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Encyclopedia > University of California, Los Angeles

Coordinates: 34°04′20.00″N, 118°26′38.75″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

University of California, Los Angeles

Motto: Fiat lux (Latin)
Motto in English: Let there be light
Established: 1881 as the Los Angeles State Normal School.
Became part of UC system in 1919
Type: Public
Endowment: US $2.299 billion[1]
Chancellor: Gene D. Block[2]
Provost: Scott L. Waugh (acting)[3]
Faculty: 4,016[4]
Staff: 26,139
Undergraduates: 25,432
Postgraduates: 11,179[5]
Location: Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Campus: Urban, 419 acres (1.7 km²)
Former names: California State Normal School Los Angeles branch (1881-82)
State Normal School at Los Angeles (1882-87)
Los Angeles State Normal School (1887-19)
University of California Southern Branch (1919-27)
Newspaper: Daily Bruin
Colors: True Blue and Gold[6]           
Nickname: UCLA
Mascot: Joe and Josephine Bruin[7]
Athletics: Bruins, NCAA Division I
Affiliations: University of California, AAU, Pac-10
Website: www.ucla.edu

The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. Established as a branch of the state university in 1919, it is the second-oldest general-purpose campus in the University of California system and has the largest enrollment of any university in the state.[8] Image File history File links Ucla_logo. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Let there be light is an English translation of the Hebrew יְהִי אוֹר (or yehiy or). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Gene D. Block (born 1948) is currently serving as the ninth chancellor of the University of California, Los Angeles. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... For other uses of terms redirecting here, see US (disambiguation), USA (disambiguation), and United States (disambiguation) Motto In God We Trust(since 1956) (From Many, One; Latin, traditional) Anthem The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City National language English (de facto)1 Demonym American... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... A lithograph of the second California State Normal School, San Jose building from the 1880s. ... The Daily Bruin (also known as The Bruin) is the student newspaper at the University of California, Los Angeles. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The Pacific-10 Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ...


UCLA comprises the College of Letters and Science (the primary undergraduate college) as well as undergraduate colleges Arts and Architecture, Herb Alpert School of Music, Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science‎, Nursing, and Theater, Film, and Television, seven professional schools, and five professional Health Science schools. Since 2001, UCLA has enrolled over 33,000 total students annually, and that number is steadily rising.[9][5]


UCLA is ranked 25th among "America's Best Colleges 2008: National Universities" by U.S. News & World Report, tied for third (with University of Michigan) for best public universities in the United States, and placed 13th in the world in 2007 in ranking done by the Shanghai Jiao Tong University.[10] UCLA also ranked 11th in the nation in terms of quality of scientific research leading towards a Nobel Prize.[10] UCLA is a Public Ivy,[11] and one of the 25 New Ivies, a list of universities ranked by Kaplan.[12] UCLA also ranks among the top 10 schools in the country with the most faculty awards.[13] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... Kaplan, Inc. ...


UCLA has more applicants than any other university in the United States.[14][15][16] Out of 55,401 applicants for Fall 2008, 12,755 (22.7%) were admitted.[17] Students come to UCLA from all 50 states and more than 100 countries, though according to statistics from 2001-05, an average 92.6% of the entire student body originated from California.[9][5]


UCLA's athletic teams, the Bruins, have won 122 national championships, including 101 NCAA team championships as of 2008—first to have won 100 and still more than any other university.[18] On May 11, 2008, the Women's Water Polo team won UCLA's 101th NCAA title. The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... NCAA redirects here. ...


In 2006, the university completed Campaign UCLA, which collected over $3.05 billion and is currently the most successful fundraising campaign in the history of higher education.[19] USD redirects here. ...


In June, the College of Letters and Science will hold its annual commencement ceremony, the largest on campus, with more than 3,000 students receiving their degrees and some 12,000 guests to help with the celebration. Among them will be Former President Bill Clinton, who will deliver the commencement address.

Contents

History

Main article: History of the University of California, Los Angeles
The Los Angeles branch of California State Normal School, in 1881.

The History of University of California, Los Angeles begins in 1919, when the Los Angeles branch of the California State Normal School became the Southern Branch of the University of California. ... Image File history File links UCLA-old-statenormal-campus. ... Image File history File links UCLA-old-statenormal-campus. ... A lithograph of the second California State Normal School, San Jose building from the 1880s. ...

Early beginnings

In March 1881, after heavy lobbying by Los Angeles residents, the California State Legislature authorized the creation of a southern branch of the California State Normal School (which later became San José State University) in downtown Los Angeles to train teachers for the growing population of Southern California. The State Normal School at Los Angeles opened on August 29, 1882, on what is now the site of the Central Library of the Los Angeles Public Library system. The new facility included an elementary school where teachers-in-training could practice their teaching technique on children. In 1887, the school became known as the Los Angeles State Normal School.[20] Californias Capitol, where the State Legislature meets California State Assembly chamber California state Senate chamber The California Legislature is the legislative branch of the state government of California. ... A lithograph of the second California State Normal School, San Jose building from the 1880s. ... San José State University, commonly shortened to San José State and SJSU, is the founding campus of what became the California State University system. ... Skyline of downtown Los Angeles Downtown Los Angeles is the central business district of Los Angeles, California, located close to the geographic center of the metropolitan area. ... This article is about the region of Southern California. ... A normal school or teachers college is an educational institution for training teachers. ... is the 241st day of the year (242nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The Los Angeles Public Library (LAPL) system serves the residents of Los Angeles, California. ... Primary or elementary education is the first years of formal, structured education that occurs during childhood. ...

University of California, Southern Branch's Vermont Campus, 1922.

In 1914, the school moved to a new campus on Vermont Avenue (now the site of Los Angeles City College) in Hollywood. In 1917, UC Regent Edward A. Dickson, the only regent representing the Southland at the time, and Ernest Carroll Moore, Director of the Normal School, began working together to lobby the State for the school to become the second University of California campus, after Berkeley. On May 23, 1919, their efforts were rewarded when Governor William D. Stephens signed Assembly Bill 626 into law, which turned the school into the Southern Branch of the University of California and added its general undergraduate program, the College of Letters and Science.[21] The Southern Branch campus opened on September 15 of that year, offering two-year undergraduate programs to 250 Letters and Science students and 1,250 students in the Teachers College, under Moore's continued direction. Image File history File links UCLA-vermontcampus-1922. ... Image File history File links UCLA-vermontcampus-1922. ... Vermont Avenue is one of the longest running north/south streets in Los Angeles. ... The LACC location in 1922, when it was the campus of UCLA. Los Angeles City College, known as LACC, is a public community college in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. ... Hollywood redirects here. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... William Dennison Stephens (b. ... Southern Branch renamed in 1927 University of California, Los Angeles. ...


Enrollment at the Southern Branch expanded so rapidly that by the mid-1920s the institution was outgrowing the 25 acre Vermont Avenue location. The Regents conducted a search for a new location and announced their selection of the so-called "Beverly Site"—just west of Beverly Hills—on March 21, 1925. (The original Vermont campus is now home to Los Angeles City College.) After the athletic teams entered the Pacific Coast conference in 1926, the Southern Branch student council adopted the nickname "Bruins," a name offered by the student council at Berkeley.[22] In 1927, the Regents renamed the school itself the "University of California at Los Angeles" (the word "at" was officially replaced by a comma in 1958, in line with other UC campuses) and the state broke ground in Westwood on land sold for $1 million, less than one-third its value, by real estate developers Edwin and Harold Janss, for whom the Janss Steps are named.[20] This article is about the unit of measurement. ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The LACC location in 1922, when it was the campus of UCLA. Los Angeles City College, known as LACC, is a public community college in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles, California. ... The term comma has various uses; comma is the name used for one of the punctuation symbols: , The term comma is also used in music theory for various small intervals that arise as differences between approximately equal intervals. ... High-rise buildings line Wilshire Boulevard through the Westwood area Another view of the Westwood skyline Westwood is a district in western Los Angeles, California, not to be confused with Westwood, California. ...


The original four buildings were the College Library, Royce Hall, the Physics-Biology Building, and the Chemistry Building (presently Powell Library, Royce Hall, the Humanities Building, and Haines Hall, respectively), arrayed around a quadrangular courtyard on the 400 acre (1.6 km²) campus. The first undergraduate classes on the new campus were held in 1929 with 5,500 students. In 1933, after further lobbying by alumni, faculty, administration and community leaders, UCLA was permitted to award the Master's degree, and in 1936, the doctorate, against resistance from Berkeley.[23] Royce Hall is a building on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ...

The University Library, now known as the Powell Library, was covered in snow on January 15, 1932

Download high resolution version (900x727, 85 KB)UCLA Powell Library in snow, January, 15 1932 This work is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (900x727, 85 KB)UCLA Powell Library in snow, January, 15 1932 This work is copyrighted. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1932 (MCMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1932 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Maturity as a university

By the 1950s, UCLA had developed into a serious and widely respected research institution. The campus received its first chancellor in 1951, thereby establishing itself as an autonomous entity within the UC system. The appointment of Franklin Murphy to the position of Chancellor in 1960 helped to spark an era of tremendous growth of facilities and faculty honors. By the end of the decade, UCLA had achieved distinction in a wide range of subjects. This era also secured UCLA's position as a proper university in her own right and not simply a branch of the UC system. This change is exemplified by an incident involving Chancellor Murphy, which was described by him later on:


"I picked up the telephone and called in from somewhere, and the phone operator said, 'University of California.' And I said, 'Is this Berkeley?' She said, 'No.' I said, 'Well, who have I gotten to?' 'UCLA.' I said, 'Why didn't you say UCLA?' 'Oh,' she said, 'we're instructed to say University of California.' So the next morning I went to the office and wrote a memo; I said, 'Will you please instruct the operators, as of noon today, when they answer the phone to say, "UCLA."' And they said, 'You know they won't like it at Berkeley.' And I said, 'Well, let's just see. There are a few things maybe we can do around here without getting their permission.'" [24]


Campus

When UCLA opened its new campus in 1929, it had four buildings. Today, the campus includes 163 buildings across 419 acres (1.7 km²) in the western part of Los Angeles, north of the Westwood shopping district and just south of Sunset Boulevard. The campus is close but not adjacent to the San Diego Freeway.[25] Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... High-rise buildings line Wilshire Boulevard through the Westwood area Another view of the Westwood skyline Westwood is a district in western Los Angeles, California, not to be confused with Westwood, California. ... Sunset Boulevard (officially known as West Sunset Boulevard, except in Beverly Hills) is a street in the western part of Los Angeles County, California, that stretches from Figueroa Street in downtown Los Angeles to the Pacific Coast Highway at the Pacific Ocean in the Pacific Palisades. ... The San Diego Freeway; the Interstate 405 segment is highlighted in red, the Interstate 5 segment is highlighted in blue. ...

Aerial photo of UCLA campus
Aerial photo of UCLA campus

The first campus buildings were designed by the local firm Allison & Allison. The Romanesque Revival style of these first four structures remained the predominant building style on campus until the 1950s, when architect Welton Becket was hired to supervise the expansion of the campus over the next two decades. Becket greatly streamlined the general appearance of the campus, adding several rows of minimalist, slab–shaped brick buildings to the southern half of the campus, the largest of these being the UCLA Medical Center.[26] Architects such as A. Quincy Jones, William Pereira and Paul Williams designed many subsequent structures on the campus during the mid-20th century. More recent additions include buildings designed by architects I.M. Pei, Richard Meier, Cesar Pelli, and Rafael Vinoly. In order to accommodate UCLA's rapidly growing student population, multiple construction and renovation projects are in progress, including expansions of the life sciences and engineering research complexes. This continuous construction gives UCLA the on-campus nickname of "Under Construction Like Always."[27] Romanesque Revival is a style of building in the late 19th century (roughly 1840 and 1900) inspired by the 11th and 12th century Romanesque style of architecture. ... The 3,000-seat Santa Monica Civic Auditorium, opened in 1958. ... For other uses, see Minimalism (disambiguation). ... UCLA Medical Center is a hospital located on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California. ... This entry is for A. Quincy Jones the architect. ... William Leonard Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) was an American architect from Chicago Illinois, of Portuguese ancestry[1] who was noted for his futuristic designs of landmark buildings such as the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco. ... Paul Williams Paul Revere Williams (February 18, 1894 – January 23, 1980) was an African American architect who based his practice largely in Los Angeles, California and the Southern California area. ... Ieoh Ming Pei (貝聿銘 pinyin Bèi Yùmíng) is a Chinese American architect born in Suzhou, China on April 26, 1917. ... Richard Meier (born October 12, 1934 in Newark, New Jersey) is a late twentieth century American architect known for his use of the purist white. ... Pellis Petronas Twin Tower César Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ... Rafael Viñoly, a world-famous architect, was born in 1944 in Uruguay. ...

Royce Hall, one of the original four buildings of the campus, has become the symbol of UCLA
Royce Hall, one of the original four buildings of the campus, has become the symbol of UCLA
The Murphy Sculpture Garden
The Murphy Sculpture Garden

The campus includes sculpture gardens, fountains, museums, and a mix of architectural styles. It is located in the residential area of Westwood and bordered by Bel-Air, Beverly Hills, and Brentwood. The campus is informally divided into North Campus and South Campus, which are both on the eastern half of the university's land. North Campus is the original campus core; its buildings are more old-fashioned in appearance and clad in imported Italian brick. North Campus is home to the arts, humanities, social sciences, law, and business programs and is centered around oak tree-lined Dickson Court. South Campus is home to the physical sciences, life sciences, engineering, psychology, mathematical sciences, all health-related fields, and the UCLA Medical Center. Image File history File linksMetadata RHall. ... Image File history File linksMetadata RHall. ... Royce Hall is a building on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... High-rise buildings line Wilshire Boulevard through the Westwood area Another view of the Westwood skyline Westwood is a district in western Los Angeles, California, not to be confused with Westwood, California. ... Bel-Air redirects here. ... Beverly Hills redirects here. ... This article is about the neighborhood in Los Angeles. ... UCLA Medical Center is a hospital located on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California. ...


Ackerman Union, the John Wooden Center, the Arthur Ashe Health and Wellness Center, the Student Activities Center, Kerckhoff Hall, the J.D. Morgan Center, the James West Alumni Center, and Pauley Pavilion stand at the center of the campus. Bruin Walk, a heavily traveled pathway from housing to the main campus, bisects the campus. John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, informally and commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ...


The tallest building on campus is named after Ralph Bunche, an African-American alumnus, who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for negotiating an armistice agreement between the Jews and Arabs in Palestine. A bust of him, on the entrance to Bunche Hall, overlooks the Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden. He was the first individual of non-European background and the first UCLA alumnus to be honored with the Prize. Dr. Ralph Johnson Bunche (August 7, 1903 – December 9, 1971) was an American political scientist, diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize for his late 1940s mediation in Palestine. ... Lester B. Pearson after accepting the 1957 Nobel Peace Prize The Nobel Peace Prize (Swedish and Norwegian: Nobels fredspris) is the name of one of five Nobel Prizes bequeathed by the Swedish industrialist and inventor Alfred Nobel. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


A mile from campus, the UCLA Hannah Carter Japanese Garden is located in the community of Bel-Air. The garden was designed by landscape architect Nagao Sakurai of Tokyo and garden designer Kazuo Nakamura of Kyoto in 1959. After the garden was damaged by heavy rains in 1969, UCLA Professor of Art and Campus Architect Koichi Kawana took on the task of its reconstruction. Bel Air is the name of several places in the United States of America: Bel Air, Alabama Bel Air, Los Angeles, California Bel Air, Kentucky Bel Air, Maryland Bel Air, Tennessee Bel Air, Texas Bel Air, Virginia (two places): in Fairfax County in Stafford County Outside America: Bel Air, Mauritius...


The campus has a large number of parking garages, both above-ground and below-ground. Yet, the university continues to suffer from a severe parking shortage which is further compounded by Southern California's regional housing shortage.[28] The university has given priority in allocation of parking spaces to staff and some students, regardless of living distances. There are many facilities with local buses. There are, in addition, other transportation services that the university provides for its students, such as "rideshares" and vanpools. Also, the "BruinGo" program allows students and staff members to use local bus services (such as Santa Monica's Big Blue Bus, initially used as a free initiative) for a reduced fare from numerous terminals located on the campus.[29] For other uses, see Parking (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... Big Blue Buses at the UCLA terminal The Big Blue Bus is a municipal bus operator in Los Angeles Westside, USA, mostly serving Santa Monica, Westwood, and Venice. ...


With a location near Hollywood and a world-famous film and television school, the UCLA campus has attracted filming for decades. Much of the 1985 film Gotcha! was shot at UCLA, as well as John Singleton's Higher Learning (1995). Legally Blonde, "Old School", "The Nutty Profesor", Erin Brockovich, and American Pie 2 all were mainly shot at the university campus or locale. Some of the exterior shots of the fictional UC Sunnydale in Buffy the Vampire Slayer were also filmed at UCLA. In response to the major demand for filming, UCLA instated a policy on filming and professional photography at the campus.[30] "UCLA is located in Los Angeles, the same place as the American motion picture industry," said UCLA visiting professor of film and television Jonathan Kuntz.[31] "So we're convenient for (almost) all of the movie companies, TV production companies, commercial companies and so on. We're right where the action is." ... Gotcha! is a 1985 action film, starring Anthony Edwards and Linda Fiorentino. ... John Daniel Singleton (born January 6, 1968 in Los Angeles, California) is an American film director, producer, and screenwriter. ... For other uses, see Higher Learning (disambiguation). ... Legally Blonde is a 2001 comedy film starring Reese Witherspoon, produced by Marc E. Platt for Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer studios and directed by Robert Luketic. ... This article refers to an individual by the name of Erin Brockovich. ... American Pie 2 is the 2001 sequel to the comedy film American Pie. ... For other uses, see Buffy the Vampire Slayer (disambiguation). ...


Academics

Janss Steps
Janss Steps

UCLA features the College of Letters and Science, seven general campus professional schools, and four professional schools for the health sciences. Collectively, these schools serve about 25,000 undergraduate and 11,000 graduate students.[5] Created in 1923, the UCLA College of Letters and Science has 34 academic departments and 900 faculty, and houses the majority of UCLA's 129 undergraduate majors as well as the students in the Graduate Division of Letters and Sciences. The UCLA College Honors Program is also housed in the College. The College of Letters and Science's programs are divided into five academic divisions: humanities, social sciences, life sciences, physical sciences, and the International Institute.[5] In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The UCLA College of Letters and Science originated on May 23 1919, the day when the Governor of California (William D. Stephens) signed a bill into law which officially established the Southern Branch of the University of California. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... The social sciences are a group of academic disciplines that study human aspects of the world. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology is the science of life (from the Greek words bios = life and logos = word). ... == Headline text ==cant there be some kind of picture somewhere so i can see by picture???? Physical science is a encompassing term for the branches of natural science, and science, that study non-living systems, in contrast to the biological sciences. ...


Students at both levels are enrolled in the School of the Arts and Architecture, the Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, and the School of Theater, Film, and Television, while the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies, the Anderson School of Management, the School of Public Affairs, and the School of Law serve graduate students. The UCLA School of Theater, Film, and Television (TFT), located in Los Angeles, USA, is unique in that it combines all three (theater, film, and television) of these aspects into a single school. ... The Graduate School of Education and Information Studies (GSE&IS) at UCLA combines two distinguished departments whose research and doctoral training programs are committed to expanding the range of knowledge in education, information science, and associated disciplines. ... UCLA Anderson School of Management is one of eleven professional schools at the University of California, Los Angeles. ... The UCLA School of Public Affairs is the public affairs graduate school at UCLA. The school consists of three departments -- Public Policy, Social Welfare, and Urban Planning -- offering two undergraduate minors, three masters degrees, and two doctoral degrees[8]. It was formerly known as the School of Public Policy... The Hugh and Hazel Darling Law Library, UCLA School of Law The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), School of Law is the law school of the University of California, Los Angeles. ...


UCLA Healthcare

UCLA Medical Plaza is near the main entrance to the campus
UCLA Medical Plaza is near the main entrance to the campus

The David Geffen School of Medicine, along with the School of Nursing, School of Dentistry, and School of Public Health, comprise the professional schools of health science. In 2005, UCLA announced its five-year plan to establish the Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Medicine; the state of California is rare in its public funding of research with new embryonic stem cell lines. The California NanoSystems Institute is another project that was created out of a partnership with the University of California, Santa Barbara to pioneer innovations in the field of nanotechnology.[27][32] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 447 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographer Nikhil Kulkarni user:nikkul I took this image and would like to release it under ccbysa 3. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 447 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographer Nikhil Kulkarni user:nikkul I took this image and would like to release it under ccbysa 3. ... UCLA School of Medicine or David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA is an accredited allopathic medical school located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The UCLA School of Nursing is a nursing school affiliated with UCLA, and is located in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. ... The UCLA School of Dentistry is the dental school of UCLA. The school is located in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. ... The UCLA School of Public Health is the graduate school of public health affiliated with UCLA, and is located within the Center for Health Sciences building on the UCLA campus. ... Mouse embryonic stem cells with fluorescent marker. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... Nanotechnology refers to a field of applied science and technology whose theme is the control of matter on the atomic and molecular scale, generally 100 nanometers or smaller, and the fabrication of devices that lie within that size range. ...


The UCLA Medical Center is actually part of a larger healthcare system, UCLA Healthcare, which also operates a hospital in Santa Monica and seven primary care clinics throughout Los Angeles County. In addition, the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine uses two Los Angeles County public hospitals as teaching hospitals—Harbor-UCLA Medical Center and Olive View-UCLA Medical Center—as well as the largest private nonprofit hospital on the West Coast, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center. In 1981, the UCLA Medical Center made history when an assistant professor named Michael Gottlieb first diagnosed an unknown affliction later to be called AIDS. UCLA medical researchers pioneered the use of PET scanning to study brain function. The signaling cascade of Nitric oxide, one of the most important molecules in cardiopulmonary physiology was discovered in part by the medical school's Professor of Pharmacology Louis J. Ignarro. He shared the award with two other researchers - Robert F. Furchgott of the SUNY Health Science Center and Ferid Murad of the University of Texas Medical School at Houston. UCLA Medical Center is a hospital located on the campus of the University of California, Los Angeles in Los Angeles, California. ... For other uses, see Santa Monica (disambiguation). ... Map of California showing Los Angeles County. ... Map of California showing Los Angeles County. ... Harbor-UCLA Medical Center is a hospital located within the city of Torrance, California, USA. The hospital was founded in 1946, and is funded by Los Angeles County Olive View-UCLA Medical Center Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center UCLA Medical Center Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Website Categories: | | ... Olive View-UCLA Medical Center is a hospital located in the Sylmar neighborhood of Los Angeles, California, USA. The hospital was founded on October 27, 1920, and is funded by Los Angeles County [1]. Harbor-UCLA Medical Center Santa Monica-UCLA Medical Center UCLA Medical Center Olive View-UCLA Medical... Cedars-Sinai Medical Center is a hospital located in Los Angeles, California. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ... R-phrases , , , , S-phrases , , , Except where noted otherwise, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 Â°C, 100 kPa) Infobox disclaimer and references Nitric oxide or Nitrogen monoxide is a chemical compound with chemical formula NO. This gas is an important signaling molecule in the body of...


In the 2007 edition of U.S. News and World Report, UCLA Medical Center was ranked best in the West, as well as one of the top 3 hospitals in the United States alongside Mayo Clinic, Cleveland Clinic, Massachusetts General Hospital, and Johns Hopkins Hospital. In 15 of the 16 medical specialty areas examined, UCLA Medical Center ranked in the top 20.[33] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Mayo Clinic is a medical practice based in Rochester, Minnesota, USA, integrated with hospital facilities and a medical school. ... The Cleveland Clinic (formally known as the Cleveland Clinic Foundation) is a multispecialty academic medical center located in Cleveland, Ohio, United States. ... Massachusetts General Hospital (often abbreviated to Mass General or just MGH) is a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School and biomedical research facility in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Dome of the Johns Hopkins Hospital as seen from Broadway. ...


In 2008, The new state of the art Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center will open and replace the aging current medical center.


Rankings

U.S. University Rankings In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

USNWR National University[34] 25th
USNWR Business School[35] 11th
USNWR Law School[36] 16th
USNWR Medical School (research) [37] 9th
USNWR Medical School (primary care) [38] 12th
USNWR Engineering School[39] 13th
USNWR Education School[40] 3rd
ARWU World[41] 13th
ARWU National[42] 11th
ARWU Natural Science & Math[43] 10th
ARWU Engineering & CS[44] 32nd
ARWU Life Sciences[45] 22nd
ARWU Clinical Medicine[46] 6th
ARWU Social Sciences[47] 14th
THES World[48] 41st
CMUP[49] 13th
Washington Monthly[50] 2nd

UCLA is one of the most highly regarded schools in the world. UCLA is ranked 25th among "America's Best Colleges 2008: National Universities" by U.S. News and World Report, third best public university in the United States. In the August 21–28, 2006 issue of Newsweek (also released as the 2007 issue of the Kaplan Guide to Colleges), UCLA was listed as one of "25 New Ivies".[51] UCLA was 12th in Newsweek's annual ranking of the Top 100 Global universities.[52] The Washington Monthly ranks UCLA 2nd nationally with criteria based on research, community service, and social mobility.[53] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ...


In 2007, UCLA was ranked 11th in North America and 13th in the world by the annual list, Top 500 World Universities, published by the Institute of Higher Education at Shanghai Jiao Tong University, China in terms of quality of scientific research leading to a Nobel Prize.[10] UCLA was ranked 16th in the country and 31st in the world by The Times Higher Education Supplement’s list of the top 200 universities in the world.[54] North American redirects here. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ...


UCLA took the second spot among all universities (surpassed only by Johns Hopkins University), and the top spot among public universities, for research spending in the sciences and engineering during the fiscal year 2004, according to a 2006 report by the National Science Foundation—UCLA spent $773 million.[55] The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ...


UCLA's School of Law, Anderson School of Management, School of Public Affairs, and School of Medicine consistently rank among the top ten to twenty in the United States. UCLA's oldest operating unit, the Graduate School of Education and Information Studies (GSEIS), was ranked second among American graduate schools of education in the 2006 edition of U.S. News and World Report, America's Best Graduate Schools.[56] The Graduate School of Education and Information Studies (GSE&IS) at UCLA combines two distinguished departments whose research and doctoral training programs are committed to expanding the range of knowledge in education, information science, and associated disciplines. ...


In the Institute for Scientific Information's 2004 database, 48 UCLA professors were listed as highly cited, making UCLA faculty 11th in the United States; as of December 2006, there were 54 highly cited faculty.[57] The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) was founded by Eugene Garfield in 1960. ...


In 1995, of the 36 Ph.D. programs examined by the National Research Council, eleven departments were ranked in the top ten.[58] Thirty-one of the Ph.D. programs examined were ranked in the top 20, the third highest number of those distinctions in the country. The National Research Council (NRC) of the USA is the working arm of the United States National Academy of Sciences and the United States National Academy of Engineering, carrying out most of the studies done in their names. ...


Admissions

Undergraduate

Fall freshman statistics[17][59]

  2008 2007 2006 2005
Applicants 55,397 50,732 47,317 42,232
Admits 12,579 11,860 12,189 11,361
 % Admitted 22.70 23.38 25.76 26.90

This table does not account deferred
applications or other unique situations.

The average admitted applicant to UCLA for Fall 2008 had a weighted GPA (a GPA that includes all extra grade points for honors or AP coursework) of 4.34, an unweighted GPA (no extra points) of 3.85, an SAT Reasoning Test score of 2001, SAT Subject scores (UCLA uses the highest scores from any two of five subject areas) of 728 and 676, 20 semesters of honors/AP course work completed between 10th and 12th grades, and 51 semesters of college prep course work overall.


UCLA is rated "Most Selective", by the Princeton Review, with an admissions selectivity rating of 98 (on a scale of 60–99).[60] UCLA received 55,397 applications for the Fall 2008 freshman class, retaining its position as the university with the most freshmen applicants, a title it has held since 1998.[16] For the 2008-09 year, 12,579 applicants were admitted, 22.7% of the total.[59] For California in-state applicants, UCLA was the most selective university in the UC system with an admission rate of 22.1%.[61] The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...

Ethnic enrollment, 2007[62] Under-
graduates
Graduate
students
African American 865 438
Asian American and Pacific Islander 9,968 2,253
Hispanic or Chicano 3,812 974
Native American 108 63
White 8,861 4,643
International, Other 1075 1695
Total 25,928 11,548

One of the major current debates is over the decreasing admission of African-Americans and Latinos, especially since the passage of Proposition 209, prohibiting racial, sexual, or ethnic discrimination at public institutions, in 1996.[63] Out of the 4,700 students in the Fall 2006 class, 96 were black, and 20 of those were recruited athletes. This is the lowest number of blacks to enter into a class at UCLA in more than 30 years, and it comes at a time when the other schools in the UC system are seeing an increase. In response to this issue, UCLA decided to shift to a more "holistic" admissions process, similar to that of UC Berkeley, starting Fall 2007.[64] Preliminary data show that the overall number of underrepresented student applicants at UCLA — Native Americans, African Americans and Chicanos/Latinos — increased from 10,097 in fall 2006 (22.2% of 2006 applicants) to 11,414 for fall 2007 (23.6%).[16] 35% of admitted students receive federal Pell grants.[65] An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... An Asian American is a person of Asian ancestry or origin who was born in or is an immigrant to the United States. ... Hispanic (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ; Latin: , adjective from Hispānia, the Roman name for the Iberian Peninsula) is a term that historically denoted relation to the ancient Hispania and its peoples. ... For other uses, see Chicano (disambiguation). ... This article is about the people indigenous to the United States. ... The term white American (often used interchangeably and incorrectly with Caucasian American[2] and within the United States simply white[3]) is an umbrella term that refers to people of European descent residing in the United States. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Predominantly Christianity and Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... Latino refers to people living in the US of Latin American nationality and their US-born descendants. ... Proposition 209, a voter referendum passed in 1996, outlaws discrimination and preferential treatment based on race, sex, color, ethnicity, or national origin in the operation of public employment, public education, or public contracting. ... The Pell Grant program is a type of post-secondary, educational federal grant program sponsored by the U.S. Department of Education. ...


Graduate

In Fall 2005 the David Geffen School of Medicine admitted 4.5% of its applicants, the School of Law admitted 16.1%, and the Anderson School of Management admitted 30.6%.[66] UCLA School of Medicine or David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA is an accredited allopathic medical school located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The Hugh and Hazel Darling Law Library, UCLA School of Law The University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), School of Law is the law school of the University of California, Los Angeles. ... UCLA Anderson School of Management is one of eleven professional schools at the University of California, Los Angeles. ...


According to the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Guide to Dental Schools, 44th Ed., the UCLA School of Dentistry had more than 1,465 applicants for 88 seats in the entering class of 2006. The average Dental Admissions Test (DAT) scores for admitted students in the entering class of 2007 were 22 on the academic portion (3rd highest average in the nation after Harvard and Columbia) and 20 on the perceptual aptitude portion of the exam (3rd highest average after Harvard and University of Washington). The UCLA School of Dentistry is the dental school of UCLA. The school is located in the Westwood neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. ... The Dental Admission Test (DAT) is a multiple-choice standardized exam taken by potential dental school students in the United States. ...


Library system

Main article: University of California, Los Angeles, library system
Powell Library, located across the quad from Royce Hall.
Powell Library, located across the quad from Royce Hall.

UCLA's library system has over eight million books and 70,000 serials spread over twelve libraries and eleven other archives, reading rooms, and research centers. It is the nation's 11th largest library in number of volumes.[67] The library system of the University of California, Los Angeles is among the top 10 academic research libraries in North America and has in its collection over eight million books and 70,000 serials. ...


The first library, University library (presently Powell), was founded in 1884. In 1910, Elizabeth Fargo became the university's first librarian. Lawrence Powell became librarian in 1944, and began a series of system overhauls and modifications, and in 1959, he was named Dean of the School of Library Service.[68] More libraries were added as previous ones filled. Page Ackerman became University Librarian in 1973, and was the nation's first female librarian of a system as large as UCLA's. She oversaw the first coordinations between other UC schools, and formed a new administrative network that is still in use today.[69] Since her retirement, the system has seen steady growth and improvement under various Librarians. The present University Librarian is Gary E. Strong, who has been in office since September 1, 2003.[70] Lawrence Clark Powell (b. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Economic impact

The University has a significant impact in the Los Angeles Economy. It is the fourth largest employer in the county, after Los Angeles County, LAUSD and the Federal Government, and the seventh largest in the region.[71][72] In 2005-2006, the university had an operating budget of $3.6 billion, of which 17.4% was from California state government appropriations.

A hoodie from the UCLA store
A hoodie from the UCLA store

Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2816 × 2112 pixel, file size: 2. ... Man wearing a hoodie A hoodie (also hoody, bunnyhug), at one time hooded sweatshirt, is a heavy upper-body garment with a hood. ...

Trademarks and Licensing

The UCLA trademark also sells as an overseas clothing and accessories brand. This trend arises from the school's athletic and academic reputation, and popular images of the Southern California lifestyle, emphasizing freedom in a land of perpetual sunshine. High demand for UCLA apparel has inspired the licensing of its trademark to UCLA brand stores throughout East Asia. Since 1980, 15 UCLA stores have opened in South Korea, and 43 are currently open in Mainland China.[73] There are also stores in Mexico, Singapore, and Europe.[74] Cindy Holmes, the licensing director of UCLA Trademarks and Licensing, has stated that UCLA makes $400,000 in royalties each year through its international licensing program.[74] This article is about the region of Southern California. ... ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


Athletics

Main article: UCLA Bruins
Official Athletic Logo
Official Athletic Logo
Pauley Pavilion is the main basketball venue

The school's sports teams are called the Bruins, with colors "true blue" (an official shade of blue) and gold. The Bruins participate in NCAA Division I-A as part of the Pacific Ten Conference. Two notable sports facilities serve as home venues for UCLA sports. The Bruin men's football team plays home games at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California; the team won a national title in 1954. The men's and women's basketball and men's and women's volleyball teams, and the gymnastics team (women's) play at Pauley Pavilion on campus. The school also sponsors men's and women's cross country, men's and women's soccer, women's rowing, men's and women's golf, men's and women's tennis, and men's and women's water polo. The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... Image File history File links UCLA_Bruins_Logo. ... Image File history File links UCLA_Bruins_Logo. ... Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, informally and commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California. ... The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The Rose Bowl is an outdoor football stadium in Pasadena, California, a suburb of Los Angeles. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... This article is about the sport. ... For the ball used in this sport, see Volleyball (ball). ... Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, informally and commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California. ...


The Bruin mascots are Joe and Josephine Bruin, and the fight songs are Sons of Westwood and Mighty Bruins. The alma mater is Hail to the Hills of Westwood. In both professional and amateur sports, fight songs are a popular way for fans to cheer for their team. ... Sons of Westwood is the official fight song of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... Mighty Bruins is the official fight song of University of California, Los Angeles sports teams. ... Hail to the Hills of Westwood is the alma mater of the University of California, Los Angeles. ...

The Rose Bowl, Pasadena
The Rose Bowl, Pasadena

When Henry "Red" Sanders came to UCLA to coach football in 1949, the uniforms were redesigned. Sanders added a gold loop on the shoulders—the UCLA Stripe. The navy blue was changed to a lighter shade of blue. Sanders figured that the baby blue would look better on the field and in film. He dubbed the baby blue uniform "Powder Keg Blue", a powder blue with an explosive kick. This would also differentiate UCLA from its older brother, UC Berkeley (and all other UC teams, as all UC campuses' official colors are blue and gold). UCLA is competitive in all major Division I-A sports and has won 122 national championships, including 101 NCAA championships, more than any other university.[75] The university recently won the 2008 Women's Water Polo championship making it the first to reach 101 NCAA championships.[75] Among these championships, some of the more notable victories are in men's basketball. Henry Russell (Red) Sanders (1905-1958) was the college football head coach at UCLA and Vanderbilt. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The NCAA Womens Water Polo Championship has existed since the 2001 season. ... The UCLA Bruins mens basketball program, established in 1920, owns a record 11 NCAA championships. ...

Drake Stadium is UCLA's track and field stadium.
Drake Stadium is UCLA's track and field stadium.

Under legendary coach John Wooden, UCLA men's basketball teams won 10 NCAA championships, including a record seven consecutive, in 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, and 1975, and an 11th was added under then-coach Jim Harrick in 1995 (thru 2006, the most consecutive by any other team is two).[75] From 1971 to 1974, UCLA men's basketball won an unprecedented 88 consecutive games. UCLA has also shown dominance in men's volleyball, with 19 national championships. All 19 teams were led by current coach Al Scates, which ties him with John McDonnell of the University of Arkansas as NCAA leader for national championships in a single sport.[75] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ... Unlike most NCAA sports, which are divided into divisions, mens volleyball is played in a single-division format with three sections: West, Mid-West, and East. Currently each section receives a bid to the final four with one additional at large bid based on national rankings. ... Al Scates (born 9 June 1939) is an American former volleyball player and is the current volleyball coach of the UCLA Bruins of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. ... John McDonnell is the head track coach for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ...


UCLA has medaled in every Olympic Games they have participated in. In the 2004 Athens games, UCLA sent 56 athletes, more than any other university, who won 19 medals. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ...


Former UCLA basketball player and current Seattle Supersonics player Earl Watson commented, "Eleven national championships, the best coach to coach the game says a lot (Wooden). I take offense to those who act like UCLA is just another school compared with Duke. Duke is a great school in the east, but UCLA is worldwide." The Seattle SuperSonics (also called the Seattle Sonics) are an American professional basketball team based in Seattle, Washington. ... Earl Joseph Watson Jr. ... Duke Universitys 26 varsity sports teams, known as the Blue Devils, compete in the Atlantic Coast Conference. ...


USC rivalry

Main article: UCLA-USC rivalry
UCLA Bruins enter the LA Coliseum, 2007
UCLA Bruins enter the LA Coliseum, 2007

UCLA shares a traditional sports rivalry with the nearby University of Southern California. USC is generally perceived as the dominant football team, while UCLA tends to succeed in basketball. In football, USC has 11 Division I national champion teams, and 35 Pacific Coast Conference titles; UCLA has one national champion team, and 16 conference titles. Under John Wooden, UCLA became a dominating power in men's basketball, winning 11 NCAA championships, against USC's none.[76] The UCLA-USC rivalry is the college rivalry between two universities located in Los Angeles, California: the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Southern California. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The NCAA Division I-A national football championship is the only Division I NCAA-sponsored sport without an organized tournament to determine its champion; in fact, while various other organizations (as described below) designate a national champion at the Division I level, the NCAA itself does not award a championship... The Pacific Coast Conference (PCC) was a college athletic conference in the United States, now defunct. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... This article is about NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship. ...


The schools share a rivalry in many other sports. In volleyball, UCLA won 19 NCAA Men's Volleyball Championships against USC's six.[75] Both schools have won sixteen NCAA Men's Tennis Championships. The Lexus Gauntlet is the name given to the official competition between the two schools in 18 varsity sports.[77] Last year, UCLA won the Gauntlet by the largest margin of victory in the history of the competition. This rivalry even extends to the Olympic Games, where UCLA athletes have won 213 medals, and USC athletes have won 234.[78][79] Unlike most NCAA sports, which are divided into divisions, mens volleyball is played in a single-division format with three sections: West, Mid-West, and East. Currently each section receives a bid to the final four with one additional at large bid based on national rankings. ... The NCAA Mens Tennis Championships are held to crown a team, individual, and doubles champion in College Tennis. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ... The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ...


The origin is unclear, but the rivalry most likely started when football Hall of Fame coach Red Sanders led UCLA to dominance in the 1950s. USC, long before established as the reigning power, diverted its attention from then-rival University of Notre Dame, and the rivalry began. Football games played each year between the two schools have no official name, but the week preceding it is known as "Blue and Gold Week" (formerly "Beat 'SC Week"). During this week, students participate in traditions known throughout the UCLA student body, with activities such as a blood drive aptly titled "Get the Red Out", a beat USC car smash, and a parade ending with a bonfire at the bottom of Janss Steps. This list consists of college football coaches who have been elected to the College Football Hall of Fame. ... For other universities and colleges named Notre Dame, see Notre Dame. ...


Student life

View of West Los Angeles from the Getty Center. Westwood and UCLA are in the middle ground.
View of West Los Angeles from the Getty Center. Westwood and UCLA are in the middle ground.

Students have access to a variety of activities when not attending class. The campus' location in Los Angeles makes excursions to local museums, theaters, or other entertainment venues relatively quick and easy. UCLA offers classical orchestras, intramural sports, and over 800 student organizations. The student government at UCLA is the Associated Students UCLA (ASUCLA), governed by a student majority board of directors. It is the umbrella organization that includes the two branches of UCLA's student government, the Graduate Students Association (GSA) and the Undergraduate Students Association Council (USAC), the UCLA Store, the Student Union, Restaurants, Trademark & Licensing, and Student Media (including the UCLA Daily Bruin). The Student Alumni Association (SAA), a branch under the UCLA Alumni Association but entirely student run, is responsible for maintaining and putting on UCLA's oldest and greatest traditions, such as Blue and Gold Week, Senior Send-off, Spring Sing, and Dinners for 12 Strangers amongst many. The Getty Center, seen from the Central Garden The Getty Center in Los Angeles, California, USA, is the current home of the J. Paul Getty Museum as well as a research institute, conservation institute, grant program, and leadership institute. ... High-rise buildings line Wilshire Boulevard through the Westwood area Another view of the Westwood skyline Westwood is a district in western Los Angeles, California, not to be confused with Westwood, California. ... Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ... For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports teams organized within a school. ...


Student Government

"USAC" is an acronym for Undergraduate Students Association Council, the governing body of the Undergraduate Students Association (USA) whose membership is comprised of every UCLA undergraduate student.[80] The university has two major political slates, Bruins United and Students First!.


USAC's thirteen student officers and commissioners are elected by members of the Undergraduate Students Association at an annual election held during Spring Quarter. In addition to its thirteen elected members, USAC includes appointed representatives of the Administration, the Alumni, and the Faculty, as well as two ex-officio members, the ASUCLA Executive Director and a student Finance Committee Chairperson who is appointed by the USA President and approved by USAC. All members of USAC may participate fully in Council deliberations, but only the thirteen elected student members have a vote.


The USA President appoints more than seventy undergraduates to administrative committees and the Academic Affairs Commissioner Appoints approximately 25 undergraduates to Academic Senate Committees. Students have an opportunity to serve on the ASUCLA Board of Directors and the Communications Board, as well as on other significant committees. Through their participation on these campus-wide committees, UCLA undergraduates have had input into the decision making process at a high level.


USA's programs offer an invaluable service to the campus and surrounding communities and provide an opportunity for thousands of students to participate in and benefit from these endeavors. For example, each year approximately 40,000 students, faculty and staff attend programs of the Campus Events Commission, including a low-cost film program, a speakers program which presents leading figures from a wide range of disciplines, and performances by dozens of outstanding entertainers. Two to three thousand UCLA undergraduates participate annually in the more than twenty voluntary outreach programs run by the Community Service Commission. A large corps of undergraduate volunteers also participate in programs run by the Student Welfare Commission, such as AIDS Awareness, Substance Abuse Awareness, Blood Drives and CPR/First Aid Training.


Currently USAC is considering the creation of a Student Senate, similar to that of University of California, Berkeley. Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


Traditions

The statue of the UCLA Bruin, on Bruin Walk, in front of the John Wooden Center.

The university has many traditions and annual events involving students, community, or the city. The school hosts events that usually require participation from more than just the student body, and competitions can occasionally involve celebrity judges and performers. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ...


The unique 73-year old Unicamp is UCLA's official charity. It is a summer camp for lower-income children of Los Angeles, where counselors (called "Woodseys") are volunteers from the student body. Unicamp helps over 500 junior high and high school students in the Los Angeles community through the help of over 300 UCLA student volunteers over the course of the summer. Los Angeles and L.A. redirect here. ...


To introduce new students to clubs and activities, UCLA starts the fall quarter with BruinBash on the Sunday before the first week of class, followed by other Welcome Week activities. The Bash includes a concert, movie, and entertainment. Past performers include T.I. in 2007 and Thrice, Common, and Xzibit and Rooney in 2006. BruinBash was created as a replacement for Black Sunday, a large-scale day of partying including all fraternities, in North Westwood Village, where the majority of off-campus students reside adjacent to campus. This article is about the musician. ... Look up thrice in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Lonnie Rashid Lynn, Jr. ... Alvin Nathaniel Joiner (born September 18, 1974) better known by his stage name Xzibit, is an American rapper, actor, and television personality, who was born in Detroit, Michigan and was raised in Los Angeles, California by his father and stepmother. ... Rooney can refer to: Rooney, a five-member band from Los Angeles signed to Geffen Records. ...


UCLA students also participate in "Midnight Yell" during finals week, a tradition where every night at midnight (starting on Sunday of finals week), students go outside and yell as loudly as possible for one minute, giving everyone a chance to take a short break from studying and release some nervous energy. Students who live in on-campus housing are not allowed to participate.

Bruin Theater, Westwood Village
Bruin Theater, Westwood Village

The quarterly Undie Run takes place during the Wednesday evening of Finals Week, when students run through the campus in their underwear or in skimpy costumes. The run first began in Fall of 2001 when a student, Eric Whitehead, wearing what he described as "really short shorts" walked around singing a song and playing a guitar to protest the Police restrictions on the Midnight Yell.[81] With the increasing safety hazards and Police and Administration involvement, a student committee, in order to satisfy concerns but keep the event, changed the route. It was changed to a run through campus to the fountain in front of Powell Library. Now it ends with students cavorting in the fountains outside Powell Library.[82] As attendance increased, committees in charge of organizing the event deemed it necessary to employ the UC Police during the event, to ward off vandalism and dangerous activity.[82] In 2007, the route was changed again to begin at Strathmore and Gayley Avenues instead of Landfair and Gayley Avenues. Tired of the UCLA administration meddling with in student-initiated, spontaneous traditions, new finals week celebrations are appearing. One of these is "Undie Ride," where students ride their bicycles in their underwear on Tuesday night of finals week. High-rise buildings line Wilshire Boulevard through the Westwood area Westwood, or Westwood Village, is a district in western Los Angeles, California. ... The University of California Police Department (UCPD) is the police department for the campuses within the University of California system. ...


The Alumni Association sponsors several events, usually large extravaganzas involving huge amounts of coordination. An example of this is the 60-year old Spring Sing, organized by the Student Alumni Association (SAA). Spring Sing is UCLA's oldest tradition--it is an annual gala of student talent, which is held at the Los Angeles Tennis Center on campus. The committee bestows the George and Ira Gershwin Lifetime Achievement Award each year to a major contributor to the music industry. Past recipients have included Stevie Wonder, Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, James Taylor, Quincy Jones and in 2008, Lionel Richie.[83] The Dinner for 12 Strangers, a common tradition among universities, is a gathering of students, alumni, administration and faculty to network around different interests.[84] Stevie Wonder (born Steveland Hardaway Judkins on May 13, 1950, name later changed to Steveland Hardaway Morris)[1] is an American singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, and record producer. ... Sinatra redirects here. ... Ella Jane Fitzgerald (April 25, 1917 – June 15, 1996), also known as Lady Ella and the First Lady of Song, is considered one of the most influential jazz vocalists of the 20th Century. ... James Vernon Taylor (born March 12, 1948) is an American singer-songwriter and guitarist, born in Belmont, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the producer and songwriter. ... Lionel Brockman Richie, Jr. ...


The George and Ira Gershwin Award was established to recognize their contributions to American music and to honor their gift of "Strike Up the Band for UCLA." The brothers had presented a new fight song, adopted from their musical Strike Up the Band, to the university. Gershwin redirects here. ... Ira Gershwin (6 December 1896 – 17 August 1983) was an American lyricist who collaborated with his younger brother, composer George Gershwin, to create some of the most memorable songs of the 20th century. ...


Various student groups organize schoolwide fundraisers such as the Jazz Reggae Festival, a two-day concert on Memorial Day weekend that attracts more than 20,000 attendees. Dance Marathon is an annual event where thousands of student volunteers/dancers raise money, dance, and join together to support the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation in the fight against pediatric AIDS. Since 2002, the Marathon has raised over $1,350,000.[85] This article is about the holiday in the United States. ... The Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation was founded in 1988 by Elizabeth Glaser, Susan DeLaurentis, and Susie Zeegen, after Glaser and husband Paul Michael Glaser learned that Mrs. ... For other uses, see AIDS (disambiguation). ...


During Blue and Gold Week, the week before the USC rivalry football game, there is a "Beat SC" parade and bonfire. Students from the various residential halls, clubs, teams, and alumni organize floats that march through De Neve Drive, ending at Wilson Plaza. The bonfire did not take place in 2006 due to fire hazard issues. Nonetheless, UCLA won the football game, upsetting the #2 ranked Trojans. This led many to believe that dispelling of the tradition led to the victory.


Media publications

Kerckhoff Hall houses the offices of the Daily Bruin.
Kerckhoff Hall houses the offices of the Daily Bruin.

Most student media publications distributed on-campus are governed by the ASUCLA Communications Board. The Daily Bruin is UCLA's most prominent student publication. Founded in 1919 under the name Cub Californian, it has since then developed into Los Angeles' third-most circulated newspaper. It has won over 20 national awards in the last five years, and is regularly commended for layout and content. In 2006, the Society of Professional Journalists awarded it Best All-Around Daily Newspaper in the national Mark of Excellence Awards.[86] The newspaper has not been without scrutiny and controversy, and in 1954, the administration attempted to intervene with the previous policy of electing editors by a student council. UCLA Student Media also publishes seven newsmagazines, each established to serve a special-interest community on campus: Al-Talib, Fem, Ha'Am, La Gente de Aztlan, Nommo, Pacific Ties, and Outwrite. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 497 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Kerckhoff Hall. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 497 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Kerckhoff Hall. ... The Daily Bruin (also known as The Bruin) is the student newspaper at the University of California, Los Angeles. ... The Daily Bruin (also known as The Bruin) is the student newspaper at the University of California, Los Angeles. ... Flag Seal Nickname: City of Angels Location Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates , Government State County California Los Angeles County Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa (D) Geographical characteristics Area     City 1,290. ... SPJ logo, taken from a cropped photo of a sign at the Region 10 SPJ Conference, March 2006 The Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ, formerly known as Sigma Delta Chi) is one of the oldest organizations representing journalists in the United States, debuting in 1909. ... La Gente de Aztlan (Spanish for The People of Aztlan) is a bilingual student newsmagazine published, circulated, and run at the University of California, Los Angeles. ...


Housing

Rieber Terrace, a housing facility on campus
Rieber Terrace, a housing facility on campus

UCLA provides over 9,500 undergraduates with housing, in 14 complexes on the western side of campus. Students can live in halls, plazas, or suites, which vary in pricing and privacy. Housing plans also offer students access to dining facilities. The university also provides housing to a limited number of graduate students. UCLA currently offers three years guaranteed housing to its incoming freshman, and one year to incoming transfer students. The Student Housing Master Plan, released October 2007, outlines goals to improve and expand student housing, including renovating older residential halls and allowing four years of guaranteed housing to all entering freshmen by 2010.[87] Student housing at University of California, Los Angeles is governed by the Office of Residential Life, and provides housing for both undergraduates and graduate students, on and off-campus. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 555 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographer Nikhil Kulkarniuser:nikkul I took this image File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 555 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Photographer Nikhil Kulkarniuser:nikkul I took this image File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...


Hospitality

Hospitality constituents of the university include departments not directly related to student life or administration. The Hospitality department manages the UCLA Guest House, a full-service, on-campus hotel. The 61-room Guest House services those visiting the university for campus-related activities.[88] The department also manages the UCLA Conference Center, a 40 acre (0.2 km²) convention center in the San Bernardino Mountains near Lake Arrowhead.[89] Hospitality also operates UCLA Catering, a Vending Machine distributor, and support for conferences on location.[90] Exhibition Hall of the Makaryev Fair. ... San Bernardino Mountains The San Bernardino Mountains are short transverse mountain range northeast of Los Angeles in southern California in the United States. ... Lake Arrowhead is a census-designated place (CDP) located in San Bernardino County, California. ... A typical U.S. snack vending machine A vending machine is a machine that provides various snacks, beverages and other products to consumers. ...


Faculty and alumni

See also: List of University of California, Los Angeles people

Six professors (two of whom are current faculty) and four alumni have been awarded the Nobel Prize for achievements in science and peace; notably Glenn T. Seaborg ('34).[91][92] 90 professors are members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, 52 have been awarded Guggenheim Fellowships, and seven are MacArthur Foundation Fellows. In 2006, 54 faculty members were listed as "Highly Cited" by the Institute for Scientific Information. Jared Diamond, a professor of Geography, won the 1998 Pulitzer Prize for his book Guns, Germs, and Steel.[93] Terence Tao, professor of Mathematics, was awarded the 2006 Fields Medal.[57] Lists of notable alumni, faculty, and current students of the University of California, Los Angeles. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Glenn Theodore Seaborg (April 19, 1912 – February 25, 1999) won the 1951 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for discoveries in the chemistry of the transuranium elements,[1] contributed to the discovery and isolation of ten elements, developed the actinide concept and was the first to propose the actinide series which led... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... Guggenheim Fellowships are awarded annually by the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation to those who have demonstrated exceptional capacity for productive scholarship or exceptional creative ability in the arts. ... The MacArthur Fellows Program or MacArthur Fellowship (sometimes nicknamed the genius grant) is an award given by the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation each year to typically 20 to 40 citizens or residents of the U.S., of any age and working in any field, who show exceptional... The Institute for Scientific Information (ISI) was founded by Eugene Garfield in 1960. ... Jared Mason Diamond (b. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... Guns, Germs, and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies is a 1997 book by Jared Diamond, professor of geography and physiology at UCLA. In 1998 it won a Pulitzer Prize and the Aventis Prize for Best Science Book. ... Terence Chi-Shen Tao (陶哲軒) (born July 17, 1975, Adelaide, South Australia) is an Australian mathematician working primarily on harmonic analysis, partial differential equations, combinatorics, analytic number theory and representation theory. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ...


Two UCLA professors of history have each won 2008 Pulitzer Prizes for general nonfiction and history. Saul Friedländer, professor of history and noted scholar of the Nazi Holocaust, won the prize for general nonfiction for his 2006 book, "The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945," and Professor Emeritus Daniel Walker Howe won for his 2007 book, "What Hath God Wrought: The Transformation of America, 1815-1848." Saul Friedländer (born 1932) is a French-Israeli historian. ...


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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 75th day of the year (76th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 169th day of the year (170th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 184th day of the year (185th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 149th day of the year (150th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 122nd day of the year (123rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 188th day of the year (189th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 150th day of the year (151st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 271st day of the year (272nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 68th day of the year (69th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 360th day of the year (361st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 95th day of the year (96th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 143rd day of the year (144th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 142nd day of the year (143rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 164th day of the year (165th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 21st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 146th day of the year (147th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 25th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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The Association of Pacific Rim Universities (or APRU) is an organisation of leading universities from around the Pacific Rim. ... The Australian National University, or ANU, is a public university located in Canberra, Australia. ... The University of Melbourne, is a public university located in Melbourne, Victoria. ... The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. ... Fudan University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), located in Shanghai, China, is one of the oldest leading and most selective universities in the Peoples Republic of China. ... This article contains a trivia section. ... Peking University (traditional Chinese: ; simplified Chinese: ; pinyin: ), colloquially known in Chinese as Beida (北大, Běidà), was established in 1898. ... Tsinghua University (THU; Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; Pinyin: ), is a university in Beijing, China. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with University of Science & Technology of China. ... Zhejiang University (Simplified Chinese: ; Traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ) is one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in China. ... Keio University ) is one of the oldest private universities in Japan. ... Kyoto University ), abbreviated to Kyodai ) is a national coeducational research university in Kyoto, Japan. ... Osaka University (大阪大学 Ōsaka Daigaku; abbreviated to 阪大 Handai) is a public coeducational research university in Suita, Osaka, Japan. ... Todai redirects here. ... Waseda University ), often abbreviated to Sōdai ), is a private university in Japan. ... A list of major institutions of higher education in South Korea. ... Not to be confused with the University of Seoul. ... The University of Malaya (or Universiti Malaya in Malay; commonly abbreviated as UM) is the oldest university in Malaysia, and is situated on a 750 acre (3. ... UNAM redirects here. ... The University of Auckland (Māori: Te Whare Wānanga o Tāmaki Makaurau) is New Zealands largest research-based university. ... This is a listing of colleges and universities in the Republic of the Philippines. ... The following is a list of universities in Russia: Universities offering broad range of degrees 1724—Saint Petersburg State University 1755—Moscow State University 1804—Kazan State University 1880—Tomsk State University 1899—Far Eastern National University, successor of Oriental Institute in Vladivostok, Russia 1909—Saratov State University 1915—Rostov... Far Eastern National University (Russian: ) is an institution of higher education located in Vladivostok, Russia. ... Malay name Malay: Universiti Nasional Singapura Tamil name Tamil: சிங்கப்பூர் தேசிய பல்கலைக்கழகம் University Cultural Centre The National University of Singapore (Abbreviation: NUS) is Singapores oldest university. ... National Taiwan University (Traditional Chinese: ; Simplified Chinese: ; Hanyu Pinyin: ; Tongyong Pinyin: ; Wade-Giles: Kuo2-li4 tai2-wan1 ta4-hsüeh2; POJ: Kok-li̍p Tâi-ôan Tāi-ha̍k; abbreviation NTU)[2] is a national university in Taipei City, Taiwan. ... Chulalongkorn University is the oldest university in Thailand [1] and has long been considered one of the countrys most prestigious universities. ... This List of colleges and universities in the United States includes colleges and universities in the U.S. that grant four-year baccalaureate and/or post-graduate masters and doctorate degrees. ... The California Institute of Technology (commonly referred to as Caltech)[1] is a private, coeducational research university located in Pasadena, California, in the United States. ... Stanford redirects here. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of California, Davis, commonly known as UC Davis, is one of the ten campuses of the University of California, and was established as the University Farm in 1905. ... The University of California, Irvine is a public coeducational research university situated in Irvine, California. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... The University of Oregon is a public university located in Eugene, Oregon. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The University of Washington, founded in 1861, is a public research university in Seattle, Washington. ...

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A steady migration of Mexicans to California from 1910 to 1930 expanded the Mexican and Chicano population in Los Angeles to approximately 200,000.
Los Angeles-Latino community was largely disenfranchised until the 1990s, when redistricting led to the election of Latino members of the City Council for the first time since the 1950s and the first Latino members of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors since its inception.
University of California, Los Angeles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (5446 words)
The University of California, Los Angeles, generally known as UCLA, is a public, coeducational university whose main campus is in the residential area of Westwood, Los Angeles, California.
UCLA was ranked 14th in the world and 12th in North America by an annual listing of the Top 500 World Universities published by the Institute of Higher Education in Shanghai, China.
UCLA is one of the most selective schools in the nation and, along with UC Berkeley, one of the two most selective schools in the UC system.
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