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Encyclopedia > University of California, Riverside
University of California, Riverside

Motto: Fiat Lux ("Let There Be Light")
Established: 1954
Type: Public, land and space grant
Endowment: US $121 million[1]
Chancellor: Robert D. Grey (acting)[2]
Provost: Ellen A. Wartella[3]
Faculty: 549[4]
Staff: 1,938[4]
Undergraduates: 14,973[5]
Postgraduates: 2,214[5]
Location: Riverside and Palm Desert, California, United States
Campus: Suburban, 1,160 acres (4.7 km²) in Riverside; rural in Palm Desert
Fight song: Brave Scots[6]
Colors: Sky Blue and Gold           
Nickname: The Highlanders
Mascot:
Scotty the bear
Athletics: NCAA Division I
Affiliations: University of California
Big West Conference
Website: www.ucr.edu

The University of California, Riverside, commonly known as UCR or UC Riverside, is a public research university and one of 10 campuses of the University of California system. The main campus sits on 1,200 acres (486 ha) in a suburban district of Riverside, California, with a branch campus of 20 acres (8 ha) in Palm Desert. Founded in 1907 as the UC Citrus Experiment Station, Riverside pioneered research in biological pest control and the use of growth regulators responsible for extending the citrus growing season in California from four to nine months. Some of the world's most important research collections on citrus diversity and entomology, as well as photography, are located at Riverside. For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Riverside Government  - Mayor Ron Loveridge Area  - City  78. ... Palm Desert is a city in Riverside County, California, in the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs area), approximately 11 miles east of Palm Springs in the Coachella Valley. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... For the single by Marilyn Manson, see The Fight Song. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Tinctures are the colours used to blazon coats of arms in heraldry. ... Tinctures are the colours used to blazon coats of arms in heraldry. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Image File history File linksMetadata UCR_logo. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Nickname: Location in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Riverside Government  - Mayor Ron Loveridge Area  - City  78. ... Palm Desert is a city in Riverside County, California, in the Coachella Valley (Palm Springs area), approximately 11 miles east of Palm Springs in the Coachella Valley. ... Predatory Polistes wasp looking for bollworms or other caterpillars on a cotton plant Biological control of pests and diseases is a method of controlling pests (including weeds and diseases) in agriculture that relies on natural predation, parasitism or other natural mechanism, rather than introduced chemicals. ... Plant hormones (also known as plant growth regulators (PGRs) and phytohormones) are chemicals that regulate a plants growth. ... For other uses, see Citrus (disambiguation). ... The U.C.R. Entomology Research Museum is the insect collection of the Department of Entomology of the University of California, Riverside. ... UCR / California Museum of Photography is an off-campus department of the University of California, Riverside, Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. ...


UCR's undergraduate College of Letters and Science opened in 1954. The Regents of the University of California declared UCR a general campus of the system in 1959, and graduate students were admitted in 1961. The campus is projected to grow to an enrollment of 21,000 students by 2015.[7] To accommodate this growth, more than $730 million has been invested in new construction projects since 1999.[8] Plans are underway to open a medical school—California's first new one in 40 years—by 2012.[9] The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ... Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center in Lubbock, Texas, USA. A medical school or faculty of medicine is a tertiary educational institution — or part of such an institution — that teaches medicine. ...


The Washington Monthly ranked UCR 15th in the United States in terms of social mobility, research achievement and community service, while US News and World Report ranked UCR 96th in the nation based on peer assessment, student selectivity, financial resources, and other factors.[10][11] U.S. News also ranked UCR as the third most ethnically diverse and, by the number of undergraduates receiving Pell Grants (42 percent), the 15th most economically diverse student body in the nation.[12][13] Nearly two-thirds of all UCR students graduate within six years, without regards to economic disparity.[14] UCR's extensive outreach and retention programs have contributed to its reputation as a "campus of choice" for minority students, including LGBT students.[15] In 2005, UCR became the first campus in the nation to offer a gender-neutral housing option.[16] The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Pell Grant program is a type of post-secondary, educational federal grant program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. ... The initialism LGBT also GLBT is in use (since the 1990s) to refer collectively to Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender people. ...


UCR's sports teams are known as the Highlanders and play in National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Division I of the Big West Conference. Their nickname was inspired by the high altitude of the campus, which lies on the foothills of Box Springs Mountain. The UCR women's basketball team won back to back Big West championships in 2006 and 2007. In 2007, the men's baseball team won its first conference championship and advanced to the regionals for the second time since the university moved to Division I in 2001. Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Contents

History

The original 1917 structure of the UC Citrus Experiment Station houses the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management.

At the turn of the 20th century, Southern California was a major producer of citrus, the region's primary agricultural export. The industry developed from the country's first navel orange trees, planted in Riverside in 1873. Lobbied by the citrus industry, the UC Regents established the UC Citrus Experiment Station (CES) on February 14, 1907, on 23 acres (9 ha) of land on the east slope of Mt. Rubidoux in Riverside. The station conducted experiments in fertilization, irrigation and crop improvement. In 1917, the station was moved to a larger site, 475 acres (192 ha) near Box Springs Mountain.[17] // The Southern California citrus belt first emerged in the 1870s, and within two decades stretched eastward from Pasadena to Redlands beneath the foothills of the San Gabriel and San Bernardino mountains. ... The A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management is located at the University of California, Riverside. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... For other uses, see Citrus (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Export (disambiguation). ... Orange blossoms and oranges on tree For other uses of orange, see orange (disambiguation) The Orange Citrus x sinensis is a Citrus tree, and the fruits of this tree. ... Nickname: Location in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Riverside Government  - Mayor Ron Loveridge Area  - City  78. ... The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Soil Fertilization or Crop Fertilization are methods of improving soil quality with a view towards improving soil fertility. ... Irrigation is the artificial application of water to the soil usually for assisting in growing crops. ... For other uses, see crop (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


The 1944 passage of the GI Bill after World War II set in motion a rise in college enrollments that necessitated an expansion of the state university system in California. A local group of citrus growers and civic leaders, including many UC Berkeley alumni, lobbied aggressively for a UC-administered liberal arts college next to the CES. State Senator Nelson Dilworth, former Assemblyman Philip L. Boyd and Riverside State Assemblyman John Babbage were instrumental in shepherding the legislation through Congress.[18][19] Governor Earl Warren signed the bill in 1949, allocating $2 million for initial campus construction.[20] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... A liberal arts college is an institution of higher education found in the United States, offering programs in the liberal arts at the post-secondary level. ... For the swing saxophonist and occasional singer, see Earle Warren Earl Warren (March 19, 1891 – July 9, 1974) was a California district attorney of Alameda County, the 20th Attorney General of California, the 30th Governor of California, and the 14th Chief Justice of the United States (from 1953 to 1969). ...


Gordon S. Watkins, dean of the College of Letters and Science at UCLA, became the first provost of the new college at Riverside. Initially conceived of as a small college devoted to the liberal arts, he ordered the campus built for a maximum of 1,500 students and recruited many young junior faculty to fill teaching positions.[21] He presided at its opening with 65 faculty and 127 students on February 14, 1954, remarking, "Never have so few been taught by so many."[22] In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1954 Gregorian calendar). ...


UCR's enrollment exceeded 1,000 students by the time Clark Kerr became president of the UC system in 1958.[23] Anticipating a "tidal wave" in enrollment growth required by the baby boom generation, Kerr developed the California Master Plan for Higher Education and the Regents designated Riverside a general university campus in 1959.[24] UCR's first chancellor, Herman Theodore Spieth, oversaw the beginnings of the school's transition to a full university and its expansion to a capacity of 5,000 students. UCR's second chancellor, Ivan Hinderaker led the campus through the era of the free speech movement and kept student protests peaceful in Riverside.[25] According to a 1998 interview with Hinderaker, the city of Riverside received negative press coverage for smog after the mayor asked Governor Ronald Reagan to declare the south coast air basin a disaster area in 1971; subsequent student enrollment declined by up to 25 percent through 1979.[18][25][26] Hinderaker's development of innovative programs in business administration and biomedical sciences created incentive for enough students to enroll at Riverside to keep the campus open.[25][27] Clark Kerr (May 17, 1911 – December 1, 2003) was the first Chancellor of the University of California, Berkeley (1952–1958) and the 12th President of the University of California (1958–1967). ... For the video game, see Baby Boomer (video game). ... The California Master Plan for Higher Education of 1960 was developed by Clark Kerr, during the administration of Gov. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Ivan Hinderaker was Chancellor of the University of California, Riverside from 1964 to 1979. ... The Free Speech Movement was a student protest which began in 1964 - 1965 on the campus of the University of California, Berkeley under the informal leadership of student Mario Savio and others. ... For other uses, see Smog (disambiguation). ... Reagan redirects here. ... A disaster area is a region or locale heavily damaged by either natural events, such as hurricanes, tsunamis, floods, earthquakes), or by war. ... The A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management is located at the University of California, Riverside. ...

Entrance along University Avenue. The Arts Building is visible in the background. (2007)
Entrance along University Avenue. The Arts Building is visible in the background. (2007)

In the 1990s, the UC experienced a new surge of enrollment applications, now known as "Tidal Wave II".[28] The Regents targeted UCR for an annual growth rate of 6.3 percent, the fastest in the UC system, and anticipated 19,900 students at UCR by 2010.[29] By 1995, African American, American Indian, and Latino student enrollments accounted for 30 percent of the UCR student body, the highest proportion of any UC campus at the time.[30] The 1997 implementation of Proposition 209—which banned the use of affirmative action by state agencies—reduced the ethnic diversity at the more selective UC campuses but further increased it at UCR.[31] Proposition 209, a voter referendum passed in 1996, outlaws discrimination and preferential treatment based on race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity...


With UCR scheduled for dramatic population growth, efforts have been made to increase its popular and academic recognition.[32] The students voted for a fee increase to move UCR athletics into NCAA Division I standing in 1998.[33] Proposals to establish a law school, a medical school, and a school of public policy at UCR have been in development since the 1990s.[34] In June 2006, UCR received its largest gift, 15.5 million from two local couples, in trust towards building its medical school.[35] The Regents formally approved UCR’s medical school proposal in 2006. Projected to be completed by 2012, it will be the first new medical school in 40 years built in California.[36][37] Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


Campus

Main article: University of California, Riverside campus
Panoramic view of campus from the Box Springs Mountain. Student housing is to the far lower right, north of which are the athletic facilities. The dense vegetation to the lower left constitutes the Botanic Gardens. The agricultural fields in the central left are designated for future campus development. (2007)
Panoramic view of campus from the Box Springs Mountain. Student housing is to the far lower right, north of which are the athletic facilities. The dense vegetation to the lower left constitutes the Botanic Gardens. The agricultural fields in the central left are designated for future campus development. (2007)

UCR's main campus sits at an elevation of 1,100 ft (340 m) to 1,450 ft (440 m) near Box Springs Mountain, 3 miles (5 km) east of downtown Riverside, and comprises 1,112 acres (450 ha) divided into eastern and western areas by the State Route 60 freeway.[32][38] This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of California, Riverside, Botanic Gardens (40 acres) are botanical gardens containing more than 3,500 plant species from around the world. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Nickname: Location in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Riverside Government  - Mayor Ron Loveridge Area  - City  78. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this articles infobox may require cleanup. ...


East Campus, occupying approximately 600 acres (243 ha), hosts the core cluster of academic buildings and services. The original buildings that formed the earliest kernel of the campus included the UC Citrus Experiment Station, residential buildings, and barn, all of which are still in use. They were designed by Lester H. Hibbard, in association with H.B. Cody. Built by 1917 at a cost of $165,000, the architecture of the major buildings followed the Mission Revival style suggesting the Spanish colonial heritage of Southern California.[32] This article is about building architecture. ... The Mission Revival Style was an architectural movement that began in the late 19th Century and drew inspiration from the early Spanish missions in California. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ...

The Carillon Bell Tower is the dominant landmark in the center of the main campus.
The Carillon Bell Tower is the dominant landmark in the center of the main campus.

Further major construction largely ceased on the site until the groundbreaking for the College of Letters and Science (CHASS) in April 1951. A group of five buildings designed by different architects in a decidedly more Modern style were completed by 1954: the Rivera Library, Webber Hall, Geology Building, Physical Education Building and Watkins Hall. After the Regents declared UCR a "general campus" of the UC system in 1958, many new buildings and additions were laid out over the following decade. Following an east–west axis, new student residence halls and athletic facilities were developed along the southeastern quadrant of the main campus, while academic and research facilities were built along the central campus area closer to the freeway.[32] The Bell Tower, one of only four carillons in California, was built in this period. Designed by A. Quincy Jones, the tower is 161 ft (49 m) tall and contains 48 bells, each weighing from 28 pounds (13 kg) to 5,091 pounds (2,309 kg), covering four chromatic octaves.[39] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1430x1980, 416 KB)A photograph of the Belltower at University of California, Riverside. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1430x1980, 416 KB)A photograph of the Belltower at University of California, Riverside. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... For the University of Regina student newspaper, see The Carillon. ... This entry is for A. Quincy Jones the architect. ... For other uses, see Octave (disambiguation). ...


After the drop in enrollment and subsequent restructuring of academic programs in 1970s, little capacity construction was undertaken over the next two decades. However, enrollment growth in the late 1980s justified considerable further campus expansion over the 1990s. Major additions built in the period include: Bourns Hall, completed in 1995; the Humanities & Social Science building, completed in 1996; and the Science Library, completed in 1998. The Pentland and Stonehaven residence halls were completed in 2000, and the Arts building was completed in 2001.[32] Active construction projects include new buildings for Engineering and Materials Science, Psychology Research, and Genomics.[40][41] The first phase of a new Commons was completed in 2007, and phase II is in development. Other ongoing projects include a new CHASS Instructional and Research Center and Students Academic Support Services Building.[42] Since 1999, more than $730 million has been invested in construction projects.[8] The University of California, Riverside Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering or UCR College of Engineering and commonly known as Bourns, is an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology-accredited College of Engineering located in Riverside, California on the campus of the University of California, Riverside. ...


Of the 511 acres (207 ha) of UCR property constituting West Campus, approximately 216 acres (87 ha) along University Avenue have been developed. These include facilities such as University Extension, the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) Germplasm Repository, International Village (student housing), Human Resources and Highlander Hall. University Village, a mixed use commercial development, features a movie theater, stores, restaurants, office space, and an apartment complex, along with a parking structure and surface parking. Citrus groves and row crops occupy the remaining 295 acres (119 ha) stretching northwest to the intersection of Chicago Avenue and Le Conte Drive. Plans for future expansion include converting a portion of these fields into new UCR infrastructure.[32] USDA redirects here. ... Mixed-use development refers to the practice of allowing more than one type of use in a building or set of buildings. ...

Arid landscaping in front of the Biological Sciences Building on the UCR campus (2007)
Arid landscaping in front of the Biological Sciences Building on the UCR campus (2007)

In downtown Riverside, the UCR/California Museum of Photography and Sweeney Art Gallery occupy adjacent historical buildings along the Main Street pedestrian mall. In 2009, a third institution, the Culver Center for the Arts, is expected to round out the UCR/ARTSblock, a collaboration with the city that includes art exhibition and studio space.[43][44] UCR / California Museum of Photography is an off-campus department of the University of California, Riverside, Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. ... Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ...


Palm Desert graduate center

The Richard J. Heckmann International Center for Entrepreneurial Management was founded in Palm Desert in 2001. After the 540-acre (219 ha) Coachella Valley Agricultural Research Station, it is UCR's second institutional presence in the Coachella Valley. Initially funded by a $6 million gift from Richard J. Heckmann, a water treatment entrepreneur, the institution was planned as a teaching and research center of the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management. The center encourages local entrepreneurship through the Coachella Valley Angel Network, an angel investment network.[45] A further investment of $10 million from the State of California and a donation of 20 acres (8 ha) of land from the City of Palm Desert allowed for the opening of an expanded graduate center on April 15, 2005, adjacent to the California State University, San Bernardino Palm Desert Campus. The center is also home to university researchers in conservation biology, technology transfer and Native American studies. Master's level instruction in business management and creative writing is available at the center.[46] Palm Desert is a city located in Riverside County, California, in the Palm Springs area, approximately eleven miles east of Palm Springs. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A water treatment plant in northern Portugal. ... The A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management is located at the University of California, Riverside. ... Entrepreneurship is the practice of starting new organizations or revitalizing mature organizations, particularly new businesses generally in response to identified opportunities. ... An angel investor or business angel is an individual who provides capital for a business start-up, usually in exchange for ownership equity. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... View of campus with San Bernardino Mountains on the background. ... Conservation biology, or conservation ecology, is the science of analyzing and protecting Earths biological diversity. ... Technology transfer is the process of developing practical applications for the results of scientific research. ... Native American Studies is an academic discipline which studies the experience of people of Native American ancestory in America. ... Management (from Old French ménagement the art of conducting, directing, from Latin manu agere to lead by the hand) characterises the process of leading and directing all or part of an organization, often a business, through the deployment and manipulation of resources (human, financial, material, intellectual or intangible). ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ...


Academics

Main article: University of California, Riverside academics

As a campus of the University of California system, UCR is governed by a Board of Regents and administered by a president. The current president is Robert C. Dynes, and the administrative head of UCR is Acting Chancellor Robert D. Grey. UCR's academic policies are set by its Academic Senate, a legislative body composed of all UCR faculty members.[47] Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ... Dr. Robert C. Dynes (born November 8, 1942 in London, Ontario, Canada), Ph. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ...

Bourns Hall, along North Campus Drive (2000)
Bourns Hall, along North Campus Drive (2000)

UCR is organized into three academic colleges, two professional schools, and several interdisciplinary divisions. UCR's liberal arts college, the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences, was founded in 1954, and began accepting graduate students in 1960. The College of Natural and Agricultural Sciences, founded in 1960, incorporated the CES as part of the first research-oriented institution at UCR; it eventually also incorporated the natural science departments formerly associated with the liberal arts college to form its present structure in 1974.[25] UCR's newest academic unit, the Bourns College of Engineering, was founded in 1989.[48][49] Comprising the professional schools are the Graduate School of Education, founded in 1968, and the A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management, founded in 1970.[25] These units collectively provide 81 majors and 52 minors, 48 master's degree programs, and 42 Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) programs.[50] UCR is the only UC campus to offer undergraduate degrees in creative writing and public policy and one of three UCs (along with Berkeley and Irvine) to offer an undergraduate degree in business administration.[51] Through its Division of Biomedical Sciences, founded in 1974, UCR offers the Thomas Haider medical degree program in collaboration with UCLA.[25] UCR's doctoral program in the emerging field of dance theory, founded in 1992, was the first program of its kind in the United States, and UCR's minor in lesbian, gay and bisexual studies, established in 1996, was the first undergraduate program of its kind in the UC system.[52][53][54] A new BA program in bagpipes was inaugurated in 2007.[55] The University of California, Riverside Marlan and Rosemary Bourns College of Engineering or UCR College of Engineering and commonly known as Bourns or BCOE, is an Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology-accredited College of Engineering located in Riverside, California on the campus of the University of California, Riverside. ... The A. Gary Anderson Graduate School of Management is located at the University of California, Riverside. ... An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... Look up policy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public, coeducational university situated in suburban Irvine, California. ... This article is about business administration. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Dance theory is a fairly new term used by some music instructors and many modern dance instructors. ... Gender studies is a theoretical work in the social sciences or humanities that focuses on issues of sex and gender in language and society, and often addresses related issues including racial and ethnic oppression, postcolonial societies, and globalization. ... A piper playing the Great Highland Bagpipe. ...


Rankings

See also: University of California#Campuses and rankings

U.S. University Rankings Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

USNWR National University[56] 96th
ARWU World[57] 102nd
ARWU National[58] 59th
ARWU Natural Science & Math[59] 77th
ARWU Engineering & CS[60] 76th
ARWU Life Sciences[61] 76th
Washington Monthly[62] 15th

Institutional rankings of UC Riverside vary widely, depending on the criteria of the publication. For instance, in the 2008 issue of US News and World Report's "America's Best Colleges", UCR was ranked 96th among national universities and 45th among public institutions; criteria include peer assessment, student selectivity and retention, as well as faculty and financial resources.[11] In the 2007 edition of the Washington Monthly college rankings, UCR ranked 15th among national universities. The Washington Monthly assesses the quality of schools based on social mobility (e.g., percentage of Pell Grant recipients who graduate), academic quality (e.g., percentage of graduates who go on to earn PhDs), and community service.[10] According to the Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index published by Academic Analytics in 2006, UCR as an institution ranked 46th among top research universities considering such criteria as faculty publications, citations, research funding and other honors.[63] Since 1997, more than 110 UCR faculty members have been elected fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Over the course of UCR's history, seven current or former faculty members have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences, and more than 50 have received Guggenheim Fellowships.[8] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Washington Monthly is a magazine based in Washington DC which covers American politics and government. ... Faculty Scholarly Productivity Index The Faculty Scholarly Productivity IndexTM, a product of Academic Analytics, LLC, was designed to create benchmark standards for the measurement of academic and scholarly quality within and among institutions. ... The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an organization that promotes cooperation between scientists, defends scientific freedom, encourages scientific responsibility and supports scientific education for the betterment of all humanity. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ...

Economic and research impact

UCR research on spider silk has identified the gene for the main protein that female spiders use to make their egg cases. Photograph by Mark Chappell, 2005.
UCR research on spider silk has identified the gene for the main protein that female spiders use to make their egg cases.[64] Photograph by Mark Chappell, 2005.

UCR operated under a $435 million budget in fiscal year 2005–06. The state government provided $153 million, student fees accounted for $111 million, the federal government financed $84 million, and $45 million came from university sales and services. Private support and other sources accounted for the remaining $18 million. Overall, monies spent at UCR have an economic impact of nearly $1 billion in California.[8] Faculty members received nearly $87 million in research funding in 2005–06, mostly from federal agencies such as the National Science Foundation and the National Institutes of Health.[65] Total research expenditures at Riverside are significantly concentrated in agricultural science, accounting for 53 percent of total research expenditures spent by the university in 2002.[66] Top research centers by expenditure, as measured in 2002, include the Agricultural Experiment Station, the Center for Environmental Research and Technology, the Center for Bibliographical Studies, the Air Pollution Research Center, and the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics.[66] Image File history File links Blackwidow_eggsac_silk. ... Image File history File links Blackwidow_eggsac_silk. ... Spider silk is a fibre secreted by spiders. ... For other uses, see Gene (disambiguation). ... A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin showing coloured alpha helices. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Ministry of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical and health-related research. ... suck my doodle ... Agricultural science is a broad multidisciplinary field that encompasses the parts of exact, natural, economic, and social sciences that are used in the practice and understanding of agriculture. ...


Throughout UCR's history, researchers have developed more than 40 new citrus varieties and invented new techniques to help the $960 million-a-year California citrus industry fight pests and diseases.[8] In 1927, entomologists at the CES introduced two wasps from Australia as natural enemies of a major citrus pest, the citrophilus mealybug, saving growers in Orange County $1 million in annual losses. This event was pivotal in establishing biological control as a practical means of reducing pest populations.[66][67] In 1963, plant physiologist Charles Coggins proved that application of gibberellic acid allows fruit to remain on citrus trees for extended periods. The ultimate result of his work, which continued through the 1980s, was the extension of the citrus-growing season in California from four to nine months.[66] In 1980, UC Riverside released the Oroblanco grapefruit, its first patented citrus variety. Since then, the citrus breeding program has released other varieties such as the Melogold grapefruit, the Gold Nugget mandarin (or tangerine), and others that have yet to be given trademark names.[66] To assist entrepreneurs in developing new products, UCR is a primary partner in the Riverside Regional Technology Park, which includes the City of Riverside and the County of Riverside.[68] It also administers six reserves of the University of California Natural Reserve System. UCR recently announced a partnership with China Agricultural University to launch a new center in Beijing, which will study ways to respond to the country's growing environmental issues.[69] In agriculture, agribusiness is a generic term that refers to the various businesses involved in the food production chain, including farming, seed, agrichemicals, farm machinery, wholesaling, processing, distribution, and retail sales. ... Entomology is the scientific study of insects. ... For other uses, see Wasp (disambiguation). ... Mealybug is the common name of insects in Pseudococcidae, a family of unarmored scale insects found in moist, warm climates. ... Biological control of pests and diseases Overview A key belief of the organic gardener is that diversity furthers health. ... Gibberellic acid (also called Gibberellin A3, GA, and (GA3) is a hormone found in plants. ... Binomial name Macfad. ... For other uses, see Patent (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Citrus reticulata Blanco For other uses, see Tangerine (disambiguation). ... “(TM)” redirects here. ... Nickname: Location in the state of California Coordinates: , Country State County Riverside Government  - Mayor Ron Loveridge Area  - City  78. ... Riverside County is a county located in the southeastern part of the U.S. state of California, stretching from Orange County to the Colorado River, which is the border with Arizona. ... The The University of California natural reserve system is the largest and most diverse set of university-owned and operated reserves in the world. ... China Agricultural University (中国农业大学) is a university in Beijing, China. ... Peking redirects here. ...


Libraries and collections

The Tomás Rivera Library (2003)
The Tomás Rivera Library (2003)
The Science Library
The Science Library

Total library collections at UCR comprise more than 2 million volumes, 14,017 electronic journals, 23,000 serial subscriptions, and 1.7 million microformats.[70] Two large, four-story libraries house most of the physical collections. The 179,595 ft (54,741 m) Rivera library was constructed in 1954 and named after Tomás Rivera in 1985. It seats a capacity of 956 and houses general humanities and social science collections, as well as special collections, including the world's largest compilation of science fiction, horror and fantasy literature, the 110,000-volume Eaton Collection.[71] The Rivera Library also hosts the only U.S. Patent and Trademark Depository based on a UC campus.[72] The 125,752 ft (38,329 m) Science Library, built in 1998, seats a capacity of 1,360 and houses 533,000 volumes in the physical, natural, agricultural, biomedical, engineering and computer sciences, with special strengths in the areas of citrus and sub-tropical horticulture, entomology, and arid lands agriculture.[73] Smaller libraries include the Media Library, the Music Library, and a branch digital library in Palm Desert.[74] The UCR Library is one of 116 members of the Association of Research Libraries, and is ranked 93rd in this group.[70] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 436 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1600x1200, 436 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby grant the permission to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1. ... Image File history File links Ucrscilibr. ... Image File history File links Ucrscilibr. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Tomás Rivera (December 22, 1935—May 16, 1984) was a Chicano author, poet, educator, and University of California, Riverside chancellor, the first Mexican American to hold the position at any UC. He is best remembered for his 1971 Faulknerian stream-of-consciousness novella Y no se lo tragó la... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ... “Horror story” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Fantasy (disambiguation). ... PTO headquarters in Alexandria The United States Patent and Trademark Office (PTO or USPTO) is an agency in the United States Department of Commerce that provides patent and trademark protection to inventors and businesses for their inventions and corporate and product identification. ... The Association of Research Libraries is an organization of research libraries in North America. ...


UCR's academic colleges administer significant museum collections in the arts and sciences. The Citrus Variety Collection constitutes 1,800 trees representing two of each of the 640 types of Citrus and 28 other related genera in the Rutaceae family, the largest such collection in the world.[75][76] The Herbarium houses more than 110,000 dried plant specimens from across the Western hemisphere.[77][78] The Entomology Research Museum contains more than three million insect specimens, with particular strengths in Hymenoptera, Chalcidoidea, Aphelinidae, Thysanoptera and Meloidae.[79][80] The UCR/California Museum of Photography and Sweeney Art Gallery house UCR's primary art collections. The UCR/CMP includes the world's largest holding of vintage stereographs, one of the three great public collections of photographic apparatus in the US, and the University Print Collection of contemporary and historical images by over 1000 photographers.[81] Located adjacent to the UCR/CMP, the Sweeney Art Gallery holds approximately 650 unique works, with especially strong collections from the modern to contemporary periods, including pieces by Alexander Calder, Roy Lichtenstein, Millard Sheets and Kara Walker.[82] A museum is distinguished a collection of often unique objects that forms the core of its activities for exhibitions, education, research, etc. ... For other uses, see Citrus (disambiguation). ... Genera About 160 genera; selected important genera: Amyris - West Indian Sandalwood Choisya - Mexican orange Citrus - Citrus Dictamnus - Burning-bush Fortunella - Kumquat Melicope - Corkwood, Alani Murraya - Curry tree Phellodendron - Cork-trees Poncirus - Trifoliate orange Ptelea - Hoptree Ruta - Rue Skimmia - Skimmia Tetradium (Euodia) - Euodias Zanthoxylum - Toothache trees Rutaceae is a family of... The U.C.R. Entomology Research Museum is the insect collection of the Department of Entomology of the University of California, Riverside. ... Suborders Apocrita Symphyta Hymenoptera is one of the larger orders of insects, comprising the sawflies, wasps, bees, and ants. ... Chalcidoidea is a superfamily of Hymenoptera There are nineteen families Agaonidae Walker, 1846 Aphelinidae Thomson, 1876 Chalcididae Latreille, 1817 Encyrtidae Walker, 1837 Eucharitidae Latreille, 1809 Eulophidae (including Elasmidae) Westwood, 1829 Eupelmidae Walker, 1833 Eurytomidae Walker, 1832 Leucospidae Fabricius, 1775 Mymaridae Haliday, 1833 Ormyridae Forster, 1856 Perilampidae Latreille, 1809 Pteromalidae Dalman... Families Suborder Terebrantia    Merothripidae    Uzelothripidae    Aeolothripidae    Adeheterothripidae    Heterothripidae    Thripidae    Fauriellidae Suborder Tubulifera    Phlaeothripidae Thrips (Thysanoptera) are tiny, slender insects with fringed wings (thus the scientific name, from the Greek thysanos (fringe) + pteron (wing)). Other common names include Thunderflies or Thunder bugs. ... Genera See text. ... UCR / California Museum of Photography is an off-campus department of the University of California, Riverside, Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences. ... Stereoscopy, stereoscopic imaging or 3-D (three-dimensional) imaging is a technique to create the illusion of depth in a photograph, movie, or other two-dimensional image, by presenting a slightly different image to each eye. ... Dejeuner sur lHerbe by Pablo Picasso At the Moulin Rouge: Two Women Waltzing by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, 1892 The Scream by Edvard Munch, 1893 I and the Village by Marc Chagall, 1911 Fountain by Marcel Duchamp, 1917 Campbells Soup Cans 1962 Synthetic polymer paint on thirty-two... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... For other persons named Alexander Calder, see Alexander Calder (disambiguation). ... Roy Lichtenstein (27 October 1923–29 September 1997) was a prominent American pop artist, whose work borrowed heavily from popular advertising and comic book styles, which he himself described as being as artificial as possible. // Roy Lichtenstein was born on 27 October 1923 into an upper-middle-class family in... Millard Owen Sheets (1907-1989) was a American painter and an important representative of the California School of painting. ... Kara Walker, Cut, Cut paper and adhesive on wall, Brent Sikkema NYC. Kara Walker (born November 26, 1969) is a contemporary American artist who is best known for her exploration of race, gender, sexuality, Violence and identity in her artworks. ...


Admissions, enrollment and retention

See also: University of California#Admissions and Diversity at the University of California, Riverside
Ethnic enrollment,
2007[83]
Undergrads
Male
Female
Grads
Male
Female
Total
Asian American 6,428 3,430 2,998 227 119 108 6,655
Hispanic American 3,903 1,503 2,400 182 94 88 4,085
White American 2,694 1,401 1,293 792 397 375 3,466
African American 1,108 403 705 47 22 24 1,155
American Indian 55 17 38 14 8 6 69
Other Ethnic 296 131 165 98 44 54 394
Not stated/Unknown 557 297 260 807 429 378 1,364
Total 15,041 7,182 7,859 2,146 1,113 1,033 17,187

Historically, UCR has accepted all students who qualify for admission to the UC system based on a 3.0 minimum grade point average (GPA) and average SAT scores of 470 on each of the math, English and writing tests.[84][85] Among freshmen admitted for the fall of 2007, high school GPAs averaged 3.59, SAT scores averaged 1673, and ACT Composite scores averaged 23.[86] UCR admitted 75.9 percent of 20,370 first-year applicants in 2007.[86] Its overall yield rate of admitted students was 17.4 percent, for an entering class of 4,025 freshmen.[87] As most other UC schools typically receive more applicants than there are spots available, the UC refers applicants who met minimum UC admission requirements but do not qualify for the more selective campuses in the system to UC Riverside and UC Merced.[85] About 4,100 UC-eligible students who were not offered admission to their campus of choice were referred to Riverside and Merced in 2007; about 300 students accept referral admissions offers each year.[84][85] In 2006, 43.4 percent of admitted students were first generation college students, 38.7 percent came from low family income backgrounds, and 24 percent graduated from low-performing high schools as measured by Academic Performance Index (API) scores.[88] Enrollment in the fall of 2007 totaled 17,187 students, 15,041 undergraduates and 2,146 postgraduates. In 2007, U.S. News ranked UCR as the third most ethnically diverse and, by the number of undergraduates receiving Pell Grants (42 percent), the 15th most economically diverse student body in the nation.[12][13] Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic Americans (Spanish: Hispano Americano) are Americans of Hispanic ethnicity who largely identify with the Hispanic cultural heritage. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... The ACT® test is a standardized achievement examination for college admissions in the United States produced by ACT, Inc. ... University of California, Merced The University of California, Merced (UC Merced), located in the San Joaquin Valley at Merced, California, is the tenth University of California campus. ... The Academic Performance Index (API) is a measurement in California of academic performance and progress of individual schools in California. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Pell Grant program is a type of post-secondary, educational federal grant program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. ...


According to statistics released by the Education Trust, a national nonprofit, in 2005 UC Riverside graduated 65.3 percent of its students in six years, a figure consistent with national averages but behind the average set by the top five public research universities by as much as 22 percent.[89][90] However, UCR's consistency with the national average is well above the median of 39 percent for low-income-serving institutions as calculated in 2006 by the National Center for Education Statistics, making the campus a model for successful approaches to diversity in higher education.[14] The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), as part of the U.S. Department of Education, collects, analyzes, and publishes statistics on education and public school district finance information in the United States; conducts studies on international comparisons of education statistics; and provides leadership in developing and promoting the use... Recently diversity has been used in a political context to justify recruiting international students or employees. ...


Student life

University Village. The movie theater doubles as a classroom during the day.
University Village. The movie theater doubles as a classroom during the day. [91]

Much of the student life on campus revolves around extensive local outreach and retention programs. Riverside enrolls the highest percentage of African American students of any of the 10 UC campuses and the second highest percentage of Latino students after Merced, prompting the Los Angeles Times and New York Times to run stories lauding UCR as a "campus of choice" for minority students.[15][92] UCR was the first college in California to open a staffed lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) resource center in 1993, the first UC campus to offer a LGBT minor studies program in 1996, and the first campus in the nation to offer a gender-neutral housing option in 2005.[16] In recognition of this, The Advocate recognized UCR as one of the nation's best campuses for LGBT students in 2006, although it did not make the top 20.[93] In 2007 the Princeton Review ranked UCR 11th in terms of low student interest in political participation and 11th in terms of low student happiness due to quality of life issues, although it also listed UCR as a "Best Western College" and one of "America's Best Value Colleges".[94] While 70 percent of students are non-white, there is a tendency for the different ethnic groups to self-segregate, and racial tension is not unheard of, according to some students.[95] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (931x461, 206 KB) Picture I took on top of the Sterling Apartments Parking Structure File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (931x461, 206 KB) Picture I took on top of the Sterling Apartments Parking Structure File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... The Advocate (ISSN 0001-8996) is a US-based LGBT-related biweekly news magazine. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Housing

Sunset over UCR residence halls
Sunset over UCR residence halls

UCR's residence halls consist of three structures—Aberdeen-Inverness, Lothian, and Pentland Hills—which as of 2002 housed 2,930 students in triple, double and single rooms. In addition, UCR features several on-campus apartment complexes such as Stonehaven, Bannockburn, Village Plaza, and International Village, which together house 959 students. UCR also offers student family housing at Canyon Crest, a low-density residential community that serves 268 and is slated for demolition to make room for higher-density residence halls.[32] Glen Mor, an apartment housing complex adjacent to Pentland Hills, was opened in 2007, and the university also purchased a nearby apartment complex for student housing in 2007.[96] About half of the student population lives in off-campus apartments, one-fourth commute, and one-fourth live on campus.[96] Thirty percent of students remain on campus for the weekend.[97] A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... A red brick apartment block in central London, England, on the north bank of the Thames An apartment building, block of flats or tenement is a multi-unit dwelling made up of several (generally four or more) apartments (US) or flats (UK). ...


Reflecting UCR's diversity, a number of residence halls have been established for specific social, cultural and academic needs. Ethnic and gender-oriented theme halls include Unete a Mundo, for students seeking to support Latino or Chicano students in acclimating to life at UCR; a Pan African Theme Hall for students interested in developing consciousness of African culture in relation to other cultures of the world; and Stonewall Hall, dedicated to students of all gender identities and sexual orientations who wish to live in a gender-neutral community. UCR's three academic colleges in the humanities, sciences and engineering fields are represented by respective theme halls, and halls exist for honor students and transfer students.[98] Non-sexist language (gender-generic, gender-inclusive, gender-neutral, or sex-neutral language) is language that attempts to refer neither to males nor females when discussing an abstract or hypothetical person whose sex cannot otherwise be determined, as opposed to sexist language, which attempts to refer to males. ...


Student organizations and activities

UCR hosts 281 registered student organizations, including the Associated Students of the University of California, Riverside (ASUCR), which represents undergraduates on administrative and policy issues.[99] ASUCR is guided by a Senate composed of 20 elected officers, who represent the three undergraduate colleges in proportion to their enrollment. Membership is composed of all UCR students who pay mandatory activity fees.[100] ASUCR assesses these fees and distributes funds to registered student groups on campus, including student lobbying groups, a right that ASUCR won in a federal court case against the Regents in 1999.[101]

In August 1955, students constructed a 132 ft (40 m) by 70 ft (21 m) concrete “C“ on the eastern slope of the Box Springs Mountain.
In August 1955, students constructed a 132 ft (40 m) by 70 ft (21 m) concrete “C“ on the eastern slope of the Box Springs Mountain.[102]

Of the registered student groups, 40 are fraternities and sororities. Ten men's fraternities belong to the North-American Interfraternity Conference; six women's sororities belong to the National Panhellenic Conference; seven men's fraternities and ten women's sororities represent the National Multicultural Greek Council, and two others fall under the campus Raza Assembly and are unique to UCR.[103] Thirteen percent of the undergraduate student body participates in Greek life, although chapter houses are not permitted.[104] Including the Greek letter organizations, more than 60 student volunteer service organizations at UCR contribute to more than 100,000 hours of collective and individual service done in the community each year.[105] Image File history File linksMetadata BigC.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File linksMetadata BigC.jpg‎ I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ... The National Multicultural Greek Council (NMGC) is an umbrella council for thirteen Multicultural Greek Letter Organizations established in 1998. ... La Raza is a Spanish-language term (literally meaning the race, but also connoting el pueblo or la gente, both of which mean the people), which refers generally to the people of Latin America who share the cultural and political legacies of Spanish colonialism, including the Spanish language and culture...


Student media organizations include The Highlander student newspaper, currently published bi-weekly, Tuesdays and Fridays, during the academic year. First published in 1954, it was a completely independent student news publication until 2001, when ASUCR passed a funding referendum for it.[106] Since then, several representatives of student government, along with the larger UCR community, have criticized The Highlander for publishing racially-insensitive content, including a cartoon that depicted a stereotypical Asian American graduate teaching assistant with poor English skills.[107] This led to a stolen run of papers and an unsuccessful proposal to redistribute the referendum funds to other student publications in 2003.[108][109] Other student news publications on campus include the Asian Community Times, Indian Time, Nuestra Cosa, Queeriosity, and the X-Factor Student Newspaper.[104] Campus literary magazines include Mosaic, published at UCR since 1959, and Crate, published by graduate students in UCR's master's level creative writing program since 2005.[110][111] UCR broadcasts over radio as KUCR at 88.3 FM.[112] The station programs a variety of independent music, news and commentary.[113] An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... College Radio Station for the University of California, Riverside Station 88. ...


On-campus entertainment events are planned by a 14-member Associated Students Program Board (ASPB), comprising six student-run divisions that include concerts, films and lectures, cultural events and special events, as well as a marketing and leadership division. ASPB's major events include the Block Party Concert, Student Film Festival, International Film Festival, World Fest, Welcome Week, Homecoming and Spring Splash.[114]


The Graduate Student Association of the University of California, Riverside (GSAUCR) is ASUCR's counterpart on the graduate level. It is guided by a Graduate Student Council consisting of representatives from every department on campus. GSAUCR assesses fees required of all graduate students and uses them to fund research awards and colloquiums, conference travel grants, and speaker funds.[115]


Athletics

UCR's school mascot, known as Scotty the bear
UCR's school mascot, known as Scotty the bear

UCR's varsity teams compete in the Big West Conference of NCAA Division I. Programs include men and women's soccer, cross country, basketball, track and field, baseball, softball, tennis, golf and women's volleyball. After students voted to assess themselves $35 a quarter to fund the athletic programs in 1998, men's and women's soccer and golf were added, and the athletic department switched from NCAA Division II in 2000.[33] While at Division II, UCR produced national championship teams in men's baseball (1977 and 1982) and women's volleyball (1982 and 1986). Women's volleyball earned an Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women (AIAW) national title in 1977.[116] As of 2006, UCR had produced 17 individual national champions, 175 All-Americans and many conference and regional champions. In 2006 and 2007, the UCR women's basketball team represented the conference in the Division I tournament but lost both times in the first round.[117] In 2005 the women's soccer team competed in the first round of the NCAA tournament.[118] In 2007, UCR's baseball team won their first Big West championship and reached the Division I postseason for the second time since 2003, and the cross country team sent its first two athletes to the national championships.[119][120] Football was played until 1975, and the team won two CCAA championships before the sport was discontinued because of low attendance and in anticipation of the impact of Title IX regulations.[121] In the United States and Canada, varsity sports teams are the principal athletic teams representing a college, university, or high school or other secondary school. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... Division I is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate womens athletics in the United States and to administer national championships. ... All-American, a Broadway musical with book by Mel Brooks, music by Charles Strouse, and lyrics by Lee Adams, opened in New York on March 19, 1962, and played 80 performances. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... CCAA redirects here. ... Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972, now known as the Patsy T. Mink Equal Opportunity in Education Act in honor of its principal author, but more commonly known simply as Title IX, is a 76-word United States law enacted on June 23, 1972 that states: No person...


The volleyball and basketball teams play home games in the Student Recreation Center (SRC), which seats 3,168. The baseball team competes at the Riverside Sports Complex, just off campus at the corner of Blaine and Rustin streets. UCR graduate Troy Percival personally built UCR's baseball clubhouse to major league quality standards.[122] Softball is played at the Amy S. Harrison Field, named after a UCR graduate who donated $300,000 towards its upgrade in 2004.[123] Adjacent to the softball field are the soccer and track fields. The soccer field was resurfaced with artificial turf in 2007, but the track field remains run-down.[124][125] UCR has not hosted a track and field meet in five years because of the condition of the field.[125] UC Riverside Student Recreation Center is a 3,168-seat, 80,000-square feet, multi-purpose arena in Riverside, California. ... Troy Eugene Percival (born August 9, 1969 in Fontana, California) is a Major League Baseball closer who is under contract with the Detroit Tigers. ... Major Leagues redirects here. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Non-varsity student sports clubs that compete with other area universities include the Rugby Football Club, established in 2006, which plays in the Southern California Rugby Football Union.[126] UCR's Karate Club is organized under the auspices of the American JKA Karate Association, an independent, national karate organization hosted at UCR. It annually holds the Shotokan Karate Championships competition in the SRC.[127] Student clubs also compete in men's soccer and Ultimate Frisbee.[128] JKA may stand for: Japan Karate Association Star Wars Jedi Knight: Jedi Academy This page concerning a three-letter acronym or abbreviation is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... -1... Ultimate Frisbee is a competitive non-contact team sport played with a Frisbee or similar flying disc most commonly weighing 175 g. ...


In 1954, UCR's founding class adopted the name "Highlanders", reflecting the campus' high altitude. After the student body passed a referendum to move to Division I competition in 1998, the bear mascot was professionally redesigned to look more ferocious. The new "Scotty" featured a half-blue face in homage to William Wallace, the subject of the movie Braveheart.[129] In line with the Scottish motif, UCR assembles a bagpipe band made up of students and staff who play at graduation and other campus events. The blue and gold tartan worn by the pipe band and the mascot is a registered trademark of the University of California.[130] For the women's basketball team's first appearance at the NCAA Tournament in 2006, UCR sent 22 members of the pipe band to play at halftime.[131] For other persons named William Wallace, see William Wallace (disambiguation). ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ... This article is about the Scottish as an ethnic group. ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... For the artificial athletic track surface, see tartan track. ...


Alumni

More than 65,000 alumni have graduated from UCR over the course of its history.[132] Notable alumni include Charles E. Young, the first UCR student body president and a former chancellor at UCLA; Dr. Richard R. Schrock, a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and winner of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, and Billy Collins, the 11th U.S. Poet Laureate. Other UCR alumni include Troy Percival, a pitcher for the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim who holds the team's all-time record for saves, and Stefani Schaeffer, a defense attorney who recently won Donald Trump's reality show, The Apprentice.[133] Lists of notable alumni, faculty, and current students of the University of California, Riverside. ... Dr. Charles E. Chuck Young is currently Chancellor Emeritus and Professor at the School of Public Affairs at UCLA. Dr. Young, internationally renowed as a leader of higher education, served as President of the Qatar Foundation from 2004-2006. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Richard Royce Schrock (born January 4, 1945) was one of the recipients of the 2005 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his contribution to the metathesis method in organic chemistry. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... William A. (Billy) Collins (born March 22, 1941) is an American poet who served two terms as the Poet Laureate of the United States, from 2001 to 2003. ... The Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress is appointed by the United States Librarian of Congress and earns a stipend of $35,000 a year. ... Troy Eugene Percival (born August 9, 1969 in Fontana, California) is a Major League Baseball closer who is under contract with the Detroit Tigers. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... Trevor Hoffman, a closer for the San Diego Padres, is currently the leader on the all-time save list. ... Stefani, 32, was born in Burbank, California and raised in Palm Springs. ... The Apprentice: Los Angeles was confirmed on November 30, 2005. ...


See also

California Portal

Image File history File links WPCF.svg‎ (All user names refer to en. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The University of California Students Association (UCSA) is a coalition of students and student governments that aims to provide a collective voice for all students through advocacy and direct action. ... The California Master Plan for Higher Education of 1960 was developed by Clark Kerr, during the administration of Gov. ...

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For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 92nd day of the year (93rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 232nd day of the year (233rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Berkeley is a city on the east shore of San Francisco Bay in Northern California, in the United States. ... University of California Press, also known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California that engages in academic publishing. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Press-Enterprise is a newspaper that serves the Inland Empire in Southern California and is based in Riverside, California. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 139th day of the year (140th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Press Enterprise (Pennsylvania) . The Press-Enterprise is a newspaper that serves the Inland Empire in Southern California. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 167th day of the year (168th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Press Enterprise (Pennsylvania) . The Press-Enterprise is a newspaper that serves the Inland Empire in Southern California. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Press Enterprise (Pennsylvania) . The Press-Enterprise is a newspaper that serves the Inland Empire in Southern California. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Not to be confused with Press Enterprise (Pennsylvania) . The Press-Enterprise is a newspaper that serves the Inland Empire in Southern California. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 296th day of the year (297th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 6th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 356th day of the year (357th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... is the 362nd day of the year (363rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 100th day of the year (101st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 102nd day of the year (103rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Flag of the National Geographic Society The National Geographic Society was founded in the United States on January 27, 1888, by 33 men interested in organizing a society for the increase and diffusion of geographical knowledge. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 214th day of the year (215th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 53rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Chauncey Village area of West Lafayette West Lafayette (IPA: ) is a city in Tippecanoe County, Indiana, United States, 65 miles (105km) northwest of Indianapolis. ... Purdue University Press, founded in 1960, is a university press that is part of Purdue University. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 290th day of the year (291st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 293rd day of the year (294th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This just IN !!!:paris hiltons new dog. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... December 27 is the 361st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (362nd in leap years). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Orlando redirects here. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 331st day of the year (332nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 119th day of the year (120th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 67th day of the year (68th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The San Diego Union-Tribune is a daily newspaper published in San Diego, California by the Copley Press. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 329th day of the year (330th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 29th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 117th day of the year (118th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 3rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 266th day of the year (267th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events of 2008: (EMILY) Me Lesley and MIley are going to China! This article is about the year. ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... {| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 235th day of the year (236th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 5th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 155th day of the year (156th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 323rd day of the year (324th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see 5th October (Serbia). ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 77th day of the year (78th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 116th day of the year (117th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 263rd day of the year (264th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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University of California, Riverside
  • Official UCR site

Coordinates: 33°58′32.37″N, 117°19′52.46″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of California, Riverside - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4646 words)
The University of California, Riverside, is a public coeducational university whose main campus is in a suburban district of the city of Riverside, California.
UCR is one of the campuses of the University of California, which is governed by a Board of Regents and administered by a president, who at present is Robert C. Dynes.
UCR hosts the University of California Institute for California and the United States, an interdisiplinary research institute dedicated to developing and coordinating a university-wide approach to Mexico-related studies[9].
Riverside, California - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2216 words)
Riverside's downtown area is known as the "Mission Inn District", after the Mission Inn, a hotel that was modeled after the missions left along the California coast by Franciscan friars in the 18th century.
California School of the Deaf for the hearing impaired from 7th to 12th grade was open since 1934.
Riverside's predominant fl gang is known as 1200 block crip.==Landmarks== Riverside is home of the historic Mission Inn, the Historic Riverside County Courthouse (based on the Petit Palais in Paris, France), and the Fox Theater (where the first showing of Gone with the Wind took place).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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