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Encyclopedia > University of California, Santa Cruz

University of California, Santa Cruz

Motto Fiat Lux (Let There Be Light)
Tagline • Thinking at the Edge
• Fiat Slug (unofficial)
Established 1965
Type Public, Land- and Space-Grant research university
Endowment $162.4 million [1]
Chancellor George Blumenthal (acting)
Provost David Kliger
Faculty 812[3]
Staff 3,209[2]
Undergraduates 13,941[4]
Postgraduates 1,419[4]
Alumni >60,000
Location Flag of United States Santa Cruz, California
Address University of California
1156 High Street
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
Campus Suburban/Sylvan
2,001 acres (8.1 km²)
Colors UCSC Blue & UCSC Gold           
Nickname Banana Slugs
Mascot Sammy the Slug
Athletics NCAA Division III
Affiliations University of California
WASC
Website www.ucsc.edu

The University of California, Santa Cruz, also known as UC Santa Cruz or UCSC, is a public, collegiate university, one of the ten campuses of the University of California. Located 75 miles (120 km) south of San Francisco at the edge of the coastal community of Santa Cruz, the campus lies on 2,001 acres (8.1 km²)[5] of gently rolling, forested hills overlooking the Pacific Ocean and Monterey Bay. Founded in 1965 along with the University of California, Irvine[6], UC Santa Cruz was the newest campus of the University of California system until the recent opening of the University of California, Merced, the tenth campus. It is currently ranked as the 76th Best University in the U.S. by US News.[7] Not GFDL. Unofficial UCSC seal. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... A tagline is a variant of a branding slogan typically used in marketing materials and advertising. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are American institutions which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... George Blumenthal is an American professor and astronomer and the Acting Chancellor of the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... “Alumni” redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Santa Cruz is the county seat and largest city of Santa Cruz County, California, United States. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... A forest is an area with a high density of trees (or, historically, a wooded area set aside for hunting). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Tinctures are the colours used to blazon coats of arms in heraldry. ... Tinctures are the colours used to blazon coats of arms in heraldry. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Species Ariolimax californicus Ariolimax columbianus Ariolimax dolichophallus The banana slugs (Ariolimax) are a genus of terrestrial mollusk, although when used in the context of a species, banana slug invariably refers to the Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The Western Association of Schools and Colleges (WASC) is one of six official academic bodies responsible for the accreditation of public and private universities, colleges, secondary and elementary schools in the United States and foreign institutions of American origin. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The University of Colombo School of Computing (UCSC) was formed in 2002 by bringing together the Department of Computer Science and the Institute of Computer Technology. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Santa Cruz is the county seat and largest city of Santa Cruz County, California, United States. ... A view of Monterey Bay Monterey Bay is a bay of the Pacific Ocean, on the coast of California, south of San Francisco. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public research university primarily situated in suburban Irvine, California, USA; a significant portion of the campus falls into the neighboring community of Newport Beach. ... The University of California, Merced (UC Merced), located in the San Joaquin Valley at Merced, California (), is the tenth University of California campus. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ...

Contents

History

Although some of the original founders had already outlined plans for an institution like UCSC as early as the 1930s, the opportunity to realize their vision did not present itself until the City of Santa Cruz made a bid to the University of California Regents in the mid-1950s to build a campus in the mountains outside town. The formal design process of the Santa Cruz campus began in the late 1950s, culminating in the Long Range Development Plan of 1963.[8] Construction had started by 1964, and the University was able to accommodate its first students (albeit living in trailers on what is now the East Field athletic area) in 1965. The campus was intended to be a showcase for contemporary architecture, progressive teaching methods, and undergraduate research.[9] Face The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known in Europe as the World Depression. ... The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ... This does not cite any references or sources. ... The Santa Cruz Mountains, part of the Pacific Coast Ranges, are a mountain range in central California, United States. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1964 (MCMLXIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (the link is to a full 1964 calendar). ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ...


When UCSC opened, student protests on college campuses across the United States were becoming increasingly common.[10] According to a popular campus myth, the campus was therefore designed on a decentralized plan, in order that there would be no central quadrangle or central administrative buildings to serve as rallying points for protests. However, the architectural plans and layout for the campus were already completed by the early 1960's, so there should be no truth to this supposition. According to founding chancellor Dean McHenry, the purpose of the college system was to combine the benefits of a major research university with the intimacy of a smaller college. [11] Direct action is a form of political activism which seeks immediate remedy for perceived ills, as opposed to indirect actions such as electing representatives who promise to provide remedy at some later date. ... Dean E. McHenry (1910 – March 17, 1998) was the founding chancellor of the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ...

McHenry Library
McHenry Library

Roads on campus were named after UC Regents who voted in favor of building the campus. Kerr Hall, which houses UCSC's top-level administrative offices, was named after then-UC President Clark Kerr, who had long shared a passion with former Stanford roommate McHenry to build a university modeled as "several Swarthmores" (i.e., small liberal arts colleges) in close proximity to each other.[12] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ... Clark Kerr (May 17, 1911 – December 1, 2003) was the first Chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley (1952–1958) and the 12th President of the University of California (1958–1967). ... Stanford may refer: Stanford University Places: Stanford, Kentucky Stanford, California, home of Stanford University Stanford Shopping Center Stanford, New York, town in Dutchess County. ... Swarthmore College is a private, independent, liberal arts college in the United States with an enrollment of about 1,450 students. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ...


One of the first University structures on campus to be completed was the Hahn Student Services Building. In April 1971, a fire gutted the building, which then had to be completely rebuilt inside the only part of the original building still standing - its burned-out concrete shell. The catastrophe, exacerbated by the length of time it took the Santa Cruz Fire Department to respond from its stations in town to the conflagration in the center of the relatively remote campus, led directly to the establishment of the UC Santa Cruz Fire Department, one of only two campus fire departments in the University of California system.[13] The UC Santa Cruz Fire Department is the agency tasked with protecting life and property from fire and related dangers on the University of California, Santa Cruzs rural, heavily-forested campus and in the surrounding community, as well as providing limited services to UCSCs more widely-distributed, off...


For most of its history, UCSC employed a unique student evaluation system. The only grades assigned were "pass" and "no pass", supplemented with narrative evaluations. Beginning in 1997, UCSC switched to a conventional letter grading system, but course grades are still supplemented with evaluations. The "pass-no pass" system is still available, but many academic programs limit or even forbid pass-no pass grading. Overall, students may now earn no more than 25% of their UCSC credits on a "pass-no pass" basis. [14] In the United States, grading is done with several different systems. ... In education, narrative evaluation is a form of performance measurement and feedback which can be used as an alternative or supplement to grading. ...


A large and growing population of politically liberal UCSC alumni in Santa Cruz has helped to change the electorate of the town from predominantly Republican [15] to markedly left-leaning, voting nearly three to one for Democrat John Kerry over Republican George W. Bush in the 2004 U.S. presidential election. [16] Mike Rotkin, UCSC alumnus, lecturer in Community Studies, and self-described 'socialist-feminist,' has been elected Mayor of Santa Cruz several times, and the City Council of Santa Cruz recently issued a proclamation opposing the USA PATRIOT Act.[17] This article is about Progressivism. ... “Alumni” redirects here. ... The Republican Party is one of two major contemporary political parties in the United States of America, along with the Democratic Party. ... “Leftism” redirects here. ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      Further information: Politics of the United States#Organization of American political parties The Democratic... John Forbes Kerry (born December 11, 1943) is the junior United States Senator from Massachusetts, in his fourth term of office. ... George Walker Bush (born July 6, 1946) is the 43rd and current President of the United States, inaugurated on January 20, 2001. ... Presidential election results map. ... Community studies is an academic discipine, drawing on sociology and anthropology, and particularly the social research methodology ethnography (participant observation). ... Socialist feminism is a branch of feminism that focuses upon both the public and private spheres of a womans life and argues that liberation can only be achieved by working to end both the economic and cultural sources of womens oppression. ... The Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism Act of 2001 (Public Law 107-56), known as the USA PATRIOT Act or simply the Patriot Act, is an American act which President George W. Bush signed into law on October 26, 2001. ...


In January 2006, UCSC was the subject of an article in The New York Times discussing the school's opposition to military recruiters and allegations of spying on the actions of Students Against War, the campus's primary antiwar group. [18] For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City by Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. ... A British Army etc. ... Antimilitarism is a doctrine commonly found in the anarchist and, more globally, in the socialist movement, which may be both characterized as internationalist movements. ...


On June 24, 2006, Denice Denton, UCSC's ninth Chancellor, committed suicide by jumping from the rooftop deck of The Paramount high-rise apartment complex in San Francisco where her partner lived. [19] She had been criticized for spending approximately $600,000 to remodel her campus residence. She had also been criticized for accepting her chancellorship with the understanding that her life partner would be given a position as well (this arrangement is not uncommon when universities recruit faculty and administrators), and for various other reasons often involving the ongoing fight for control of the campus between the UC Office of the President and the local faculty. She had however been widely lauded at UCSC for her response to Harvard President Larry Summers's remarks at an academic symposium regarding the genetic suitability of different genders to careers in science and mathematics.[19] June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... Denice Dee Denton (August 27, 1959 – June 24, 2006) was the ninth Chancellor of the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC). ... Rather than surrender to US soldiers, the Mayor (Bürgermeister) of Leipzig Germany, committed suicide along with his wife and daughter on April 20, 1945. ... The Paramount, or 680 Mission Street at Third is a 43-story rental-apartment tower that is located in South of Market just outside of the Financial District on Mission Street in San Francisco, California. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... Robert C. Dynes is the president of the University of California system. ... Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... Larry Summers Lawrence Henry Summers (born November 30, 1954) is an American economist, politician, and academic. ...


Campus

The Great Meadow
The Great Meadow
A view of the western side of the UCSC campus, with College Eight to the left and Family Student Housing to the right.
A view of the western side of the UCSC campus, with College Eight to the left and Family Student Housing to the right.
Engineering Two Building
Engineering Two Building

The 2,001 acre (8.1 km²) UCSC campus is located 75 miles (120 km) south of San Francisco. Elevation varies from 285 feet (87 m) at the campus entrance to 1,195 feet (364 m) at the northern boundary, a difference of about 900 feet (275 m). The southern portion of the campus primarily consists of a large, open meadow, locally known as the Great Meadow. To the north of the meadow lie most of the campus' buildings, many of them among redwood groves. The campus is bounded on the south by the city's upper-west-side neighborhoods, on the east by Harvey West Park [20] and the Pogonip open space preserve, [21] on the north by Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park [22] near the town of Felton, and on the west by Gray Whale Ranch, a portion of Wilder Ranch State Park. [23] The northern half of the campus property has remained in its undeveloped, forested state apart from hiking and bicycle trails. The heavily-forested area has allowed UC Santa Cruz to operate a recreational vehicle park as a form of student housing. [24] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x621, 137 KB) Summary The Great Meadow at the University of California, Santa Cruz near Santa Cruz, California. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x621, 137 KB) Summary The Great Meadow at the University of California, Santa Cruz near Santa Cruz, California. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 598 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 533 pixelsFull resolution (1536 × 1024 pixel, file size: 598 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links LickObservOriginalBldgLargeScope--cropped. ... Image File history File links LickObservOriginalBldgLargeScope--cropped. ... The Lick Observatory is an astronomical observatory, owned and operated by the University of California. ... Mount Hamilton is a mountain in Californias Diablo Range. ... Nickname: Location of San Jose within Santa Clara County, California. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x619, 198 KB) Summary Engineering Building 2 and the Jack Baskin Engineering Building at the University of California, Santa Cruz, near Santa Cruz, California. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x619, 198 KB) Summary Engineering Building 2 and the Jack Baskin Engineering Building at the University of California, Santa Cruz, near Santa Cruz, California. ... Nickname: Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: , Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Founded 1776 Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ... A meadow is a habitat of rolling or flat terrain where grasses predominate. ... Binomial name Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. ... Henry Cowell Redwoods State Park is a property of the State of Californias State Parks Department. ... Felton is a census-designated place located in Santa Cruz County, California. ... Gray Whale Ranch is a part of Wilder Ranch State Park in Santa Cruz County, California. ... A RV park (sometimes referred to as a Recreational Vehicle park or Caravan park) is the equivalent of a hotel for people with recreational vehicles. ...


Facilities

The McHenry Library houses UCSC's arts and letters collection, with most of the scientific reading at the newer Science and Engineering Library. In addition, the colleges host smaller libraries, which serve as quiet places to study. The McHenry Special Collections Library includes the archives of Robert A. Heinlein, the mycology book collection of composer John Cage, the Hayden White collection of 16th century Italian printing, a photography collection with nearly half a million items, and the Mary Lea Shane Archive. The latter contains an extensive collection of photographs, letters, and other documents related to Lick Observatory dating back to 1870. [25] As of 2006, a renovation and expansion program is underway at McHenry, scheduled for completion in 2009. The library will remain open during construction, with brief closures as needed. [26] The McHenry Library is the main campus library of the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Robert Anson Heinlein (July 7, 1907 – May 8, 1988) was one of the most popular, influential, and controversial authors of hard science fiction. ... Mycology (from the Greek μύκης, meaning fungus) is the study of fungi, their genetic and biochemical properties, their taxonomy, and their use to humans as a source for tinder, medicinals (e. ... For Mortal Kombat character, see Johnny Cage. ... Insert non-formatted text hereHayden White(1928-3012) is an historian in the tradition of literary criticism, perhaps most famous for his work Metahistory: The Historical Imagination in Nineteenth-Century Europe (1973). ... The Lick Observatory is an astronomical observatory, owned and operated by the University of California. ... 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Off-campus facilities maintained by UCSC include the Lick and Keck Observatories and the Long Marine Laboratory. The Lick Observatory is an astronomical observatory, owned and operated by the University of California. ... The W. M. Keck Observatory is home to two of the largest optical/near-infrared telescopes in the world, at the 4,145 meter (13,600 ft) summit of Mauna Kea in Hawaii. ... The Long Marine laboratory is a research and education center which opened on March 11, 2000. ...


Geology

The campus is built on a portion of the Cowell Family ranch, which was given as a gift to the University of California. The original living quarters for ranch employees are still standing at the campus' main entrance, or "base", as is the stonehouse which served as the paymaster's house. The stonehouse was home to the campus newspaper, City on a Hill Press, from the 1970s to the mid-1990s. Many of the other original ranch buildings have been renovated into comfortable modern offices. City on a Hill Press, originally launched in 1966 as The Fulcrum, is the student newspaper of record for the University of California, Santa Cruz. ...


The Cowell Ranch was a part of the Henry Cowell Lime and Cement Company. The limestone that runs under most of campus was pulled from one of several quarries, the most notable being the Upper Quarry. There is an amphitheater in this quarry that is used for most of the large gatherings on campus. The original campus plan included a stadium in the Lower Quarry, but this was never realized. Once the limestone was quarried, lime was extracted by burning it in limekilns adjacent to the quarries. The fires were fueled by the redwood trees that were logged from adjacent land. Although most of the kilns are fenced off, they are visible in several locations on and around campus and in Pogonip.-1... Calcium oxide (CaO), commonly known as lime, quicklime or burnt lime, is a widely used chemical compound. ... A 19th century limekiln A preserved lime kiln in London A lime kiln is a kiln used to produce quicklime by the calcination of limestone (calcium carbonate). ... The Pogonip is a city-run park and open space in Santa Cruz, California, located adjacent to the University of California, Santa Cruz. ...


Creeks traverse the UCSC campus within several ravines. Footbridges span those ravines on pedestrian paths linking various areas of campus. The footbridges make it possible to walk to any part of campus within 20 minutes in spite of the campus being built on a mountainside with varying elevations. At night, fog shrouds the ends of the bridges, so that one can be in the center without being able to see either end or the bottom of the ravine below. Only the orange lights along the path twisting away into the woods provide any sense of place.


There are a number of caves on the UCSC grounds, some of which have challenging passages. [27]


The combination of porous limestone bedrock with torrential coastal winter rains can lead to sinkholes; there are two such 'bottomless' pits across from the Science Hill complex. The Jack Baskin Engineering Building, formerly known as the Applied Sciences Building, began sinking shortly after it was built; in the late 1970's, hundreds of tons of concrete were poured underneath its foundation to prevent it from sinking.[citation needed]


The UCSC campus is also one of the few homes to Mima Mounds in the United States. They are extremely rare in the United States, and, indeed, in the world in general. Mima Mounds are mounds of soil some meters tall that occur in various places in the world. ...


Organization

UCSC Chancellors
†Died in office

The university offers 61 undergraduate majors and 31 minors, with graduate programs in 32 fields.


[28] Popular undergraduate majors include Art, Business Management Economics, Molecular and Cell Biology, and Psychology. [29] Interdisciplinary programs, such as Feminist Studies, Community Studies, American Studies, Environmental Studies, and the unique History of Consciousness Department are also hosted alongside UCSC's more traditional academic departments. The Bath, a painting by Mary Cassatt (1844–1926). ... Management (from Old French ménagement the art of conducting, directing, from Latin manu agere to lead by the hand) characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organization, often a business, through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... Psychology (from Greek: ψυχή, psukhÄ“, spirit, soul; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is an academic / applied discipline involving the scientific study of mental processes and behavior of humans and animals. ... History of Consciousness is an interdisciplinary graduate program with links to the sciences, social sciences, and humanities at the University of California in Santa Cruz, California. ...


The undergraduate program, with only the partial exception of those majors run through the University's School of Engineering, is still based on the version of the "residential college system" outlined by Clark Kerr and Dean McHenry at the inception of their original plans for the campus (see History, above). Upon admission, all undergraduate students join one of ten colleges, with which they usually stay affiliated for their entire undergraduate careers.[30] Almost all faculty members are affiliated with a college as well.[30] The individual colleges provide housing and dining services, while the university as a whole offers courses and majors to the general student community.[30] Other universities with similar college systems include Rice University and the University of California, San Diego. The ten colleges are, in order of establishment: A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ... Lovett Hall William Marsh Rice University (commonly called Rice University and opened in 1912 as The William Marsh Rice Institute for the Advancement of Letters, Science and Art) is a private, comprehensive research university located in Houston, Texas, USA, near the Museum District and adjacent to the Texas Medical Center. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a public, coeducational research university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ...


Each of the colleges has its own, distinctive architectural style and a resident faculty provost, who is the nominal head of his or her college.[30] An incoming first-year student will take a mandatory "core course" within his or her respective college, with a curriculum and central theme unique that college.[30] College resident populations vary from about 750 to 1,550 students, with roughly half of undergraduates living on campus within their college community or in smaller, intramural campus communities such as the International Living Center, the Trailer Park, and the Village.[30] Coursework, academic majors and general areas of study are not limited by college membership, although colleges host the offices of many academic departments. Graduate students are not affiliated with a residential college, though a large portion of their offices, too, have historically tended to be based in the colleges. Cowell College with the Monterey Bay in the background The first of the ten residential colleges of the University of California, Santa Cruz, established in 1965, Cowell College sits on the edge of a redwood forest with a remarkable view of Monterey Bay. ... Stevenson College Adlai E. Stevenson College is a residential college at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Crown College is one of the residential colleges that makes up the University of California, Santa Cruz, USA. Located on the upper northern side of campus by Merrill College, Crown also borders the newly constructed Colleges Nine and Ten. ... Categories: University stubs | University of California | Universities and colleges in California ... Redwood sign in front of Porter College Benjamin F. Porter College, a residential college at the University of California, Santa Cruz, is located on the lower west side of the university, to the south of Kresge College. ... Kresge College sign Kresge College is one of the residential colleges that make up the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Oakes College Oakes College is a residential college at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Entrance to College Eight College Eight is a residential college at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Dorm buildings at College Nine. ... A dorm building at College Ten. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ...


Students and faculty

In the Fall 2006 semester, UCSC enrolled 13,941 undergraduates and 1,419 graduate and postgraduate students, for a student body total of 15,360. [4]

The following table shows the ethnic breakdown of the student body:[4] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixelsFull resolution (930 × 654 pixel, file size: 268 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Modified/enhanced version of Image:027 24A.JPG, a view from Cowell College, University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 563 pixelsFull resolution (930 × 654 pixel, file size: 268 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Modified/enhanced version of Image:027 24A.JPG, a view from Cowell College, University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Cowell College with the Monterey Bay in the background The first of the ten residential colleges of the University of California, Santa Cruz, established in 1965, Cowell College sits on the edge of a redwood forest with a remarkable view of Monterey Bay. ... Download high resolution version (1098x728, 481 KB)Entrance to Oakes College, one of the residential colleges at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Download high resolution version (1098x728, 481 KB)Entrance to Oakes College, one of the residential colleges at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Oakes College Oakes College is a residential college at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Image File history File links Ucsdcollegeeight. ... Image File history File links Ucsdcollegeeight. ... Entrance to College Eight College Eight is a residential college at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 490 pixelsFull resolution (1344 × 823 pixel, file size: 685 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Administration building at Merrill College, one of the residential colleges at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 490 pixelsFull resolution (1344 × 823 pixel, file size: 685 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg)Administration building at Merrill College, one of the residential colleges at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Categories: University stubs | University of California | Universities and colleges in California ...

Ethnicity Under-
graduates
Graduate
students
White[31] 51.7% 48.8%
Asian American and Pacific Islander 19.5% 9.6%
Hispanic or Latino 15.6% 8.5%
African American 2.6% 1.6%
American Indian 0.9% 0.7%
Not stated (U.S. residents) 9.1% 17.1%
International 0.6% 13.7%

The term White American officially refers to people of European, Middle Eastern, and North African descent residing in the United States. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... // Demographics in 2000 US Census Pacific Islander Americans represent the smallest group counted on the 2000 US Census. ...  Countries where Spanish has official status. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Native Americans in the United States are the indigenous peoples from the regions of North America now encompassed by the continental United States, including parts of Alaska. ...

Econo-political demographics

According to a 2002 study of first year students, most students come from mass affluent backgrounds and are more likely to identify as liberal than the national average. The majority came from the households in the upper income quartile. The median household income UCSC students reported for their families of origin was $80,600, roughly 87.5% above the national average in 2002. In terms of political orientation, the student body was far more liberal than the general U.S. population, but more centrist than the national average for professors. The majority of respodents, 59%, identified as liberal, 34% as "Middle of the Road" and 8% as conservative.[32] A 2004 survey among full-time faculty members across the U.S. found 72% of professors identifying as liberal, with 15% identifying as conservative.[33] Mass affluent is a marketing term used to refer to the growing high end of the mass market. ... This article discusses the history and development of various notions of liberalism in the United States. ... The term Average Joe, Average Jane or Average Joe-Schmoe is used in the United States to refer to the average American. ... For information on the income of individuals please see Personal income in the United States This graphic shows the distribution of gross annual household income. ... The median household income is commonly used to provide data about geographic areas and divides households into two equal segments with the first half of households earning less than the median household income and the other half earning more. ... In politics, centrism usually refers to the political ideal of promoting moderate policies which land in the middle ground between different political extremes. ... The meaning of the word professor (Latin: one who claims publicly to be an expert) varies. ... Conservatism in the United States comprises a constellation of political ideologies including fiscal conservatism, free market or economic liberalism, social conservatism,[1] bioconservatism and religious conservatism,[2][3] as well as support for a strong military,[4] small government and promotion of states rights. ...


Though UCSC students come from throughout the United States and the world, a large majority are from California. The hometowns of UCSC undergraduates include:[4] Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ...

Region Percent
Monterey Bay area and Silicon Valley 16.1%
San Francisco Bay Area 31.9%
Other Northern California 2.5%
Central Valley and adjacent areas 10.7%
Los Angeles and Southern California 24.7%
San Diego and desert areas 7.7%
Other U.S. states 3.1%
Foreign 0.3%
Unknown 2.9%

In general, graduation and retention rates are above national averages but below the mean among UC campuses. Among students who entered in 1999, 70% graduated within six years, ten percentage points below the UC average. Earlier statistics show that the six-year graduation rate is above the mean for both NCAA Division I schools and a sample of major universities throughout the United States. [34] About half of graduates pursue further education, and 13 percent proceed to advanced degree programs within six months of graduation. [35] A view of Monterey Bay Monterey Bay is a bay of the Pacific Ocean, on the coast of California, south of San Francisco. ... A view of downtown San Jose, the self-proclaimed Capital of Silicon Valley. ... USGS satellite photo of the San Francisco Bay Area. ... Northern California, sometimes referred to as NorCal, is the northern portion of the U.S. state of California. ... The Central Valley of California Part of the Valley as seen from overhead A typical Central Valley scene at ground level The Central Valley is a large, flat valley that dominates the central portion of the U.S. state of California. ... d Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... For the urban complex straddling the United States-Mexico border, see Bajalta California. ... Nickname: Location of San Diego within San Diego County Coordinates: , Country United States State California County San Diego Founded July 16, 1769 Incorporated March 27, 1850 Government  - Mayor Jerry Sanders  - City Attorney Michael Aguirre  - City Council Scott Peters Kevin Faulconer Toni Atkins Tony Young Brian Maienschein Donna Frye Jim Madaffer... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  Politics Portal      A U.S. state is any one of the fifty subnational entities of the... Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ...


As of 2006, UCSC's faculty included two members of the Institute of Medicine, 21 members of the Academy of Arts and Sciences, and eleven members of the National Academy of Sciences.[6] The young Baskin School of Engineering, UCSC's first professional school, and the Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering are gaining recognition, as has the work UCSC researchers have done on the Human Genome Project. UCSC administers the National Science Foundation's Center for Adaptive Optics. 2006 is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, is an American organization whose purpose is to provide national advice on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine, and health (National Academy of Sciences, n. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... The University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC or UC Santa Cruz) is a coeducational public university located in Santa Cruz, California, USA. It is one of the ten campuses of the University of California, and ranked by US News as the twenty-eighth best public university in the nation. ... // The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a project to de-code (i. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ...


According to a 2005 report by SCI-BYTES magazine, UCSC ranked second in the United States for academic research impact in the field of space sciences between 1999 and 2003, behind Princeton University. [36] A report in 2002 had ranked UCSC first for research impact in the space sciences and second in physics. [37] In the last National Research Council rankings of graduate programs, published in 1995, Astronomy and Astrophysics and Linguistics both ranked in the top ten. [38] In its survey of more than 300 research universities, econphd.net, an online resource for graduate students, ranked the UCSC Economics Department ninth in the world in the field of international finance. [39] Of all the UC campuses, UC Santa Cruz has had the highest percentage of upper-division students participating in UC’s Education Abroad Program for the last five years.[citation needed] Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey, in the United States of America. ...


In September 2003, a ten-year task order contract valued at more than $330 million was awarded by NASA Ames Research Center to the University of California to establish and operate a University Affiliated Research System (UARC). UCSC manages the UARC for the University of California. [40] Aerial View of Moffett Field and NASA Ames Research Center. ...


Athletics and student traditions

UCSC competes in Division III of the NCAA as an Independent member. There are fourteen varsity sports (men's and women's basketball, soccer, water polo, volleyball, swimming and diving, women's golf, and women's cross country). UCSC teams are nationally ranked in tennis, soccer, water polo and swimming. They have won six men's tennis team championships, and are the current defending national champions after defeating Emory to win the 2007 National Championship. The Banana Slugs were also runners-up in men's soccer in 2004. In the 2006 season, the men's water polo team won the Division III championship, as well as an overall ranking of 19th in the nation. UCSC is one of the largest NCAA Division III members. Division III (or DIII) is a division of the National Collegiate Athletic Association of the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... Basketball is a team sport in which two teams of five active players each try to score points against one another by throwing a ball through a 10-foot high hoop (the basket) under organized rules. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... Water polo is a team water sport, which can be best described as a combination of swimming, handball and wrestling. ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State High school Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...


In addition to its NCAA sports, UCSC maintains a number of successful club sides including its women's rugby team, which won the Division II National Collegiate Championship during its 05-06 season.[1] A BCRFC match at Boston College Rugby football, often just rugby, may refer to a number of sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School in England United Kingdom. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ...


UCSC's mascot is the banana slug (specifically, Ariolimax dolichophallus[41]). In 1981, when the university began participating in NCAA intercollegiate sports, the then-chancellor and some student athletes declared the mascot to be the "sea lions." Most students disliked the new mascot and offered an alternative mascot, the banana slug. In 1986, students voted via referendum to declare the banana slug the official mascot of UCSC—a vote the chancellor refused to honor, arguing that only athletes should choose the mascot. When a poll of athletes showed that they, too, wanted to be "Slugs," the chancellor relented. A sea lion statue can still be seen in front of the Thimann Hall lecture building, and a sea lion is still painted on the floor of the basketball court used for league play.[42] Species Ariolimax californicus Ariolimax columbianus Ariolimax dolichophallus The banana slugs (Ariolimax) are a genus of terrestrial mollusk, although when used in the context of a species, banana slug invariably refers to the Pacific banana slug (Ariolimax columbianus). ... Genera Eumetopias Zalophus Otaria Neophoca Phocarctos Hundreds of California Sea Lions sunbathing on Pier 39 in San Francisco. ... Elections Part of the Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A referendum (plural: referendums or referenda) or plebiscite (from Latin plebiscita, originally a decree of the Concilium Plebis) is a direct vote in which an entire electorate is asked to either accept or reject a particular proposal. ...


UC Santa Cruz is well known for its marijuana culture. On April 20, 2007, approximately 2000 UCSC students gathered at Porter Meadow to celebrate the annual "420 day." Students and others openly smoked marijuana while campus police stood by. [43] Another well known tradition is what is known as "The Porter Run" or "First Rain". Students run around campus naked or nearly naked to celebrate the school year's first night of rain. The run starts at Porter and proceeds to travel to the other colleges.[citation needed]


Student media

  • City on a Hill Press, a weekly publication that serves as the traditional campus newspaper.
  • TWANAS, the Third World and Native American Student Press Collective publishes issues about every quarter for various communities of color at UCSC. It's peak years were during the 70s, 80s and 90s.
  • Fish Rap Live!, the "alternative," comedic paper
  • "The Moxie Production Group", The best student run film organization at UCSC, producing content on a quarterly basis.
  • The Project, a quarterly paper, for UCSC's radical community
  • The Disorientation Guide, published on sporadic years, introduces new students to UCSC's radical history and various political issues that face the campus and community
  • Rapt Magazine, a quarterly literary and arts magazine (formerly known as the Kresge Town Krier)
  • The Leviathan, a Jewish student life publication
  • Chinquapin, an open-ended creative journal sponsored by the creative writing department [2]
  • Turnstile, a poetry journal
  • Red Wheelbarrow, a "literary arts" journal [3]
  • Matchbox Magazine, an annual humanities publication, started at UCSC, that operates across many UC campuses.
  • KZSC, the student-run campus radio station
  • Santa Cruz Indymedia, a local activist resource with a lot of UCSC content

City on a Hill Press, originally launched in 1966 as The Fulcrum, is the student newspaper of record for the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... Fish Rap Live!, also known as FRL!, is a monthly alternative publication at the University of California, Santa Cruz. ... An external view of the KZSC building KZSC (88. ... The Independent Media Center, also called Indymedia or the IMC, is a loose network of amateur or alternative media organizations and journalists who organize into decentralized collectives, normally around geographic locations. ...

See also

This page lists notable alumni and faculty of the University of California, Santa Cruz // William D. Adams - President of Colby College, Waterville, Maine Alexander Gonzalez, PhD 1979 - President of California State University, Sacramento Tod Machover - MIT Media Lab Susie Bright - Writer, sex activist Laurie Garrett, BA 1975 - Newsday science reporter... Santa Cruz is the county seat and largest city of Santa Cruz County, California, United States. ... The UC Santa Cruz Fire Department is the agency tasked with protecting life and property from fire and related dangers on the University of California, Santa Cruzs rural, heavily-forested campus and in the surrounding community, as well as providing limited services to UCSCs more widely-distributed, off... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The University of California, Santa Cruz, Arboretum, also called the UCSC Arboretum, is located on the campus of the University of California, Santa Cruz, in Santa Cruz, California, USA. The Arboretum, and in fact the entire campus, was originally part of the larger property of pioneer Henry Cowell. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ America's Best Colleges 2006: University of California-Santa Cruz: At A Glance. U.S. News and World Report: America's Best Colleges 2006. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  2. ^ [http://planning.ucsc.edu/irps/StaffProfiles/PersonnelProfilePage2006.pdf UCSC Personnel Profile by Status and Gender from the Payroll Activity Record, as of November 2006]. UCSC Institutional Research & Policy Studies. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  3. ^ Statistics on Senate Faculty 2006-07. UCSC Academic Human Resources. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  4. ^ a b c d e UC Santa Cruz - Statistics. Retrieved on 2007-05-15.
  5. ^ 1988 LRDP intro. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  6. ^ a b UC Santa Cruz - Campus Overview. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  7. ^ US News. (13 July, 2007). America's Best Colleges 2007: National Universities: Top Schools.. Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  8. ^ Long Range Development Plan, University of California, Santa Cruz (1963). Campus Planning Committee. Retrieved on 2007-04-10.
  9. ^ Santa Cruz: Historical Overview. University of California History, Digital Archives. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  10. ^ Opening of UCSC heralds social and political changes. Santa Cruz Sentinel. Retrieved on 2007-03-26.
  11. ^ Dean McHenry: 03-23-98. University of California, Santa Cruz Currents. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  12. ^ Ibid.
  13. ^ Every day is different for UCSC firefighters. UC Santa Cruz Currents Online. Retrieved on 2007-03-25.
  14. ^ UCSC Discover - Academics. Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  15. ^ "Tom Honig: Santa Cruz was once Reagan country", Santa Cruz Sentinel, 2004-06-04. Retrieved on 2006-05-04. 
  16. ^ Santa Cruz County Election Results, November 2004 (pdf). Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  17. ^ ACLU press release announcing that the City of Santa Cruz passed a resolution opposing the USA PATRIOT Act. Retrieved on 2006-06-08.
  18. ^ A Protest, a Spy Program and a Campus in an Uproar. The New York Times (2006-01-14).
  19. ^ a b UC Santa Cruz chancellor jumps to her death in S.F.. San Francisco Chronicle (2006-06-24).
  20. ^ Parks and Recreation - Harvey West Park. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  21. ^ Parks and Recreation - Pogonip. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  22. ^ Henry Cowell Redwoods SP. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  23. ^ Wilder Ranch SP. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  24. ^ UC Santa Cruz - University Family Student Housing. Retrieved on 2006-10-27.
  25. ^ UCSC Special Collections--Introduction. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  26. ^ The McHenry Library Addition and Renovation Project (Frequently Asked Questions). Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  27. ^ UCSC campus map showing cave location, Empire Cave. Accessed October 27, 2006.
  28. ^ UC Santa Cruz - Academic Programs. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  29. ^ University of California, Santa Cruz (Statistics). The Princeton Review. Retrieved on 2006-06-29. (Note: Registration required)
  30. ^ a b c d e f UCSC General Catalog 2004-2006 (The Colleges section). Retrieved on 2006-06-29.
  31. ^ The cited survey uses the term "Euro-American"
  32. ^ Higher Education Research Institute. (Fall 2002). CIRP Freshman Survey.. Retrieved on 2007-07-13.
  33. ^ Kurtz, H. (29 March, 2005). College Faculties A Most Liberal Lot, Study Finds. The Washington Post.. Retrieved on 2007-07-02.
  34. ^ UC Santa Cruz - Retention & Graduation. Retrieved on 2006-06-28.
  35. ^ UC Santa Cruz - WASC Accreditation Process. Retrieved on 2006-06-28.
  36. ^ SCI-BYTES: Space Science: High-Impact US Universities, 1999-2003. Retrieved on 2006-06-28.
  37. ^ Physical Sciences at U.S. Universities. Retrieved on 2006-07-31.
  38. ^ UC excels in national ranking of doctoral programs. Retrieved on 2006-07-31.
  39. ^ Economics Department at UCSC ranked ninth in world in international finance. Retrieved on 2006-07-31.
  40. ^ UARC - Index. Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  41. ^ Leading in the New Millennium. UCSC University Relations. Retrieved on 2006-10-15.
  42. ^ UCSC General Catalog 2004-2006: Student Life (Banana Slug Mascot section). Retrieved on 2006-05-04.
  43. ^ Santa Cruz Sentinel: 04-24-2007. Santa Cruz Sentinel. Retrieved on 2007-04-24.

For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 3 is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 26 is the 85th day of the year (86th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 84th day of the year (85th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... shelby was here 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... June 4 is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 159th day of the year (160th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 300th day of the year (301st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 180th day of the year (181st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 212th day of the year (213th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For the Manfred Mann album, see 2006 (album). ... is the 124th day of the year (125th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is now the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (115th in leap years). ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of California, Santa Cruz - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2587 words)
The University of California, Santa Cruz, also known as UCSC or UC Santa Cruz, is one of the ten campuses of the University of California.
Although the original founders had outlined their plans for the University in the 1930s, the opportunity did not present itself to realize their vision until the City of Santa Cruz made a bid to the University of California Regents in the mid-1950s to build a campus in the mountains outside town.
In January 2006, UCSC was the subject of an article in The New York Times discussing the school's opposition to military recruiters and allegations of spying on one of the campus's anti war groups.
Santa Cruz, California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2350 words)
Santa Cruz was first settled by the Ohlone, Native American hunter-gatherers who inhabited the region between 500 BCE and the early colonial period.
Santa Cruz was discovered by Spanish exlorer Don Gaspar de Portola in 1769 and was subsequently colonized in the mid-1700s by Spain, which established both a mission (Mission Santa Cruz) and a secular settlement named Branciforte.
Santa Cruz is home to the University of California, Santa Cruz, which was built starting in the 1960s as an 'alternative' campus with a residential college system based on the British system, (see University of Cambridge or University of Oxford).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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