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Encyclopedia > University of California, Irvine

Coordinates: 33°38′43.26″N, 117°50′33.51″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

University of California, Irvine

Motto: Fiat lux (Latin)
Motto in English: Let there be light
Established: 1965
Type: Public, Land, Space Granted Research University
Endowment: US $227 million[1]
Chancellor: Dr. Michael V. Drake, M.D.
Provost: Michael R. Gottfredson, Ph.D.
Faculty: 1,453
Undergraduates: 20,843 (2006)[2]
Postgraduates: 4,387 (2006)[2]
Location: Flag of the United States Irvine, California, United States
Campus: Suburban, 1,489 acres (6 km²)
Newspaper: New University
Colors: Blue and Gold           
Nickname: Anteaters
Mascot: Peter the Anteater
Athletics: NCAA Division I
Affiliations: University of California
Association of American Universities
Big West Conference
Website: www.uci.edu

The University of California, Irvine is a public coeducational research university situated in Irvine, California. Founded in 1965, it is the second-youngest University of California campus and is widely recognized as UCI or UC Irvine. Image File history File links Ucirvine-seal. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latins and Latin (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Let there be light is an English translation of the Hebrew יְהִי אוֹר (or yehiy or). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are American institutions which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Dr. Michael Drake was named fifth chancellor of the University of California, Irvine on May 26, 2005; his appointment will begin July 1, 2005. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Motto: Innovation. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Illustration of the backyards of a surburban neighbourhood Suburbs are inhabited districts located either on the outer rim of a city or outside the official limits of a city (the term varies from country to country), or the outer elements of a conurbation. ... In the United Kingdom, the term New University has two meanings regarding British universities. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Tinctures are the colours used to blazon coats of arms in heraldry. ... Tinctures are the colours used to blazon coats of arms in heraldry. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... The UC Irvine Anteaters is the nickname used for the official sports teams of the University of California, Irvine (also known as UCI and UC Irvine). ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... NCAA redirects here. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Image File history File links Ucirvine_logo. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Motto: Innovation. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ...


UC Irvine's name is originated from the Irvine Company, which donated 1,000 acres (4 km²) (for a single dollar) and sold another 500 acres (2 km²) to the University of California. In 1971, the University of California and the Irvine Company planned a city around the campus, which was incorporated as the city of Irvine. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


UC Irvine's location is in the heart of Orange County, California, serving the fifth most-populous county in the United States. Additionally, UCI also maintains the UC Irvine Health Sciences system (with its flagship UCI Medical Center in Orange), the University of California, Irvine, Arboretum, and a portion of the University of California Natural Reserve System. Cities in Orange County Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... The University of California, Irvine Medical Center (or UCI Medical Center) is a major research hospital located in the City of Orange. ... Nickname: Motto: A Slice of Old Town Charm Location of Orange within Orange County, California. ... The University of California, Irvine, Arboretum (or UCI Arboretum) is a 12-acre botanical garden and arboretum, located north of the University of California, Irvine campus. ... The The University of California natural reserve system is the largest and most diverse set of university-owned and operated reserves in the world. ...


The 2008 U.S. News & World Report: America's Best Colleges ranked UC Irvine the 44th best university in the United States, 13th best public university in the United States, and 5th best (shared with Santa Barbara) of all the UC schools - (after Berkeley, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Davis [3]). UC Irvine is also the youngest university that appears on the listing of "Top National Universities" in the United States, and is a Public Ivy institution of higher education.[4] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located on the Pacific Ocean in Santa Barbara County, California, USA. It is one out of 10 campuses of the University of California. ... Sather Tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public research university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... The University of California, Davis, commonly known as UC Davis, is one of the ten campuses of the University of California, and was established as the University Farm in 1905. ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ...

Contents

History

Early years

The University of California at Irvine, was one of three new campuses established in the 1960s under the California Master Plan for Higher Education with the San Diego and Santa Cruz.[5] During the 1950s, the University of California saw the need for the new campuses to handle both the large number of college-bound World War II veterans (largely due to the G. I. Bill) and the expected increase in enrollment from the post-war baby boom. One of the new campuses was to be in the Los Angeles area; the location selected was Irvine Ranch, an area of agricultural land bisecting Orange County from north to south. This site was chosen to accommodate the county's growing population, complement the growth of nearby UCLA and UC Riverside, and allow for the construction of a master planned community in the surrounding area.[6] The California Master Plan for Higher Education of 1960 was developed by Clark Kerr, during the administration of Gov. ... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD, or sometimes UC San Diego) is a highly selective, research-oriented[1] public university located in La Jolla, a seaside resort community of San Diego, California. ... “UCSC” redirects here. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Stamp commemorating the G.I. Bill or Servicemens Readjustment Act The G. I. Bill of Rights or Servicemens Readjustment Act of 1944 provided for college or vocational education for returning World War II veterans (commonly referred to as GIs or G. I.s) as well as one-year... For further information, see Baby boomer. ... Cities in Orange County Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The University of California, Riverside is a public, coeducational university situated in Riverside, California beside Box Springs Mountain. ...

One of two identical UCI signs that face the main campus' Bison Avenue entrance.
One of two identical UCI signs that face the main campus' Bison Avenue entrance.

Unlike other University of California campuses, UCI was not named for the city it was built in; at the time of the university's founding (1965), the current city of Irvine (established in 1975) did not exist. The name "Irvine" is a reference to James Irvine, a landowner who administered the 94,000 acre (380 km²) Irvine Ranch. In 1960 The Irvine Company sold one thousand acres (4 km²) of the Irvine Ranch to the University of California for one dollar, since a company policy prohibited the donation of property to a public entity.[7] The University purchased an additional 510 acres (2.1 km²) in 1964 for housing and commercial developments. Much of the land that was not purchased by UCI (which is now occupied by the cities of Irvine, Tustin, Newport Beach, and Newport Coast) is now held under The Irvine Company. During this time, the University also hired William Pereira and Associates as the Master Planner of the Irvine Ranch area. Pereira intended for the UC Irvine campus to complement the neighboring community, and the two grew in tandem. Soon after UC Irvine opened in 1965, the City of Irvine became incorporated and established in 1971 and 1975, respectively.[8] Image File history File links UCISign. ... Image File history File links UCISign. ... City tree Camphor City flower Lily of the Nile City insect Western Swallowtail Butterfly Mayor Beth Krom County Orange County Area   - Total   - Sphere of Influence 55. ... The Irvine Company is a century-old, privately held company based in Orange County, California, and specializing in real estate development. ... Tustin may refer to: Tustin, California Tustin, Michigan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... City Incorporation September 1, 1906 City Tree Coral Tree City flower Bougainvillea Mayor Steven Bromberg County Orange County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water 50. ... An entrance to Newport Coast from Pacific Coast Highway Newport Coast is a census-designated place located in Orange County, California. ... The Irvine Company is a century-old, privately held company based in Orange County, California, and specializing in real estate development. ... William Leonard Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) was an American architect from Chicago Illinois, of Portuguese ancestry[1] who was noted for his futuristic designs of landmark buildings such as the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco. ...


UC Irvine's first Chancellor, Daniel G. Aldrich, developed the campus' first academic plan around a College of Arts, Letters, and Science, a Graduate School of Administration, and a School of Engineering. The College of Arts, Letters, and Science was composed of twenty majors in five "Divisions": Biological Sciences, Fine Arts, Humanities, Physical Sciences, and Social Sciences (which transformed into the present-day "Schools").[9] Aldrich was also responsible for implementing the wide variety of flora and fauna on the campus that fit the local Mediterranean climate zone, feeling that it served an "aesthetic, environmental, and educational [purpose]."[10] Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr. ...


On June 20, 1964, U.S. President Lyndon B. Johnson dedicated UC Irvine before a crowd of 15,000 people, and on October 4, 1965 the campus began operations with 1,589 students, 241 staff members, 119 faculty, and 43 teaching assistants.[11][12] However, many of UCI's buildings were still under construction and landscaping was still in progress, with the campus only at 75% completion.[13] By June 25, 1966, UCI held its first Commencement with fourteen students, which conferred ten Bachelors of Arts, three Masters of Arts, and one Doctor of Philosophy degree.[14] In 1965 the formerly osteopathic California College of Medicine, the oldest continuously operating medical college in the southwestern US was joined to UCI. Over the protests of faculty, the University bowed to pressure from Governor Brown and bought the Orange County Medical Center from the government ending ambitions for an on campus teaching hospital. Intermittent attempts over the years to bring a full medical center to the school itself have been frustrated by many factors. is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... LBJ redirects here. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the 1966 Gregorian calendar. ...


Present day

A view of suburban Irvine. The white tower in the foreground is part of University Center, and everything to its left and right is part of UCI.
A view of suburban Irvine. The white tower in the foreground is part of University Center, and everything to its left and right is part of UCI.

UC Irvine itself has grown with its surroundings, with the university earning national acclaim in academia that reflects its status as a nationally-ranked public research university. This fast-paced growth has made UC Irvine the educational and cultural center of Orange County, as well as making a popular translation of the abbreviation "UCI" as "Under Construction Indefinitely".[15] The University is also a central component of Southern California's Tech Coast and the OCTANe technology initiative, fueling corporate and technological development that reflects its history as a planned campus. As the second-largest employer in Orange County (the largest employer being The Walt Disney Company), UCI contributes an annual economic impact of $3.7 billion. Its extramural funding, which has shown exponential annual growth, was a record $263 million in 2005.[16] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2266x1587, 2869 KB) Summary Description: Irvine, California Source: self-made Date: Febuary 2006 Author: Kevin Zollman --Kzollman 04:08, 22 February 2006 (UTC) Permission: GFDL and CC-by-sa Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Irvine, California... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2266x1587, 2869 KB) Summary Description: Irvine, California Source: self-made Date: Febuary 2006 Author: Kevin Zollman --Kzollman 04:08, 22 February 2006 (UTC) Permission: GFDL and CC-by-sa Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Irvine, California... Motto: Innovation. ... Tech Coast is the nickname given to the Southern California region extending from Santa Barbara in the north to San Diego in the south. ... Cities in Orange County Orange County is a county in Southern California, United States. ... Disney redirects here. ...


In 2006, UC Irvine operated 68 undergraduate degree programs, 53 minors, 45 master's degree programs, and 43 doctorate programs (including one M.D., two Ed. D. programs).[17][18] At UC Irvine's 2005 Commencement ceremonies, the university conferred 6,759 degrees to what was at the time its largest graduating class.[19]


Future growth

As part of its long-term efforts to "attain flagship status,"[20] UC Irvine has implemented construction projects (estimated to cost $1.3 billion over the next decade) that will accelerate the campus build-out and employ the remainder of the university's land grant.[21][22][23][24] The exponential increase in construction activity is a part of the Strategy for Academic Development at UCI through 2015, a master plan that outlines the vision of making UCI a first-choice university for college applicants nationwide.[25]


Campus

UCI's core campus and surrounding areas. Aldrich Park is in the center.
UCI's core campus and surrounding areas. Aldrich Park is in the center.
Main article: University of California, Irvine campus

The layout of the core campus resembles a rough circle with its center being the Aldrich Park, initially known as Central Park, and lined up by the Ring Road and buildings surrounding the road. To further emphasize the layout, academic units' placement relative to the center is based on their educational attainment in which undergraduate schools would be closer to the center than the graduate schools.[26] Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x720, 172 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (960x720, 172 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Within the Aldrich Park, there are numerous thickly-wooded trees indigenous to the local Mediterranean climate. The very center of the park features a garden and a memorial plaque of UCI's founding. The park itself has a network of paved and dirt pathways shared by pedestrians and cyclists.


The Ring Road is the main pedestrian road used by students and faculty to travel around the core campus. The road measures up to a perfect mile and completely encircles the Aldrich Park.[27] Most schools and libraries are lined up by this road with each of these schools having their own central plaza which also connects to the Aldrich Park.


Other areas of the university outside of the core campus such as the College of Medicine and the School of Arts are connected by four pedestrian bridges. Beyond the core campus and the bridges, the layout of the campus is more suburban.

Panoramic view of Aldrich Park.
Panoramic view of Aldrich Park.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 118 pixels Full resolution (8401 × 1234 pixel, file size: 8. ...

Surroundings

See also: UCI Medical Center, University of California, Irvine, Arboretum, and University of California Natural Reserve System
Anteater sand sculpture.
Anteater sand sculpture.

Although the campus is located in the city of Irvine, it is located very close to the city of Newport Beach; in fact, the campus itself is directly bounded by the city of Newport Beach and Newport Coast on many sides. The western side of the campus borders the San Joaquin Freshwater Marsh Reserve, through which Campus Drive connects UCI to the 405 freeway. The northern and eastern sides of UCI are adjacent to Irvine proper; the eastern side of the campus is delineated by Bonita Canyon Road, which turns into Culver Drive at its northern terminus and offers links to the San Joaquin Hills Toll Road and 405 freeway, respectively. Additionally, UCI's southern boundary is adjacent to the San Joaquin Transportation Corridor. The University of California, Irvine Medical Center (or UCI Medical Center) is a major research hospital located in the City of Orange. ... The University of California, Irvine, Arboretum (or UCI Arboretum) is a 12-acre botanical garden and arboretum, located north of the University of California, Irvine campus. ... The The University of California natural reserve system is the largest and most diverse set of university-owned and operated reserves in the world. ... Motto: Innovation. ... City Incorporation September 1, 1906 City Tree Coral Tree City flower Bougainvillea Mayor Steven Bromberg County Orange County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water 50. ... An entrance to Newport Coast from Pacific Coast Highway Newport Coast is a census-designated place located in Orange County, California. ... Interstate 405, colloquially referred to as The 405 (the four-oh-five), is one of the principal north-south highways in Southern California, and the major bypass of I-5 running through Southern California. ... State Route 73 runs from Interstate 405 to Interstate 5 through the San Joaquin Hills in Orange County, California. ... Interstate 405, colloquially referred to as The 405 (the four-oh-five), is one of the principal north-south highways in Southern California, and the major bypass of I-5 running through Southern California. ... State Route 73 runs from Interstate 405 to Interstate 5 through the San Joaquin Hills in Orange County, California. ...


There exists a "North Campus" that houses the Facilities Management Department, the Faculty Research Facility, Central Receiving, Fleet Services, the Air Pollution Health Effects Laboratory, and numerous other functions. It is located next to the UCI Arboretum; both the North Campus and the arboretum are located about 1 mile (2 km) from from the main campus. The University of California, Irvine, Arboretum (or UCI Arboretum) is a 12-acre botanical garden and arboretum, located north of the University of California, Irvine campus. ...


Despite the suburban environment, a variety of wildlife inhabits the University's central park, open fields, and wetlands. The university has bobcats, mountain lions, hawks, golden eagles, great blue herons, peregrine falcons, rabbits, raccoons, owls, skunks, weasels, bats, and coyotes. The UCI Arboretum hosts a collection of plants from California and Mediterranean climates around the world. The small rabbits in particular are very numerous and can be seen across campus in high numbers, especially during hours of low student traffic. For other uses, see Bobcat (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Puma concolor (Linnaeus, 1771) The puma (Puma concolor) is a type of large cat found in North, Central and South America. ... For other uses, see Hawk (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Golden Eagle (disambiguation). ... Binomial name Linnaeus, 1758 The Great Blue Heron , Ardea herodias, is a wading bird in the heron family Ardeidae, common over most of North and Central America as well as the West Indies and the Galápagos Islands, except for the far north and deserts and high mountains where there... Binomial name Tunstall, 1771 Global range Yellow: Breeding summer visitor Green: Breeding resident Blue: Winter visitor Light blue: Passage visitor Subspecies 17-19, see text Synonyms Falco atriceps Hume Falco kreyenborgi Kleinschmidt, 1929 Falco pelegrinoides madens Ripley & Watson, 1963 Rhynchodon peregrinus (Tunstall, 1771) and see text The Peregrine Falcon (Falco... For other uses, see Rabbit (disambiguation). ... For the river, see Raccoon River. ... For other uses, see Owl (disambiguation). ... Polecat redirects here. ... For other uses, see Weasel (disambiguation). ... “Chiroptera” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Coyote (disambiguation). ... The University of California, Irvine, Arboretum (or UCI Arboretum) is a 12-acre botanical garden and arboretum, located north of the University of California, Irvine campus. ...


Architecture

Murray Krieger Hall in the School of Humanities, named after an inspirational professor and an example of the Brutalist architecture of the campus.
Murray Krieger Hall in the School of Humanities, named after an inspirational professor and an example of the Brutalist architecture of the campus.
See also: Brutalism, Futurist architecture, Modern Architecture, and Postmodern architecture

The first buildings were designed by a team of architects led by William Pereira and including A. Quincy Jones and William Blurock. The initial landscaping, including Aldrich Park, was designed by an association of three firms, including that of the famous urban-landscaping innovator Robert Herrick Carter. Aldrich Park was designed under the direction of landscape architect Gene Uematsu, and was modeled after Frederick Law Olmsted's designs for New York City's Central Park. The campus opened in 1965 with the inner circle and park only half-completed. There were only nine buildings and a dirt road connecting the main campus to the housing units. Only three of the six "spokes" that radiate from the central park were built, with only two buildings each. Pereira was retained by the university to maintain a continuity of style among the buildings constructed in the inner ring around the park, the last of which was completed in 1972. These buildings were designed in a style which Pereira called "California Brutalist", combining sweeping curves and expressionistic shapes with elements of classic California architecture such as red tiled roofs and clay-tiled walkways.[28] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x768, 1012 KB) Summary Murray Krieger Hall, an example of the architecture on the campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x768, 1012 KB) Summary Murray Krieger Hall, an example of the architecture on the campus. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Brutalism is an architectural style that spawned from the Modernist architectural movement and which flourished from the 1950s to the 1970s. ... Perspective drawing from La Citta Nuova by SantElia, 1914. ... Modern architecture, not to be confused with contemporary architecture, is a term given to a number of building styles with similar characteristics, primarily the simplification of form and the elimination of ornament. ... 1000 de La Gauchetière, with ornamented and strongly defined top, middle and bottom. ... William Leonard Pereira (April 25, 1909 – November 13, 1985) was an American architect from Chicago Illinois, of Portuguese ancestry[1] who was noted for his futuristic designs of landmark buildings such as the Transamerica Pyramid in San Francisco. ... This entry is for A. Quincy Jones the architect. ... {{Infobox Person | name = | image = FLOlmstead. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... Central Park is a large public, urban park (843 acres, 3. ...

Engineering complex
Engineering complex

Construction on the campus all but ceased after the Administration building, Aldrich Hall, was completed in 1974, and then resumed in the late 1980s, beginning a massive building boom that still continues today. This second building boom continued the futuristic trend, but emphasized a much more colorful, postmodern approach that somewhat contradicted the earthy, organic designs of the early buildings. Architects such as Frank Gehry and Arthur Erickson were brought in to bring the campus more "up to date". This in turn led to a "contextualist" approach beginning in the late 1990s, combining stylistic elements of the first two phases in an attempt to provide an architectural "middle ground" between the two vastly different styles. Gehry's building was recently removed from campus to make way for a new building, with a design that has been called a "big beige box with bands of bricks." Postmodernity (also called post-modernity or the postmodern condition) is a term used by philosophers, social scientists, art critics and social critics to refer to aspects of contemporary art, culture, economics and social conditions that are the result of the unique features of late 20th century and early 21st century... Frank Owen Gehry, CC (born Ephraim Owen Goldberg, February 28, 1929) is a Pritzker Prize winning architect based in Los Angeles, California. ... Arthur Charles Erickson OC (born June 14, 1924, in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada) is a Canadian architect of Swedish descent. ...


As of 2005, the campus has more than 200 buildings and encompasses most of the university's 1,500 acres (6 km²)[29]. The campus is in the midst of a $1.1 billion construction campaign.[30]


Libraries and study centers

Main article: University of California, Irvine campus#Libraries and study centers
Langson Library is the main repository for most of UC Irvine's research materials and hosts many study areas. It is one of four central libraries maintained by UC Irvine.
Langson Library is the main repository for most of UC Irvine's research materials and hosts many study areas. It is one of four central libraries maintained by UC Irvine.
Science Library
Science Library

UC Irvine Libraries has four main branches: Image File history File linksMetadata UCILibrary. ... Image File history File linksMetadata UCILibrary. ...

Jack Langson Library Resources for the Arts, Humanities, Education, Social Sciences, Social Ecology, and Business & Management disciplines[31]
Science Library One of the largest consolidated science and medical library in the nation. Resources for the schools of Biological Sciences, Engineering, Information and Computer Science, Physical Sciences, portions of Social Ecology, and the College of Medicine[32]
Grunigen Medical Library Located at UCI Medical Center, contains 43,000 volumes of material[33]
Biomedical Library Located at the main campus, serves as a resource library for the National Network of Medical Libraries with more than 156,000 volumes and 2,500 periodical subscriptions[33]

Nearly all departments and schools on campus complement the resources of the UC Irvine Libraries by maintaining their own reading rooms and scholarly meeting rooms. They contain small reference collections and are the choice for more intimate lectures, graduate seminars, and study sessions. The University of California, Irvine Medical Center (or UCI Medical Center) is a major research hospital located in the City of Orange. ...


In addition with these libraries being themselves a study center, other study centers include the Student Center which also offers several auditoriums and a food court, the Aldrich Park, the Cross-Cultural Center, and plazas located at every Schools that are lined up by the Ring Road. Another area for study is the five drop-in computer labs available throughout the campus. The School of Humanities itself has a computer lab specializing in language and digital media.


The Student Center had been closed for renovations since spring of 2005. In the fall of 2007, it reopened with a warm welcome from the student body, faculty, and staff. Some improvements include: more lounge (such as the TV lounge), more study space, more conference and meeting room space, a ballroom, a convenience store, and the pub. It has been noted to be more than 50% larger than the old building. There are now two food courts as opposed to one, offering students more food choices. [34]


Governance

Michael V. Drake, M.D. is UCI's fifth Chancellor and formerly served as the UC Vice President for Health Affairs for five years.
Michael V. Drake, M.D. is UCI's fifth Chancellor and formerly served as the UC Vice President for Health Affairs for five years.

Like other University of California campuses, UC Irvine is governed by a Chancellor who has significant authority over campus academic and planning affairs. The Chancellor, in turn, is nominated by and answers to the Regents of the University of California and the UC President. Listed below are all of UC Irvine's Chancellors since its founding: Image File history File linksMetadata MichaelVDrake. ... Image File history File linksMetadata MichaelVDrake. ... Michael V. Drake became the fifth chancellor of the University of California, Irvine on July 1, 2005. ... Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The Regents of the University of California make up the governing board of the University of California. ...

Chancellors of UC Irvine Years as Chancellor
Daniel G. Aldrich 1962–1984
Jack W. Peltason 1984–1992
Laurel L. Wilkening 1993–1998
Ralph J. Cicerone 1998–2005
Michael V. Drake 2005–present

After the Chancellor, the second most senior official is the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost.[35] He serves as the university's chief academic and operating officer. Every school on campus reports to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost through a Dean, and all other academic and administrative units report to his office through a Vice Chancellor or chief administrator. A partial list of these units includes Campus Recreation, Intercollegiate Athletics, Planning and Budget, Student Affairs, UC Irvine Libraries, UC Irvine Medical Center, and University Advancement. The Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost also governs the faculty senate. Daniel G. Aldrich, Jr. ... Ralph J. Cicerone is an American atmospheric scientist, the chancellor of UC Irvine, and was elected president of the National Academy of Sciences in 2005. ... Michael V. Drake became the fifth chancellor of the University of California, Irvine on July 1, 2005. ...


Academics

Main article: University of California, Irvine academics
The School of Social Sciences from Aldrich Park.
The School of Social Sciences from Aldrich Park.

UC Irvine's academic units are referred to as Schools. There are eight undergraduate Schools, two graduate Schools, one Department, and one field of Interdisciplinary Studies. The most recent academic unit, the College of Health Sciences, was established in 2004.[36] On November 16, 2006, the UC Regents approved the establishment of the School of Law, with an expected opening in fall 2009.[37] The remaining academic units offer accelerated or community education in the form of Summer Session and UC Irvine Extension. Additionally, UCI's Campuswide Honors Program is implementing an independent study program, which will allow students to develop their own curriculum across Schools and graduate with their own self-created major. Image File history File linksMetadata Social_sciences. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Social_sciences. ... is the 320th day of the year (321st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Frederick Reines Hall in the School of Physical Sciences, named after one of three UCI faculty members to receive the Nobel prize.

Current academic units at UC Irvine: Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 712 KB)A picture of the Fredricks Reines Hall in the physical sciences section of the University of California, Irvine. ... Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 712 KB)A picture of the Fredricks Reines Hall in the physical sciences section of the University of California, Irvine. ... Frederick Reines Frederick Reines (March 16, 1918 - August 26, 1998) was an American physicist. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ...

The Engineering Tower, located in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering, is the tallest building on campus.
The Engineering Tower, located in the Henry Samueli School of Engineering, is the tallest building on campus.

Proposed academic units at UC Irvine: Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... UC Irvines Paul Merage School of Business Paul Merage School of Business - Building Formerly known as the Graduate School of Management, the school was renamed in Spring 2005 to the Paul Merage School of Business, after receiving a generous donation by philanthropist, entrepreneur, and Chef America founder, Paul Merage. ... The Donald Bren School of Information and Computer Sciences, also known as the school of ICS or more formally as the Bren School, is an academic unit of University of California, Irvine (UCI), and the only dedicated school of computer science in the University of California system. ... The University of California, Irvine School of Law, also known as the Donald Bren School of Law is a law school at the University of California, Irvine. ... University of California Irvine School of Medicine is an accredited medical school located in Irvine, California. ... The School of Social Sciences is one of the schools of the University of California, Irvine (UCI). ...

  • School of Design

Research organizations

Calit2, UCI
Calit2, UCI

To complement its mission as a research university, UCI hosts a diverse array of nationally and internationally-recognized research organizations.[38] These organizations are either chaired by or composed of UCI faculty, frequently draw upon undergraduates and graduates for research assistance, and produce a multitude of innovations, patents, and scholarly works. Some are housed in a school or department office; others are housed in their own multimillion-dollar facilities. These are a few of the more prolific research organizations at UCI:

  • Beckman Laser Institute
  • California Institute for Telecommunications and Information Technology (also known as Calit2) [1]
  • Center for Global Peace and Conflict Studies
  • Center for Unconventional Security Affairs
  • Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center
  • National Fuel Cell Research Center
  • Reeve-Irvine Research Center
  • Center for the Study of Democracy
  • Center for Health Policy Research

Rankings and distinctions

U.S. University Rankings In higher education, college and university rankings are listings of universities and liberal arts colleges in an order determined by any combination of factors. ...

USNWR National University[39] 44th
USNWR Medical School (research) [40] 41st
USNWR Medical School (primary care) [41] 50th
USNWR Engineering School[42] 37th
ARWU World[43] 45th
ARWU National[44] 36th
ARWU Natural Science & Math[45] 32nd
ARWU Engineering & CS[46] 41st
ARWU Life Sciences[47] 51st
ARWU Clinical Medicine[48] 76th
ARWU Social Sciences[49] 51st
THES World[50] 140th
CMUP[51] 48th
Washington Monthly[52] 49th

Many UCI's graduate programs received top-50 rankings from U.S. News & World Report, earning distinction in literary criticism and theory (2), criminology (4), behavioral neuroscience (5), creative writing (6), health care management (9), organic chemistry (9), information systems (11), drama and theater (12), third-world literature (12), cognitive psychology (13), English (16), psychology – neurobiology and behavior (16), chemistry (18), experimental psychology (19), gender and literature (19), executive M.B.A. (20), cell biology/developmental biology (21), 19th- and 20th century literature (22), psychology – cognitive science (22), sociology (27), aerospace engineering (29), computer science (29), physics (29), mechanical engineering (30), civil engineering (31), biological sciences (32), history (32), environmental engineering (34), fine arts (34), political science (35), business (38), biomedical engineering (40), engineering (41), medicine (41), materials science engineering (45), mathematics (47), psychology and social behavior (47), economics (48), and electrical engineering (49).[53] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... The Washington Monthly is a monthly magazine of United States politics and government that is based in Washington, DC. Its founder is Charles Peters, who started the magazine in 1969 and continues to write columns occasionally. ...


UCI's Master of Fine Arts degree program in creative writing has graduated such authors as Richard Ford, Michael Chabon, and Alice Sebold. The graduate program in philosophy was ranked 17th in the English-speaking world by the Philosophical Gourmet Report, while Chemical and Engineering News ranks UCI fifth (tied with, among others, Harvard University) in conferring doctoral degrees in chemistry. The Wall Street Journal ranks UCI's Paul Merage School of Business fourth in the nation for information technology.[54] In the United States, a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) is a terminal graduate degree in an area of visual, plastic, literary or performing arts typically requiring two to three years of study beyond the bachelor level. ... Richard Ford (born February 16, 1944) is an American novelist and short story writer. ... Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... Alice Seebold (b. ... Harvard redirects here. ...


Three faculty members have been named National Medal of Science recipients.[55] Additionally, three researchers from UCI's faculty received the Nobel Prize during their tenure at UCI: Frank Sherwood Rowland (Chemistry, 1995), Frederick Reines (Physics, 1995) (deceased), and Irwin Rose (Chemistry, 2004). Dr. Rowland's Nobel-winning research was conducted exclusively at UC Irvine, along with fellow prize-winner Mario J. Molina. Irwin Rose received the Nobel Prize for his work on biological proteins. F. Sherwood Rowland is known for helping to discover CFCs and their harmful effects on the ozone layer, while Frederick Reines received the Nobel Prize for his work in discovering the neutrino. UCI is the first public university to have two Nobel laureates (Rowland and Reines) who received their prizes in the same year (1995). National Medal of Science The National Medal of Science is an honor given by the President of the United States to individuals in science and engineering who have made important contributions to the advancement of knowledge in the fields of behavioral and social sciences, biology, chemistry, engineering, mathematics and physics. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... Frank Sherwood Rowland (born June 28, 1927) is a Nobel laureate and a professor of chemistry at the University of California, Irvine. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Frederick Reines Frederick Reines (March 16, 1918 - August 26, 1998) was an American physicist. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Irwin A. Rose (born 16 July 1926 in NY) is an American biologist. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... Mario José Molina Henríquez (born March 19, 1943) was awarded the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his role in elucidating the threat to the Earths ozone layer of chlorofluorocarbon gases (or CFCs). ... CFC, cfc, or Cfc may stand for: Chlorofluorocarbon : a class of chemical compounds known to inflict great damage to the ozone layer. ... The ozone layer is a layer in Earths atmosphere which contains relatively high concentrations of ozone (O3). ... For other uses, see Neutrino (disambiguation). ...


UCI's faculty are also members of the following U.S. learned societies[55]: A learned society is a society that exists to promote an academic discipline or group of disciplines. ...

The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) is an organization that promotes cooperation between scientists, defends scientific freedom, encourages scientific responsibility and supports scientific education for the betterment of all humanity. ... The American Philosophical Society is a discussion group founded as the Junto in 1743 by Benjamin Franklin. ... The American Physical Society was founded in 1899 and is the worlds second largest organization of physicists. ... The American Psychological Association (APA) is a professional organization representing psychology in the US. It has around 150,000 members and an annual budget of around $70m. ... The Institute of Medicine, a part of the National Academy of Sciences, is an American organization whose purpose is to provide national advice on issues relating to biomedical science, medicine, and health (National Academy of Sciences, n. ... Founded in 1964, the National Academy of Engineering (NAE) in the United States provides engineering leadership in service to the nation. ... President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ...

Admissions

UC Irvine is categorized by U.S. News and The Princeton Review as "most selective" for college admissions ratings within the United States. [56] It is the fifth-most selective University of California campus on the ratio of applicants versus admitted students (behind UC Berkeley, UCLA, UC San Diego, and UC Santa Barbara).[57] Berkeley Davis Irvine Los Angeles Merced Riverside San Diego Santa Barbara Santa Cruz UC Office of the President in Oakland The University of California (UC) is a public university system in the state of California. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... The University of California, San Diego (popularly known as UCSD) is a public, coeducational university located in La Jolla, California. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located in Santa Barbara County, California. ...


The choice to offer admission is based on the University of California's comprehensive review program. It considers a candidate's personal situation, community involvement, extracurricular activities, and academic potential in addition to the traditional high school academic record, personal statement, and entrance examination scores.[58] While residency is not a factor in admission, it is a factor in tuition expenses, with out-of-state residents spending more annually than California residents. State law prohibits UC Irvine from practicing affirmative action in its admissions process. Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Ethnocracy Anti-discriminatory Affirmative action in the United States Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity...


Of the 39,940 high school students that applied to UC Irvine for fall 2007 admission, 22,146 (or 55.4%) were offered admission. 96.4% of those students identified with "Eligibility in the Local Context," a statistical indicator that identifies the top 4% of all California high school graduates as eligible for admission to the University of California, who applied to UC Irvine were admitted.[59]


Incoming freshmen predominantly represent the San Francisco Bay Area and the counties of Los Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, and San Diego. The most popular major for freshmen is a major in the School of Biological Sciences (26.3%), followed by Social Sciences (19.4%), Undecided/Undeclared (18.2%), Engineering (11.3%), Humanities (6.7%), Physical Sciences (6.0%), Arts (4.0%), Social Ecology (3.5%), Information and Computer Sciences (2.7%), and Health Sciences (1.8%).[60] The average high school GPA for accepted freshmen was 3.89. The average SAT I scores were 595 (Critical Reading), 636 (Mathematics), and 502 (Writing), while the average ACT composite score was 26.[61] SAT verbal scores for the middle 50% were 600 and 640, while SAT math scores ranged between 640 and 700.[60]

Claire Trevor Theatre, UCI
Claire Trevor Theatre, UCI

Currently and in the past two decades, the ethnic breakdown at UCI was:

  • Asian/Asian-American — 56.8%
  • Caucasian/White — 20.6%
  • Mexican-American — 11.1%
  • Spanish-American — 3.7%
  • No response or Unknown — 3.5%
  • African-American — 2.3%
  • Other — 1.7%
  • American Indian — <1%[60]

Student life

UCI's history as part of a preplanned suburban community, combined with the tendency for some students to go home on the weekends, gives Irvine a reputation as a quieter college town. However, there are a number of opportunities for vibrant and exciting social outings, so long as students take the initiative and have access to an automobile. There are also many storied traditions at UCI, which have helped the young university develop a strong sense of campus spirit and personality. In spite of its suburban location and relative youth compared to other traditional universities, the University of California, Irvine has a number of student activities and traditions that make the university a distinct social hub for students. ...


Greek life

UCI's Greek Life began in 1975 and continues today as a very active and growing community. There are two major overhead bodies on the campus that govern the Greek Life, Inter Fraternity Council and The Panhallenic Council. The IFC governs over the thirteen chapters which are considered Greek by the National Inter Fraternity Council (NIC). Nic may refer to: In music: Nic Cester, Australian singer, guitarist and songwriter for rock band Jet. ...


The UCI IFC is composed of a board of an executive board and two delegates from each of the chapters represented on the campus. The executive board is intended to keep track of changes and take care bureaucratic matters, while the delegations as a group make final decisions on everything done within the IFC.


Of the tasks the IFC undertakes, the most important in recent years has been monitoring recruitment events to make sure no illegal activities are taking place and running the Judicial Board, which is compromised of representatives from the individual chapters.

NIC Fraternities The North-American Interfraternity Conference (or NIC), (formerly known as the National Interfraternity Conference) is an association of collegiate mens fraternities that was formally organized in 1910, although it began on November 27, 1909. ...

NPC Sororities Alpha Epsilon Pi (ΑΕΠ or AEPi) is currently the only international Jewish college fraternity in North America, with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 234 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Phi Gamma Delta (also known as FIJI) is a collegiate social fraternity with 107 chapters and 7 colonies across the United States and Canada. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... Sigma Lambda Beta (ΣΛΒ) International Fraternity, (also known as Lambda-Betas or Betas) is the largest historically Latino Greek letter intercollegiate fraternity. ... ΣΝ (Sigma Nu) is an undergraduate college fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Sigma Pi (ΣΠ) is an international college social fraternity with chapters in the United States and Canada. ... Triangle Fraternity is a social fraternity, limiting its recruitment of members to male students majoring in engineering, architecture, and the physical, mathematical, biological, and computer/computational sciences. ... The National Panhellenic Conference (NPC), founded in 1902, is an umbrella organization for 26 inter/national womens sororities. ...

Multicultural Fraternities / Sororities Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Alpha Phi (ΑΦ) is a fraternity for women founded at Syracuse University on October 10, 1872. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Phi Sigma Rho is a social sorority for women in engineering and engineering technology. ... Multiculturalism or cultural pluralism is a policy, ideal, or reality that emphasizes the unique characteristics of different cultures in the world, especially as they relate to one another in immigrant receiving nations. ...

Professional Fraternities Alpha Epsilon Omega (ΑΕΩ) is an Armenian fraternity that was founded in 2000 at the California State University, Northridge. ... Alpha Phi Omega (commonly known as APO, but also ΑΦΩ, A-Phi-O, and A-Phi-Q) is a co-ed service fraternity organized to provide community service, leadership development, [1] and social opportunities to college students. ... alpha Kappa Delta Phi (αΚΔΦ) (also known as aKDPhi) is the largest, nationwide Asian-American interest sorority. ... Lambda Theta Delta (ΛΘΔ), is a collegiate fraternity. ... Pi Alpha Phi (ΠΑΦ also known as PAPhis) is an American university-level fraternity. ... The sisterhood of ΣΟΠ (Sigma Omicron Pi) (also known as SOPi) was founded in 1930 to further the awareness of women in Asian culture. ... Tau Theta Pi (ΤΘΠ) (also known as Taus) is a sorority founded at the University of Southern California in 1998. ... ΖΦΡ (Zeta Phi Rho, Inc. ... This article is about people called professionals. ...

ΑΚΨ (Alpha Kappa Psi) is a co-ed professional business fraternity. ... ΦAΔ (Phi Alpha Delta), or PAD, is the largest co-ed professional law fraternity in the United States of America. ...

Residential accommodations

Residence Halls at the Middle Earth undergraduate housing complex (for freshmen) are named after places and characters from J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings books.
Residence Halls at the Middle Earth undergraduate housing complex (for freshmen) are named after places and characters from J.R.R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings books.

UC Irvine has a number of residential options for students interested in living on campus. Approximately 36% of UCI students are housed in university accommodations; 3,300 live in freshmen residential dormitories, approximately 4,000 other undergraduates live in apartment/theme community housing, and 1,542 living units are available for graduate students and their families.[62] Part of UCI's long-range development plan involves expanding on-campus housing to accommodate 50% of all UCI students.[63] Middle-earth refers to the fictional mortal lands where some of the stories of author J. R. R. Tolkien take place, as opposed to Aman or undying lands, where the angelic Valar live together with most of the High Elves. ... J. R. R. Tolkien in 1916. ... Dust jacket of the 1968 UK edition The Lord of the Rings is an epic fantasy story by J. R. R. Tolkien, a sequel to his earlier work, The Hobbit. ... Student housing at the University of California, Irvine is separated between freshmen, continuing students, graduate students, and faculty. ...


The on-campus housing communities for undergraduates are: Mesa Court, Middle Earth, Campus Village, Arroyo Vista, Vista Del Campo, and VDC Norte. Graduate students are able to live on campus in Palo Verde, Verano Place, Vista Del Campo, and VDC Norte.


There are 42 houses located in Arroyo Vista and 38 are currently in use; 4 are under renovation and will be open again in the summer. There are 8 sorority and 4 fraternity houses that are located in Arroyo Vista. The sorority houses are Alpha Phi, Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Gamma Phi Beta, Pi Beta Phi, Alpha Chi Omega, Kappa Kappa Gamma, and Kappa Alpha Theta. The fraternities in Arroyo Vista are Sigma Phi Epsilon, Phi Gamma Delta, Kappa Sigma, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon. Some of the themed houses include the Rosa Parks House, Casa Caesar Chavez, International Peace and Conflict Studies, International Village, and Sage. Arroyo Vista also has many academic themed houses such as Engineering, Information and Computer Science, Humanities, and Sociology. Arroyo Vista is very unique because it houses first, second, third, fourth, and fifth-year undergraduates all in the same community.


Off-campus housing options vary widely, given a student's preferred living arranagements and budget. However, a common denominator for off-campus apartment housing in Irvine and nearby Newport Beach, Tustin, and Costa Mesa is the fact that most accommodations are maintained by The Irvine Company. UCI offers off-campus housing search assistance and roommate listings through its student housing office. Motto: Innovation. ... City Incorporation September 1, 1906 City Tree Coral Tree City flower Bougainvillea Mayor Steven Bromberg County Orange County Area   - Total   - Land   - Water 50. ... Tustin may refer to: Tustin, California Tustin, Michigan This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Costa Mesa is a city located in Orange County, California. ... The Irvine Company is a century-old, privately held company based in Orange County, California, and specializing in real estate development. ...


Athletics

A prominent UCI sign at Crawford Hall, part of the Crawford Athletic Complex.
A prominent UCI sign at Crawford Hall, part of the Crawford Athletic Complex.
UC Irvine Anteaters logo
UC Irvine Anteaters logo
Main article: UC Irvine Anteaters

UCI's sports teams are known as the Anteaters. They participate in the NCAA's Division I, as members of the Big West Conference and the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. Their traditional rivals are Cal State Fullerton, Long Beach State, and UC Santa Barbara. Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 709 KB)  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 709 KB)  ©  This image is copyrighted. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The UC Irvine Anteaters is the nickname used for the official sports teams of the University of California, Irvine (also known as UCI and UC Irvine). ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... Genera Myrmecophaga Tamandua Cyclopes Anteaters are mammals of the order Xenarthra and the family Myrmecophagidae, commonly known for eating ants and termites. ... NCAA redirects here. ... The Big West Conference (BWC) is an NCAA-affiliated Division I major college athletic conference that formerly sponsored Division I-A American football. ... The Mountain Pacific Sports Federation is a College Athletic Conference whose member teams are located in the western United States. ... California State University, Fullerton, commonly known as CSUF, CSU Fullerton, or Cal State Fullerton, is the fastest growing California State University campus. ... The Walter Pyramid, the Universitys most prominent sporting complex and most recognizable landmark. ... The University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) is a coeducational public university located in Santa Barbara County, California. ...


UCI fields nationally-competitive teams in cross country, track and field, basketball, baseball, volleyball, water polo, soccer, swimming, rowing, and sailing. UCI's renowned Baseball program recently returned to UCI, after a period of state funding crises led to its temporary retirement.


UCI athletics has won 25 national titles. The most recent title came from the men's volleyball team, who won the NCAA Division I national title on May 5, 2007 against IPFW (3-1) at Ohio State. Other titles include 2 baseball Division II titles, 3 men's swimming titles (Div. II), 6 men's tennis titles (Div. II), and 3 men's waterpolo titles (Div. I). Most recently, the men's baseball team impressed the nation, the Anteaters being one of the Final Four teams left in the College World Series, just six years after the baseball program had been formally re-instated after a ten-year absence.[64]


Unlike many traditional universities, UCI does not have a football team, and a football program seems unlikely in the future. A pragmatic explanation is that UCI administrators tend to see a football program as not cost-effective, given the fact that a more diverse number of athletic programs may benefit from the funds required to support a football team. Additionally, UCI wishes to avoid the controversies associated with college football (such as negative academic and social concerns).[65]


However, students have expressed their displeasure with the administration's stance on a school football team. Some students believe that this is the reason that there is a noticeable lack of unity and lack of school spirit among the students. Without football, they also believe that they are not getting the full college experience. Students also believe that a football team will improve, and not hurt, academics on the campus. Although these are characteristics of a desired football program, the UCI faculty and administration believes that a football program will cost more than it's worth.[citation needed]


The anteater as mascot

The UCI mascot is the anteater. This 430-pound statue is a gift of the class of 1987.
The UCI mascot is the anteater. This 430-pound statue is a gift of the class of 1987.

The anteater was chosen in 1965 when students were allowed to submit mascot candidates, which would be voted on in a campus election. An undergraduate named Schuyler Hadley Basset III is credited with choosing the anteater and designing a cartoon representation, having been disappointed with other mascots such as a roadrunner, unicorn, and golden bison.[66] Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 718 KB)A picture of UC Irvines Mascot, the Anteater. ... Download high resolution version (1984x1488, 718 KB)A picture of UC Irvines Mascot, the Anteater. ... For other uses, see Anteater (disambiguation). ...


The anteater was inspired by "Peter the Anteater" from the Johnny Hart comic strip, "B.C.. Before the voting took place on campus, it is said that the men’s water polo team highly encouraged the students to vote for the anteater as the school mascot. The men’s water polo team promoted the anteater at one of their game, which is said to have increased student’s interest in voting for the anteater.[citation needed] Since it was "original and slightly irrelevant," it became the mascot of UC Irvine after winning 56% of the vote, beating a close second with the choice of "none of the above". The anteaters are not to be confused with the aardvark, an African animal that also eats ants. The anteater has grown to become a beloved mascot, and is the inspiration for many of UCI'sathletic and campus spirit traditions. Johnny Hart (February 18, 1931 – April 7, 2007) was an American cartoonist noted as the creator of the comic strip B.C. and co-creator of the strip The Wizard of Id. ... B.C. logo in a 2005 comic strip. ... The UC Irvine Anteaters is the nickname used for the official sports teams of the University of California, Irvine (also known as UCI and UC Irvine). ... In spite of its suburban location and relative youth compared to other traditional universities, the University of California, Irvine has a number of student activities and traditions that make the university a distinct social hub for students. ...


School chants and cheers feature the word "zot" which was the noise Johnny Hart's "Peter the Anteater" made while eating ants. A hand signal of the anteater is done by touching the tips of the two middle fingers with the thumb, and sliding the thumb back, making the pinky and index finger the ears and the fingers in the middle the snout of the anteater.


In August 2007, a small stuffed Peter accompanied astronaut Tracy Caldwell on the Space Shuttle Endeavour mission STS-118.[67] Tracy E. Caldwell (Ph. ... Space Shuttle Orbiter Endeavour (NASA Orbiter Vehicle Designation: OV-105), is the fifth and final operational NASA space shuttle. ... STS-118 was a Space Shuttle mission to the International Space Station (ISS) flown by Space Shuttle Endeavour. ...


Controversy

See also: UCI Medical Center

The University of California, Irvine Medical Center (or UCI Medical Center) is a major research hospital located in the City of Orange. ...

Aramark

UC Irvine is the last UC campus that subcontracts its food services. In summer of 2004, UCI signed a contract with Aramark, a food services corporation, granting it control of nearly all residential dining facilities and restaurants on university property. This includes UCI's three dining halls (Brandywine, Pippin Commons, and Mesa Commons) and three on-campus restaurants (Phoenix Grille, B.C.'s Cavern on the Green, and Bistro by the Bridge). ASUCI, which is partially responsible for negotiating UCI's food services contract, has justified the decision to offer Aramark its business with the argument that Aramark has pledged to invest millions of dollars into the university's food service infrastructure.[68] A subcontract is a contract that assigns part of an existing contract to a different party. ... Aramark Corporation (NYSE: RMK) is a professional services organization, providing food services, facilities management, hospitality services, and uniforms and career apparel to health care institutions, universities and school districts, stadiums and arenas, businesses, prisons, senior living facilities, parks and resorts, correctional institutions, conference centers, convention centers, and public safety professionals...


Critics argue that offering one corporation the university's food services contract is a de facto monopoly. It is also argued that the management of food services by Aramark leads to low-quality food and poor customer service, and that support of Aramark condones its poor employee relations record. Many full time Aramark employees qualify for public assistance and rely on Medi-Cal, low-income housing, and other social programs. Though these workers prepare and serve food on the UC Irvine campus in residential dining halls, they are not afforded the same rights as UC service employees. Aramark Corporation prohibits its workers from unionizing to fight for higher wages.[68] Welfare has four main meanings. ... Medi-Cal is the name of the Medicaid program in the State of California. ... Distribution of U.S. Median Home Values Affordable housing is a dwelling where the total housing costs are affordable to those living in that housing unit. ... The examples and perspective in this article or section may not represent a worldwide view. ... The Lawrence textile strike (1912), with soldiers surrounding peaceful demonstrators A trade union or labor union is an organization of workers who have banded together to achieve common goals in key areas such as wages, hours, and working conditions, forming a cartel of labour. ...


Proponents argue that maintaining one entity for food service lowers costs for the University, which in turn lowers costs for students. Also, the fact that food service workers are not UC employees further lowers costs for the university. Furthermore, UCI notes the large investment Aramark is making is in dining infrastructure, which will outlast its current contract and support UCI's long-range development plan.[68]


Law School Dean

In hiring an inaugural dean of the Donald Bren School of Law, which opens in 2008, the University approached Professor Erwin Chemerinsky, a well known legal scholar in constitutional law and liberal commentator. After signing a contract with Chemerinsky on September 4, 2007, the hire was rescinded by UCI Chancellor Michael V. Drake because he felt the law professor's commentaries were "polarizing" and would not serve the interests of California's first new public law school in 40 years; Drake claimed the decision was his own and not the subject of any outside influence.[69] The action was roundly criticized by liberal and conservative scholars who felt it hindered the academic mission of the law school, and disbelief over Chancellor Drake's claims that it was the subject of no outside influence.[69][70] The University of California, Irvine School of Law, also known as the Donald Bren School of Law is a law school at the University of California, Irvine. ... Erwin Chemerinsky speaking at the William & Mary School of Law in September 2007. ...


The issue was the subject of a New York Times editorial on Friday, September 14. [71] Details emerged revealing that UCI had received criticism on the hire from California Chief Justice Ronald M. George, who criticized Chemerinsky's grasp of death penalty appeals as well as a group of prominent Orange County Republicans and Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, who wanted to derail the appointment.[72] Drake traveled over a weekend to Durham, North Carolina, and the two reached an agreement late Sunday evening.[72] On September 17, Chemerinsky issued a joint press release with UCI Chancellor Michael V. Drake indicating that Chemerinsky would head the UCI law school, stating "Our new law school will be founded on the bedrock principle of academic freedom. The chancellor reiterated his lifelong, unqualified commitment to academic freedom, which extends to every faculty member, including deans and other senior administrators."[73] The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Look up editorial, op-ed in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 257th day of the year (258th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Justices of the Supreme Court of California (circa May 2005). ... Ronald Marc George (born March 11, 1940) is the current and 27th Chief Justice of California, where he heads the Supreme Court of California. ... Michael Dennis Antonovich (born 1939 in Los Angeles, California) is a member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors representing the Fifth District, which covers northern Los Angeles County, the Antelope, Santa Clarita, and parts of the San Fernando and San Gabriel Valleys. ... Nickname: Location in North Carolina Coordinates: , Country State Counties Durham, Orange, Wake Government  - Mayor Bill Bell Area  - City  94. ... Michael V. Drake became the fifth chancellor of the University of California, Irvine on July 1, 2005. ...


UCI Extension

From 2002 to 2007, Capella University, a for-profit, on-line institution, paid $500 per student to UCI Extension for each of the 36 students who transferred to Capella. This undisclosed financial arrangement resulted in a total payment of $12,000 to UCI.[74] The payments, first reported in the Chronicle of Higher Education, were inadvertently revealed when Jeffry La Marca, a former student of UCI Extension and Capella, filed a public records request for correspondence between UCI and Capella. Capella University is a private for-profit distance institution of higher learning. ... The Chronicle of Higher Education is a newspaper that is a source of news, information, and jobs for college and university faculty and administration. ... Public records refers to information that has been filed or recorded by public agencies, such as corporate and property records. ...


UCI continuing education dean Gary Matkin announced the school would end the arrangement by October 31, 2007 and plans to place $12,000 into a scholarship fund for needy students. UCI officials represented that the agreement was legal per Department of Education regulations, however, UCI had tried to hide the payments and the arrangement was frequently criticized as unethical because it raised the possibility that school counselors might make recommendations to students based on financial incentives rather than the student's best interests.[74] is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...


Alleged Antisemitism

On November 30, 2007 the Office of Civil Rights of the Department of Education issued a report finding "insufficient evidence" for allegations that Jewish students at UCI were harassed and subjected to a hostile environment based on their national origin. The federal agency investigated a total of thirteen alleged incidents of harassment that occurred between Fall of 2000 and December of 2006, and determined that five were "isolated acts" that could not be addressed because they occurred more than 180 days after they were reported. Further, the agency considered these acts, which included a rock thrown at a Jewish student, the destruction of a Holocaust memorial display, and various threatening or harassing statements made to individual Jewish students, substantially different in nature as to be unrelated to the eight other recurring acts it investigated, which included graffiti depicting swastikas on campus, events during an annual "Zionist Awareness Week," exclusion of Jewish students during an anti-hate rally, and the wearing of graduation stoles signifying support for Hamas or Palestine. The agency ultimately found that none of the incidents leading to the allegations qualified as "sufficiently severe, pervasive or persistent as to interfere with or limit the ability of an individual to participate in from the services, activities or privileges" provided by UCI, and that university officials had acted appropriately in response to each incident. In December 2007, UCI Administration has been cleared of anti-semitism complaints by the US Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. [75][76] The Office of Civil Rights is a sub-agency in the United States Department of Education, responsible for ensuring equal access to education and enforcing civil rights in the United States education system. ... Department of Education may refer to any of several government agencies: United Kingdom Department for Education and Skills (until 1996 named Department of Education) Scottish Education Department United States United States Department of Education United States Department of Health, Education, and Welfare Many U.S. states also have their own... Hamas (; acronym: , or Harakat al-Muqawama al-Islamiyya or Islamic Resistance Movement[1]) is a Palestinian Sunni Islamist[2][3] militant organization and political party. ... A 2003 satellite image of the region. ...


Following a speech by Chancellor Michael Drake at the national Hillel meeting in Washington, D.C. in March 2008, campus Jewish groups issued a press release defending Drake and claiming that anti-Semitic activity was "exaggerated."[77] Since then, twenty current and former students issued a statement expressing concern over ongoing issues and Drake's handling of them. Pro-Palestinian student groups are still inviting anti-Israel speakers.[78] UC Irvine's Muslim student association has the reputation of being one of the most conservative in the county.[79]


Notable UC Irvine people

As of 2005, UCI has over 85,000 alumni.[80] As with any major university, many UC Irvine alumni have achieved fame after graduating. These people include athletes (Steve Scott, Greg Louganis and 34 Olympians), film and television actors (Jon Lovitz), and technological innovators (Roy Fielding and Paul Mockapetris). This page lists noted individuals associated with the University of California, Irvine. ... Steve Scott (born May 5, 1956) is an American athlete who is one of the greatest milers in American history. ... Gregory (Greg) Efthimios Louganis (born January 29, 1960 in El Cajon, California) is an American diver. ... Jonathan Lovitz (born July 21, 1957 in Tarzana, California) is an American actor and comedian perhaps best known as a cast member of Saturday Night Live and for his show The Critic. ... Roy T. Fielding (born 1965) is one of the principal authors of the HTTP specification and a frequently-cited authority on computer network architecture. ... Dr. Paul V. Mockapetris proposed a Domain Name System (DNS) architecture in 1983 in RFCs 882 and 883 while at the Information Sciences Institute (ISI) of the University of Southern California. ...


The UC Irvine writing program has produced a number of authors, such as Michael Chabon, James McMichael, Robert Peters, Alice Sebold, Aimee Bender, Richard Ford, and Yusef Komunyakaa. The renown of these writers has contributed to the national reputation of the school's creative writing program. More recent alumni include Glen David Gold, Maile Meloy, Alex Espinoza and Joshua Ferris. Michael Chabon (born May 24, 1963) is an American author and one of the most celebrated writers of his generation. ... Image:JamesMcMichaelPoet. ... Robert Louis Peters is a poet, critic, scholar, playwright, editor, and actor born in an impoverished rural area of northern Wisconsin in 1924. ... Alice Seebold (b. ... Aimee Bender is an American novelist and short story writer, known for her often fantastic and surreal plots and characters. ... Richard Ford (born February 16, 1944) is an American novelist and short story writer. ... Yusef Komunyakaa Yusef Komunyakaa (1947- ) is an eminent American poet who currently teaches at Princeton University. ... Glen David Gold is best known as the author of Carter Beats the Devil (Hyperion, 2001). ... Maile Meloy (born 1972) is an American author of fiction. ... Alex Espinoza is a former NFL quarterback who played for one season with the Kansas City Chiefs. ... Joshua Ferris (born 1974) is an American author best known for his debut 2007 novel, Then We Came to the End. ...


Several members of the faculty have been honored with the Nobel and Pulitzer. The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ...


In 1995, two UCI Professors earned the Nobel Prize[81]:

  • Dr. Frank Sherwood Rowland, Chemistry
  • Dr. Frederick Reines, Physics

In 2004, UCI earned its third Nobel:

  • Dr. Irwin Rose, Chemistry

Ralph Cicerone, an earth system science professor and former chancellor, is currently president of the National Academy of Sciences. Cicerone has been vocal in raising awareness on the issue of Global Warming. An article in Rolling Stone Magazine, described Cicerone as "The Hardballer" on the controversial issue. President Harding and the National Academy of Sciences at the White House, Washington, DC, April 1921 The National Academy of Sciences (NAS) is a corporation in the United States whose members serve pro bono as advisers to the nation on science, engineering, and medicine. ... Global warming refers to the increase in the average temperature of the Earths near-surface air and oceans in recent decades and its projected continuation. ... This article is about the music magazine. ...


Faculty members who have taught literary criticism and critical theory at UCI have included Jaques Derrida and Wolfgang Iser, and visiting professors in these fields have included Judith Butler, Slavoj Zizek, Giorgio Agamben, Barbara Johnson, Frederic Jameson, Elizabeth Grosz, and Étienne Balibar. Jacques Derrida Jacques Derrida (July 15, 1930 – October 8, 2004) was an Algerian-born French literary critic and philosopher of Jewish descent, considered the first to develop deconstruction. Positioning Derridas thought Derrida had a significant effect on continental philosophy and on literary theory, particularly through his long-time association... Wolfgang Iser (born July 22, 1926) is a German literary scholar. ... Image:J Butler. ... Slavoj Žižek. ... Giorgio Agamben (born 1942) is an Italian philosopher who teaches at the Università IUAV di Venezia. ... Barbara Johnson (b. ... Fredric Jameson (b. ... Elizabeth Grosz is an Australian feminist academic. ... Étienne Balibar (born April 23, 1942 in Avallon, Bourgogne, France) is a French Marxist philosopher. ...


Joseph McGinty Nichol, of the class of 1990, is responsible for directing the Charlie's Angels films and is the executive producer of the television series The OC. Joseph McGinty McG Nichol (born c. ... This article is about the television series. ... The O.C. ( stands for Orange County) is an American television drama/soap opera program broadcast on the Fox Network. ...


Aras Baskauskas, graduated with a degree in Philosophy in 2002 and an MBA in 2004, and played for the UC Irvine Men's basketball team. Aras is the winner of Survivor: Panama. He was the youngest male winner in the history of the show at the time of the taping. Aras Baskauskas (born September 26, 1981) is the winner of Survivor: Panama and is the youngest male winner of Survivor at the time of taping. ...


UC Irvine in film and television

UCI as backdrop for Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. Social Science Tower, which was brand new at the time, is in the background.
UCI as backdrop for Conquest of the Planet of the Apes. Social Science Tower, which was brand new at the time, is in the background.
  • Neuroscience labs and exteriors of UCI were featured in the science fiction/comedy film Creator.
  • The Engineering Tower is used as the STRATA Headquarters exterior in Saul of the Mole Men, an Adult Swim TV show inspired in part by the Planet of the Apes film series.
  • The school was featured in the production of Ocean's Eleven. In the movie, the building where the crew steals the EMP device is actually the Gillespie Neuroscience Research Facility located in the College of Medicine.
  • Exterior shots of the Langson library were used in the film Poltergeist.
  • Commander Chuck Street, a helicopter pilot, traffic reporter for KIIS-FM and KTLA, and local celebrity, landed in front of UCI's Gateway Study Center next to the Administration building lawn to participate in 2004 Wayzgoose celebrations. This stunt was made riskier in light of an unexpected rainstorm that occurred during his landing, which eventually led to the event's cancellation. Commander Chuck also made an appearance at UCI Medical Center in 2006.[82]
  • On MTV's America's Best Dance Crew various parts of UCI are shown.

Image File history File linksMetadata Apes4. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Apes4. ... Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972) is the third film sequel to the 1968 science fiction film Planet of the Apes. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... For the novel by Kin Platt, see The Blue Man. ... The Bren Events Center is the on-campus multipurpose indoor arena in Irvine, California, just south of Anaheim. ... Creator is a 1985 movie directed by Ivan Passer, starring Peter OToole, Vincent Spano and Mariel Hemingway. ... Perspective drawing from La Citta Nuova by SantElia, 1914. ... Conquest of the Planet of the Apes (1972) is the third film sequel to the 1968 science fiction film Planet of the Apes. ... Saul of the Mole Men is a live action show created by Craig Lewis, writer on The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy and Fosters Home for Imaginary Friends. ... Mel Brooks (born June 28, 1926) is an Academy Award-winning American director, writer, comedian, actor and producer best known as a creator of broad film farces and comedy parodies. ... This article is about the comedy film. ... Oceans Eleven is a 2001 remake of the 1960 Rat Pack caper film Oceans Eleven. ... The term electromagnetic pulse (EMP) has the following meanings: electromagnetic radiation from an explosion (especially a nuclear explosion) or an intensely fluctuating magnetic field caused by Compton-recoil electrons and photoelectrons from photons scattered in the materials of the electronic or explosive device or in a surrounding medium. ... Poltergeist is the first and most successful Poltergeist film, released on June 4, 1982 and nominated for three Oscars. ... The O.C. was an American teen drama television series that originally aired on FOX in the United States , and in Canada On CTV Television Network from August 5, 2003, to February 22, 2007, running a total of four seasons. ... Joseph McGinty McG Nichol (born c. ... KIIS-FM is a Los Angeles, California, USA-based radio station with a rhythmic leaning top 40 musical format. ... KTLA, channel 5, is a television station in Los Angeles, California. ...

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2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 295th day of the year (296th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... [[Media:Italic text]]{| style=float:right; |- | |- | |} is the 50th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 105th day of the year (106th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 240th day of the year (241st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 160th day of the year (161st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 346th day of the year (347th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 71st day of the year (72nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 334th day of the year (335th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 345th day of the year (346th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 354th day of the year (355th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Orange County Register is a daily newspaper published in Santa Ana, California. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 87th day of the year (88th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Jerusalem Post is an Israeli newspaper in the English language. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 93rd day of the year (94th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 96th day of the year (97th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 4th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Student media

KUCI is a free-form alternative not-for-profit college radio station broadcasting at 88. ... The Irvine Progressive is a left leaning student newspaper at the University of California, Irvine (UCI) in Irvine, California. ...

Student clubs and organizations


  Results from FactBites:
 
Employer Profile: University of California, Irvine (1629 words)
UC Irvine embraces the idea that undergraduate students, as well as graduate students, should enjoy the opportunity not only to be exposed to the research process but to participate as well.
When architect William Pereira was commissioned to plan a new UC campus and the city that would become Irvine, the community saw a unique opportunity for a university and a city to develop together, working in partnership to enhance the quality of life in the city and the quality of the university.
UC Irvine shares in the University of California systemwide vision of excellence through diversity and is committed to the goal of reflecting diversity in its faculty, student, and staff populations, as well as through its curriculum and research endeavors.
University of California, Irvine - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (7907 words)
It is one of ten University of California campuses and is commonly known as UCI or UC Irvine.
UC Irvine's reputation as a top-ranked university, combined with the high volume of applicants for freshman admission, encourages the university to be highly selective; it is the fourth-most selective University of California campus on the ratio of applicants versus admitted students (behind UC San Diego, UCLA, and UC Berkeley).
Unlike other University of California campuses, UCI was not named for the city it was built in; at the time of the university's founding (1967), the current city of Irvine (established in 1971) did not exist.
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