1483, 116 KB)Cambridge University Shield - embossed. ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage, though he retains the Greek flag (white cross... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor¹ Alison Fettes Richard (born in Kent, United Kingdom) is the current Vice_Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Cambridge Blue is the colour commonly used by sports teams from Cambridge University. ... A University Sporting Blue is an award earned by sportsmen and sportswomen at Cambridge, Oxford, and some other universities for competing at the highest level of university sport. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) was launched in January 2006 as a leading co-operative network of 10 international research-intensive universities. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... This article is about the city in England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Map of medieval European universities This is a list of the oldest extant universities in the world. ... Definitions of the Anglosphere vary: Countries in which English is the first language of a large fraction of the population are shown in blue. ... Athletics: The Sporting Blue Affiliations: Russell Group Coimbra Group EUA LERU IARU Website: http://www. ... Post-nominal letters also called Post-nominal initials or Post-nominal titles are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, educational degree, accreditation, office, or honour. ... This article is about the city in England. ...


The University grew out of an association of scholars in the city of Cambridge that was formed, early records suggest, in 1209 by scholars leaving Oxford after a dispute with local townsfolk there.[5] The universities of Oxford and Cambridge are often jointly referred to as Oxbridge. In addition to cultural and practical associations as a historic part of English society, the two universities also have a long history of rivalry with each other. Athletics: The Sporting Blue Affiliations: Russell Group Coimbra Group EUA LERU IARU Website: http://www. ... This article is about the city of Oxford in England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For the English village, see Oxbridge, Dorset. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge, collectively known as Oxbridge, are the two oldest and most famous universities in Britain. ...


The University of Cambridge is a member of the Russell Group, a network of research-led British universities; the Coimbra Group, an association of leading European universities; the League of European Research Universities; and the International Alliance of Research Universities. It is also considered part of the "Golden Triangle", a geographical concentration of UK university research. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The International Alliance of Research Universities (IARU) was launched in January 2006 as a leading co-operative network of 10 international research-intensive universities. ... The Golden Triangle is a group of leading research UK universities. ...


Academically, Cambridge is consistently ranked in the world's top 5 universities.[6][7] It has traditionally been an academic institution of choice of the Royal Family (King Edward VII, King George VI, Prince Henry of Gloucester, Prince William of Gloucester and Edinburgh and Prince Charles were all undergraduates) and has produced 82 Nobel Laureates to date. // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Members of the Royal Family, during the lifetime of the late Queen Mother, on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, of the British Dominions beyond the Seas, and Emperor of India from 22 January 1901 until his death on 6 May 1910. ... George VI (Albert Frederick Arthur George; 14 December 1895 – 6 February 1952) was King of the United Kingdom and the British Dominions from 11 December 1936 until his death. ... The Prince Henry, Duke of Gloucester (Henry William Frederick Albert; 31 March 1900 – 10 June 1974) was a member of the British Royal Family, the third son of George V of the United Kingdom and Queen Mary, and thus uncle to Elizabeth II. He was appointed regent for his niece... His Royal Highness Prince William Frederick, Duke of Gloucester and Edinburgh (January 15, 1776 - November 30, 1834) was a member of the British Royal Family, a great grandson of King George II. Early Life Prince William was born on 15 January 1776 in Rome, Italy. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Nobel Prizes have always been a source of pride for universities, suggesting their excellence in teaching or in providing research opportunities. ...

Contents

Organisation

Left to Right: The Senate House, Gonville & Caius College and the University Church (Great St Mary's) from King’s Parade
Left to Right: The Senate House, Gonville & Caius College and the University Church (Great St Mary's) from King’s Parade

Cambridge is a collegiate university, with its main functions divided between the central departments of the university and 31 colleges. In general, the departments perform research and provide centralised lectures to students, while the colleges are responsible for the domestic arrangements and welfare of undergraduate students, graduate students, post-doctoral researchers and some University staff. The colleges also provide most of the small group teaching for undergraduates, referred to as supervisions. The 31 colleges are technically institutions independent of the university itself and enjoy considerable autonomy. For example, colleges decide which students they are to admit, and appoint their own fellows (senior members). In Cambridge, “the university” often refers to the University as distinct from the colleges. Download high resolution version (1081x768, 170 KB)The town centre of Cambridge with the University Church (Great St Marys) on the right, the Senate House of Cambridge University on the left, and Gonville and Caius College in the middle at the back. ... Download high resolution version (1081x768, 170 KB)The town centre of Cambridge with the University Church (Great St Marys) on the right, the Senate House of Cambridge University on the left, and Gonville and Caius College in the middle at the back. ... Class lists for Part III of the Mathematical Tripos, June 2005 The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... St Mary the Great with St Michael, also known as Great St Marys Church, is the church of the University of Cambridge, England. ... In the United Kingdom, a collegiate university is a university whose functions are divided between the central departments of the university and a number of colleges. ... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... // Academia In British academic parlance, a tutorial is a small class of one, or only a few, students, in which the tutor (a professor or other academic staff member) gives individual attention to the students. ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ...


Central administration

The current Chancellor of the university is the Duke of Edinburgh. The current Vice-Chancellor is Professor Alison Richard. The office of Chancellor, which is held for life, is mainly ceremonial, while the Vice-Chancellor is de facto the principal academic and administrative officer. The University's internal governance is carried out almost entirely by its own members, with little external representation on its governing bodies with the exception of the Audit Committee. The governing body of the University is the Regent House (composed of resident senior members of the University and the Colleges, together with the Chancellor, the High Steward, the Deputy High Steward, and the Commissary[citation needed]). The University Council is the principal executive and policy-making body of the University, and is subject to Regent House. Since January 2005, the membership of the Council has included two external members.[8] The General Board of the Faculties is responsible, subject to the Regent House and to the responsibilities of the Council, for the academic and educational policy of the University.[9] The Cambridge Reporter Regent House and The Senate consists of all holders of the MA degree or higher degrees. It elects the Chancellor and the High Steward; until their abolition in 1950, it elected Members to the House of Commons for the Cambridge University constituency, but otherwise it has not had a major role since 1926.[citation needed] A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (born Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, 10 June 1921)[2] is the husband and consort of Queen Elizabeth II. Originally a royal Prince of Greece and Denmark, Prince Philip renounced these titles shortly before his marriage, though he retains the Greek flag (white cross... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor¹ Alison Fettes Richard (born in Kent, United Kingdom) is the current Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge. ... The Regent House is the name given to the governing body of the University of Cambridge. ... The High Steward in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge (sometimes erroneously known as the Lord High Steward) is a once important but now largely ceremonial university official. ... In the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge and Dublin, the degree of Master of Arts (MA) is awarded to Bachelors of Arts of those universities on application after seven years seniority as members of the university. ... Type Lower House Speaker Michael Martin, (Non-affiliated) since October 23, 2000 Leader Harriet Harman, (Labour) since June 28, 2007 Shadow Leader Theresa May, (Conservative) since May 5, 2005 Members 659 Political groups Labour Party Conservative Party Liberal Democrats Scottish National Party Plaid Cymru Democratic Unionist Party Sinn Féin... Cambridge University was a university constituency electing two members to the House of Commons, from 1603 to 1950. ...


Colleges

View over Trinity College, Gonville and Caius, Trinity Hall and Clare College towards King’s College Chapel, seen from St John’s College chapel. On the left, just in front of Kings College chapel, is the University Senate House
View over Trinity College, Gonville and Caius, Trinity Hall and Clare College towards King’s College Chapel, seen from St John’s College chapel. On the left, just in front of Kings College chapel, is the University Senate House

The University of Cambridge currently has 31 colleges, of which three admit only women (Murray Edwards, Newnham and Lucy Cavendish). The remaining 28 are mixed, Magdalene being the last all-male college to begin admitting women in 1988. Two colleges admit only postgraduates (Clare Hall and Darwin), and four more admit mainly mature students or graduate students (Hughes Hall, Lucy Cavendish, St Edmund’s and Wolfson). The other 25 colleges admit both undergraduate and postgraduate students. Colleges are not required to admit students in all subjects, with some colleges choosing not to offer subjects such as architecture or history of art, but most offer close to the complete range. Some colleges maintain a bias towards certain subjects, for example with Churchill leaning towards the sciences and engineering[10], while others such as St Catharine's College aim for a balanced intake [11]. Costs to students (accommodation and food prices) vary considerably from college to college.[citation needed] Others maintain much more informal reputations, such as for the students of Kings College to hold left-wing and Liberal political views [12], or Robinson College's attempts to minimise its environmental impact [13]. Photograph of Cambridge colleges seen from St Johns College Chapel Photo by Bob Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Photograph of Cambridge colleges seen from St Johns College Chapel Photo by Bob Tubbs I, the creator of this image, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... College name College of Scholars of the Holy Trinity of Norwich Named after The Holy Trinity Established 1350 Location Trinity Lane Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ... College name Clare College Named after Elizabeth de Clare Established 1326 Previously named University Hall (1326-1338) Clare Hall (1338-1856) Location Trinity Lane Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ... Class lists for Part III of the Mathematical Tripos, June 2005 The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... This is a list of the colleges within the University of Cambridge. ... In relation to universities, the term college normally refers to a part of the university which does not have degree-awarding powers in itself. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal Dame Patricia Hodgson Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage N/A A view of the Clough and Kennedy buildings of... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name The College of Saint Mary Magdalene Motto Garde ta Foy Keep your Faith Named after Mary Magdalene Previous names Buckingham College Established 1428 Sister College(s) Magdalen College Master Duncan Robinson Location Magdalene Street Undergraduates 335 Postgraduates 169 Homepage Boatclub Magdalene College (pronounced ) was founded in 1428 as... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... Full name Clare Hall Motto - Named after Clare College Previous names - Established 1966, 1984 Sister College St Cross College President Prof. ... Full name Darwin College Motto - Named after The Darwin Family Previous names - Established 1964 Sister College(s) Wolfson College Master Prof. ... A mature student (aka adult student) in tertiary education (at a university or a college) is normally classified as an (undergraduate) student who is at least 21 years old (23 years old in Ireland) at the start of their course and usually having been away from school for at least... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Full name Hughes Hall Motto Disce ut Servus Named after Miss Elizabeth Phillips Hughes Previous names - Established 1885 Sister College(s) None President Prof. ... Full name Lucy Cavendish College Motto - Named after Lucy Cavendish Previous names - Established 1965 Sister College None President Dame Veronica Sutherland Location Lady Margaret Road Undergraduates 106 Graduates 116 Homepage Boatclub Lucy Cavendish College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge with a focus on the needs of... Full name Saint Edmunds College Motto per revelationem et rationem through revelation and reason Named after St Edmund of Abingdon Previous names St. ... Full name Wolfson College Motto Ring True Named after The Wolfson Foundation Previous names University College, Wolfson College (1972) Established 1965 Sister College Linacre College President Dr Gordon Johnson Location Barton Road Undergraduates 90 Graduates 510 Homepage Boatclub Wolfson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article is about building architecture. ... This article is an overview of the history of art worldwide. ... College name Churchill College Motto Forward Named after Sir Winston Churchill Established 1960 Location Storey’s Way Admittance Men and women Master Sir David Wallace Undergraduates 440 Graduates 210 Sister college Trinity College, Oxford Official website Boat Club website Churchill College Main Entrance Churchill College is one of the constituent... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... Full name Collegium sive aula D. Catharinæ in Universitate Cantabrigiensi Motto   For the wheel! (unofficial) Named after St Catharine of Alexandria Previous names Katharine Hall (1473-1860) Established 1473 Sister College(s) Worcester College Master Prof. ...


There are several historical colleges which no longer exist, such as King’s Hall (founded in 1317) and Michaelhouse which were combined by King Henry VIII to establish Trinity in 1546, Gonville Hall which was founded in 1348 and then re-founded in 1557 as Gonville & Caius, and God's House which was re-founded as Christ's in 1505. Kings Hall was once one of the constituent colleges of Cambridge, and the 2nd to be founded, in 1317. ... Full name The Hall and College of Michaelhouse Motto Named after St. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a... College name Christ’s College Named after Jesus Christ Established 1505 Previously named God’s-house (1437-1505) Location St. ...


There are also several theological colleges in Cambridge, (for example Westminster College and Ridley Hall Theological College) that are loosely affiliated with the university through the Cambridge Theological Federation. Westminster College sits on one of the busier intersections of Cambridges ring road . Westminster College in Cambridge is a theological college of the Presbyterian Church in England, now the United Reformed Church. ... Ridley Hall is a theological college in Cambridge in the United Kingdom which trains intending ministers for the Church of England and other churches. ... The Cambridge Theological Federation is an association of theological colleges in Cambridge. ...


Research and teaching

The Fitzwilliam Museum, the art and antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge
The Fitzwilliam Museum, the art and antiquities museum of the University of Cambridge

Cambridge University has research departments and teaching faculties in most academic disciplines. Cambridge tends to have a slight bias towards scientific subjects, but it also has a number of strong humanities and social science faculties. Academic staff (and often graduate students for the larger subjects) teach the undergraduates in both lectures and personal supervisions in which a ratio of one teacher to between one and three students is usually maintained. This pedagogical system is often cited as being unique to the Universities of Cambridge and Oxford (where “supervisions” are known as “tutorials”) – similar practices can be found elsewhere, though not on the Oxbridge scale. Download high resolution version (1117x768, 254 KB)The main entrance to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. ... Download high resolution version (1117x768, 254 KB)The main entrance to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge. ... The main entrance to the Fitzwilliam Museum, facing Trumpington Sreet. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... A Mongolian Pedagogical University Graduation Award Badge. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... For the English village, see Oxbridge, Dorset. ...


All research and lectures are conducted by University Departments. The colleges are in charge of giving or arranging most supervisions, student accommodation, and funding most extracurricular activities. During the 1990s Cambridge added a substantial number of new specialist research laboratories on several University sites around the city, and major expansion continues on a number of sites [14].


See also Category:Departments of the University of Cambridge and Departments in the University of Cambridge [15].


Finances

In late 2006, the total financial endowment of the university and the colleges was estimated at £4.1 billion (US$7.9 billion): £1.2 billion tied directly to the university, £2.9 billion to the colleges [16]. (The total endowment was estimated at £3.1 billion in late 2005 by Bloomberg – see [17] – this endowment is arguably the largest in Europe. Oxford (including its colleges) is possibly ranked second, having reported an endowment valued at £3.9bn in mid-2006 [18] (in 2005, estimates for Oxford ranged from £2.4bn to £2.9bn [19]). The Central European University in Budapest has the third largest endowment, with an estimated €400 million in 2005. Each college is an independent charitable institution with its own endowment, separate from that of the central university endowment. Central European University is a US-licensed and accredited university based in Budapest, Hungary. ... For other uses, see Budapest (disambiguation). ...


If ranked on a US university endowment table using figures reported in 2006, Cambridge would rank sixth or seventh (depending on whether one includes the University of Texas System – which incorporates nine full scale universities and six health institutions), or fourth in a ranking compared with only the eight Ivy League institutions.[20] For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... The University of Texas System comprises fifteen educational institutions in Texas, of which nine are general academic universities and six are health institutions. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ...


Comparisons between Cambridge's endowment and those of other top US universities are however inaccurate because being a state-funded public university, Cambridge receives a major portion of its income through education and research grants from the British Government. In 2006, it was reported that approximately one third of Cambridge’s income comes from UK government funding for teaching and research, with another third coming from other research grants. Endowment income contributes around 6%.[21]


The operating budget of Cambridge for the fiscal year 2006/07 was approximately £599 million[2].


In 2005, the Cambridge 800th Anniversary Campaign [22] was launched, aimed at raising £1 billion by 2012 – the first US-style university fundraising campaign in Europe. £663 million of funds have been secured to date.


Reputation

Results for the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos are read out inside Senate House and then tossed from the balcony.
Results for the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos are read out inside Senate House and then tossed from the balcony.

According to UCAS, Cambridge and Oxford are the most academically selective universities in the United Kingdom – there is a special national admissions process which sets Oxbridge apart from other British universities. Traditionally, Cambridge applicants have had to fill the Cambridge Application Form (CAF) in addition to UCAS although this will no longer be necessary for entry beginning 2009, being replaced with a more standard supplementary information form, in line with other universities in the UK.[23] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (730x994, 415 KB)Picture taken by me, June 23, 2005. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (730x994, 415 KB)Picture taken by me, June 23, 2005. ... Results for parts II and III of the Mathematical Tripos are read out inside Senate House, University of Cambridge and then tossed from the balcony. ... Class lists for Part III of the Mathematical Tripos, June 2005 The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... This page is about the Universities and Colleges Admissions Service. ... For the English village, see Oxbridge, Dorset. ...


In the most recent British Government Research Assessment Exercise in 2001,[24] Cambridge was ranked first in the country. In 2005, it was reported that Cambridge produces more PhDs per year than any other British university (over 30% more than second placed Oxford).[25] In 2006, a Thomson Scientific study showed that Cambridge has the highest research paper output of any British university, and is also the top research producer (as assessed by total paper citation count) in 10 out of 21 major British research fields analysed (Imperial College came second, leading in 3 fields).[26] Another study published the same year by Evidence showed that Cambridge won a larger proportion (6.6%) of total British research grants and contracts than any other university (coming first in three out of four broad discipline fields).[27] The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is an exercise undertaken every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils (HEFCE, SHEFC, HEFCW, DELNI) to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions. ... Connecticut-based Thomson Scientific & Healthcare is one of the four operating divisions of The Thomson Corporation. ... Royal School of Mines Entrance Imperial College London is a college of the University of London which focuses on science and technology, and is located in South Kensington in London. ...


Historically, the university has produced a significant proportion of Britain’s prominent scientists, writers and politicians. Officially, affiliates of Cambridge University have won a total of 82 Nobel Prizes,[28] more than any other university in the world, by some accounts[29] and more than any country in the world except the United Kingdom and the United States. Seventy of these Nobel Laureates also attended Cambridge as undergraduate or graduate students. In addition, there are at least six Nobel Laureates who taught or researched for an extended period at Cambridge who have not been recognised by the official total.[citation needed] A scientist, in the broadest sense, refers to any person that engages in a systematic activity to acquire knowledge or an individual that engages in such practices and traditions that are linked to schools of thought or philosophy. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Nobel Prizes have always been a source of pride for universities, suggesting their excellence in teaching or in providing research opportunities. ... The following persons attended the University of Cambridge but did not necessarily complete a degree course there. ...


In addition to a long distinguished tradition in the humanities and the arts, the University of Cambridge is especially known for producing prominent scientists and mathematicians. This distinguished list includes Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin, William Harvey, Paul Dirac, J. J. Thomson, Ernest Rutherford, Jane Goodall, James Clerk Maxwell, Francis Crick, Alan Turing, Stephen Hawking, and Fred Sanger. Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... This article is about William Harvey, the English doctor. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... Sir Joseph John “J.J.” Thomson, OM, FRS (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940) was a British physicist and Nobel laureate, credited for the discovery of the electron and of isotopes, and the invention of the mass spectrometer. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 – 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a chemist (B.Sc. ... Dame Jane Goodall, DBE, PhD, (born 3 April 1934 as Valerie Jane Morris Goodall) is an English UN Messenger of Peace, primatologist, ethologist, and anthropologist. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (pronounced ) (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician and cryptographer. ... Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA, (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist. ... This article or section should be merged with Frederick Sanger Fred Sanger (born 1918), is an English biochemist, the winner of two Nobel prizes in Chemistry. ...


The university is also closely linked with the development of the high-tech business cluster in and around Cambridge, which forms the area known as Silicon Fen or sometimes the “Cambridge Phenomenon”. In 2004, it was reported that Silicon Fen was the second largest venture capital market in the world, after Silicon Valley. Estimates reported in February 2006 suggest that there were about 250 active startup companies directly linked with the university, worth around US$6 billion.[30] Silicon Fen (sometimes the Cambridge Cluster) is the name given to the region around Cambridge, England, which is home to a large cluster of high-tech businesses, especially those related to software, electronics, and biotechnology. ... Venture capital is a general term to describe financing for startup and early stage businesses as well as businesses in turn around situations. ... For the Nintendo 64 game, see Space Station Silicon Valley. ... A startup company is a company with a limited operating history. ...


League Table Rankings

UK
2008 2007 2006 2005
Times Good University Guide 2nd[31] 2nd[32] 2nd[33]
Guardian University Guide 2nd[34] 1st[35] 2nd[36]
Sunday Times University Guide 1st[37] 1st[38] 1st[38]
Daily Telegraph 1st[39]
World
2007 2006 2005 2004 2003
THES - QS World University Rankings 2nd 2nd[40] 3rd[41]
Academic Ranking of World Universities 4th[42] 2nd[43] 2nd[44] 3rd[45] 5th[46]

The THES - QS rankings also placed Cambridge first in the international academic reputation peer review, first in the natural sciences, first in biomedicine, first in the arts & humanities, fourth in the social sciences, and sixth in technology. A 2006 Newsweek ranking which combined elements of the Jiao Tong survey with other factors that purportedly evaluated an institution's global "openness and diversity" suggested that Cambridge was ranked 6th in the world overall.[47] In all these surveys, Cambridge was the highest ranked non-US institution, and therefore the leading university in Europe. (Note that all university rankings are subject to controversy about their methodology, and that the THES - QS and Jiao Tong tables are the only annual comprehensive international rankings by academic specialists available). The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Michelson–Morley experiment was used to disprove that light propagated through a luminiferous aether. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... By the mid 20th century humans had achieved a mastery of technology sufficient to leave the surface of the Earth for the first time and explore space. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ...


History

Early history

Roger of Wendover wrote that the University of Cambridge could trace its origins to a crime committed in 1209. Although not always a reliable source, the detail given in his contemporaneous writings lends them credence. Two Oxford scholars were convicted of the murder or manslaughter of a woman and were hanged by the town authorities with the assent of the King. In protest at the hanging, the University of Oxford went into voluntary suspension, and scholars migrated to a number of other locations, including the pre-existing school at Cambridge (Cambridge had been recorded as a “school” rather than university when John Grim held the office of Master there in 1201). These post-graduate researchers from Oxford started Cambridge’s life as a university in 1209. Cambridge’s status as a university is further confirmed by a decree in 1233 from Pope Gregory IX which awarded the ius non trahi extra (a form of legal protection) to the chancellor and universitas of scholars at Cambridge. After Cambridge was described as a studium generale in a letter by Pope Nicholas IV in 1290, and confirmed as such in a bull by Pope John XXII in 1318, it became common for researchers from other European medieval universities to come and visit Cambridge to study or to give lecture courses.[48] Roger of Wendover (d. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Pope Gregory IX, born Ugolino dei Conti, was pope from 1227 to August 22, 1241. ... Studium Generale is the old name for a medieval university which was registered as an institution of international excellence by the Holy Roman Empire. ... Nicholas IV, né Girolamo Masci (Lisciano, a small village near Ascoli Piceno, September 30, 1227 – April 4, 1292), was Pope from February 22, 1288 to April 4, 1292. ... Pope John XXII, born Jacques Duèze or dEuse (1249 – December 4, 1334), was the son of a shoemaker in Cahors. ... The first European medieval universities were established in Italy and France in the late 12th and early 13th Century for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology. ...


Foundation of the Colleges

Clare College (left) and King’s College Chapel (centre), seen from The Backs
Clare College (left) and King’s College Chapel (centre), seen from The Backs

Cambridge’s colleges were originally an incidental feature of the system. No college is as old as the university itself. The colleges were endowed fellowships of scholars. There were also institutions without endowments, called hostels. The hostels were gradually absorbed by the colleges over the centuries, but they have left some indicators of their time, such as the name of Garrett Hostel Lane. Download high resolution version (1025x768, 217 KB)The west end of Kings College Chapel seen from The Backs. ... Download high resolution version (1025x768, 217 KB)The west end of Kings College Chapel seen from The Backs. ... College name Clare College Named after Elizabeth de Clare Established 1326 Previously named University Hall (1326-1338) Clare Hall (1338-1856) Location Trinity Lane Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The Backs, or the Backs of the Colleges refers to an area of Cambridge at the rear of several colleges by the River Cam. ...


Hugh Balsham, Bishop of Ely, founded Peterhouse in 1284, Cambridge’s first college. Many colleges were founded during the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries, but colleges continued to be established throughout the centuries to modern times, although there was a gap of 204 years between the founding of Sidney Sussex in 1596 and Downing in 1800. The most recent college established is Robinson, built in the late 1970s. However, Hughes Hall only achieved full university college status in April 2007, making it the newest full college.[49] Hugh de Balsham (d. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY... College name Peterhouse Named after Saint Peter Established 1284 Previously named The Scholars of the Bishop of Ely Saint Peter’s College Location Trumpington Street Admittance Men and women Master The Lord Wilson of Tillyorn Undergraduates 284 Graduates 130 Sister college Merton College, Oxford Official website Boat Club website Peterhouse... College name The College of the Lady Frances Sidney Sussex Motto Dieu me Garde de Calomnie (French: God preserve me from calumny) Founder Lady Frances Sidney, Countess of Sussex Established 1596 Location Sidney Street Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ... Full name Downing College Motto Quaerere Verum Seek the truth Named after Sir George Downing Previous names - Established 1800 Sister College(s) Lincoln College Master Prof. ... College name Robinson College Named after Sir David Robinson Established 1977 Location Grange Road Admittance Men and women Warden (Anthony) David Yates Undergraduates 397 Graduates 105 Sister college St Catherines College, Oxford Official website Boat Club website Robinson College is one of the constituent colleges of the University of... Full name Hughes Hall Motto Disce ut Servus Named after Miss Elizabeth Phillips Hughes Previous names - Established 1885 Sister College(s) None President Prof. ...


In medieval times, colleges were founded so that their students would pray for the souls of the founders. For that reason they were often associated with chapels or abbeys. A change in the colleges’ focus occurred in 1536 with the dissolution of the monasteries. King Henry VIII ordered the university to disband its Faculty of Canon Law and to stop teaching “scholastic philosophy”. In response, colleges changed their curricula away from canon law and towards the classics, the Bible, and mathematics. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... For other uses, see Prayer (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Soul (disambiguation). ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Bold textTHIS IS THE PAGE THAT A.S. REALLY NEEDS!! THIS IS NOW MARKED!!! ] ps i like A.O. This article is about an abbey as a Christian monastic community. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Scholastic redirects here. ... For other uses, see Classics (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Bible (disambiguation). ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ...


Mathematics

From the time of Isaac Newton in the later 17th century until the mid-19th century, the university maintained a strong emphasis on mathematics. Study of this subject was compulsory for graduation, and students were required to take an exam for the Bachelor of Arts degree, the main first degree at Cambridge in both arts and science subjects. This exam is known as a Tripos. Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... B. A. redirects here. ... The University of Cambridge, England, divides the different kinds of honours bachelors degree by Tripos, a word which has an obscure etymology, but which may be traced to the three-legged stool candidates once used to sit on when taking oral examinations. ...


Students awarded first-class honours after completing the mathematics Tripos were named wranglers. The Cambridge Mathematical Tripos was competitive and helped produce some of the most famous names in British science, including James Clerk Maxwell, Lord Kelvin, and Lord Rayleigh. However, some famous students, such as G. H. Hardy, disliked the system, feeling that people were too interested in accumulating marks in exams and not interested in the subject itself. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... At the University of Cambridge, a wrangler is a student who has completed the third year (called Part II) of the Mathematical Tripos with first-class honours. ... Results for parts II and III of the Mathematical Tripos are read out inside Senate House, University of Cambridge and then tossed from the balcony. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist. ... For other persons named William Thomson, see William Thomson (disambiguation). ... John William Strutt, 3rd Baron Rayleigh OM (12 November 1842 – 30 June 1919) was an English physicist who with William Ramsay discovered the element argon, an achievement for which he earned the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1904. ... Godfrey Harold Hardy FRS (February 7, 1877 Cranleigh, Surrey, England [1] – December 1, 1947 Cambridge, Cambridgeshire, England [2]) was a prominent English mathematician, known for his achievements in number theory and mathematical analysis. ...


Although diversified in its research and teaching interests, Cambridge today maintains its strength in mathematics. The Isaac Newton Institute, part of the university, is widely regarded as the UK’s national research institute for mathematics and theoretical physics. Cambridge alumni have won eight Fields Medals and one Abel Prize for mathematics. The University also runs a special Certificate of Advanced Studies in Mathematics course. Opened in 1992, the Isaac Newton Institute for Mathematical Sciences is the United Kingdoms de facto national research institute for mathematics and theoretical physics. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... The Abel Prize is awarded annually by the King of Norway to outstanding mathematicians. ... CASM stands for Certificate of Advanced Studies in Mathematics. It is both the culmination of the Cambridge University mathematics degree, as an additional year for those who wish to go on beyond the BA course, and a separate graduate course which accepts many people coming from other universities. ...


Contributions to the advancement of science

Many of the most important scientific discoveries and revolutions were made by Cambridge alumni. These include:

-1... For other persons named Francis Bacon, see Francis Bacon (disambiguation). ... Newtons First and Second laws, in Latin, from the original 1687 edition of the Principia Mathematica. ... Sir Isaac Newton in Knellers portrait of 1689. ... For other uses, see Electron (disambiguation). ... Sir Joseph John “J.J.” Thomson, OM, FRS (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940) was a British physicist and Nobel laureate, credited for the discovery of the electron and of isotopes, and the invention of the mass spectrometer. ... The nucleus of an atom is the very small dense region, of positive charge, in its centre consisting of nucleons (protons and neutrons). ... See also: John Cockroft (politician) Sir John Douglas Cockcroft (May 27, 1897 - September 18, 1967) was a British physicist. ... Ernest Thomas Sinton Walton (October 6, 1903 – June 25, 1995) was an Irish physicist and Nobel laureate for his work with John Cockcroft with atom-smashing experiments done at Cambridge University in the early 1930s. ... This box:      Electromagnetism is the physics of the electromagnetic field: a field which exerts a force on particles that possess the property of electric charge, and is in turn affected by the presence and motion of those particles. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist. ... This article is about the chemistry of hydrogen. ... For other persons named Henry Cavendish, see Henry Cavendish (disambiguation). ... This article is about evolution in biology. ... For other uses, see Natural selection (disambiguation). ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... For the test of artificial intelligence, see Turing test. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (pronounced ) (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician and cryptographer. ... The structure of part of a DNA double helix Deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, is a nucleic acid molecule that contains the genetic instructions used in the development and functioning of all known living organisms. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ...

Women’s education

Originally all students were male. The first colleges for women were Girton College (founded by Emily Davies) in 1869 and Newnham College in 1872. The first women students were examined in 1882 but attempts to make women full members of the university did not succeed until 1947. Although Cambridge did not give degrees to women until this date women were in fact allowed to study courses, sit examinations, and have their results recorded from the nineteenth century onwards. In the twentieth century women could be given a “titular degree”; although they were not denied recognised qualifications, without a full degree they were excluded from the governing of the university. Since students must belong to a college, and since established colleges remained closed to women, women found admissions restricted to colleges established only for women. Starting with Churchill College, all of the men’s colleges began to admit women between 1960 and 1988. One women’s college, Girton, also began to admit men, but the other women’s colleges did not follow suit. In the academic year 2004–5, the university’s student gender ratio, including post-graduates, was male 52%: female 48% [50]. Full name Girton College Motto - Better is wisdom than weapons of war (Alumni) Named after Girton Village Previous names The College for Women (1869), Girton College (1872) Established 1869 Sister College(s) Somerville College Mistress Professor Dame Marilyn Strathern Location Huntingdon Road Undergraduates 503 Postgraduates 201 Homepage Boatclub Girton College... Cover of book of Emily Davies collected letters This article is about the womens education advocate. ... Full name Newnham College Motto - Named after Its location in the village of Newnham Previous names Newnham Hall Established 1871 Sister College(s) Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford Principal Dame Patricia Hodgson Location Sidgwick Avenue Undergraduates 396 Postgraduates 120 Homepage N/A A view of the Clough and Kennedy buildings of...


Admissions

The Centre for Mathematical Sciences in West Cambridge, home to a number of new faculty buildings.
The Centre for Mathematical Sciences in West Cambridge, home to a number of new faculty buildings.

The application system to Cambridge and Oxford often involves additional requirements, with candidates typically called to face-to-face interviews. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 551 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 551 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... The Centre for Mathematical Sciences at the University of Cambridge houses the universitys Faculty of Mathematics, the Isaac Newton Institute, and the Betty and Gordon Moore Library. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ...


How applicants perform in the interview process best determines which candidates are accepted.[51] Most applicants are expected to be predicted at least three A-grade A-level qualifications relevant to their chosen undergraduate course, or equivalent overseas qualifications. Due to a very high proportion of applicants receiving the highest school grades, the interview process is crucial for distinguishing the most able candidates.[51] In 2005, 5,325 students were rejected who went on to get 3 A levels or more at grade A, representing about 60% of all applicants rejected.[52] The interview is performed by College Fellows, who evaluate candidates on unexamined factors such as potential for original thinking and creativity.[53] For exceptional candidates, a Matriculation Offer is sometimes offered, requiring only two A-levels at grade E or above - Christ's College is unusual in making this offer to about one-third of successful candidates.[54] The A-level, short for Advanced Level, is a General Certificate of Education qualification in England, Northern Ireland and Wales, usually taken by students during the optional final two years of secondary school (Years 12 & 13 (usually ages 16-18), commonly called the Sixth Form except for Scotland), or at... College name Christ’s College Named after Jesus Christ Established 1505 Previously named God’s-house (1437-1505) Location St. ...


In recent years, admissions tutors in certain subjects have required applicants to sit the more difficult STEP papers, tuition for which is not normally provided by British schools outside the private or independent sector, in addition to achieving top grades in their A-levels or International Baccalaureate diplomas. For example, almost every college requires 1,2, and a significant number requiring 1,1, or better in the 2 STEP Papers as well as A grades at A-levels including A-level Mathematics and Further Mathematics in order to be considered for entry for the Mathematical Tripos. Between one-half and two-thirds of those who apply with the required grades are given offers of a place. Sixth Term Examination Papers in Mathematics, often referred to as STEP (or redundantly as STEP papers), are examinations set by the University of Cambridge in England to assess applicants for its undergraduate mathematics course. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into International Baccalaureate Organization. ...


Public debate in the United Kingdom continues over whether admissions processes at Oxford and Cambridge are entirely merit based and fair; whether enough students from state schools are encouraged to apply to Cambridge; and whether these students succeed in gaining entry. Almost half of all successful applicants come from independent schools. However, the average qualifications for successful applicants from state schools are slightly lower than the average qualification of successful applicants from private schools[citation needed]. Critics have argued that the lack of state school applicants with the required grades applying to Cambridge and Oxford has had a negative impact on Oxbridge’s reputation for many years, and the University has encouraged pupils from state schools to apply for Cambridge to help redress the imbalance. Others counter that government pressure to increase state school admissions constitutes inappropriate social engineering.[55] The proportion of undergraduates drawn from independent schools has dropped over the years, and such applicants now form only a significant minority (42.1%)[56] of the intake. In 2005, 32% of the 3599 applicants from independent schools were admitted to Cambridge, as opposed to 24% of the 6674 applications from state schools.[57]. In 2008 the University of Cambridge received a gift of £4m to improve its accessibility to candidates from maintained schools. [58] State school is an expression used in the United Kingdom and other countries apart from the United States to distinguish schools provided by the government from public schools which are in fact private institutions. ... Social engineering is a concept in political science that refers to efforts to systematically manage popular attitudes and social behavior on a large scale, whether by governments or private groups. ...


Graduate admission is first decided by the faculty or department relating to the applicant’s subject. This effectively guarantees admission to a college - though not necessarily the applicant’s preferred choice.[59]


Sport and other extracurricular activities

Cambridge maintains a long tradition of student participation in sport and recreation. Rowing is a particularly popular sport at Cambridge, and there are competitions between colleges, notably the bumps races, and against Oxford, the Boat Race. There are also Varsity matches against Oxford in many other sports, ranging from cricket, seeCambridge University Cricket Club and rugby, see Cambridge University RUFC, to chess and tiddlywinks. Athletes representing the university in certain sports entitle them to apply for a Cambridge Blue at the discretion of the Blues Committee, consisting of the captains of the thirteen most prestigious sports. There is also the self-described “unashamedly elite” Hawks’ Club, which is for men only, whose membership is usually restricted to Cambridge Full Blues and Half Blues. A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... Corpus bumps Girton at the 2005 May Bumps in Cambridge A bumps race is a form of rowing race in which a number of boats chase each other in single file; each boat attempts to catch the boat in front without being caught by the boat behind. ... Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ... A varsity match is a sporting fixture between two university rivals. ... This article is about the sport. ... Cambridge University Cricket Club (now subsumed into the Cambridge University Centre of Cricketing Excellence) is a first-class cricket team. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... The Cambridge University Rugby Union Football Club (Cambridge University RUFC or CURUFC) is the rugby union club of Cambridge University. ... This article is about the Western board game. ... // Tiddlywinks is a game played with sets of small, thin discs (called winks) lying on a surface, usually a felt mat. ... A Blue is earned by sportsmen at Cambridge University in one of thirteen designated sports (e. ... The front door of the Hawks Club at 18 Portugal Place, Cambridge The Hawks Club is a members-only social club for sportsmen at the University of Cambridge. ...


The Cambridge Union serves as a focus for debating. Drama societies notably include the Amateur Dramatic Club (ADC) and the comedy club Footlights, which are known for producing well-known showbusiness personalities. Student newspapers include the long-established Varsity and its younger rival, The Cambridge Student. The student-run radio station, CUR1350, promotes broadcast journalism. The Cambridge Union Society, commonly referred to simply as the Cambridge Union, is one of the largest student societies at the University of Cambridge and one of the oldest in the world. ... Cambridge University ADC Logo Founded in 1855, the Amateur Dramatic Club (or ADC) is the oldest University dramatic society in England - and the largest dramatic society in Cambridge. ... The ADC Theatre is the home of the Footlights. ... Varsity is the older of Cambridge Universitys main student newspapers (The Cambridge Student is the other, younger, one). ... The Cambridge Student, commonly known as TCS, is the younger of Cambridge Universitys student newspapers (Varsity is the other). ... CUR1350 (formerly known as Cambridge University Radio) is a student-run radio station at the University of Cambridge. ...

See also: List of social activities at the University of Cambridge and Category:Clubs and societies of the University of Cambridge
Further information: University website list of societies

This is intended to be a complete list of articles on Wikipedia detailing clubs, societies and other common leisure activities associated with the University of Cambridge. ...

Myths, legends and traditions

The Mathematical Bridge over the river Cam (at Queens’ College)
The Mathematical Bridge over the river Cam (at Queens’ College)

There are many popular myths associated with the University of Cambridge: Photograph of the Mathematical Bridge over the River Cam at the University of Cambridge, showing punters on the river. ... Photograph of the Mathematical Bridge over the River Cam at the University of Cambridge, showing punters on the river. ... The Mathematical Bridge The Mathematical Bridge is the popular name of a wooden bridge across the River Cam, between two parts of Queens College, Cambridge. ... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College(s) Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Postgraduates 270 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, as... There are a number of popular legends associated with Cambridge University and its history, often recounted by punt guides to tourists whilst cruising the River Cam. ...


One famous myth relates to Queens’ College’s so-called Mathematical Bridge (pictured right). Supposedly constructed by Sir Isaac Newton, it reportedly held itself together without any bolts or screws. Legend has it inquisitive students took it apart and were then unable to reassemble it without bolts. However, the bridge was erected 22 years after Newton’s death. This myth may have arisen from the fact that earlier versions of the bridge used iron pins and screws at the joints, whereas the current bridge uses more visible nuts and bolts. Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College(s) Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Postgraduates 270 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, as... The Mathematical Bridge The Mathematical Bridge is the popular name of a wooden bridge across the River Cam, between two parts of Queens College, Cambridge. ...


Another famous myth involves Clare Bridge, currently the oldest bridge, which is attached to Clare College. Spherical stone ornaments adorn this bridge. One of these has a quarter sphere wedge removed from the back. This is a feature pointed out on almost all tours over the bridge. Various myths are associated with this sphere. See Cambridge legends. The following is a list and brief history of the bridges over the River Cam in Cambridge, England. ... College name Clare College Named after Elizabeth de Clare Established 1326 Previously named University Hall (1326-1338) Clare Hall (1338-1856) Location Trinity Lane Admittance Men and women Master Prof. ... There are a number of popular legends associated with Cambridge University and its history, often recounted by punt guides to tourists whilst cruising the River Cam. ...


A discontinued tradition is that of the wooden spoon, the ‘prize’ awarded to the student with the lowest passing grade in the final examinations of the Mathematical Tripos. The last of these spoons was awarded in 1909 to Cuthbert Lempriere Holthouse, an oarsman of the Lady Margaret Boat Club of St John’s College. It was over one metre in length and had an oar blade for a handle. It can now be seen outside the Senior Combination Room of St John's. Since 1909, results were published alphabetically within class rather than score order. This made it harder to ascertain who the winner of the spoon was (unless there was only one person in the third class), and so the practice was abandoned. A wooden spoon is a mock or real award, usually given to an individual or team which has come last in a competition, but sometimes also to runners-up. ... College name The College of Saint John the Evangelist of the University of Cambridge Motto Souvent me Souvient (Latin: I often remember) Named after The Hospital of Saint John the Evangelist Established 1511 Location St. ...


On the other hand, the legend of the Austin 7 delivery van that ended up on the apex of the Senate House is no myth at all. The Caius College website recounts in detail how this vehicle “went up in the world”. [60] The Austin 7 was a vintage car produced from 1922 through to 1939 in the United Kingdom. ... Full name Gonville and Caius College Motto Named after Edmund Gonville & John Caius Previous names Gonville Hall (1348), Gonville & Caius (1557) Established 1348, refounded 1557 Sister College(s) Brasenose College Master Sir Christopher Hum Location Trinity St Undergraduates 468 Postgraduates 291 Homepage Boatclub Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge is a...


Each Christmas Eve, BBC radio and television broadcasts The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols by the Choir of King's College, Cambridge. The radio broadcast has been a national Christmas tradition since it was first transmitted in 1928 (though the festival has existed since 1918). The radio broadcast is carried worldwide by the BBC World Service and is also syndicated to hundreds of radio stations in the USA. The first television broadcast of the festival was in 1954.[61][62][63] Nativity of the Lord redirects here. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a format of Christian worship service celebrating the birth of Jesus and traditionally followed at Christmas. ... The world-famous Choir of Kings College, Cambridge is one of todays most accomplished and renowned representatives of the great British choral tradition. ... The BBC World Service is one of the most widely recognised international broadcasters, transmitting in 33 languages to many parts of the world through multiple technologies. ...


Miscellaneous

Degree ceremony at the Senate House
Degree ceremony at the Senate House

Building on its reputation for enterprise, science and technology, Cambridge has a partnership with MIT in the United States, the Cambridge–MIT Institute. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Class lists for Part III of the Mathematical Tripos, June 2005 The Senate House of the University of Cambridge in the centre of the city is used mainly for degree ceremonies and formerly for meetings of the Council of the Senate. ... Mapúa Institute of Technology (MIT, MapúaTech or simply Mapúa) is a private, non-sectarian, Filipino tertiary institute located in Intramuros, Manila. ...


In 2000, Bill Gates of Microsoft donated US$210 million through the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation to endow the Gates Scholarships for students from outside the UK seeking postgraduate study at Cambridge. The University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, which taught the world’s first computing course in 1953, is housed in a building partly funded by Gates and named after his grandfather, William Gates. For other persons named Bill Gates, see Bill Gates (disambiguation). ... Microsoft Corporation, (NASDAQ: MSFT, HKSE: 4338) is a multinational computer technology corporation with global annual revenue of US$44. ... The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is the worlds largest charitable foundation. ... The Gates Cambridge Scholarships were established by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation in 2000, with a $210 million endowment. ... The William Gates Building, which currently houses the Computer Laboratory. ...


After the founding of Harvard College in 1636 at Newtowne, Massachusetts, the town adopted the new name of “Cambridge” in 1638 to promote its reputation as an academic centre. The first president (Henry Dunster), the first benefactor (John Harvard), and the first schoolmaster (Nathaniel Eaton) of Harvard were all Cambridge University alumni, as was the then ruling (and first) governor of the Massachusetts Bay Colony, John Winthrop. In 1629, Winthrop had led the signing of the founding document of the city of Boston, Massachusetts, which was known as the Cambridge Agreement, after the university [64]. Harvard Yard Harvard College is the undergraduate section and oldest school of Harvard University, a private university in the United States, founded in 1636 by the Massachusetts legislature. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1636 Government  - Type Mayor-City Council  - Mayor Kenneth Reeves (D) Area  - Total 7. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Henry Dunster(c. ... John Harvard Statue in the Harvard University Yard. ... Nathaniel Eaton (1610–1674) was the first schoolmaster of Harvard College in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and later became a clergyman. ... A map of the Massachusetts Bay Colony Capital Charlestown, Boston History  - Established 1629  - New England Confederation 1643  - Dominion of New England 1686  - Province of Massachusetts Bay 1692  - Disestablished 1692 The Massachusetts Bay Colony (sometimes called the Massachusetts Bay Company, for the institution that founded it) was an English settlement on... John Winthrop (12 January 1587/8–26 March 1649) led a group of English Puritans to the New World, joined the Massachusetts Bay Colony in 1629 and was elected their first governor on April 8, 1630. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Cambridge Agreement was an agreement made on August 29, 1629, between the shareholders of the Massachusetts Bay Company. ...


The concept of grading students' work quantitatively was developed by a tutor named William Farish at the University of Cambridge in 1792.[65] This article is about evaluation of school work. ...


In Japan, there is a Cambridge and Oxford Society, [66] a rare example of the name Cambridge coming before Oxford when the two universities are referred to together — traditionally, the order used when referring to both universities is “Oxford and Cambridge”, the order in which they were founded. The probable reason for this inversion is that the Cambridge Club was founded first in Japan, and it also had more members than its Oxford counterpart when they amalgamated in 1905.


The University’s publishing arm, the Cambridge University Press, is the oldest printer and publisher in the world. The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ...


The University set up its Local Examination Syndicate in 1858. Today, the Syndicate, which is known as Cambridge Assessment, is Europe’s largest assessment agency and it plays a leading role in researching, developing and delivering assessments across the globe. Cambridge Assessment (formerly known as UCLES) is one of the largest international assessment agencies recognised by governments around the world. ...


Selected notable members

See also List of University of Cambridge members (extensive list), Alumni of the University of Cambridge (college lists) and Academics of the University of Cambridge (lists of academics). The following persons attended the University of Cambridge but did not necessarily complete a degree course there. ...

Babbage redirects here. ... Sir Francis Bacon Francis Bacon, 1st Viscount St Albans (January 22, 1561 - April 9, 1626) was an English philosopher, statesman, and essayist. ... Niels Henrik David Bohr (October 7, 1885 – November 18, 1962) was a Danish physicist who made fundamental contributions to understanding atomic structure and quantum mechanics, for which he received the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1922. ... Byron redirects here. ... Sir James Chadwick, CH (20 October 1891 – 24 July 1974) was an English physicist and Nobel laureate who is best known for discovering the neutron. ... “Prince Charles” redirects here. ... Cleese redirects here. ... Samuel Taylor Coleridge (October 21, 1772 – July 25, 1834) (pronounced ) was an English poet, critic, and philosopher who was, along with his friend William Wordsworth, one of the founders of the Romantic Movement in England and one of the Lake Poets. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... Oliver Cromwell (25 April 1599 – 3 September 1658) was an English military and political leader best known for his involvement in making England into a republican Commonwealth and for his later role as Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... Germaine Greer (born January 29, 1939) is an Australian-born writer, broadcaster and retired academic, widely regarded as one of the most significant feminist voices of the 20th century. ... This article is about William Harvey, the English doctor. ... Stephen William Hawking, CH, CBE, FRS, FRSA, (born 8 January 1942) is a British theoretical physicist. ... 1 Aspinall Street, Mytholmroyd, West Yorkshire, where Ted Hughes was born. ... Allama Dr. Sir Muhammad Iqbal Allama Dr. Sir Muhammad Iqbal (November 9, 1877-April 21, 1938) was an important Indian Muslim poet from the colonial era, a philosopher and thinker of Kashmiri origin. ... Louis Cha or Zha Liangyong (sometimes Cha Leung Yung), OBE (born June 6, 1924), known to most by his penname Jinyong (Jin Yong) or Kam-yung (Cantonese), is one of the most influential modern Chinese-language novelists who is also the co-founder of the Hong Kong daily Ming Pao. ... For other persons named William Thomson, see William Thomson (disambiguation). ... Keynes redirects here. ... Kim Dae-jung (born December 3, 1925) is a South Korean politician. ... This article is about the English dramatist. ... James Clerk Maxwell (13 June 1831 – 5 November 1879) was a Scottish mathematician and theoretical physicist. ... Alan Alexander Milne (IPA pronunciation: ) (January 18, 1882 – January 31, 1956), also known as A. A. Milne, was an English author, best known for his books about the teddy bear Winnie-the-Pooh and for various childrens poems. ... For other persons named John Milton, see John Milton (disambiguation). ... This page is about the novelist. ... Pandit Jawaharlal Nehru (Hindi: , IPA: (November 14, 1889 – May 27, 1964) was a major political leader of the Congress Party, a pivotal figure in the Indian independence movement and the first Prime Minister of independent India. ... Sir Isaac Newton in Knellers portrait of 1689. ... William Pitt the Younger (28 May 1759 – 23 January 1806) was a British politician of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. ... Bertrand Arthur William Russell, 3rd Earl Russell, OM, FRS, (18 May 1872 – 2 February 1970), was a British philosopher, logician, mathematician, advocate for social reform, and pacifist. ... Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 – 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a chemist (B.Sc. ... This article or section should be merged with Frederick Sanger Fred Sanger (born 1918), is an English biochemist, the winner of two Nobel prizes in Chemistry. ... Siegfried Loraine Sassoon, CBE MC (8 September 1886 – 1 September 1967) was an English poet and author. ... This article is about the Prime Minister of India. ... Lord Tennyson, Poet Laureate Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson (August 6, 1809 - October 6, 1892) is generally regarded as one of the greatest English poets. ... Sir Joseph John “J.J.” Thomson, OM, FRS (18 December 1856 – 30 August 1940) was a British physicist and Nobel laureate, credited for the discovery of the electron and of isotopes, and the invention of the mass spectrometer. ... Alan Mathison Turing, OBE, FRS (pronounced ) (23 June 1912 – 7 June 1954) was an English mathematician, logician and cryptographer. ... For other people named James Watson, see James Watson (disambiguation). ... William Wilberforce (August 24, 1759 – July 29, 1833) was a British politician, philanthropist and slavery abolitionist. ... Wittgenstein redirects here. ... Wordsworth redirects here. ...

Cambridge University in literature and popular culture

Fiction

See also the list of Fictional Cambridge Colleges This article is about the novel. ... A watercolour and pencil sketch of Jane Austen, believed to be drawn from life by her sister Cassandra (c. ... Mr. ... This article is about the novel. ... Chaucer: Illustration from Cassells History of England, circa 1902 Chanticleer the rooster from an outdoor production of Chanticleer and the Fox at Ashby_de_la_Zouch castle Geoffrey Chaucer (ca. ... The Reeves Prologue and Tale is the third story to be told in Geoffrey Chaucers The Canterbury Tales. ... Frederic Michael Raphael (born Chicago, 1931) is an American-born, British-educated screenwriter, as well as a prolific novelist and journalist. ... The Longest Journey (1907) is a Bildungsroman by E. M. Forster. ... E. M. Forsters Maurice Maurice is a novel attributed to E. M. Forster. ... Edward Morgan Forster (January 1, 1879 - June 7, 1970) was an English novelist. ... For A. Byatt, the director of French documentary films, see Andy Byatt. ... Chariots of Fire is a British film released in 1981. ... Peters Friends (1992) is a British comedy-drama film written by Rita Rudner and her husband Martin Bergman, and directed and produced by Kenneth Branagh. ... Strangers and Brothers is a series of novels by C.P.Snow, published between 1940 and 1974. ... Charles Percy Snow, Baron Snow, CBE (15 October 1905–1 July 1980) was a scientist and novelist. ... // Porterhouse Blue is a novel written by Tom Sharpe, first published in 1974. ... Grantchester Grind is a novel written by Tom Sharpe, a British novelist born in 1923 who was educated at Lancing College and then at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... Tom Sharpe (born March 30, 1928) is an English satirical author, born in London and educated at Lancing College and at Pembroke College, Cambridge. ... Terence Hanbury White (May 29, 1906 – January 17, 1964) was an English writer, born in Bombay (now Mumbai), India. ... Sir Walter Besant (1836 - 1901) was a novelist and historian from London. ... High Table, Lower Orders is a BBC Radio 4 comedy-drama murder mystery set in a fictional Cambridge college in crisis. ... Susanna Gregory is the pseudonym of Elizabeth Cruwys, a Cambridge academic who was previously a coroners officer. ... Kwame Anthony Appiah (1954-) is a philosopher whose interests include political and moral theory, the philosophy of language and mind, and African intellectual history. ... Jack Rosenthal, CBE (8 September 1931 - 29 May 2004) , was a playwright, who wrote several early episodes of the ITV soap opera Coronation Street and a number of successful plays and films. ... Maureen Lipman CBE (born Hull, 10 May 1946), is a British film, theatre and television actress, columnist, and comedienne. ... Tom Wilkinson, OBE (born February 5th, 1948) is an Academy Award-nominated English actor. ... Sir Alec Guinness CH, CBE (2 April 1914 – 5 August 2000) was an Academy Award and Tony Award-winning English actor. ... Full name The Queens College of Saint Margaret and Saint Bernard in the University of Cambridge Motto Floreat Domus May this House Flourish Named after - Previous names - Established 1448 Sister College(s) Pembroke College President Lord Eatwell Location Silver Street Undergraduates 490 Postgraduates 270 Homepage Boatclub The Gatehouse, as... The title as it appeared in most episodes opening credits. ... All Good Things. ... Data[1] is a character, portrayed by Brent Spiner, in the Star Trek fictional universe. ... The incumbent of the Lucasian Chair of Mathematics, the Lucasian Professor is the holder of a mathematical professorship at Cambridge University. ... This article is about the television series. ... Shada is an unaired serial of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who. ... The Fourth Doctor is the name given to the fourth incarnation of the fictional character known as the Doctor seen on screen in the long-running BBC television science-fiction series Doctor Who. ... For other uses, see Romana (disambiguation). ... The Five Doctors was a special movie-length episode of the British science fiction television series Doctor Who, produced in celebration of the programmes twentieth anniversary. ... For the complete series of games, see Civilization (series). ... Sidney K. Meier (born 1954 in Detroit, Michigan) is an American programmer and designer of several popular computer strategy games. ... Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Full name The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity Motto Virtus vera nobilitas Virtue is true Nobility Named after The Holy Trinity Previous names King’s Hall and Michaelhouse (until merged in 1546) Established 1546 Sister College(s) Christ Church Master The Lord Rees of Ludlow Location Trinity Street... Sid Meiers Civilization II, a. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Thomas Bernhard (February 9, 1931, Heerlen - February 12, 1989, Ohlsdorf) was an Austrian playwright and novelist. ... Sir Tom Stoppard, OM, CBE (born as Tomáš Straussler on July 3, 1937)[1] is an Academy Award winning British playwright of more than 24 plays. ... Rock n Roll is a play by Tom Stoppard that premiered at the Royal Court Theatre, London, in 2006. ... Cabaret is a form of entertainment featuring comedy, song, dance, and theatre, distinguished mainly by the performance venue — a restaurant or nightclub with a stage for performances and the audience sitting around the tables (often dining or drinking) watching the performance. ... Published by Faber/Profile Books in 2005 Alan Bennett (born May 9, 1934) is an English author and actor noted for his work, his boyish appearance and his sonorous Yorkshire accent. ... The History Boys is a six-time Tony Award winning play (and later movie) by English playwright Alan Bennett. ... This article is about the 2006 film. ... Fictional colleges are perennially popular in modern novels, allowing the author much greater license when describing the more intimate activities of a Cambridge college. ...


Non-fiction

  • A concise history of the University of Cambridge, by Elisabeth Leedham-Green, Cambridge University Press, 1996, ISBN 0-521-43978-7, ISBN 978-0-521-43978-7
  • A history of the University of Cambridge, by Christopher N.L. Brooke, Cambridge University Press, 4 volumes, 1988–2004, ISBN 0-521-32882-9, ISBN 0-521-35059-X, ISBN 0-521-35060-3, ISBN 0-521-34350-X
  • Bedders, bulldogs and bedells: a Cambridge glossary, by Frank Stubbings, Cambridge 1995 ISBN 0-521-47978-9
  • Japanese Students at Cambridge University in the Meiji Era, 1868–1912: Pioneers for the Modernization of Japan [26], by Noboru Koyama, translated by Ian Ruxton [27], Lulu Press, September 2004, ISBN 1-4116-1256-6. This book includes information about the wooden spoon and the university in the 19th century as well as the Japanese students.
  • Teaching and Learning in 19th century Cambridge, by J. Smith and C. Stray (ed.), Boydell Press, 2001 ISBN 0-85115-783-1
  • The Architectural History of the University of Cambridge and of the Colleges of Cambridge and Eton, Robert Willis, Edited by John Willis Clark, 1988. Three volume set, Cambridge University Press ISBN 0-521-35851-5
  • The Cambridge Apostles: A History of Cambridge University’s Elite Intellectual Secret Society, by Richard Deacon, Cassell, 1985, ISBN 0-947728-13-9

John Willis Clark (1833-1910), sometimes J.W. Clark, was an English academic and antiquarian. ...

University activities

History and traditions

This is a list of professorships at the University of Cambridge. ... This is a list of Chancellors of the University of Cambridge, from about 1246 to the present day: Hugh de Hotton, c. ... The Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge is the main administrative and academic officer of the university, and is elected by the Regent House for a term of up to seven years. ... Cambridge University was a university constituency electing two members to the House of Commons, from 1603 to 1950. ... The Registrary is the senior administrative officer of the University of Cambridge. ... Most of the colleges of the University of Cambridge have sister colleges in the University of Oxford (and vice versa). ... This snowman has been kitted out in a college scarf belonging to a member of Churchill College, Cambridge. ... The gown and hood worn for BA graduation As is natural in the second oldest university in the United Kingdom, the University of Cambridge has a long tradition of academic dress. ... St Johns College, Cambridge hall during a formal meal Churchill College, Cambridge dining hall prepared for a formal Formal Hall is the name given to a formal evening meal at any college in the universities of Oxford, Cambridge or Durham open to all members of the college and their guests. ...

Organisations and institutions associated with the university

See List of organisations and institutions associated with the University of Cambridge The following organisations associated with the University of Cambridge have wikipedia articles. ...


See also

List of organisations with a British royal charter is an incomplete list of organisations based both in the United Kingdom and throughout the world, in chronological order, that have received a royal charter from an English, Scottish, or British monarch. ... A marmoset inside Cambridge University, filmed by BUAV The use of primates in experiments at Cambridge University is controversial, first coming to widespread public attention in the UK following undercover investigations lasting ten months in 1998 by the British Union for the Abolition of Vivisection (BUAV), the results of which... Cambridge University Students Union (CUSU) is the university-wide representative body for students at the University of Cambridge, England. ... The Chancellor and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Cambridge have the power to appoint and swear constables under the Universities Act 1825. ... The first European medieval institutions generally considered to be universities were established in Italy, France, and England in the late 11th and the 12th centuries for the study of arts, law, medicine, and theology. ...

References

  1. ^ "Press Release - Investments and Endowments Nov 2006". University of Cambridge. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  2. ^ a b "Facts and Figures January 2008". University of Cambridge. Retrieved on 2008-06-01.
  3. ^ a b c "Table 0b - All students FTE by institution and level of study 2004/05" (Microsoft Excel spreadsheet). Higher Education Statistics Agency. Retrieved on 2008-06-01.
  4. ^ "Identity Guidelines - Colour". University of Cambridge Office of External Affairs and Communications. Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  5. ^ A Brief History: Early records from the university web site, retrieved 4 September 2007.
  6. ^ "Top 500 World Universities (1-99)". ARWU 2007. Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  7. ^ "World University Rankings". The Times Higher Education Supplement (Requires subscription and log-in). Retrieved on 2007-10-09.
  8. ^ Reporter 15/12/04: Annual Report of the Council for 2003-04
  9. ^ "Developing governance by building on good practice: a green paper issued by the University Council", 25 April 2007
  10. ^ Information about Churchill College, Churchill College website, updated 29 September 2007, retrieved 7 January 2008
  11. ^ About St. Catharine's College, University of Cambridge website
  12. ^ [1]
  13. ^ [2]
  14. ^ [3]
  15. ^ Departments in the University of Cambridge
  16. ^ [4] – Cambridge University press release
  17. ^ [5] – Report by Bloomberg
  18. ^ [6]
  19. ^ [7]
  20. ^ [8] — NACUBO report
  21. ^ Cambridge turns to City to lead fund Financial Times, November 26 2006
  22. ^ Cambridge 800th Anniversary Campaign
  23. ^ "Applying to Cambridge is to become simpler".
  24. ^ [9] – Report in The Guardian
  25. ^ [10] — Report in The Guardian
  26. ^ [11] — Report available online via thomson.com
  27. ^ [12] — Report in the Times Higher Education Supplement
  28. ^ [13] — The official list of Cambridge’s 82 Nobel Prize winners, from the University of Cambridge website.
  29. ^ [14] — A list of universities with the most Nobel Prize winner affiliations. The University of Chicago has the second most with 78 (30 of which were won by former students).
  30. ^ [15] — Cambridge University press release
  31. ^ "The Times Good University Guide 2008". The Times. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  32. ^ "The Times Good University Guide 2007 - Top Universities 2007 League Table". The Times. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  33. ^ "The Times Top Universities". The Times. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  34. ^ "University ranking by institution". The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  35. ^ "University ranking by institution". The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  36. ^ "University ranking by institution". The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  37. ^ "The Sunday Times Good University Guide League Tables". The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  38. ^ a b "The Sunday Times University League Table". The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  39. ^ "University league table". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  40. ^ "THES - QS World University Rankings 2006". THES. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  41. ^ "THES - QS World University Rankings 2005". THES. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  42. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2007". Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  43. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2006". Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  44. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2005". Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  45. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2004". Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  46. ^ "Academic Ranking of World Universities 2003". Shanghai Jiao Tong University. Retrieved on 03-11-2007.
  47. ^ The Top 100 Global Universities - Newsweek: International Editions - MSNBC.com
  48. ^ Leedham-Green, Elizabeth (1996). A Concise History of the University of Cambridge. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1–4. ISBN 0-521-43978-7. 
  49. ^ http://www.varsity.co.uk/news/418/1/
  50. ^ Source: Cambridge University Reporter, [16]
  51. ^ a b [17] — University of Cambridge guide to Interviews
  52. ^ [18] — Cambridge University Reporter
  53. ^ [19] — Cambridge University information on interviews
  54. ^ [20]
  55. ^ [21] — Report by the Sutton Trust. [22] — Article in The Spectator
  56. ^ BBC NEWS | Education | Call for more university links
  57. ^ http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/reporter/2005-06/special/11/table1-1.pdf
  58. ^ News from Cambridge UK
  59. ^ (see the Board of Graduate Studies admissions flowchart).
  60. ^ [23]
  61. ^ BBC News | ARTS | Choir that sings to the world
  62. ^ BBC - Religion - Carols from King's
  63. ^ Amazon.com: Carols From King's / Choir of King's College, Cambridge · Stephen Cleobury: Stephen Cleobury,Bethia Beadman,Dorothy Belgrove,Robert Tear,Bryony Wicks,George Pattison (II),Sam Mason (III),Emma Hebblethwaite,David Kremer: Movies & TV
  64. ^ [24]
  65. ^ Postman, Neil (1992). Technopoly: The Surrender of Culture to Technology (in English). New York City: Alfred A. Knopf. ISBN 9780679745402. 
  66. ^ [25]
  67. ^ futuristic version of the Cambridge University skyline around the year 2395

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Microsoft Excel (full name Microsoft Office Excel) is a spreadsheet application written and distributed by Microsoft for Microsoft Windows and Mac OS. It features calculation and graphing tools which, along with aggressive marketing, have made Excel one of the most popular microcomputer applications to date. ... The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 152nd day of the year (153rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 247th day of the year (248th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 282nd day of the year (283rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... College name Churchill College Motto Forward Named after Sir Winston Churchill Established 1960 Location Storey’s Way Admittance Men and women Master Sir David Wallace Undergraduates 440 Graduates 210 Sister college Trinity College, Oxford Official website Boat Club website Churchill College Main Entrance Churchill College is one of the constituent... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... For other uses, see University of Chicago (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Times. ... For other uses, see Times. ... For other uses, see Times. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London, England, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London, England, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... Neil Postman (March 8, 1931 - October 5, 2003) was an American professor, media theorist, and cultural critic who is best known by the general public for his 1985 book about television, Amusing Ourselves to Death. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Colophon of the publisher Alfred A. Knopf. ...

External links

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Images and maps links

Coordinates: 52.202702° N 0.119884° E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Cambridge University Press (63 words)
Cambridge University Press publishes the finest academic and educational writing from around the world.
As a department of the University of Cambridge, its purpose is to further the University's objective of advancing knowledge, education, learning, and research.
Cambridge is not just a leading British publisher, it is the oldest printer and publisher in the world and one of the largest academic publishers globally.
University of Cambridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4216 words)
Cambridge is a member of the Russell Group, a network of large, research-led British universities; the Coimbra Group, an association of leading European universities; the LERU (League of European Research Universities), and the IARU (International Alliance of Research Universities).
Cambridge is a collegiate university, with its main functions divided between the central departments of the university and a number of colleges.
Cambridge’s status as a University is further confirmed by a decree in 1233 from Pope Gregory IX which awarded the ius non trahi extra (a form of legal protection) to the chancellor and universitas of scholars at Cambridge.
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