FACTOID # 20: Statistically, Delaware bears more cost of the US Military than any other state.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of British Columbia

University of British Columbia

Motto Tuum est (Latin)
"It Is Yours" or "It is up to you"
Established 1908
Type Public
Endowment $876.8 million (FY 2006)[1]
Chancellor Allan McEachern
President Stephen Toope
Provost Dr. David Farrar
Undergraduates 35,860 - Vancouver
4,000 - Okanagan
Postgraduates 7,719 - Vancouver
132 - Okanagan
Location Vancouver , Kelowna & Great Northern Way Campus, British Columbia, Canada
Campus Urban, 402 ha (4 km²)
Mascot Thunderbird
Affiliations G13, APRU, Universitas 21, ASAIHL
Website www.ubc.ca

The University of British Columbia (UBC) is a Canadian public research university with campuses in Vancouver and Kelowna. UBC is rated as one of Canada’s top universities.[2] Image File history File links UBC-Crest. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... This page may meet Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Stephen Toope (born 1958) is the President-select of the University of British Columbia, set to take office July 1, 2006. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Locator map for Kelowna, BC Kelowna (2001 population 96,288, metropolitan population 147,739) is a city on Okanagan Lake in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. ... The Great Northern Way Campus (GNWC) is a small, graduate-level educational institution situated east of downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Motto: Splendor sine occasu (Latin: Splendour without diminishment) Capital Victoria Largest city Vancouver Official languages English (de facto) Government Lieutenant-Governor Steven Point Premier Gordon Campbell (BC Liberal) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament House seats 36 Senate seats 6 Confederation July 20, 1871 (6th province) Area  Ranked 5th Total 944... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Depiction of a Thunderbird on a Totem Pole The mythological Thunderbird is a mythical creature common to Indigenous spirituality in North America . ... This article is about the group of research-intensive Canadian universities. ... The Association of Pacific Rim Universities (or APRU) is an organisation of leading universities from around the Pacific Rim. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... The Association of Southeast Asian Institutions of Higher Learning or ASAIHL is a non-governmental organization founded in 1956 to assist higher learning institutions in strengthening themselves through a mutual self help and to achieve international distinction in teaching, research and public service. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This does not cite its references or sources. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Locator map for Kelowna, BC Kelowna (2001 population 96,288, metropolitan population 147,739) is a city on Okanagan Lake in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. ...

Contents

Locations

Vancouver

49°16′N, 123°15′W

Aerial View of UBC Campus & Pacific Spirit Park
Aerial View of UBC Campus & Pacific Spirit Park

The Vancouver campus is located at Point Grey, a twenty-minute drive from downtown Vancouver. It is near several beaches and has views of the North Shore mountains. The 7.63 km² Pacific Spirit Regional Park serves as a green-belt between the campus and the city. The campus, along with Pacific Spirit Regional Park, the University Endowment Lands, and the residential community of University Hill, is not within Vancouver's city limits. It is part of the Greater Vancouver Regional District's Electoral Area A, which is made up of the non-incorporated areas of the Lower Mainland. As a result, UBC is policed by the RCMP rather than the Vancouver Police Department. However, the Vancouver Fire Department does service UBC under a contract. Also, all postage sent to any building on campus includes Vancouver in the address. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1485, 920 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1485, 920 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera... The North Shore Mountains are a subrange of the Pacific Ranges of the Coast Mountains overlooking the Greater Vancouver Regional District to the south. ... Pacific Spirit Regional Park is located in the University Endowment Lands, on Point Grey to the west of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... This article is about the unincorporated area west of Vancouver. ... University Hill or the proper University Endowment Lands is a community adjacent to Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... Greater Vancouver Electoral Area A is a part of the Greater Vancouver Regional District in British Columbia. ... The Lower Mainland is the name that residents of British Columbia apply to the region surrounding the City of Vancouver. ... RCMP redirects here. ... Vancouver Police Department Coat Of Arms VPD Patch The Vancouver Police Department is the police force for the City of Vancouver. ...


UBC Vancouver also has three satellite campuses within the city of Vancouver: a campus at Vancouver General Hospital for the medical sciences, UBC Robson Square in downtown Vancouver for part-time credit and non-credit programmes, and a limited series of classes at the Great Northern Way Campus. Vancouver General Hospital is a medical facility located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Robson Square. ... The Great Northern Way Campus (GNWC) is a small, graduate-level educational institution situated east of downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


Kelowna

49°56′N, 119°24′W

New construction of a second Science building at UBC Okanagan
New construction of a second Science building at UBC Okanagan

The Kelowna campus, known as UBC Okanagan, is located on the former North Kelowna Campus of Okanagan University College, adjacent to the international airport on the north-east side of Kelowna, British Columbia.[3] This campus offers undergraduate degrees in Arts, Science, Nursing, Education, Management and Engineering as well as graduate degrees in most of these disciplines. The Okanagan campus is experiencing a rapid expansion with construction of several new residential, teaching and research buildings now underway. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3600 × 2880 pixel, file size: 5. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 750 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3600 × 2880 pixel, file size: 5. ... The campus in late spring getting decked out for Convocation. ... Okanagan College is the predominant vocational and undergraduate post-secondary institution in the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, Canada. ... Locator map for Kelowna, BC Kelowna (2001 population 96,288, metropolitan population 147,739) is a city on Okanagan Lake in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. ...


History

Early history

One of UBC's oldest buildings: Chemistry
One of UBC's oldest buildings: Chemistry

The information in this section is taken from "The History of the University" by former UBC President N.A.M. (Norman) MacKenzie, originally published in "The President's Report", 1957-58, available online at the UBC Archives. myphotoof chem This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... myphotoof chem This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


A provincial university was first called into being by the British Columbia University Act of 1890. The Act constituted a twenty-one member senate with Dr. Israel W. Powell of Victoria as Chancellor. The British Columbia University Act was enacted by the British Columbia Legislative Assembly to establish degree granting universities in British Columbia. ...


Attempts at establishing a degree-granting university with assistance from the Universities of Toronto and McGill saw varying degrees of success. McGill University College was set up by Henry Marshall Tory[4] in an arrangement with McGill during 1906 to 1908, as a private institution granting McGill University degrees until 1915. The University of Toronto (U of T) is a public research university in the city of Toronto, Ontario, Canada. ... McGill University. ... Henry Marshall Tory (January 11, 1864 – February 6, 1947) was the first president of the University of Alberta (1908-1929), the first president of the National Research Council (1928-1935) and the first president of Carleton College (1942-1947). ... McGill University. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In the meantime appeals were again made to the government to revive the earlier legislation for a provincial institution, leading to the University Endowment Act in 1907, and The University Act in 1908. In 1910 the Point Grey site was chosen, and the government appointed Dr. Frank Fairchild Wesbrook as President in 1913. The outbreak of war in August, 1914 compelled the University to postpone plans for building at Point Grey, and instead the former McGill University College site at Fairview became home to the University until 1925. The first day of lectures was September 30, 1915. is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


World War I dominated campus life, and the student body was "decimated" by enlistments for active service, with three hundred UBC students in Company "D" alone. By the end of the war, 697 members of the University had enlisted. A total of 109 students graduated in the three war-time congregations, all but one in the Faculties of Arts and Science. “The Great War ” redirects here. ...


By 1920, the university had only three faculties: Arts, Applied Science, and Agriculture (with Departments of Agronomy, Animal Husbandry, Dairying, Horticulture and Poultry). It only awarded the degrees of Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) and Bachelor of Science (B.Sc.). There were 1,189 male students and 341 female students, but only 64 academic staff, including 6 women.[5] Agronomy is a branch of agricultural science that deals with the study of crops and the soils in which they grow. ... Shepherd with his sheep in Făgăraş Mountains, Romania. ... Dairy farming is a class of agricultural enterprise, raising female cattle for long-term production of milk, which may be either processed on-site or transported to a dairy for processing and eventual retail sale. ... Horticulture (Latin: hortus (garden plant) + cultura (culture)) are classically defined as the culture or growing of garden plants. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... B.S. redirects here. ...


In 1922 the now twelve-hundred-strong student body embarked on a "Build the University" campaign. 56,000 signatures were presented at legislature in support, and on September 22, 1925, lectures began on the new Point Grey campus. A legislatureis a type of representative deliberative assembly with the power to ratify laws. ... is the 265th day of the year (266th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Except for the Library, Science and Power House buildings, all the campus buildings were temporary constructions. Two playing fields were built by the students themselves, but the University had no dormitories and no social centre. Still, the University continued to grow by leaps and bounds. Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ...

View of the north part of the Point Grey Campus, including Green College, the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, and the Museum of Anthropology. The Grand Campus Washout of 1935 carved a ravine from the area at the top left corner, diagonally through the wooded gully, to the beach.
View of the north part of the Point Grey Campus, including Green College, the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts, and the Museum of Anthropology. The Grand Campus Washout of 1935 carved a ravine from the area at the top left corner, diagonally through the wooded gully, to the beach.

Soon, however, the effects of the depression began to be felt. In 1932-33 salaries were cut by up to 23%. Posts remained vacant, and many faculty lost their jobs. Most graduate courses were dropped. Just as things began to improve, World War II broke out. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 799 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1446 × 1085 pixel, file size: 440 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 799 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1446 × 1085 pixel, file size: 440 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Green College is one of two residential colleges at the University of British Columbia. ... Exciting museum displaying and showcasing the anthropological works primarily of the regions. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


Canada declared war on September 10, 1939. Soon afterwards, University President Klinck wrote: is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1939 (MCMXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

From the day of the declaration of war, the University has been prepared to put at the disposal of the Government all possible assistance by way of laboratories, equipment and trained personnel, insofar as such action is consistent with the maintenance of reasonably efficient instructional standards. To do less would be unthinkable.

Military training on the campus became popular, and WWII marked the first provision of money from the federal government to the University. By the end of the war, it became clear that the facilities at Point Grey had become totally inadequate. The University needed new staff, new courses, new faculties, and new buildings for teaching and accommodation. The student population rose from 2,974 in 1944-45 to 9,374 in 1947-48.


Surplus Army and Air Force camps were used for both classrooms and accommodation. Fifteen complete camps were taken over by the University in the course of the 1945-46 session alone, with a sixteenth camp, situated on Little Mountain in Vancouver, converted into suites for married students.


Student numbers hit 9,374 in 1948; more than 53% of the students were war veterans in 1947-67. Between 1947 and 1951 twenty new permanent buildings were erected.


Heavy rains and melting snowfall eroded a deep ravine across the north end of the campus, in the Grand Campus Washout of 1935. The campus did not yet have storm drains, and surface runoff went down a ravine to the beach. When the University carved a ditch to drain flooding on University Avenue, the rush of water steepened the ravine and eroded it back as fast as 10 feet per hour. The resulting gully eventually consumed 100,000 cubic yards, two bridges, and buildings near Graham House. The University was closed for 4½ days. Afterwards, the gully was filled with debris from a nearby landslide, and only traces are visible today.[6]


Coat of arms

Coat of Arms, with the Latin motto Tuum est or "It Is Yours"

The Coat of Arms of UBC has the second longest history of all the post secondary institutions of British Columbia, dating back to 1915.[7] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


The university today

Rose Garden
Rose Garden

UBC's current president is Dr. Stephen Toope, appointed on July 1, 2006. He succeeds Dr. Martha Piper, who was the University's first female president and the first non-Canadian born president. Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 445 KB) Summary Vincent Ng Feb 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 445 KB) Summary Vincent Ng Feb 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Stephen Toope (born 1958) is the President-select of the University of British Columbia, set to take office July 1, 2006. ... is the 182nd day of the year (183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Dr. Martha Piper is the former President and Vice-Chancellor of the University of British Columbia. ...


The Vice-President (VP) Students is Brian Sullivan; VP External and Legal is Dennis Pavlich, VP Research is John Hepburn and VP Finance and Administration is Terry Sumner. The Provost pro tem and Vice-President Academic, is currently Dr. George A. Mackie, after the recent resignation of Dr. Lorne Whitehead.


The UBC Okanagan campus is led by Dr. Doug Owram, Deputy Vice-Chancellor. The campus in late spring getting decked out for Convocation. ...


In 2003, UBC had 3,167 full-time Faculty, and 4,612 non-faculty full-time employees. It had over forty thousand students (33,566 undergraduate students and 7,379 graduate students), and more than 180,000 alumni in 120 countries. Enrollment continues to grow. The founding of the new Okanagan campus will increase these numbers dramatically. The university is one of only two Canadian universities to have membership in Universitas 21, an international association of research-led institutions (McGill University is the other). A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... McGill University. ...


Buildings on the Vancouver campus currently occupy 1,091,997 gross m², located on 1.7 km² of maintained land.


The Vancouver campus' street plan is mostly in a grid of malls (for driving and pedestrian-only). Lower Mall and West Mall are in the southwestern part of the peninsula, with Main, East, and Wesbrook Malls northeast of them.


Wireless internet access is available at no charge to students, faculty, and staff inside and outside of most buildings at both campuses.[8]


Tuition

Chancellor Place at UBC
Chancellor Place at UBC

In 2001-02, UBC had one of the lowest undergraduate tuition rates in Canada, at an average of $2,181 CAD per year for a full-time programme. This was due to a government-instituted tuition freeze. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (823x522, 57 KB) Summary My photo of Chancellor Place, taken 2005, 7 November. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (823x522, 57 KB) Summary My photo of Chancellor Place, taken 2005, 7 November. ... Tuition means instruction, teaching or a fee charged for educational instruction especially at a formal institution of learning. ...


In 2001, however, the BC Liberal party defeated the NDP in British Columbia and lifted the tuition freeze. In 2002-03 undergraduate and graduate tuition rose by an average of 30%, and by up to 40% in some faculties. This has led to increased enrollment and better facilities, but also to student unrest and contributed to a teaching assistant union strike. Students occupying Sheffield town hall over the introduction of higher education fees Student activism is work done by students to effect political, environmental, economic, or social change. ... Strike action, often simply called a strike, is a work stoppage caused by the mass refusal by employees to perform work. ...


UBC again increased tuition by 30% in the 2003-04 year, again by approximately 15% in the 2004-05 season, and 2% in the 2005-06 and 2006-07 years. Increases were lower than expected because, in the 2005 Speech from the Throne, the government announced that tuition increases would be capped to inflation.[9] Queen Elizabeth II reads Canadas Speech from the Throne in 1977 The Speech from the Throne (or Throne Speech) is an event in certain monarchies in which the monarch (or a representative) reads a prepared speech to a complete session of parliament, outlining the governments agenda for the...


Despite these increases, UBC's tuition remains below the national average and below other universities in the regions. In 2006-07, the Canadian average undergraduate tuition fee was $4347 and the BC average was $4960.[10] UBC tuition for 2007-2008 is $4,257 for a Canadian student in a basic 30-unit program, though various programs cost from $3,406 to $9,640, and Dentistry and Medicine cost $14,566. Tuition for international students is roughly four times as much.[11]


Finances

In 2006-2007, the University faces a $36 million deficit. Present proposals to cover the void include raising the domestic application cost from $60 to $100 and the registration deposit for courses from $100 to $250.[citation needed] Online credit card payments for domestic students have been discontinued for an estimated saving of $2.5 million dollars per year.[12]


As of 2006, UBC had assets of $3,065,865,000 and liabilities of $1,841,884,000. Total revenue for 2005-2006 was $1.6 billion, of which 37% came from the provincial government, 12% from the federal government, 33% from "sales of goods and services", and 18% from all other sources. Total expenses were $1.4 billion, of which salaries, wages, benefits, and honoraria were 52%, "other expenses" were 14%, office supplies and expenses were 11%, amortization was 8%, and all other expenses were 14%. Less than 1% of expenses went to fundraising.[13][14]


Quality of education

Poll rankings

UBC consistently ranks as one of the top three Canadian universities by Research InfoSource[2] and ranks as second in Canada and thirty-sixth in the world in the Academic Ranking of World Universities.[15] In 2006, Newsweek magazine ranked the University of British Columbia second in Canada and 27th in the world.[16] The Times Higher Education Supplement of the UK ranked UBC as second in Canada and thirty-third in the world in 2007. According to Maclean's University Rankings, UBC has the highest percentage of Ph.D level professors among all public universities in North America (92%). It has received widespread recognition by Maclean's and Newsweek magazines for its foreign language program; the Chinese program is North America's largest, and the Japanese program is North America's second largest (after the University of Hawaii).The Department of Art History, Visual Arts and Theory has been recognized consistently for the world-class artists who teach there.[citation needed] In 2003 the National Post stated UBC had the highest entrance requirements for undergraduate admission out of all universities in Canada.[17] // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher for short, is a newspaper based in London, United Kingdom, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... A cover of the Canadian magazine Macleans. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... A foreign language is a language not spoken by the indigenous people of a certain place: for example, English is a foreign language in Japan. ... This article is about the University of Hawaii system. ...


Recipients of honorary degrees

Flag Plaza
Flag Plaza

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 489 KB) Summary Vincent Ng Feb 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 489 KB) Summary Vincent Ng Feb 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Tenzin Gyatso (born 6 July 1935) is the fourteenth and current Dalai Lama. ... Desmond Mpilo Tutu (born 7 October 1931) is a South African cleric and activist who rose to worldwide fame during the 1980s as an opponent of apartheid. ... Shirin Ebadi at a press conference in November 2005. ... Raffi on the cover of his album Bananaphone Raffi Cavoukian, OC, OBC (born July 8, 1948), usually known simply as Raffi, is a popular childrens entertainer in Canada, the United States, and the Western world at large. ... David Dodge David A. Dodge is the current Governor of the Bank of Canada. ...

Famous instructors

David Takayoshi Suzuki, CC, OBC, Ph. ... A biologist is a scientist devoted to and producing results in biology through the study of organisms. ... Michael Smith, CC, OBC (April 26, 1932 – October 4, 2000) was a British-born Canadian biochemist who was the 1993 Nobel Prize winner in Chemistry. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Hans Georg Dehmelt (born September 9, 1922 in Görlitz, Germany) is an American physicist, who co-developed the ion trap. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Carl Edwin Wieman (born March 26, American physicist of the University of Colorado at Boulder who (with Eric Allin Cornell), in 1995, produced a Bose-Einstein condensate. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Daniel Kahneman Daniel Kahneman (born March 5, 1934 in Tel Aviv, in the then British Mandate of Palestine, now in Israel), is a key pioneer and theorist of behavioral finance, which integrates economics and cognitive science to explain seemingly irrational risk management behavior in human beings. ... The Bank of Sweden Prize in Economic Sciences (Swe. ... Economics is the social science studying production and consumption through measurable variables. ... Michael Grant Ignatieff, M.P., Ph. ... For other uses, see Author (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Meryn Cadell is a Canadian singer, writer and performance artist. ... This article is about Performance art. ... Steven Galloway (born July 1975) is a Canadian novelist and playwright. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... M. Dale Kinkade (1933-2004) was a linguist known especially for his work on Salishan languages. ... The Salishan (also Salish) languages are a group of languages of western Canada and the Pacific Northwest of the United States. ... Richard Joseph Pearson (born 1937) is a Canadian archaeologist. ... Archaeology or sometimes in American English archeology (from the Greek words αρχαίος = ancient and λόγος = word/speech) is the study of human cultures through the recovery, documentation and analysis of material remains, including architecture, artefacts, biofacts, human remains, and landscapes. ... Dr. Rudolf Vrba in 1997. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Pharmacology (in Greek: pharmacon is drug, and logos is science) is the study of how chemical substances interfere with living systems. ... Erich Wolfgang Vogt (born 1929) is a Canadian physicist. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Bill Unruh teaching in UBC William G. Unruh (born August 21, 1945) is a Canadian physicist at the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, who discovered the Unruh effect. ... Not to be confused with physician, a person who practices medicine. ... Har Gobind Khorana (born January 9, 1922) is an American molecular biologist born of Indian Punjabi heritage in British India. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physiology or Medicine from 1901 to the present day. ... The Flag of Canada George Francis Gillman Stanley, C.C., C.D., F.R.S.C., F.R.H.S.C. (hon). ... This article is about the occupation of studying history. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 (1965-Present) The National Flag of Canada (), popularly known as the Maple Leaf Flag (French: lUnifoli the one-leaved), is a base red flag with a white square in its centre, featuring a red stylized 11-pointed maple leaf. ... A Lieutenant Governor or Lieutenant-Governor is a government official who is the subordinate or deputy of a Governor or Governor-General. ... This article is about the Canadian province. ... Joel Conrad Bakan (born 1959) is a Canadian lawyer and writer. ... The Corporation is a 2003 Canadian documentary film critical of the modern-day corporation, considering it as a class of person and evaluating its behaviour towards society and the world at large as a psychologist might evaluate an ordinary person. ... Jeff Wall (born Vancouver September 29 1946) is a Canadian photographer best known for his large-scale back-lit cibachrome photographs and art-historical writing. ... A photographer at the Calgary Folk Music Festival Paparazzi at the Tribeca Film Festival A photographer is a person who takes a photograph using a camera. ... Cyril Shirley Belshaw (born 1921) is an anthropologist, and was professor of anthropology at the University of British Columbia (UBC) from 1953 until his retirement in 1987. ... Four Boats Stranded: Red and Yellow, Black and White was installed upon the roof of the Vancouver Art Gallery in 2001. ... The following is a list of some important Canadian artists and groups of artists: Individuals Ran Andrews, 1956-, painter Robert Bateman, 1930-, painter Emily Carr, 1871-1945, painter Alex Colville, 1920-, painter Ken Danby, 1940-, painter Charles Daudelin, 1920-2001, sculptor and painter Paterson Ewen, 1925-2002, painter Marcelle Ferron... Kris Holm is a Canadian best known for riding a unicycle in off-road conditions. ...

Libraries

The UBC Library, which comprises 4.7 million books and journals, 5.0 million microforms, over 800,000 maps, videos and other multimedia materials and over 46,700 subscriptions, is the second largest research library in Canada.[18] The library has twenty-six branches and divisions at UBC and at other locations, including three branches at teaching hospitals (St. Paul's Hospital, Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre, BC Children's Hospital), one at UBC's Robson Square campus in downtown Vancouver, and one at the new UBC Okanagan campus. Plans are also underway to establish a library at the Great Northern Way Campus on the Finning Lands. Currently Main library is under construction, but the Irving K. Barber wing is available and completely functional. Koerner Library, University of British Columbia The University of British Columbia Library is the library system of the University of British Columbia (UBC). ... Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre (VHHSC) is a medical facility located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... BC Childrens Hospital is a medical facility located in Vancouver, British Columbia. ... The campus in late spring getting decked out for Convocation. ... The Great Northern Way Campus (GNWC) is a small, graduate-level educational institution situated east of downtown Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ...


Landmarks and attractions

Lobby of the UBC Life Sciences Centre, opened in 2004
Lobby of the UBC Life Sciences Centre, opened in 2004

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 2056 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia The 4400 User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Haspel Corporation Metadata This file contains additional... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2272x1704, 2056 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia The 4400 User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Haspel Corporation Metadata This file contains additional...

Gardens

  • UBC Botanical Garden and Centre for Plant Research (website): the first UBC department, it holds a collection of over 8000 different kinds of plants used for research, conservation and education
  • Nitobe Memorial Garden (website): built to honour Japanese scholar Inazo Nitobe, the garden has been the subject of more than fifteen years' study by a UBC professor, who believes that its construction hides a number of impressive features, including references to Japanese philosophy and mythology, shadow bridges visible only at certain times of year, and positioning of a lantern that is filled with light at the exact date and time of Nitobe's death each year. The garden is behind the university's Asian Centre, whose roof features a glass and wood structure from Japan's exhibit at Tokyo Expo.

UBC Botanical Garden, at the University of British Columbia, was established in 1916 under the directorship of John Davidson, British Columbias first provincial botanist. ... Nitobe Memorial Garden during July. ... Inazo Nitobe (1862-1933) Inazo Nitobe (1862-1933) Inazo Nitobe (新渡戸 稲造; Nitobe Inazō, September 1, 1862 - October 15, 1933) was a Christian Japanese agriculturist, philosopher, educator and international political activist from Morioka, Iwate. ...

Museums and galleries

Exciting museum displaying and showcasing the anthropological works primarily of the regions. ... First Nations is a Canadian term of ethnicity which refers to the aboriginal peoples located in what is now Canada, and their descendants who are neither Inuit nor Métis. ... A Gitxsan pole (left) and Kwakwakawakw pole (right) at Thunderbird Park in Victoria, British Columbia. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Ancient Egyptian ceramic art: Louvre Museum. ... A museum is distinguished a collection of often unique objects that forms the core of its activities for exhibitions, education, research, etc. ... Art exhibitions are traditionally the space in which art objects (in the most general sense) meet an audience. ... Goddess of Democracy The Goddess of Democracy (Chinese: 民主女神; pinyin: mínzhǔ nǚshén), also known as the Goddess of Democracy and Freedom, was a 10-metre (30 ft) high statue created during the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989. ...

Performance arts theatres

Chan Centre for the Performing Arts.
Chan Centre for the Performing Arts.
  • The Chan Centre for the Performing Arts: a performing arts centre containing the Chan Shun Concert Hall. It is often the location of convocation ceremonies as well as the filming location for the 4400 Center on the television show The 4400,[citation needed] as well as the Madacorp entrance set on Kyle XY.[citation needed] It has also been featured as the Cloud 9 Ballroom in the reimagined Battlestar Galactica (Season 1, Episode 11: Colonial Day).[citation needed] It has also been used in Stargate Atlantis (Season 2, Episode 5: Condemned).[citation needed]
  • Frederic Wood Theatre ("Freddy Wood Theatre"): plays performed here, mostly performed by UBC's own BFA drama students.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1516 KB) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1516 KB) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Metadata This file contains... The performing arts are those forms of art which differ from the plastic arts insofar as the former uses the artists own body, face and presence as a medium, and the latter uses materials such as clay, metal or paint which can be molded or transformed to create some... Chan Centre Chan Shun Concert Hall is a 1265-seat concert hall located in the Chan Centre for the Performing Arts. ... The 4400 Center The 4400 Center is a fictional building in the science fiction television series The 4400. ... The 4400 is a science fiction television program produced by the USA Network and Sky One. ... Kyle XY is an American drama television series about a boy named Kyle, who wakes up in the forest outside of Seattle, Washington with no memory of his life up until that point. ... Battlestar Galactica. ... Stargate Atlantis (often abbreviated as SGA) is an American-Canadian science fiction television program, part of the Stargate franchise owned by MGM. Developed by longtime SG-1 producers Brad Wright and Robert C. Cooper, it is a spin-off from the television series Stargate SG-1. ... The Bachelor of Fine Arts, usually abbreviated BFA, is the standard undergraduate degree for students seeking a professional education in the visual or performing arts. ... For other uses, see Drama (disambiguation). ...

Student services and residences

Student government

UBC Vancouver students are represented by the Alma Mater Society, or AMS. The society's mandate is to improve the quality of educational, social, and personal lives of students of UBC. The executive - comprised of the President; Vice President, External Affairs; Vice President, Administration; Vice President, Finance; and Vice President, Academic and University Affairs - are responsible for lobbying the UBC administration on behalf of the student body, providing services, such as the AMS/GSS Health and Dental Plan, supporting and administering student clubs, and maintaining the Student Union Building (aka SUB) and the services it houses. The Alma Mater Society (AMS) is the student society of UBC and represents more than 43,000 undergraduate and graduate students at UBC. The AMS also operates student services, student owned businesses, resource groups and clubs. ...


UBC Okanagan students are represented by The University of British Columbia Students' Union - Okanagan. The campus in late spring getting decked out for Convocation. ...

Orientation day for first year students at UBC Okanagan.
Orientation day for first year students at UBC Okanagan.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 262 pixelsFull resolution (2408 × 788 pixel, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 262 pixelsFull resolution (2408 × 788 pixel, file size: 2. ...

Student clubs

UBC has a vibrant campus community with over three hundred student run clubs. Some examples include the Chinese Varsity Club (established in 1930), the charitable organization 5 Cents for the Homeless, the Film Society, the UBC Croquet Society, the Dance Club, the uVOTE Political Awareness Club, the Anime Club, the Fitness Club, the Political Science Student Association, the UBC Gentleman's Club, the UBC Improv Theatre Society, and the Wine Tasting Club, as well as the UBC Amateur Radio Club (VE7UBC). The AMS club directory lists all of the clubs.


Other facilities

The Student Union Building (SUB).
The Student Union Building (SUB).
Gage Towers
Gage Towers
  • The Student Union Building (SUB) (website): offices of many clubs, half a dozen restaurants and cafes, a pub ("The Gallery"), a nightclub ("The Pit"), the inexpensive 425-seat Norman Bouchard Memorial Theatre ("The Norm Theatre"), several shops and a post office. The majority of the outlets and shops in the SUB are run by the AMS, however the addition of major corporate outlets in recent years by UBC Food Services has generated some controversy. The SUB Art Gallery contains mostly students' work. Beside the SUB, there is a small mound called The Grassy Knoll, which was constructed from the contents of the open pool dug near the Aquatic Centre. The Grassy Knoll is slated to be removed for the planned construction of an underground bus loop, a plan that is unpopular with some students.
  • The Ladha Science Student Centre (website): Home of the Science Undergraduate Society (website). Funded through a generous donation from Abdul Ladha, a levy from all Science undergraduate students, the VP Students, and the Dean of Science, this new building on East Mall just north of University Boulevard is now open and provides space for Science undergraduates to meet, to study, and to have fun. (http://www.escience.ubc.ca/)
  • Totem Park: A residence primarily for first and second year undergraduate students (houses 1163). It consists of 6 dormitory buildings (Nootka, Dene, Haida, Salish, Kwakiutl, and Shuswap Houses), and a Commons Block (Coquihalla). It is considered by some to be the "loudest" of the residences.
    • All houses, except Shuswap, are co-ed, with alternating men's and women's floors.
    • Shuswap house is currently the only house at Totem with co-ed floors (that is, men and women are allowed to live on the same floor).
  • Place Vanier: A residence primarily for first and second year undergraduate students (houses 1370). It consists of 12 blocks constructed in 1959, 1960, 1961 and 1968, with two (Tec de Monterrey and Korea House) of the twelve houses constructed in 2002 and 2003. The buildings vary from Male and Female only, to alternating gender floors, as well as fully mixed floors. The residences have both single and double rooms, with each floor having a lounge and communal bathrooms.
  • Gage Towers: A residence consisting of three 17-floor towers (North, South and East) primarily for second, third, and fourth year undergraduate students. Gage houses the most students and is closest to the Pit Pub. It consists of three interconnected towers (North, South, and West) as well as single student housing(both studio, and apartment) in a separate adjacent building. The towers are composed of "quads" which consist of 4 separate pods, each consisting of 6 individual bedrooms, a bathroom and a communal kitching/dining area.
  • Fairview Crescent: A residence primarily for second and third year undergraduate students. Also houses many graduate students. Consists of an L-Shaped pedestrian-only street lined with 4, 5 & 6 student (a mix of single-sex and co-ed) townhouses. The Beanery is nestled in the middle of the residence.
  • Thunderbird: A residence primarily for graduate students and fourth year undergraduate students.
  • Ritsumeikan-UBC House: A residence with a Japanese cultural setting, named for Ritsumeikan University. Houses Japanese exchange students and Canadian students, who participate in unique intercultural programmes. The residence's tatami room is used for practice sessions by the UBC Urasenke Japanese tea ceremony club. Two Canadian students are typically paired with two Japanese exchange students.
  • Marine Drive Residence: A new residence on the west side of campus. The first phase, consisting of Building 1 (an 18-floor tower) and Building 2 (a 5 floor building commonly called the "Podium") opened Fall 2005, and is the most expensive residence on campus. In February 2006, the Board of Governors approved plans for the second phase of Marine Drive, finally putting an end to the debacle caused by concerns over the view of Wreck beach (Phase I's Building 1 was reduced from 20 floors to 18 because of this). Phase II consists of Buildings 3 through 5 (two towers and another "Podium", respectively), and also the Commonsblock. Building 3 is expected to be open for students as of September 2007, with buildings 4 and 5 following in 2008. A separate Commonsblock (the current Front Desk being located in building 1) is expected to be completed in 2009, and will contain similar services to the Commonsblocks of other residences, such as an exercise room and a small store. The Commonsblock will mark the completion of the Marine Drive Residence, which will be one of the most populous residences on campus.
  • Green College: A residential college for graduate students with an interdisciplinary focus.
  • St. John's College: A residential college for graduate students with an international focus.
  • The Beanery: A coffee shop located in the Fairview residence. It has study areas popular with students. There are numerous other coffee outlets on campus, including a Blenz, four Starbucks (The village, the SUB, in Forestry, and near the engineering "E") and two Tim Horton's.
  • A new Tim Horton's in the Forestry building that opened up in the winter of 2006, to replace the Bread Garden that was there before.
  • UBC operates the Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre on Vancouver Island for research biologists, ecologists and oceanographers. As a founding member of the Western Canadian Universities Marine Sciences Society, UBC maintains this field station on the west coast of Vancouver Island, BC.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1781 KB) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1781 KB) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Metadata This file contains... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (863x563, 106 KB) Summary My photo of the Gage Towers, taken 2005 November 7. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (863x563, 106 KB) Summary My photo of the Gage Towers, taken 2005 November 7. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Restaurant (disambiguation). ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... Walter H. Gage (1922 - 1978) was a Canadian professor. ... Zonshinkan is one of the symbolic buildings in Kinugasa Campus. ... Six-mat room with tatami flooring and shoji Tatami ) (originally meaning folded and piled) mats are a traditional Japanese flooring. ... Urasenke (裏千家, literally rear of the Sen house) is the name of one of the main schools of Japanese tea ceremony. ... A woman wearing a kimono performs a tea ceremony outdoors, while seated in seiza position. ... Green College is one of two residential colleges at the University of British Columbia. ... A residential college is an organisational pattern for a division of a university that places academic activity in a community setting of students and faculty, usually at a residence and with shared meals, the college having a degree of autonomy and a federated relationship with the overall university. ... St. ... Blenz corporate logo Blenz The Canadian Coffee Company, also known as simply Blenz, is a Canadian franchise chain of coffee shops. ... For other meanings of the name Starbuck, see Starbuck. ... Tim Hortons (written without an apostrophe) is the largest coffee and doughnut chain in Canada. ... Tim Hortons (written without an apostrophe) is the largest coffee and doughnut chain in Canada. ... Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre is a marine research station run by UVic, UBC, SFU, UofA and UofC. The centre is housed in the building built as the western terminus of the British Empires worldwide undersea cable. ...

Athletics

UBC is represented in Canadian Interuniversity Sport by the UBC Thunderbirds. UBC is considering joining the NCAA [20] CIS Logo Canadian Interuniversity Sport (CIS) is the national governing body of university sport in Canada. ... The UBC Thunderbirds are the athletic teams that represent the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Sports and recreation

Place Vanier
Place Vanier
The Student Recreation Centre (SRC).
The Student Recreation Centre (SRC).
  • UBC REC (website): UBC's intramural program is one of the largest in Canada, including various leagues and the year-ending Storm the Wall.
  • Aquatic Centre (website): offers swimming pools indoors and outdoors. At designated times students can use the facility for free.
  • Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre: during final exam periods (December and April), hundreds of chairs and tables are placed inside for students to take examinations. The Centre is currently torn down, and is being restructured for the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver.
  • In between Main and Koerner Libraries is an artificial 6-metre deep valley, whose massive amount of dirt was transported to a bog in the Pacific Spirit Park decades ago, now being criticized as an anti-environmental act. The valley was intended as a student gathering place for eating lunches, meeting and relaxing, but it is mostly unused due to its lack of visibility and dangerously slippery muddy grass.
  • There is a rock-climbing wall in the SUB, hidden behind the movie theatre screen, which is operated by the UBC Varsity Outdoor Club.(website)
  • The UBC Bike Hub, which houses the AMS Bike Co-op and the Bike Kitchen. The Bike Kitchen is a full service student-run non-profit bike shop, which also runs workshops and provides one-on-one instruction.(website)
  • The UBC Croquet Societyplays friendlies during the week on various lawns and in front of Koerner's library. Tournaments are held twice a semester.
  • The UBC Debating Society is the only debating team in Canada that is a part of a university's varsity athletics programme.(website) In late 2006 it hosts the World Universities Debating Championships.
  • The Student Recreation Centre houses a gymnasium, sports equipment shop, dojo, and climbing wall, in addition to rooms for special exercise programmes.
  • The neighbouring Pacific Spirit Regional Park has an extensive network of running trails. On the coast to the west of campus, the park includes Wreck Beach, one of the largest clothing-optional beaches in the world.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 488 KB) Summary Vincent Ng Feb 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1280x960, 488 KB) Summary Vincent Ng Feb 2006 Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1507 KB) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (2272x1704, 1507 KB) Other versions of this file File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): University of British Columbia User:Buchanan-Hermit/photographs/uel Metadata This file contains... A winter sport is a sport commonly played during winter. ... To examine somebody or something is to inspect it closely, hence an examination is a detailed inspection or analysis of an object or person. ... Wikinews has related news: Vancouver 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games The 2010 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XXI Olympic Winter Games, are the next Winter Olympics and will be celebrated in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada in 2010. ... For other uses, see Coop. ... The World Universities Debating Championship is the highest-profile tournament in university debating. ... A dojo ) is a Japanese term which literally means place of the Way. Initially, Dojo were adjunct to temples. ... Pacific Spirit Regional Park is located in the University Endowment Lands, on Point Grey to the west of the city of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Wreck Beach is one of the largest officially clothing optional beaches in the world. ...

Student media

  • The Ubyssey (website), a twice-weekly student newspaper that serves the Vancouver campus. Established in 1918.
  • "The Phoenix" (website), is a biweekly student newspaper that serves the Okanagan campus. Established in 1989 at Okanagan University College.
  • The Graduate (website), a monthly magazine of news, opinion, and humour, by graduate students.
  • Discorder ("That magazine from CiTR") (website), a music and entertainment magazine produced by the campus radio station.
  • CiTR "Thunderbird Radio" (website), the campus radio station.
  • The Point, a weekly student paper of athletics, clubs, and what's happening at UBC.
  • The Underground, a satirical newspaper of the Arts Undergraduate Society with a vibrant arts and culture section, The Grounder.
  • The 432 (website), a satirical, biweekly publication of the Science Undergraduate Society.
  • The Cavalier (website), the official humour and events paper of the Commerce Undergraduate Society (CUS),
  • The nEUSpaper , a humorous, biweekly publication of the Engineering Undergraduate Society, or EUS.
  • The Paradigm (website), an academic, bi-annual publication of the Science Undergraduate Society.
  • Perspectives (website), British Columbia's first English-Chinese student newspaper.
  • The Knoll (website), a monthly magazine examining society from an activist/humanist point of view.
  • PRISM international (website), a quarterly literary magazine published by graduate students in the UBC Creative Writing Program.

The cover of the March 17, 2006 issue of the Ubysseys Page Friday issue focusing on racism The Ubyssey is the University of British Columbias student-run paper. ... CITR is a Canadian FM radio station based out of the University of British Columbias Student Union Building and student run. ... CiTR (Canadian Independent Thunderbird Radio) is a Canadian FM radio station based out of the University of British Columbias Student Union Building in the University Endowment Lands, just west of the city limits of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Engineering Undergraduate Society (EUS), is the engineering society at the University of British Columbia in the University Endowment Lands, British Columbia, Canada (just west of Vancouvers city limits). ... Perspectives is British Columbias first English-Chinese student newspaper. ...

See also

Faculty of Applied Science (website) Departments of Engineering (incl. ... Stephen J. Toope (2006–) Martha C. Piper (1997–2006) David W. Strangway (1985–1997) Robert H. T. Smith (1985) George Pedersen (1983–1985) Douglas Kenny (1975–1983) Walter Harry Gage (1969–1975) Fredrick Kenneth Hare (1968–1969)) John B. Macdonald (1962–1967) Leonard Klinck (1919–1944) Frank Wesbrook (1913–1918... Allan McEachern (2002– ) William Sauder (1996–2002) Robert H. Lee (1993–1996) Leslie R. Peterson (1987–1993) W. Robert Wyman (1984–1987) John V. Clyne (1978–1984) Donovan F. Miller (1975–1978) Nathan T. Nemetz (1971–1975) Allan M. McGavin (1969–1972) John Murdoch Buchanan (1966–1969) Phyllis Ross (1961... Main article: University of British Columbia Some notable alumni from UBC include: Michael Conway Baker, composer Geoffrey Ashe, writer Albert Bandura, psychologist Pierre Berton, author and historian Stewart Blusson, diamond hunter and philanthropist Mark Borland, World Skeet shooting Champion Peter Borwein, mathematician and pi researcher Stevie Cameron, journalist John J... The Alma Mater Society (AMS) is the student society of UBC and represents more than 43,000 undergraduate and graduate students at UBC. The AMS also operates student services, student owned businesses, resource groups and clubs. ... This article is about the unincorporated area west of Vancouver. ... For the UK college, see Regent College, Leicester Regent College is a graduate school of Christian Studies, located next to the campus of the University of British Columbia in the University Endowment Lands west of Vancouver, British Columbia, and is an affiliated college of that university. ... The Vancouver School of Theology (or VST) is a theological graduate school located on the campus of the University of British Columbia (UBC) in the University Endowment Lands, west of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. ... TRIUMF, which stands for Tri-University Meson Facility, is a particle accelerator laboratory located on the University of British Columbia campus in the University Endowment Lands, just outside the city limits of Vancouver, British Columbia. ... Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre is a marine research station run by UVic, UBC, SFU, UofA and UofC. The centre is housed in the building built as the western terminus of the British Empires worldwide undersea cable. ...

External link

References

  1. ^ "The approximately $877 million market value of the Endowment also results..." - accessed from: University Endowment Investment Portfolio Annual Report.
  2. ^ a b ResearchInfoSource Top 50.
  3. ^ UBC Okanagan campus website.
  4. ^ "Henry Marshall Tory, A Biography", originally published 1954, current edition January 1992, E.A. Corbett, Toronto: Ryerson Press, ISBN 0-88864-250-4
  5. ^ Dominion Bureau of Statistics, Canada Year Book 1921, Ottawa, 1922
  6. ^ Williams, M. Y. (Winter 1966). "The Grand Campus Washout" (PDF). UBC Alumni Chronicle 20 (4): 9-11.  Includes several contemporary photos of the Washout.
  7. ^ Visual Identity Usage Guidelines. UBC Okanagan.
  8. ^ Welcome to UBC Wireless.
  9. ^ Premier of British Columbia (2005-02-08), British Columbia to limit tuition increases, <http://www2.news.gov.bc.ca/nrm_news_releases/2005OTP0017-000120.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-09-03
  10. ^ Stats Canada (2006-09-01), The Daily, <http://www.statcan.ca/Daily/English/060901/d060901a.htm>. Retrieved on 2007-09-03
  11. ^ University of British Columbia (2007), Adding it up, <https://you.ubc.ca/ubc/vancouver/adding.ezc>. Retrieved on 2007-09-03
  12. ^ Credit Card Savings Directed Toward UBC Teaching and Learning. University of British Columbia. Retrieved on 2007-07-17.
  13. ^ Canada Revenue Agency, Charities Directorate. Registered Charity Information Return for "University of British Columbia". Registered Charities listings. Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-04-13. This link returns search results with links to UBC tax returns for the last few years. It is a query within the Canada Revenue Agency website. It may not work every time. If it does not, try again, or search the Charities Directorate main page (see reference below) for "University of British Columbia".
  14. ^ Canada Revenue Agency, Charities Directorate. Charities Directorate main page. Registered Charities listings. Government of Canada. Retrieved on 2007-04-13. This page allows you search for tax returns from any Canadian registered charity. To find the UBC tax return, search for "University of British Columbia".
  15. ^ Ranking.
  16. ^ "NOTE: The Web version, unlike the print version of the rankings, fails to take ties into account and therefore places UBC incorrectly at 31st." Newsweek Top 100 Global Universities.
  17. ^ Queen's University's 'back door' is in England: Easier to gain admission to campus at 15th-century castle, Heather Sokoloff, National Post, June 5, 2003
  18. ^ UBC Library.
  19. ^ http://www.library.ubc.ca/archives/sculptures/sculptures1.html#goddess
  20. ^ http://www.canada.com/vancouver/theprovince/news/sports/story.html?id=4bcb77e5-b379-4e18-8a33-578138b9eba7.


Henry Marshall Tory (January 11, 1864 – February 6, 1947) was the first president of the University of Alberta (1908-1929), the first president of the National Research Council (1928-1935) and the first president of Carleton College (1942-1947). ... Categories: Stub | British Columbia premiers ... Statistics Canada (French: Statistique Canada) is the Canadian federal government department commissioned with producing statistics to help better understand Canada, its population, resources, economy, society, and culture. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Example of a cheque from the Canada Revenue Agency The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers: tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories; international trade legislation; and various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Example of a cheque from the Canada Revenue Agency The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers: tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories; international trade legislation; and various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system. ... Example of a cheque from the Canada Revenue Agency The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) administers: tax laws for the Government of Canada and for most provinces and territories; international trade legislation; and various social and economic benefit and incentive programs delivered through the tax system. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 103rd day of the year (104th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Flag of Canada Universities in British Columbia Flag of British Columbia
Public universities
UBC | UNBC | Royal Roads | Simon Fraser | Thompson Rivers | Victoria
Private universities
Canada West | Quest | Trinity Western

  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Northern British Columbia - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (345 words)
The University of Northern British Columbia (UNBC) is a small, primarily undergraduate university whose main campus is in Prince George, British Columbia.
The British Columbia legislature established the university on 21 June 1990 with the UNBC Act in response to a grass roots movement spearheaded by the Interior University Society.
Because of its northern latitude, UNBC is a member of the University of the Arctic.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m