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Encyclopedia > University of California, San Francisco
University of California, San Francisco

Motto: Fiat lux (Latin)
Motto in English: Let there be light
Established: 1873
Type: Public
Endowment: US $1.363 billion[1]
Chancellor: J. Michael Bishop
Faculty: 1,686
Postgraduates: 2,863 (Fall 2005) UC Office of the President
Location: San Francisco, California
Campus: Urban, 135 acres (0.6 km²), plus 43 acres at Mission Bay campus
Colors: UCSF Teal      
Affiliations: University of California
Website: www.ucsf.edu

The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) is one of the world's leading centers of health sciences research, patient care, and education. UCSF's medical, pharmacy, dental, nursing, and graduate schools are among the top health science professional schools in the world. The UCSF Medical Center is consistently ranked among the top 10 hospitals in the United States by U.S. News & World Report [2]. Some of UCSF's most renowned treatment centers include kidney and liver transplant, neurosurgery, neurology, oncology, ophthalmology, gene therapy, women's health, fetal surgery, pediatrics, and internal medicine. UCSF also has the nation's leading HIV/AIDS treatment and research centers. Collaborations with African Universities such as the University of Zimbabwe to deal with HIV have been established. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Let there be light is an English translation of the Hebrew יְהִי אוֹר (or yehiy or). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... J. Michael Bishop (born February 22, 1936) is an American immunologist and microbiologist who won the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Bleu celeste (sky blue) is a rarely-occurring tincture in heraldry (not being one of the seven main colours or metals or the three staynard colours). Initially considered to be European rather than English or Scottish, after the Second World War it became more prevalent in England in badges of... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ... Patient care is part of a nurses role in implementing a care plan. ... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that are used to treat patients. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the dental profession. ... This article is about the practice in general. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A profession is a specialized work function within society, generally performed by a professional. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The kidneys are the organs that filter wastes (such as urea) from the blood and excrete them, along with water, as urine. ... The liver is the largest internal organ in the human body, and is an organ present in vertebrates and some other animals. ... Insertion of an electrode during neurosurgery for Parkinsons disease. ... Neurology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the nervous system. ... See cancer for the biology of the disease, as well as a list of malignant diseases. ... Gene therapy is the insertion of genes into an individuals cells and tissues to treat a disease, and hereditary diseases in which a defective mutant allele is replaced with a functional one. ... Womens health generally refers to health issues and matters specific to human female anatomy. ... Open fetal surgery is an invasive form of fetal intervention in the treatment of birth defects where the uterus is opened up for direct surgery on the fetus. ... This article is about the branch of medicine. ... Doctors of internal medicine (internists) are medical specialists who focus on adult medicine and have had special study and training focusing on the prevention and treatment of adult diseases. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The University of Zimbabwe (UZ), is the first, largest and most complete university in Zimbabwe. ...


Founded in 1873, the mission of UCSF is to serve as a "public university dedicated to saving lives and improving health." Though one of the ten campuses of the University of California, it is unique for being the only University of California campus dedicated solely to graduate education, and this in health and biomedical sciences. UCSF has developed a reputation for unique interdisciplinary collaboration between the health science disciplines which has led to some of the most important discoveries in the biosciences. The graduate-focused environment of UCSF, its relatively small size, and its culture of collaboration allows for a flexibility to translate new discoveries into new treatments hard to find even at many of the world's other top medical centers. Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Health science is the discipline of applied science which deals with human and animal health. ...

Contents

History

UCSF in 1908, with the streetcar that used to run on Parnassus Avenue
UCSF in 1908, with the streetcar that used to run on Parnassus Avenue

UCSF traces its history to Dr. Hugh H. Toland, a South Carolina surgeon who found great success and wealth after moving to San Francisco in 1852.[2] A previous school, the Cooper Medical College of the University of Pacific (founded 1858), entered a period of uncertainty in 1862 when its founder, Dr. Elias Samuel Cooper, passed away.[3] In 1864, Toland founded a new medical school, Toland Medical College, and the faculty of Cooper Medical College elect to suspend operations and join the new school.[3] Image File history File links UCSF_1908. ... Image File history File links UCSF_1908. ... Official language(s) English Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Largest metro area Columbia Area  Ranked 40th  - Total 34,726 sq mi (82,965 km²)  - Width 200 miles (320 km)  - Length 260 miles (420 km)  - % water 6  - Latitude 32° 2′ N to 35° 13′ N  - Longitude 78° 32′ W to 83... The University of the Pacific (also known as Pacific, and formerly known as UOP) is a private northern California university originally chartered on July 10, 1851 in Santa Clara, California, under the name California Wesleyan College by the California Supreme Court. ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ...


The University of California was founded in 1868, and by 1870 Toland Medical School began negotiating an affiliation with the new public university.[4] Meanwhile, some faculty of Toland Medical School elected to reopen the Medical Department of the University of the Pacific, which would later become Stanford University School of Medicine.[5] Negotiations between the Toland and the UC were complicated by Toland's demand that the medical school continue to bear his name, which he finally conceded.[4] In March 1873, the trustees of Toland Medical College deeded it to the Regents of the University of California, and it became "The Medical Department of the University of California."[4] On September 15, 1874, the school opened its doors to female students. Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1870 (MDCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Stanford Medical School Stanford University School of Medicine is affiliated with Stanford University and is located at Stanford University Medical Center in Stanford, California, adjacent to Palo Alto and Menlo Park. ... 1873 (MDCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ... is the 258th day of the year (259th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Campus

Saunders Court, Parnassus campus
Saunders Court, Parnassus campus

UCSF operates four major campus sites within the city of San Francisco, as well as numerous other minor sites scattered through San Francisco and the Bay Area.


Parnassus

Parnassus serves as the main campus and includes the 600 bed UCSF Medical Center, Langley Porter Psychiatric Institute, the School of Dentistry, the Children's Hospital, and research labs. UCSF's Beckman Vision Center is also located at the Parnassus campus. It is a center for the diagnosis, treatment and research of all areas of eye care, including vision correction surgery. For other uses, see Eye (disambiguation). ... Eye surgery in the middle ages. ...


Mission Bay

Mission Bay, UCSF
Mission Bay, UCSF
Mission Bay Community Center
Mission Bay Community Center

UCSF's Mission Bay Campus is the largest ongoing biomedical construction project in the world.[6] The 43-acre Mission Bay campus, opened in 2003 with construction still ongoing, contains additional research space and facilities to foster biotechnology and life sciences companies. It will double the size of UCSF's research enterprise over the next 10 years. The biotechnology company Genentech contributed $50 million toward construction of a building as part of a settlement regarding alleged theft of UCSF technology several decades earlier.[citation needed] Also located on the Mission Bay campus, the Arthur and Toni Rembe Rock Hall was designed by César Pelli and opened in February 2004. The building is named in honor of Arthur Rock and his wife, who made a $25 million gift to the university.[7] Byers Hall serves as the headquarters for the California Institute for Biomedical Research (QB3), a cooperative effort between the UC campuses at San Francisco, Berkeley, and Santa Cruz. The building is named after venture capitalist Brook Byers, co-chair of UCSF's capital campaign that concluded in 2005 and raised over $1.6 billion.[8] Additionally, the William J. Rutter Center, designed along with the adjacent 600-space parking structure by Ricardo Legorreta, opened in October 2005 and contains a fitness and recreation center, swimming pools, student services, and conference facilities. The building is named in honor of William J. Rutter, former chairman of the university's Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics and co-founder of Chiron Corporation.[9] Finally, a housing complex for 750 students and postdoctoral fellows and an 800-space parking garage also opened in late 2005. A fourth research building, designed by Rafael Viñoly and named the Helen Diller Family Cancer Research Building, is currently under construction and expected to open in fall 2008.[10] Two additional research buildings designated for neuroscience and cardiovascular research are currently in the planning and design phase.[11] UCSF is also in the early stages of planning for a new specialty hospital focused on women, children, and cancer to be built at the Mission Bay campus and scheduled to open by the end of 2014.[12] Mission Bay is a 303 acre neighborhood on the central bayshore of San Francisco, bounded by Townsend Avenue on the north, San Francisco Bay on the east, Mariposa Street on the south, and 7th Street and Interstate 280 on the west. ... Genentech, Inc. ... Genentech, Inc. ... muu Cesar Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted Argentine architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ... Arthur Rock (born August 19, 1926) is a venture capitalist of Silicon Valley, California. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Ricardo Legorreta Vilchis is a Mexican architect. ... A Chairman is the presiding officer of a meeting, organization, committee, or other deliberative body. ... Chiron Corporation (NASDAQ: NVS) was a multinational biotechnology firm based in Emeryville, California that was acquired by Novartis International AG on April 30, 2006. ... Rafael Viñoly, a world-famous architect, was born in 1944 in Uruguay. ...


Other

The Mount Zion campus contains UCSF's Comprehensive Cancer Center, Women's Health Center, and outpatient resources. The San Francisco General Hospital campus cares for the indigent population of San Francisco and contains San Francisco's only Level I trauma center.[citation needed] The hospital itself is owned and operated by the city of San Francisco, but many of its doctors carry UCSF affiliation and maintain research laboratories at the hospital campus. The earliest cases of HIV/AIDS were discovered at SF General Hospital in the 1980s.[citation needed] To this day SF General Hospital has the world's leading HIV/AIDS treatment and research center.[citation needed] San Francisco General Hospital is the main public hospital in San Francisco, California, and the only Level I Trauma Center in the city. ... Level I trauma center provides the highest level of Surgical care to trauma patients. ...


UCSF is also affiliated with the San Francisco VA Hospital and the J. David Gladstone Institutes, a private biomedical research entity that has recently moved to a new building adjacent to UCSF's Mission Bay campus. The headquarters of the new California Institute for Regenerative Medicine are also located nearby in the Mission Bay neighborhood. The United States Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is a government-run military veteran benefit system with Cabinet-level status. ... Embryonic stem cells of a mouse. ...


Academics

Hippocrates statue, Parnassus Ave. in front of the Robert H. Crede Ambulatory Care Center
Hippocrates statue, Parnassus Ave. in front of the Robert H. Crede Ambulatory Care Center

University of California, San Francisco is unique in that it performs only biomedical and patient-centered research in its Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Nursing, and Dentistry, and the Graduate Division, and their hundreds of associated laboratories. The university is known for innovation in medical research, public service, and patient care. UCSF's faculty includes three Nobel Prize winners, 31 members of the National Academy of Sciences, 69 members of the Institute of Medicine, and 30 members of the Academy of Arts and Sciences. UCSF confers a number of degrees, including Master of Science, Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Pharmacy, Doctor of Medicine, Doctor of Dental Surgery, and Doctor of Physical Therapy in a variety of fields. For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For other uses, see Pharmacy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the practice in general. ... This article is about the dental profession. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... The Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, is an American organization whose purpose is to provide national advice on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine, and health (National Academy of Sciences, n. ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... A masters degree is an academic degree usually awarded for completion of a postgraduate course of one or two years in duration. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... // In Canada the PharmD program is offered in both English and French. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Doctor of Dental Medicine. ... The Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) is a postbaccaluareate degree conferred upon successful completion of a doctoral level professional (entry-level) or postprofessional education program. ...


Rankings

In 1995, the National Research Council ranked UCSF in the top ten for biochemistry and molecular biology (1st), genetics (2nd), cell and developmental biology (3rd), neurosciences (4th), physiology (5th), and biomedical engineering (7th). The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ... Wöhler observes the synthesis of urea. ... Molecular biology is the study of biology at a molecular level. ... This article is about the general scientific term. ... Cell biology (also called cellular biology or formerly cytology, from the Greek kytos, container) is an academic discipline that studies cells. ... Views of a Foetus in the Womb, Leonardo da Vinci, ca. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The AbioCor artificial heart, an example of a biomedical engineering application of mechanical engineering with biocompatible materials for Cardiothoracic Surgery using an artificial organ. ...


Overall, the campus is fourth[13] in the nation in annual NIH funding with $452.2 million received in 2005. National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Ministry of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. ...


The well-regarded Academic Ranking of World Universities, published annually by Shanghai Jiaotong University, in 2008 ranks UCSF 3rd in the world for Life and Agricultural Sciences and 2nd in the world for Clinical Medicine and Pharmacy [14]. The professional schools of the University of California, San Francisco are among the top in the nation, according to current (2006) US News and World Report graduate school and other rankings. The schools also rank at or near the top in research funding from the National Institutes of Health. In addition, the UCSF Medical Center in 2007 was ranked by US News and World Report the 7th-best hospital in the nation[15], making it the highest-ranked medical center in northern California. National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Ministry of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. ...


School of Medicine

In 2007, ranked fifth overall among research-based medical schools by US News and World Report; the top in western United States. In rankings of medical schools for primary care, UCSF ranked 8th. In addition, the magazine ranked UCSF in the top 10 in seven of the eight medical school specialty programs assessed, including first in AIDS medical care, second in women's health, and second in internal medicine. The UCSF drug and alcohol abuse specialty ranks fifth nationally in the 2006 survey, while family medicine ranks 10th, pediatrics ninth, and geriatrics ninth.[16]


In 2005, the School of Medicine was the third largest recipient of National Institutes of Health research funds among all US medical schools, receiving awards totaling $398.2 million. National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Ministry of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. ...


Biological Sciences, PhD Programs

US News and World Report in 2006, the last time it surveyed doctoral programs in the biological sciences, ranked UCSF ninth best overall. In that survey, UCSF ranked second in cell biology, third in molecular biology, fifth in biochemistry/biophysics/structural biology, genetics/genomics/bioinformatics, and immunology/infectious disease, and sixth in neuroscience.[17]


School of Nursing

In 2003, US News and World Report ranked the UCSF graduate programs in nursing as second in the nation. UCSF ranked in the top 10 in seven of the rated eight nursing specialties, including first for its family nurse practitioner program and second for training adult/medical-surgical nurses. The adult nurse practitioner and psychiatric/mental health programs ranked third nationally, pediatric nurse practitioner fourth, gerontological/geriatric fifth, and community/public health ninth.[18] This article is about the practice in general. ... A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has completed specific advanced nursing education (generally a masters degree) and training in the diagnosis and management of common medical conditions. ... A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has completed specific advanced nursing education (generally a masters degree) and training in the diagnosis and management of common medical conditions. ... An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ... Mental health is a term used to describe either a level of cognitive or emotional wellbeing or an absence of a mental disorder. ... A nurse practitioner is a registered nurse who has completed specific advanced nursing education (generally a masters degree) and training in the diagnosis and management of common medical conditions. ... Public health is the study and practice of addressing threats to the health of a community. ...


The School of Nursing in 2005 ranked first nationally in total NIH research funds with $12.5 million. NIH can refer to: National Institutes of Health Norwegian School of Sports Sciences: (Norges idrettshøgskole - NIH) Not Invented Here This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


School of Pharmacy

The UCSF School of Pharmacy ranked as the top in the US, according to a 2002 survey published in The Annals of Pharmacotherapy, which weighed key criteria, including funding for research and the frequency of scientific publications by faculty, that are not considered in other rankings.


In 2005, US News and World Report ranked the UCSF School of Pharmacy number one in its "America's Best Graduate Schools" edition.


In 2005, the School of Pharmacy ranked first in NIH research funding among all US pharmacy schools, receiving awards totaling $22.2 million. NIH can refer to: National Institutes of Health Norwegian School of Sports Sciences: (Norges idrettshøgskole - NIH) Not Invented Here This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


School of Dentistry

The School of Dentistry in 2005 ranked first among all dental schools in NIH research funding. It received awards totaling $18.8 million from the NIH. NIH can refer to: National Institutes of Health Norwegian School of Sports Sciences: (Norges idrettshøgskole - NIH) Not Invented Here This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... NIH can refer to: National Institutes of Health Norwegian School of Sports Sciences: (Norges idrettshøgskole - NIH) Not Invented Here This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


UCSF Medical Center

In 2007, US News and World Report named the UCSF Medical Center the 7th-best hospital in the nation, making it the highest-ranked medical center in Northern California. Among pediatric care centers, UCSF Children's Hospital ranked no. 16 — among the highest-rated children's medical service in California. The UCSF Medical Center at Parnassus Heights and Mount Zion in San Francisco, California are the major research and medical teaching hospitals of the University of California, San Francisco. ...


In the magazine's "America's Best Hospitals" survey, the UCSF Medical Center ranked best in Northern California — as well as among the best in the nation — in the following specialties: endocrinology, neurology/neurosurgery; gynecology; cancer; kidney disease; ophthalmology; respiratory disorders; rheumatology; urology; digestive disorders; ear, nose, and throat; psychiatry; heart and heart surgery; and pediatrics.[19] Endocrinology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the endocrine system and its specific secretions called hormones. ... Neurology is a branch of medicine dealing with disorders of the nervous system. ... Insertion of an electrode during neurosurgery for Parkinsons disease. ... The shamefulness associated with the examination of female genitalia has long inhibited the science of gynaecology. ... Cancer is a class of diseases or disorders characterized by uncontrolled division of cells and the ability of these to spread, either by direct growth into adjacent tissue through invasion, or by implantation into distant sites by metastasis (where cancer cells are transported through the bloodstream or lymphatic system). ... See the article on the kidney for the anatomy and function of healthy kidneys and a list of diseases involving the kidney. ... This article is about the branch of medicine. ... Rheumatology, a subspecialty of internal medicine, is devoted to the diagnosis and therapy of rheumatic diseases. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Otolaryngology is the branch of medicine that specializes in the diagnosis and treatment of ear, nose, throat, and head & neck disorders. ... An MRI scan of a human brain and head. ... Cardiology is the branch of medicine pertaining to the heart. ... Cardiac surgery is surgery on the heart, typically to correct congenital heart disease or the complications of ischaemic heart disease or valve problems caused by endocarditis. ... This article is about the branch of medicine. ...


In San Francisco Magazine's 2003 survey of the "Best Doctors" in the Bay Area, 55 percent of those honored were UCSF faculty.


Distinctions

  • First to discover that normal cellular genes can be converted to cancer genes (Nobel Prize in Medicine, J. Michael Bishop and Harold Varmus, 1989)
  • First to discover (together with Stanford) the techniques of recombinant DNA, the seminal step in the creation of the biotechnology industry
  • First to discover the precise recombinant DNA techniques that led to the creation of a hepatitis B vaccine
  • First to perform a successful in-utero fetal surgery (Michael R. Harrison)
  • First to clone an insulin gene into bacteria, leading to the mass production of recombinant human insulin to treat diabetes
  • First to synthesize human growth hormone and clone into bacteria, setting the stage for genetically engineered human growth hormone
  • First to develop prenatal tests for sickle cell anemia and thalassemia
  • First to train pharmacists as drug therapy specialists
  • First to establish special care units for AIDS patients and among the first to identify HIV as the causative agent of the disease
  • First to discover and name prions (PREE-ons), an infectious agent that is responsible for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases (Nobel Prize in Medicine, Stanley Prusiner, 1997)
  • First to develop catheter ablation therapy for tachycardia, which cures "racing" hearts without surgery
  • First university west of the Mississippi to offer a doctoral degree in nursing
  • First to discover that missing pulmonary surfactants are the culprit in the death of newborns with respiratory distress syndrome; first to develop a synthetic substitute for it, reducing infant death rates significantly
  • With a work force of 18,600 people and annual economic impact of $2 billion, UCSF is San Francisco's second largest employer

Prose is writing distinguished from poetry by its greater variety of rhythm and its closer resemblance to everyday speech. ... Open fetal surgery is an invasive form of fetal intervention in the treatment of birth defects where the uterus is opened up for direct surgery on the fetus. ... Michael R. Harrison, M.D. (born May 5, 1943 in Portland, OR) has served as division chief in Pediatric Surgery at the Children’s Hospital at the University of California, San Francisco for over 20 years, where he established the first Fetal Treatment Center in the U.S. He is... For the bird, see Prion (bird). ... Diagram of the alveoli with both cross-section and external view Pulmonary surfactant is a surface-active lipoprotein complex formed by type II alveolar cells. ... Infant respiratory distress syndrome (RDS, also called Respiratory distress syndrome of newborn, previously called hyaline membrane disease), is a syndrome caused by developmental lack of surfactant and structural immaturity in the lungs of premature infants. ...

Noted alumni/faculty

Lieutenant Andrew James Baldwin, M.D., USN (born February 5, 1977) is a humanitarian, US Naval Officer, physician, navy diver, and triathlete. ... For the 1999 movie The Bachelor starring Chris ODonnell, see The Bachelor (film). ... J. Michael Bishop (born February 22, 1936) is an American immunologist and microbiologist who won the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Elizabeth (Liz) H(elen) Blackburn (November 26, 1948 - ) is a professor of biology and leading researcher in the field of the telomere and the telomerase enzyme, and their relationships to aging and cancer. ... Ribonucleoprotein(RNP) is a compound that combined ribonucleic acid (RNA) and protein together. ... Ribbon diagram of the enzyme TIM, surrounded by the space-filling model of the protein. ... Telomerase is an enzyme that adds specific DNA sequence repeats (TTAGGG in all vertebrates) to the 3 (three prime) end of DNA strands in the telomere regions, which are found at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes. ... A controversial entity, created by George W. Bush, whose purpose is to regulate (or, at least, tell the president how he ought to regulate) biotechnology and biomedical research. ... Leon Kass Leon Kass (born February 12, 1939) is an American bioethicist, best known as a leader in the effort to stop human embryonic stem cell and cloning research as former chair of the Presidents Council on Bioethics from 2002–2005. ... Blastocyst. ... Dr. Richard Carmona Richard Henry Carmona, (born November 22, 1949) was the 17th Surgeon General of the United States. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Diagram of the alveoli with both cross-section and external view Pulmonary surfactant is a surface-active lipoprotein complex formed by type II alveolar cells. ... Richard G.A. Feachem, CBE, FREng was born in Manchester, UK in 1947. ... The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a UN-related organization whose purpose is to finance programs that purport to prevent and treat patients with AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, three major threats to health on a global scale. ... Julie Gerberding is the director of the Centers for Disease Control since July 2003. ... The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in Atlanta, Georgia, is recognized as the leading United States agency for protecting the public health and safety of people. ... Ralph Nader (born February 27, 1934) is an American attorney, author, lecturer, political activist, and candidate for President of the United States in five elections. ... American physician, lawyer, and statesman. ... Yale University is a private university in New Haven, Connecticut. ... FDA redirects here. ... Peter Andrew Kollman (born 1944-07-24, died 2001-05-25) was a professor of chemistry and pharmaceutical chemistry at the University of California, San Francisco. ... For other uses, see Amber (disambiguation). ... A force field is used to minimize the bond stretching energy of this ethane molecule. ... Molecular dynamics (MD) is a form of computer simulation wherein atoms and molecules are allowed to interact for a period of time under known laws of physics, giving a view of the motion of the atoms. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public research university primarily situated in suburban Irvine, California, USA. Founded in 1965, it is one of ten University of California campuses and is commonly known as UCI or UC Irvine. ... Dr. Robert C. Gallo Robert Charles Gallo (born March 23, 1937) is a U.S. biomedical researcher. ... The National Cancer Institute (NCI) is part of the United States Federal governments National Institutes of Health. ... Luc Montagnier (born 1932 in Chabris, France) is a French virologist. ... The Pasteur Institute (French: Institut Pasteur) is a French non-profit private foundation dedicated to the study of biology, microorganisms, diseases and vaccines. ... Species Human immunodeficiency virus 1 Human immunodeficiency virus 2 Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a retrovirus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS, a condition in humans in which the immune system begins to fail, leading to life-threatening opportunistic infections). ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... The Miss California USA competition is the pageant that selects the representative for the state California in the Miss USA pageant. ... US Public Health Service US Public Health Service Collar Device US Public Health Service Cap Device The Surgeon General of the United States is the head of the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps (PHSCC) and thus the leading spokesperson on matters of public health in the U.S... Dr. Dean Ornish is president and founder of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute in Sausalito, California, as well as Clinical Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. ... Coronary heart disease (CHD), also called coronary artery disease (CAD) and atherosclerotic heart disease, is the end result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries that supply the myocardium (the muscle of the heart). ... Stanley B. Prusiner, M.D., a Professor of Neurology and Biochemistry at the University of California, San Francisco, was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology or medicine in 1997 for his discovery of prions a class of infectious self-reproducing agents composed of protein. ... For the bird called a prion, see Prion (bird) Prions - short for proteinaceous infectious particle - are infectious self-reproducing protein structures. ... Steven A. Schroeder is Distinguished Professor of Health and Health Care at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). ... The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation is one of the worlds biggest philanthropic organizations and the fifth largest in the United States. ... Harold E. Varmus was a co-recipient (along with J. Michael Bishop) of the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for discovery of the cellular origin of retroviral oncogenes. ... NIH can refer to: National Institutes of Health Norwegian School of Sports Sciences: (Norges idrettshøgskole - NIH) Not Invented Here This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... President Clintons Cabinet, circa 1993 Headed by President of the United States Bill Clinton, the Clinton Administation was the executive branch of the federal government of the United States from 1993 to 2001. ... The original New York Cancer Hospital[1], first built between 1884 and 1886, now converted to luxury condominiums, at 455 Central Park West and 106th St. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... Randy Shilts (August 8, 1951 – February 17, 1994) was a gay American journalist and author. ... And the Band Played On: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic is a work of nonfiction written by San Francisco Chronicle journalist Randy Shilts (original copyright 1987) chronicling the discovery and spread of HIV and AIDS, with a special emphasis on government indifference and political infighting to what was initially... Michael R. Harrison, M.D. (born May 5, 1943 in Portland, OR) has served as division chief in Pediatric Surgery at the Children’s Hospital at the University of California, San Francisco for over 20 years, where he established the first Fetal Treatment Center in the U.S. He is... Open fetal surgery is an invasive form of fetal intervention in the treatment of birth defects where the uterus is opened up for direct surgery on the fetus. ...

References

  1. ^ UC Annual Endowment Report, Fiscal Year Ended June 30, 2007. Office of the Treasurer of the Regents of the University of California (2008). Retrieved on 2008-03-28.
  2. ^ Hugh Huger Toland (1806-1880), UCSF, Accessed June 11, 2007.
  3. ^ a b A History of UCSF's School of Medicine: San Francisco's First Medical Schools, UCSF, Accessed June 11, 2007.
  4. ^ a b c A History of UCSF's School of Medicine: University Affiliation, UCSF, Accessed June 11, 2007.
  5. ^ Chronology of the Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford School of Medicine, Accessed June 11, 2007.
  6. ^ New UCSF Mission Bay campus: country's largest biomedical university expansion
  7. ^ $25 Million Gift Creates Professorship for UCSF Chancellor, Furthers Construction of Mission Bay Campus
  8. ^ QB3's Inaugural Event Features Announcement of Major Partnerships with Industry
  9. ^ Tansey, Bernadette. "UCSF to name building after biotech pioneer Bill Rutter", San Francisco Chronicle, November 29, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-11-29. 
  10. ^ Support for Mission Bay: Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center Research Building
  11. ^ Rauber, Chris. "Invention, born of necessity", San Francisco Business Times, October 12, 2007. Retrieved on 2008-02-11. 
  12. ^ UCSF Medical Center at Mission Bay
  13. ^ UCSF one of top universities in 2005 NIH research funding
  14. ^ [1]
  15. ^ "America's Best Hospitals 2007", U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved on 2007-10-16. 
  16. ^ US News medical school rankings
  17. ^ US News rankings
  18. ^ US News nursing school rankings
  19. ^ US News and World Report rankings of best hospitals

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Todays San Francisco Chronicle was founded in 1865 as The Daily Dramatic Chronicle by teenage brothers Charles de Young and Michael H. de Young. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... American City Business Journals is an American newspaper chain based in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 289th day of the year (290th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
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Coordinates: 37°45′47.95″N, 122°27′30.74″W San Francisco redirects here. ... City College of San Francisco, or CCSF, is a two-year community college in San Francisco, California. ... This article is about New College of California. ... San Francisco State University (commonly referred to as San Francisco State, SF State, State and SFSU) is a public university located in the southwestern San Francisco, California, bordering Lake Merced and Lowell High School, near Fort Funston and Daly City, near the San Mateo County line. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_San_Francisco,_California. ... The Academy of Art University, a for-profit institution owned by the Stephens Institute, was founded in San Francisco in 1929 by Richard S. Stephens. ... // The Art Institute of California - San Francisco (or AICA-SF) is a part of EDMCs system of vocational institutions. ... Founded in 1907, California College of the Arts (formerly California College of Arts and Crafts) is a regionally accredited, independent school of art and design in Oakland and San Francisco, California, USA. It is one of the premier fine arts and design institutions in the United States. ... California Culinary Academy in San Francisco, California offers Le Cordon Bleu culinary and hospitality management training. ... San Francisco Conservatory of Music, founded in 1917, is a music school, with enrollment of about collegiate 300 students. ... Founded in 1871, the San Francisco Art Institute (SFAI) is one of the U.S.’s older and more prestigious schools of higher education in contemporary art. ... Alliant International University is an independent, not-for-profit, upper-division university formed in July 2001 as a result of a merger between California School of Professional Psychology (CSPP) and United States International University (USIU). ... The California Institute of Integral Studies (CIIS) is a private graduate school founded in 1968 and based in San Francisco, California with two main schools—the School of Professional Psychology and the School of Consciousness and Transformation. ... Golden Gate University is a private university that was founded as the night school arm of the San Francisco YMCA in 1853. ... The Arthur A. Dugoni School of Dentistry is a school of dentistry located in the Pacific Heights area of the United States city of San Francisco. ... San Francisco Law School is a private, non-profit law school in San Francisco, California. ... Saybrook Graduate School and Research Center, a San Francisco, California based distance learning institution (originally founded in 1971 as the Humanistic Psychology Institute), is geared to providing a personalized, mentored educational experience for graduate students. ... University of California, Hastings College of the Law is a law school located in downtown San Francisco, California. ... University of San Francisco (USF) is a private Catholic, Jesuit University in San Francisco, California, United States. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
university: Definition and Much More from Answers.com (2793 words)
The first true university was the University of Bologna, founded in the 11th century; the first in northern Europe was the University of Paris, which served as a model for the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Heidelberg, and others.
A university is an institution of higher education and research, which grants academic degrees at all levels (bachelor, master, and doctorate) in a variety of subjects.
The first European medieval university was the University of Magnaura in Constantinople (now Istanbul, Turkey), founded in 849 by the regent Bardas of emperor Michael III, followed by the University of Salerno (9th century), University of Bologna (1088) in Bologna, Italy, and the University of Paris (c.
University of California, San Francisco - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2302 words)
Founded in 1873, the mission of UCSF is to serve as a "public university dedicated to saving lives and improving health." Though one of the ten campuses of the University of California, it is unique for being the only University of California campus dedicated solely to graduate education, and this in health and biomedical sciences.
University of California, San Francisco is unique in that it does biomedical and patient-centered research in its Schools of Medicine, Pharmacy, Nursing and Dentistry and their hundreds of associated laboratories.
UCSF is also in the early stages of planning for a new specialty hospital focused on women, children, and cancer to be built at the Mission Bay campus.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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