FACTOID # 19: Cheap sloppy joes: Looking for reduced-price lunches for schoolchildren? Head for Oklahoma!
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of Bristol

University of Bristol

Latin: Bristolliensis (Bris.)

Motto Vim promovet insitam
"[Learning] promotes one's innate power" – from Horace, Ode 4.4[1]
Established 1909 (predecessor in 1876)[2]
Type Public
Endowment £43,192,000[3]
Chancellor Baroness Hale of Richmond[5]
Vice-Chancellor Prof Eric Thomas[6]
Visitor The Lord President of the Council ex officio[7]
Staff 5,119 (2006)[4]
Students 23,630[8]
Undergraduates 15,845[8]
Postgraduates 7,785[8]
Location Bristol, England
Campus Urban
Colours      Pantone 187 [9]
Affiliations Russell Group
Coimbra Group
Worldwide Universities Network
Website http://www.bristol.ac.uk

The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England. It received its Royal Charter in 1909[10] although its predecessor institution University College, Bristol then a college of the University of London had been in existence since 1876.[11] It is one of the original "red brick" universities.[12] Bristol ranks as one of the top 10 universities in the United Kingdom according to most published league tables.[13][14][15] This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Horace, as imagined by Anton von Werner Quintus Horatius Flaccus, (December 8, 65 BC - November 27, 8 BC), known in the English-speaking world as Horace, was the leading Roman lyric poet during the time of Augustus. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1876 Pick up Sticks(MDCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Thursday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Brenda Marjorie Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond, DBE, PC (born January 31, 1945) became the first ever woman to become a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Eric Thomas Eric Jackson Thomas, born 24 March 1953 in Hartlepool, County Durham, has been Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bristol since 2001. ... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... This article is about the English city. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... The University of London is a university based primarily in London. ... Red Brick originally referred to the six civic British universities which were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and which achieved university status before World War II. The modern term roughly equates to those members of the so-called Russell group of universities founded between... League Tables of British Universities, which rank the performances of universities in the United Kingdom on a number of criteria, have been published every year by The Times newspaper since the early 1990s. ...


The University is a member of the Russell Group,[16] European-wide Coimbra Group[17] and the Worldwide Universities Network of which the University's Vice-Chancellor Prof Eric Thomas is the current Chair.[18] The most recent Research Assessment Exercise data shows a particular research strength with 15 departments awarded a 5* rating.[19] Bristol has around 23,000 students and is one of two universities in Bristol, the other being the more recently established University of the West of England.[20] The University has gained press attention for its high private school intake and the 2003 dispute over its admissions system.[21] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ... Professor Eric Thomas Eric Jackson Thomas, born 24 March 1953 in Hartlepool, County Durham, has been Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bristol since 2001. ... The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is an exercise undertaken every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils (HEFCE, SHEFC, HEFCW, DELNI) to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions. ... The University of the West of England (abbrev. ... Private schools, or independent schools, are schools not administered by local, state, or national government, which retain the right to select their student body and are funded in whole or in part by charging their students tuition rather than with public (state) funds. ... Bristol university has traditionally been popular with middle class students and privately educated students The 2003 Bristol admissions row was a row over university admissions in the United Kingdom. ...

Contents

History

As chief benefactor of what was then University College of Bristol Henry Overton Wills was influential in allowing Bristol to gain a Royal Charter.
As chief benefactor of what was then University College of Bristol Henry Overton Wills was influential in allowing Bristol to gain a Royal Charter.

"There shall be from henceforth for ever in Our said City of Bristol a University..." - King Edward VII, Charter of Incorporation of the University of Bristol, 4 December 1909[22] Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (835x1160, 186 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (835x1160, 186 KB) This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years or less. ... Henry Overton Wills III Henry Overton Wills III (22 December 1828 - 4 September 1911) was the first Chancellor of the University of Bristol. ... Edward VII (Albert Edward; 9 November 1841 – 6 May 1910) was King of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, King of the Commonwealth Realms, and the Emperor of India. ... is the 338th day of the year (339th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The University was preceded by the University College of Bristol founded in 1876[11] where its first lecture was attended by only 99 students.[23] Representation of a university class, 1350s. ...


The University was able to apply for a Royal Charter due to the financial support of the Wills and Fry families who made their fortunes in tobacco plantations and chocolate respectively. Although the Wills Family made vast sums of money from the slave-produced plantations they later became abolitionists who gave their money to the city of Bristol.[24] A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... The Fry family was a prominent Bristol Quaker family involved in the chocolate business in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. ... Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ... For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... W.D. & H.O. Wills was a British Tobacco importer and cigarette manufacturer formed in Bristol, England. ... This article is about the abolition of slavery. ...


The Royal Charter was gained in May 1909 with 288 undergraduates and 400 other students entering the University in October 1909. Henry Overton Wills III became its first chancellor.[11] Henry Overton Wills III Henry Overton Wills III (22 December 1828 - 4 September 1911) was the first Chancellor of the University of Bristol. ...


Since the founding of the University itself in 1909, it has grown considerably and is now a member of the Russell Group of research-led UK universities, the Coimbra Group of leading European universities and the Worldwide Universities Network (the WUN). This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The Coimbra Group (CG) is a network of European universities that gathers 38 universities, some of which are among the oldest and most prestigious in Europe. ... The Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) is an invitation-only group of 16 research-led universities which have agreed to carry out research and research training on a collaborative basis. ...


The University College was the first such institution in the country to admit women on the same basis as men.[11] While University College London makes a similar claim, Bristol was the first to offer segregated courses on an equal footing to men and women, while later, UCL was the first to offer the same course to a mixed class.[25] Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ...


The University is now one of the largest employers in the local area, although it is considerably smaller by student numbers than the nearby University of the West of England.[8] Bristol does not have a campus but is spread over a considerable geographic area. Most of its activities however, are concentrated in the area of the city centre referred to as the "University Precinct". The University of the West of England (abbrev. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ...


Early years

Most of the buildings here are used by the University. The Wills Memorial Building is left of centre. Viewed from the Cabot Tower on Brandon Hill
Most of the buildings here are used by the University. The Wills Memorial Building is left of centre. Viewed from the Cabot Tower on Brandon Hill
The Victoria Rooms now house the University's Department of Music.
Bristol's Royal Fort

After the founding of the University College as a College of the University of London in 1876, Government support began in 1889 and allowed the opening of a new Medical School and an Engineering School after mergers with the Bristol Medical School in 1893 and the Merchant Venturers' Technical College in 1909,[26] two subjects which remain among the University's greatest strengths. In 1908, gifts from the Fry and Wills families, particularly £100,000 from Henry Overton Wills III (£6m in today's money) were provided to endow a University for Bristol and the West of England, provided that a Royal Charter could be obtained within two years. In December 1909, the King granted such a Charter[27] and erected The University of Bristol. Henry Wills became its first Chancellor. He died in 1911, and in tribute his sons George and Harry built the Wills Memorial Building, started in 1913 and completed in 1925.[28] These days, it houses parts of the academic provision for law, geography and geology amongst others and graduation ceremonies are held in its Great Hall. The Wills Memorial Building is listed Grade II* building.[29] Download high resolution version (600x1028, 113 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (600x1028, 113 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Wills Memorial Building[1] also known as the Wills Memorial Tower[2][3] or simply the Wills Tower[4] is a Gothic building situated near the top of Park Street on Queens Road in Bristol, United Kingdom. ... The Wills Memorial Building Park Street in Bristol runs from College Green, Bristol up a steep incline northwards to join Park Row at the southern apex of the Clifton Triangle. ... Most of the buildings here are used by the university. ... Most of the buildings here are used by the university. ... The Wills Memorial Building[1] also known as the Wills Memorial Tower[2][3] or simply the Wills Tower[4] is a Gothic building situated near the top of Park Street on Queens Road in Bristol, United Kingdom. ... The tower, viewed from Brandon Hill park. ... The Victoria Rooms in Bristol, built in 1842, and now part of the University of Bristol. ... The Victoria Rooms in Bristol, built in 1842, and now part of the University of Bristol. ... The Victoria Rooms now house the Universitys Department of Music. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 176 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Royal Fort Tower, Bristol University This is part of the physics department of the University of Bristol. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 176 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Royal Fort Tower, Bristol University This is part of the physics department of the University of Bristol. ... The Royal Fort (grid reference ST580734) is a historic house in Tyndalls Park, Bristol. ... The University of London is a university based primarily in London. ... The Fry family was a prominent Bristol Quaker family involved in the chocolate business in the 18th, 19th, and early 20th centuries. ... Henry Overton Wills III Henry Overton Wills III (22 December 1828 - 4 September 1911) was the first Chancellor of the University of Bristol. ... A Royal Charter is a charter given by a monarch to legitimize an incorporated body, such as a city, company, university or such. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... George Alfred Wills (3 June 1854 - 11 July 1928) was a President of Imperial Tobacco and the head of an eminent Bristol family. ... Henry Herbert Wills (20 March, 1856 - 11 May, 1922) was a businessman and philanthropist from Bristol. ... The Wills Memorial Building[1] also known as the Wills Memorial Tower[2][3] or simply the Wills Tower[4] is a Gothic building situated near the top of Park Street on Queens Road in Bristol, United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Academic procession during the University of Canterbury graduation ceremony. ... The Wills Memorial Building[1] also known as the Wills Memorial Tower[2][3] or simply the Wills Tower[4] is a Gothic building situated near the top of Park Street on Queens Road in Bristol, United Kingdom. ...


In 1920 George Wills bought the Victoria Rooms and endowed them to the University as a Students' Union.[11] The building now houses the Department of Music and is a Grade II* listed building.[30] The Victoria Rooms now house the Universitys Department of Music. ... A students union, student government, student leadership, student council, or students association is a student organization present in many elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, colleges and universities. ...


At the point of foundation, the University was required to provide for the local community. This mission was behind the creation of the Department of Extra-Mural Adult Education in 1924 to provide courses to the local community. This mission continues today ; a new admissions policy specifically caters to the 'BS' postcode area of Bristol. UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... This article is about the English city. ...


In 1927 the H.H. Wills Physics Laboratory was opened by Ernest Rutherford.[31] It has since housed some of Bristol's most famous names: Paul Dirac (1933),[32] a Bristol graduate; Cecil Frank Powell (1950);[33] Hans Albrecht Bethe (1967);[34] and Sir Nevill Francis Mott (1977).[35] The Laboratory stands on the same site today close to the Bristol Grammar School and the city museum and remains at the forefront of research in the field.[36] Ernest Rutherford, 1st Baron Rutherford of Nelson OM PC FRS (30 August 1871 - 19 October 1937), widely referred to as Lord Rutherford, was a nuclear physicist who became known as the father of nuclear physics. ... Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, OM, FRS (IPA: [dɪræk]) (August 8, 1902 – October 20, 1984) was a British theoretical physicist and a founder of the field of quantum physics. ... Cecil Frank Powell (December 5, 1903 - August 9, 1969) was a British physicist, awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1950 for his development of the photographic method of studying nuclear processes and for the resulting discovery of the pion (pi-meson), a heavy subatomic particle. ... Hans Albrecht Bethe (born July 2, 1906), is a German-American physicist from Strassburg (then part of Germany, now Strasbourg, France). ... Sir Nevill Francis Mott (September 30, 1905 – August 8, 1996) was a British physicist. ... Bristol Grammar School is a co-educational public school in Clifton, Bristol, England. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Sir Winston Churchill became the University's third Chancellor in 1929, serving the University in that capacity until 1965.[11] “Churchill” redirects here. ...


Mass higher education

During World War II, the Wills Memorial was bombed, destroying the Great Hall and the organ it housed.[37] It has since been restored to its former glory, complete with oak panelled walls and a new organ. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000...


In 1946, the University established the first drama department in the country.[11] In the same year, Bristol began offering special entrance exams and grants to aid the resettlement of servicemen returning home. Student numbers continued to increase, and the Faculty of Engineering eventually needed the new premises that were to become Queen's Building in 1955. This substantial building housed all of the University's engineers until 1996 when Electrical Engineering and Computer Science moved over the road into the new Merchant Venturers' Building to make space for these rapidly expanding fields. Today, Queen's Building caters for most of the teaching needs of the Faculty and provides academic space for the "heavy" engineering subjects (civil, mechanical, aeronautical). This does not cite any references or sources. ... In education, certification, counselling, and many other fields, a test or exam (short for examination) is a tool or technique intended to measure students expression of knowledge, skills and/or abilities. ... Grants are funds given to tax-exempt nonprofit organizations or local governments by foundations, corporations, governments, small business and individuals. ... Electrical Engineers design power systems… … and complex electronic circuits. ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Mechanical engineering is an engineering discipline that involves the application of principles of physics for analysis, design, manufacturing, and maintenance of mechanical systems. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering concerning aircraft, spacecraft and related topics. ...


With unprecedented growth in the 1960s, particularly in undergraduate numbers, the Student's Union eventually acquired larger premises in a new building in the Clifton area of the city, in 1965. This building was more spacious than the Victoria Rooms, which were now given over to the Department of Music. The new Union provides many practice and performance rooms, some specialist rooms as well as three bars: the Epi; the Mandela (also known as AR2) and the Avon Gorge. Whilst spacious, the Union building is thought by many to be ugly[38] and out of character compared to the architecture of the rest of the Clifton area having been mentioned in a BBC poll to find the worst architectural eyesores in Britain.[39] However, there is some evidence that the University has looked at relocating the Student's Union building.[40] The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... The University of Bristol Union (UBU) is the students union of Bristol University, England. ... The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... The British Broadcasting Corporation, which is usually known as the BBC, is the largest broadcasting corporation in the world in terms of audience numbers, employing 26,000 staff in the United Kingdom alone and with a budget of more than GB£4 billion. ...


The 1960s were a time of considerable student activism in the United Kingdom, and Bristol was no exception. In 1968, many students marched in support of the Anderson Report, which called for higher student grants. This discontent culminated in an 11-day sit-in the Senate House (the administrative headquarters of the University).[11] The 1960s decade refers to the years from January 1, 1960 to December 31, 1969, inclusive. ... The Anderson Report was a British report on Higher Education published in the 1960s which called for higher student grants. ...


As the age of mass higher education dawned, Bristol continued to build its student numbers. The various undergraduate residences were repeatedly expanded and more recently, some postgraduate residences have been constructed. These more recent ventures have been funded (and are run) by external companies in agreement with the University since the University currently has little borrowing facility left available to it to finance large capital ventures without external funding.[41] The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... Capital has a number of related meanings in economics, finance and accounting. ...


Recent history

1981 saw the establishment of one of the few Centres for Deaf Studies in the United Kingdom, followed in 1988 by the Norah Fry Centre for research into learning difficulties. Also in 1988, and again in 2004,[42] the Students' Union AGM voted to disaffiliate from the National Union of Students (NUS). On both occasions, however, the subsequent referendum of all students reversed that decision and Bristol remains affiliated to the NUS. The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ...


In 2002, the University was involved in argument over press intrusion after details of Euan Blair's application to university (son of then-Prime Minister Tony Blair) were published in national newspapers. Euan eventually gained a 2:1 in Ancient History from Bristol.[43] Euan Anthony Blair (born January 19, 1984, London), is the eldest son of British Prime Minister Tony Blair. ... For other people of the same name, see Tony Blair (disambiguation) Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born May 6, 1953)[1] is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, First Lord of the Treasury, Minister for the Civil Service, Leader of the Labour Party, and Member of Parliament for the constituency... “Ancient” redirects here. ...


As the number of postgraduate students has grown (particularly the numbers pursuing taught Master's Degrees) there eventually became a need for separate representation on University bodies and the Postgraduate Union (PGU) was established in 2000.[44] Universities are increasingly expected to exploit the intellectual property generated by their research activities and, in 2000, Bristol established the Research and Enterprise Division (RED) to further this cause (particularly for technology-based businesses). In 2001 the university signed a 25-year research funding deal with IP2IPO, a intellectual property commercialisation company.[45] In 2007 research activities were expanded further with the opening of the Advanced Composites Centre for Innovation and Science (ACCIS) and The Bristol Insititute for Public Affairs (BIPA). Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ... For the 2006 film, see Intellectual Property (film). ...


In 2002, the University opened a new Centre for Sports, Exercise and Health in the heart of the University precinct.[46] At a cost local residents are also able to use the facilities.[47]


Expansion of teaching and research activities continues. In 2004, the Faculty of Engineering completed work on the Bristol Laboratory for Advanced Dynamics Engineering (BLADE). This £18.5m project[48] provides cutting-edge technology to further the study of dynamics and is the most advanced such facility in Europe. It was built as an extension to the Queen's Building and was officially opened by Queen Elizabeth II in March 2005. The Bristol Laboratory for Advanced Dynamics Engineering or BLADE is a research facility which is part of the University of Bristol. ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


In January 2005, The School of Chemistry was awarded £4.5m by the Higher Education Funding Council for England to create Bristol ChemLabS: a Centre for Excellence in Teaching & Learning (CETL),[49] with an additional £350k announced for the capital part of the project in February 2006. Bristol ChemLabS stands for Bristol Chemical Laboratory Sciences; it is the only Chemistry CETL in the UK.[50] The Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) is a non-departmental public body of the Department for Education and Skills in the United Kingdom which distributes funding to Universities and Colleges of Higher and Further Education in England since 1992. ...


There is also a plan to significantly redevelop the centre of the University Precinct in the coming years.[51]


2003 admissions row

The University has been regarded as being elitist by some commentators,[52] taking 42% of its undergraduate students from non-state schools according to the most recent 2006/2007 figures despite the fact that such pupils make just 7% of the population in the UK.[53] It should be noted that 20% of sixth form pupils attend non-state funded institutions. In late February and early March 2003, Bristol became embroiled in a row about admissions policies, with some private schools threatening a boycott[54] based on their claims that, in an effort to improve equality of access, the University was discriminating against their students. These claims were hotly denied by the University.[55] In August 2005, following a large-scale survey, the Independent Schools Council publicly acknowledged that there was no evidence of bias against applicants from the schools it represented.[56] The University has a new admissions policy[57] which lays out in considerable detail the basis on which any greater or lesser weight may be given to particular parts of particular applicants backgrounds — in particular what account may be taken of which school the applicant hails from. This new policy also encourages greater participation from locally resident applicants. Bristol university has traditionally been popular with middle class students and privately educated students The 2003 Bristol admissions row was a row over university admissions in the United Kingdom. ... Elitism is a belief or attitude that an elite — a selected group of persons whose personal abilities, specialized training or other attributes place them at the top of any field (see below) — are the people whose views on a matter are to be taken most seriously, or who are alone... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Academic reputation

League tables generally place Bristol within the top ten universities in the United Kingdom. The 2008 University League Table published by The Times placed Bristol 8th[58] and The Sunday Times placed Bristol 9th.[59] The Good University Guide placed Bristol 7th.[60] The Guardian which uses a slightly different methodology places Bristol 15th,[61] According to data published in The Telegraph Bristol has the third highest percentage of 'good honours' of any university, behind Oxford and Cambridge.[62] League Tables of British Universities, which rank the performances of universities in the United Kingdom on a number of criteria, have been published every year by The Times newspaper since the early 1990s. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... The Sunday Times is a Sunday broadsheet newspaper distributed in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland, published by Times Newspapers Ltd, a subsidiary of News International which is in turn owned by News Corporation. ... The Good University Guide is a guide to British Universities published annually. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...


Internationally, The Times Higher Education Supplement places Bristol joint 16th in Europe[63] and 64th in the world.[64] The Shanghai Jiao Tong University in its 2007 Academic Ranking of World Universities placed Bristol 62nd globally.[65] The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ...


Bristol is also known for its research strength, having 15 departments gaining the top grade of 5* in the 2001 Research Assessment Exercise.[66] Only Oxbridge and University College London received more maximum scores.[67] Overall, 36 out of 46 or 84%[68] of University departments rated gained the top two ratings - 5 or 5* ratings [69] and 76% of all the academic staff working in departments scored these top two levels.[70] In terms of teaching strength Bristol had an average Teaching Quality Assessment score of 22.05/24[71] before the TQA was abolished. For 2007 admissions Bristol reported that there were 38,000 applications for the 3,100 home-funded undergraduate places at the university.[72] The average A-level tariff score for 2005 entry was 436.4.[73] The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is an exercise undertaken every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils (HEFCE, SHEFC, HEFCW, DELNI) to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions. ... Oxbridge is a name used to refer to the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, the two oldest in the United Kingdom and the English-speaking world. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ...


Students' Union and student life

The University has a Student Union, the University of Bristol Union which claims to have the largest Student's Union building in the country[74] From this location the student radio station BURST (Bristol University Radio Station) broadcasts and the student paper Epigram publishes. In terms of student life the Union is responsible for the organisation of the annual fresher fair, the coordination of Bristol Student Community Action which organizes volunteering projects in the local community and the organization of entertainment events and student societies. The largest student society is RAG (Raise and Give) which raises money for various charities.[75] The current President of the union is Tobin Webb.[76] Previous presidents have included Sue Lawley and Liberal Democrat MP Lembit Opik. There is a separate union for postgraduate students, an athletic union which is a member of the British Universities Sports Association.[77] In distinction to the 'blues' awarded for sporting excellence at Oxford and Cambridge, Bristol's outstanding athletes are awarded 'reds'.[78] The University of Bristol Union (UBU) is the students union of Bristol University, England. ... The University of Bristol Union (UBU) is the students union of Bristol University, England. ... BURST (Bristol University Radio Station) is a student-run radio station, based in the University of Bristol, and a member of the Student Radio Association. ... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... The British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) is the governing body for United Kingdom. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ...


Student accommodation

Accommodation for undergraduates is focused upon two areas of Bristol - Clifton and Stoke Bishop.[79] Goldney Hall, one of the student residences, is a popular location for filming, with The Chronicles of Narnia, The House of Eliott and Truly, Madly, Deeply as well as episodes of Only Fools and Horses and Casualty being filmed there.[80] The Grotto at Goldney House is a Grade I listed building.[81] The University also owns Clifton Hill House, a Grade I listed building.[82] All residences are linked to the Internet using the University of Bristol Residential Networking Service or Resnet.[83] Postgraduate houses and student residences are also available. The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ... Goldney Hall is one of the three halls of residence in Clifton, Bristol providing accommodation for students at the University of Bristol. ... The BBC produced a television adaptation of four books of C. S. Lewiss The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe (1988), Prince Caspian (1989), The Voyage of the Dawn Treader (1989) and The Silver Chair (1990). ... The House of Eliott is a British television series produced and broadcast by the BBC in three series between 1991 and 1994. ... Truly, Madly, Deeply is a British romance film, made in 1990 for the BBCs Screen One series. ... Only Fools and Horses is a British television sitcom, created and written by John Sullivan, and made and broadcast by the BBC. Seven series were originally broadcast in the UK between 1981 and 1991, with sporadic Christmas specials until 2003. ... Casualty is the longest running emergency medical drama series in the world[1], first broadcast in 1986 and transmitted in the UK on BBC One (with repeats on UKTV Gold). ... The Grotto at Goldney House (grid reference ST571737) is a highly decorated grotto, dating from 1739, in Clifton, Bristol, England. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ... Clifton Hill House (grid reference ST571737) is a grade I listed[1] Palladian villa in the Clifton area of Bristol, England which is now used as a hall of residence by the University of Bristol. ...

Image Hall Name Established Location Catered/Self-catered Principal
Badock Hall 1964 Stoke Bishop Catered Mrs Francoise Evans
Churchill Hall 1964 Stoke Bishop Catered Mr A G Rump
Clifton Hill House 1750 Clifton Catered Mrs AM Burnside
Durdham Hall 1994 Stoke Bishop Self-catered Mrs T-E Beech
Goldney Hall c1720 Clifton Self-catered Profesor G McLennan
Hiatt Baker Hall 1966 Stoke Bishop Catered WGC Boyd
Manor Hall 1932 Clifton Self-catered M J Crossley Evans
University Hall 1971 Stoke Bishop Self-catered Mrs FJM Wilke
Wills Hall 1928 Stoke Bishop Catered DR Shell

Badock Hall is a catered Bristol University halls of residence located in Stoke Bishop. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ... Churchill Hall is one of the halls of residence located in the Stoke Bishop site of the University of Bristol. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ... The Old Clifton section of Clifton Hill House, taken by me File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Clifton Hill House (grid reference ST571737) is a grade I listed[1] Palladian villa in the Clifton area of Bristol, England which is now used as a hall of residence by the University of Bristol. ... The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... Durdham Hall is one of the halls of residence located in the Stoke Bishop site of the University of Bristol. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ... Goldney Hall is one of the three halls of residence in Clifton, Bristol providing accommodation for students at the University of Bristol. ... The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... Hiatt Baker Hall is one of the nine halls of residence of the University of Bristol. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ... Manor Hall is a student hall of residence at the University of Bristol, England. ... The crowded Princess Victoria Street lies at the heart of Clifton Village Clifton is an inner suburb of the English port city of Bristol. ... University Hall is one of six halls of residence in Stoke Bishop for the University of Bristol. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (2048x1536, 682 KB) I, the creator of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Wills Hall is one of the nine halls of residence in the University of Bristol. ... Stoke Bishop is a small middle class outer city suburb in the north-west of Bristol, located in between Westbury-on-Trym, Sneyd Park, and Sea Mills, Bristol. ...

Faculties

The University is made up of a number of schools and departments organised into six faculties:[84]

Faculty of Arts

  • Archaeology and Anthropology
  • Drama: Theatre, Film, Television
  • History of Art
  • Music
  • Philosophy
  • Classics & Ancient History
  • English
  • Historical Studies
  • Theology and Religious Studies
  • French
  • German
  • Hispanic, Portuguese and Latin American Studies
  • Italian
  • Russian

Faculty of Engineering

  • Aerospace Engineering
  • Civil Engineering
  • Computer Science
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Engineering Mathematics
  • Mechanical Engineering

Faculty of Medical and Veterinary Sciences

  • Anatomy
  • Biochemistry
  • Cellular & Molecular Medicine
  • Clinical Veterinary Science
  • Physiology and Pharmacology

Faculty of Science

  • Biological Sciences
  • Chemistry
  • Earth Sciences
  • Experimental Psychology
  • Geographical Sciences
  • Mathematics
  • Physics

Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry

  • Clinical Science at North Bristol
  • Clinical Science at South Bristol
  • Community-Based Medicine
  • Oral & Dental Science
  • Social Medicine

Faculty of Social Sciences and Law

  • Politics
  • Sociology
  • Education (Graduate School of)
  • Policy Studies
  • Deaf Studies
  • Hearing and Balance Studies
  • Exercise, Nutrition and Health Sciences
  • Accounting and Finance
  • Economics
  • Management
  • Law

Governance

In common with most UK universities, Bristol is headed formally by the Chancellor, currently Brenda Hale and lead on a day-to-day basis by the Vice-Chancellor, currently Prof Eric Thomas. There are four Pro-Vice-Chancellors and two ceremonial Pro-Chancellors.[85] // Whilst the Chancellor is the titular head of the University, it is in practice led by the Vice-Chancellor, currently Prof. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Brenda Marjorie Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond, DBE, PC (born January 31, 1945) became the first ever woman to become a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Eric Thomas Eric Jackson Thomas, born 24 March 1953 in Hartlepool, County Durham, has been Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bristol since 2001. ...


Responsibility for running the University is held at an executive level by the Vice-Chancellor, but the Council is the only body which can recommend changes to the University's statutes and Charter,[86] with the exception of academic ordinances. These can only be made with the consent of the Senate, the chief academic body in the University.[87] The Chancellor and Pro Chancellors are appointed formally by Court, whose additional powers are now limited to these appointments and a few others, including some lay members of Council.[88] Finally, Convocation, the body of all staff, ceremonial officers and graduates of the University returns 100 members to Court and 1 member to Council,[89] but is otherwise principally a forum for discussion and to ensure graduates stay in touch with the University.


Chancellors and Vice-Chancellors

The Chancellor is elected by Court on nomination by the Council. The initial term is ten years, although this is renewable. There have been seven Chancellors of the University:[90][91]

There have been twelve Vice-Chancellors of the University:[90][91] Henry Overton Wills III Henry Overton Wills III (22 December 1828 - 4 September 1911) was the first Chancellor of the University of Bristol. ... Richard Burdon Sanderson Haldane, 1st Viscount Haldane, (July 30, 1856 - August 19, 1928), was an important British Liberal politician, lawyer, and philosopher. ... “Churchill” redirects here. ... Henry Hugh Arthur FitzRoy Somerset, 10th Duke of Beaufort KG GCVO KStJ PC (April 4, 1900 – February 5, 1984) was a British peer, the son of Henry Somerset, 9th Duke of Beaufort. ... Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin OM (May 12, 1910–July 29, 1994) was a British scientist, born Dorothy Mary Crowfoot in Cairo. ... Sir Jeremy Morse was Chancellor of Bristol University between 1989 and 2003 before being replaced with the Baroness Hale of Richmond. ... Brenda Marjorie Hale, Baroness Hale of Richmond, DBE, PC (born January 31, 1945) became the first ever woman to become a Lord of Appeal in Ordinary under the Appellate Jurisdiction Act 1876. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ...

  • Professor Conwy Lloyd Morgan, 1909
  • Sir Isambard Owen, 1909 - 1921
  • Professor E. F. Francis, (Acting) 1921 - 1922
  • Thomas Loveday, 1922 - 1945
  • Professor A. M. Tyndall (Acting) 1945 - 1946
  • Sir Philip Morris, 1946 - 1966
  • Professor J. E. Harris 1966 - 1968
  • Professor A. R. Collar 1968 - 1969
  • Sir Alec Merrison, 1969 - 1984
  • Professor P. Haggett (Acting) 1984 - 1985
  • Sir John Kingman, 1985 - 2001
  • Professor Eric Thomas, 2001 -

C. Lloyd Morgan (Conwy Lloyd Morgan) (1852 - 1936) was a British psychologist. ... Sir John Frank Charles Kingman, a mathematician, was born on 28 August 1939 in Beckenham, Kent1. ... Professor Eric Thomas Eric Jackson Thomas, born 24 March 1953 in Hartlepool, County Durham, has been Vice-Chancellor of the University of Bristol since 2001. ...

Degrees

Bristol awards a range of academic degrees spanning bachelor's and master's degrees as well as junior doctorates and higher doctorates. The postnominals awarded are the degree abbreviations used commonly among British universities. The University is part of the Engineering Doctorate scheme,[92] and awards the Eng.D. in systems engineering, engineering management, aerospace engineering and non-destructive evaluation.[93] A B.A. issued as a certificate A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... A bachelors degree is usually an undergraduate academic degree awarded for a course or major that generally lasts for three, four, or in some cases and countries, five or six years. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ... Post-nominal letters also called Post-nominal initials or Post-nominal titles are letters placed after the name of an individual to indicate that that individual holds a position, educational degree, accreditation, office, or honour. ... Abbreviations are normally used to specify a degree, rather than spelling out the name in full, such as in reference books like Whos Who or on business cards. ... An Engineering Doctorate (EngD) is a postgraduate degree awarded by twenty universities[1] in the United Kingdom. ... Systems engineering techniques are used in complex projects: from spacecrafts to chip design, from robotics to creating large software products to building bridges, Systems engineering uses a host of tools that include modeling & simulation, requirements analysis, and scheduling to manage complexity Systems Engineering (SE) is an interdisciplinary approach and means... Engineering management is a field that bridges the gap between engineering and management. ... Aerospace engineering is the branch of engineering that concerns aircraft, spacecraft, and related topics. ... Nondestructive testing (NDT), also called nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and nondestructive inspection (NDI), is testing that does not destroy the test object. ...


Bristol notably does not award by title any Bachelor's degrees in music which is available for study but awarded B.A. (although it does award M.Mus. and D.Mus.), or any degree in divinity since divinity is not available for study (students of theology are awarded a B.A.). Similarly, the University does not award B.Litt. (Bachelor of Letters), although it does award both M.Litt. and D.Litt. In regulations the University does not name M.D. or D.D.S. as higher doctorates although they are in many universities.[94], as these degrees are normally accredited professional doctorates. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... The Master of Music (M.M. or M.Mus. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For other uses, see Divinity (disambiguation) and Divine (disambiguation). ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... A B.A. issused as a certificate Bachelor of Arts (B.A., BA or A.B.), from the Latin Artium Baccalaureus is an undergraduate bachelors degree awarded for either a course or a program in the liberal arts or the sciences, or both. ... Degree abbreviations are used as an alternative way to specify an academic degree instead of spelling out the title in full, such as in reference books like Whos Who and on business cards. ... The Master of Letters (MLitt from the Latin magister litterarum) is a postgraduate Masters degree. ... Doctor of Letters (Latin: Litterarum doctor; D.Litt. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Doctor of Dental Medicine. ... A doctorate is an academic degree of the highest level. ...


The degrees of D.Litt., D.Sc., D.Eng., LL.D. and D.Mus., whilst having regulations specifying the grounds for award,[95] are most often conferred as honorary degrees (in honoris causa).[96] Those used most commonly are the D.Litt., D.Sc. and LL.D., with the M.A. (and occasionally the M.Litt.) also sometimes conferred honorarily for distinction in the local area or within the University. D.Sc. ... The Doctor of Engineering (DEng or EngD) is an academic degree awarded on the basis of advanced study and research in engineering. ... Doctor of Laws (Latin: Legum Doctor, LL.D) is a doctorate-level academic degree in law. ... An honorary degree (Latin: honoris causa ad gradum, not to be confused with an honors degree) is an academic degree awarded to an individual as a decoration, rather than as the result of matriculating and studying for several years. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...


Academic dress

The University specifies a mix of Cambridge and Oxford academic dress.[97] For the most part, it uses Cambridge-style hoods and Oxford-style gowns. Unusually for British universities, the hoods are required to be 'University red' (see the logo at the top of the page) rather than black.[98] // The academic dress prescribed by the University of Bristol is a mixture of that prescribed by Cambridge and Oxford. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Academic dress or academical dress (also known in the United States as academic regalia) is traditional clothing worn specifically in academic settings. ...


Alumni

Bristol has produced 6 Nobel Laureates and academics include 10 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences,4 Fellows of the British Academy,12 Fellows of the Royal Academy of Engineering and 18 Fellows of the Royal Society. [99] This page collects together some of the more notable among the alumni of the University of Bristol, along with a brief description of their notability. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


Notable alumni of the University of Bristol include writers Dick King-Smith, Angela Carter and David Nicholls author of the novel Starter for Ten turned into a screenplay set in the University of Bristol.[100] Other high profile former students include illusionist Derren Brown and TV newsreader Alastair Stewart as well as musician James Blunt. Radio 4 presenter Sue Lawley was a student as were Little Britain stars Matt Lucas and David Walliams,[101] Simon Pegg (of Hot Fuzz fame) and Chris Morris, creation of the controversial Brass Eye. Liberal Democratic MP Lembit Opik was President of Bristol University Students' Union during his time there. For a full list of famous alumni see Bristol University's page on notable alumni.[102] “Alumni” redirects here. ... dick king smith was a writer who wrote books such as. ... Angela Carter (May 7, 1940 – February 16, 1992) was an English novelist and journalist, known for her post-feminist magical realist and science fiction works. ... The Reverend David Gwyn Nicholls DLitt (Oxon) (1936-1996) Born Woking, Surrey, on 3 June 1936, David Nicholls was educated at Woking Grammar School (1947-54), the London School of Economics (1954-57, Lash Prize 1956, BScEcon in Government (first-class honours) 1957, Gladstone Prize 1957), King’s College, Cambridge... Starter for Ten by David Nicholls is a novel first published in 2003 about Brian Jackson in his first year of university (1985-6), his attempts to get on the Granada Television quiz show University Challenge, and his tentative attempts at romance with Alice Harbinson, another member of the University... Derren Victor Brown (born February 27, 1971) is an English psychological illusionist and skeptic of paranormal phenomena. ... Alastair James Stewart OBE (born June 22, 1952) is a British television newsreader. ... James Blunt (born James Hillier Blount, February 22, 1974) is an English singer-songwriter whose debut album, Back to Bedlam, and single releases — especially the number one hit Youre Beautiful — brought him to fame in 2005. ... Sue Lawley (born July 14, 1946) is a English broadcaster. ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ... Matthew Richard Lucas (born March 5, 1974) is an English comedy actor. ... David Walliams (born David Williams, August 20, 1971) is an English comedy actor, best known for his partnership with Matt Lucas in the sketch show Little Britain. ... Simon John Pegg (born 14 February 1970 in Gloucester) is an English comedian, writer and film and television actor. ... Hot Fuzz is a 2007 British police action comedy film written by Simon Pegg and Edgar Wright and starring Simon Pegg and Nick Frost. ... Chris Morris may refer to : Chris Morris (satirist) Chris Morris (activist) Chris Morris (basketball player) This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Brass Eye is a UK television series of satirical spoof documentaries which aired on Channel 4 in 1997 and was re-run in 2001. ... Lembit Öpik (born March 2, 1965) is a British politician in the Liberal Democrat Party. ...


Logo

In 2004, the University unveiled its new logo. This logo has replaced the University Arms shown, but the Arms will continue to be used where there is a specific historical or ceremonial requirement.[103] The Arms comprise: This image depicts a seal, an emblem, a coat of arms or a crest. ...

argent on a cross quadrate gules the arms of the City of Bristol between in pale and a sun in splendour (for Wills) and an open book proper, leaved and clasped or, and inscribed with the words Nisi quia Dominus, and in fesse to the dexter a dolphin embowed (for Colston), and to the sinister a horse courant (for Fry), both of the third.[103]

The inscription on the book is the Latin opening of the 124th Psalm, "If the Lord Himself had not (been on our side...)".[103] For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ...


Further reading

  • University for Bristol: A History in Text and Pictures by Don Carleton,University of Bristol P. (Oct 1984) , ISBN-10: 0862922003
  • Wills Memorial Building (University of Bristol Buildings series) by Sarah Whittingham, ISBN-10: 086292541X
  • How Did This Garden Grow?: The History of the Botanic Gardens of the University of Bristol by Rosalind Delany, Friends of Bristol University Botanic Garden ISBN-10: 0954350405

See also

Bristol has some of the most under performing schools in the England, but also some of the highest performing schools in the country. ...

References

  1. ^ The University of Bristol style guides and templates. University of Bristol Coat of Arms. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  2. ^ NNDB. Bristol University, Educational Institution. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  3. ^ http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/specialreport/table/0,,2023291,00.html
  4. ^ University of Bristol Facts & Figures. Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  5. ^ Bristol University. Chancellor’s biography. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  6. ^ Bristol University. Vice Chancellor's welcome. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  7. ^ http://www.privy-council.org.uk/output/Page49.asp
  8. ^ a b c d Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  9. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/visualidentity/logo.html
  10. ^ The University of Bristol Acts. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRISTOL ACT 1909. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h Bristol University History. History of the University. Retrieved on 2007-05-13.
  12. ^ The University of Bristol. The University of Bristol: About the University. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  13. ^ The Times Good University Guide 2007. Top Universities 2007 League Table. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  14. ^ The Sunday Times University League Table. 2007 League Table. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  15. ^ The Good University Guide. The Good University Guide. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  16. ^ The Russell Group. List of Russell Group Members. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  17. ^ The Coimbra Group. List of Coimbra Group Members. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  18. ^ The Worldwide Universities Network. List of WUN Group Members. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  19. ^ RAE Assessment Data 2001. 2001 Research Assessment Exercise. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  20. ^ http://www.uwe.ac.uk/aboutUWE/uwe.shtml
  21. ^ Bristol faces boycott over admissions row. Guardian article on the admissions dispute. Retrieved on 2007-05-14.
  22. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cms/go/statutes/regs/charter.html
  23. ^ http://education.guardian.co.uk/higher/universityguide/profile/story/0,,478329,00.html
  24. ^ http://www.epigram.org.uk/view.php?id=1612
  25. ^ http://www.ucl.ac.uk/about-ucl/history/landmarks
  26. ^ http://www.history-ontheweb.co.uk/uni/bristol.htm
  27. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/cms/go/universitycalendar/regs/charter.html
  28. ^ http://eis.bris.ac.uk/~glejl/WMB/index.html
  29. ^ http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?id=380278
  30. ^ http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?id=380288
  31. ^ http://www.phy.bris.ac.uk/history.html
  32. ^ http://www.alumni.bris.ac.uk/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?&pid=280&srcid=190
  33. ^ http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1950/
  34. ^ http://www.student-consolidation.net/nobel-prize-winners/bethe/bethe.htm
  35. ^ http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1977/mott-bio.html
  36. ^ http://www.hero.ac.uk/rae/rae_dynamic.cfm?myURL=http://195.194.167.103/Results/byuoa/uoa19.htm
  37. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/ceas/summer_school/about.shtml
  38. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/union/altprospectus/unilife/union
  39. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/talking_point/3266673.stm
  40. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/council/papers/2002-03/0410mtg/0410app4.html
  41. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/finance/statements/current/fs0506.pdf
  42. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/bristol/3463995.stm
  43. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/2212130.stm
  44. ^ http://www.pgu.org.uk/yourpgu/
  45. ^ http://education.guardian.co.uk/businessofresearch/story/0,,1658169,00.html
  46. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/sport/about/
  47. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/sport/community
  48. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/gallery/places/blade.html
  49. ^ http://www.chm.bris.ac.uk/whatsnew/cetl.htm
  50. ^ http://www.hefce.ac.uk/learning/tinits/cetl/final/
  51. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/Depts/Bursar/masterplan.html
  52. ^ http://education.independent.co.uk/news/article166899.ece
  53. ^ http://www.epigram.org.uk/view.php?id=1583
  54. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/2818263.stm
  55. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/bristol/3014108.stm
  56. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/education/4161100.stm
  57. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/university/how_run/policies/admissions-policy.html
  58. ^ http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/education/good_university_guide/article2105007.ece
  59. ^ http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/stug2006/stug2006.pdf
  60. ^ http://www.thegooduniversityguide.org.uk/league_static.php?auth=1&startNum=1&endNum=12&order_by=rank
  61. ^ http://browse.guardian.co.uk/education?SearchBySubject=&FirstRow=0&SortOrderDirection=&SortOrderColumn=&Subject=Institution-wide&Institution=Bristol&Tariff=6
  62. ^ http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/main.jhtml?xml=/news/2007/07/30/ncambs430.xml
  63. ^ http://www.thes.co.uk/statistics/international_comparisons/2006/top_europe.aspx
  64. ^ http://www.paked.net/higher_education/rankings/times_rankings.htm
  65. ^ http://ed.sjtu.edu.cn/rank/2007/ARWU2007_Top100.htm
  66. ^ http://www.hero.ac.uk/rae/rae_dynamic.cfm?myURL=http://195.194.167.103/Results/openInst.asp
  67. ^ http://www.thegooduniversityguide.org.uk/universities/university.php?ins=Bristol
  68. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/law/research/research-awards/award-details/student-award.pdf
  69. ^ http://education.independent.co.uk/higher/az_uni_colleges/article1213466.ece
  70. ^ http://www.thegooduniversityguide.org.uk/universities/university.php?ins=Bristol
  71. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/tsu/ext_quality/qaa/qaaresults.html
  72. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/news/2007/5577.html
  73. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/facts/
  74. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/internationalcentre/europe/erasmusin/arrival.html
  75. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/articles/2007/01/23/rag_feature.shtml
  76. ^ http://www.epigram.org.uk/view.php?id=1584
  77. ^ http://www.busa.org.uk/fl/members.asp
  78. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/sport/high-performance/bristol-reds.html
  79. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/accom/prospectus/pros.pdf
  80. ^ Titles with locations including Goldney Hall, Clifton, Bristol, England, UK from imdb.com. Retrieved 3 January 2007.
  81. ^ http://www.imagesofengland.org.uk/search/details.aspx?id=379242
  82. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/property/estatebuilding/
  83. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/is/computing/advice/homeusers/resnet/about/faq.html#whatis
  84. ^ Academic Departments and Research Centres by Faculty. University of Bristol. Retrieved on 2007-08-10.
  85. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/governance/
  86. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/council/
  87. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/council/
  88. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cms/go/statutes/regs/statutes/stat13.html
  89. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/governance/
  90. ^ a b Bristol University - Fomer Officers. University of Bristol. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  91. ^ a b Papers of the University of Bristol. Archives Hub. Retrieved on 2007-06-22.
  92. ^ Engineering Doctorate Centre Details. Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. Retrieved on 2006-07-18.
  93. ^ Regulations for the Degree of Engineering Doctorate (Eng.D.). University of Bristol. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  94. ^ Regulations for Dissertations for Doctoral and Masters Degrees.... University of Bristol. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  95. ^ Regulations for the Degrees of Doctor of Letters, Doctor of Science, Doctor of Engineering and Doctor of Laws. University of Bristol. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  96. ^ Honorary Graduates. University of Bristol. Retrieved on 2007-08-06.
  97. ^ http://www.bris.ac.uk/cms/go/statutes/regs/regulations/regscostume.html
  98. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/cms/go/statutes/cms/go/statutes/regs/regulations/regscostume.html
  99. ^ http://www.bristol.ac.uk/university/distinctions
  100. ^ http://www.bbc.co.uk/bristol/content/articles/2006/06/26/starter_feature.shtml
  101. ^ http://www.alumni.bris.ac.uk/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?&pid=268&srcid=190
  102. ^ http://www.alumni.bris.ac.uk/NetCommunity/Page.aspx?&pid=190&srcid=178
  103. ^ a b c http://www.bristol.ac.uk/visualidentity/arms.html

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (91st in leap years), with 275 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 133rd day of the year (134th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... May 14 is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 222nd day of the year (223rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

  • University of Bristol – official website
  • University of Bristol Union – official website
  • The Times' profile for Bristol University - The Times

Coordinates: 51°27′23.34″N, 02°36′15.75″W This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Website http://www. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Imperial College London (also known as Imperial College of Science, Technology and Medicine) is a British university institution and a constituent college of the University of London. ... Mascot Reggie the lion Affiliations University of London Russell Group Golden Triangle Website http://www. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Golden Triangle G5 Group Website http://www. ... The University of Manchester is a university located in Manchester, England. ... Newcastle University is a British university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north-east of England. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Queens University Belfast is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland and a member of the Russell Group (a lobby group of major research universities in the United Kingdom). ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... The University of Southampton is a university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south coast of Great Britain. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... The University of Warwick is a British campus university located on the outskirts of Coventry, West Midlands, England. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Bristol University - Department of Philosophy - Home (826 words)
Bristol will be holding the Joint Session of the Aristotelian Society and Mind Association (6-8 July 2007) and the annual conferences of the British Society for the Philosophy of Science (5-6 July 2007) and the British Society for Ethical Theory (9-11 July 2007).
In addition, the philosophers of science within the department hold a regular seminars in philosophy and history of science, incorporating joint seminars in philosophy of physics with the Bristol physics department and in philosophy of  mathematics and logic with the mathematics department, as well as seminars in the history and sociology of science.
Surrounding the University are the historic and attractive areas of Clifton, Redland and Cotham, where most of our students choose to live, either in Halls of Residence, postgraduate flats or private accommodation.
University of Bristol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3373 words)
The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England.
Bristol is also known for its research strength, having 15 departments gaining the top grade of 5* in the latest RAE (Research Assessment Exercise) in 2001, and for its teaching strength, having an average Teaching Quality Assessment score of 22.05/24 before the TQA was abolished.
Universities are increasingly expected to exploit the intellectual property generated by their research activities and, in 2000, Bristol established the Research and Enterprise Division (RED) to further this cause (particularly for technology-based businesses).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m