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Encyclopedia > University of Bonn
University of Bonn
Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

Established: 1818
Type: Public university
President: Matthias Winiger
Staff: 4,100[1]
Students: 27,000[1]
Location: Bonn, Germany Flag of Germany
Campus: Urban
Affiliations: Europaeum
Website: http://www.uni-bonn.de
Data as of June 2007

The University of Bonn (German: Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn) is a public research university located in Bonn, Germany. Founded in 1818 the University of Bonn is today one of the largest universities in Germany. The University of Bonn offers a large number of undergraduate and graduate programs in a range of subjects. Its library holds more than two million volumes. The University of Bonn has more than 500 professors and 27,000 students. Among its notable alumni and faculty are six Nobel Laureates, one Fields Medalist, Pope Benedict XVI, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche and Joseph Schumpeter. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... This article is about work. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... The Europaeum is a loose organisation of ten leading European universities. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... June 2007 is the sixth month of that year. ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philologist and philosopher. ... Joseph Schumpeter Joseph Alois Schumpeter (February 8, 1883 – January 8, 1950) was an economist from Austria and an influential political scientist. ...

Contents

History

The university's forerunner was the Kurkölnische Akademie Bonn (English: Academy of the Prince-elector of Cologne) which was founded in 1777 by Maximilian Frederick of Königsegg-Rothenfels, the prince-elector of Cologne. In the spirit of the Enlightenment the new academy was nonsectarian. The academy had schools for theology, law, pharmacy and general studies. In 1784 Emperor Joseph II granted the academy the right to award academic degrees (Licentiat and Ph.D.), turning the academy into a university. The academy was closed in 1798 after the left bank of the Rhine was occupied by France during the French Revolutionary Wars. The prince-electors or electoral princes of the Holy Roman Empire — German: Kurfürst (singular) Kurfürsten (plural) — were the members of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Emperors of Germany. ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Maximilian Frederick of Königsegg-Rothenfels Maximilian Frederick of Königsegg-Rothenfels (German: Maximilian Friedrich von Königsegg-Rothenfels) (May 13, 1708 – April 15, 1784) was the Archbishop-Elector of Cologne from 1761 to 1784. ... The Age of Enlightenment (French: ; Italian: ; German: ; Spanish: ; Swedish: ; Polish: ; Portuguese: ) was an eighteenth-century movement in Western philosophy. ... Joseph II (full name: Joseph Benedikt August Johannes Anton Michel Adam; March 13, 1741 – February 20, 1790) was Holy Roman Emperor from 1765 to 1790 and ruler of the Habsburg lands from 1780 to 1790. ... For other uses, see Rhine (disambiguation). ... Combatants Great Britain Austria Prussia Spain[1] Russia Sardinia Ottoman Empire Portugal Dutch Republic[2] France The French Revolutionary Wars were a series of major conflicts, from 1792 until 1802, fought between the French Revolutionary government and several European states. ...

The university founder Frederick William III of Prussia.
The university founder Frederick William III of Prussia.

The Rhineland became a part of Prussia in 1815 as a result of the Congress of Vienna. Shortly after the seizure of the Rhineland, on April 5, 1815, the Prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm III promised the establishment of a new university in the new Rhine province (German: den aus Landesväterlicher Fürsorge für ihr Bestes gefaßten Entschluß, in Unsern Rheinlanden eine Universität zu errichten). At this time there was no university in the Rhineland, as all three universities that existed until the end of the 18th century were closed as a result of the French occupation. The Kurkölnische Akademie Bonn was one of these three universities. The other two were the Roman-catholic University of Cologne and the Protestant University of Duisburg. Image File history File linksMetadata FWIII.jpg Summary Frederic Willhelm III King of Prussia Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Frederick William III of Prussia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata FWIII.jpg Summary Frederic Willhelm III King of Prussia Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Frederick William III of Prussia Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... The Rhineland (Rheinland in German) is the general name for the land on both sides of the river Rhine in the west of Germany. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... The Congress of Vienna by Jean-Baptiste Isabey, 1819. ... For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... Frederick William III Frederick William III, known in German as Friedrich Wilhelm III, reigned as king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... The University of Cologne (German Universität zu Köln) is one of the oldest universities in Europe and, with over 44. ... The old University of Duisburg was a university in Duisburg. ...


The new Rhein University (German: Rhein-Universität) was then founded on October 18, 1818, by the Prussian king Frederick William III. It was the sixth Prussian University, founded after the universities in Greifswald, Berlin, Königsberg, Halle and Breslau. The new university was equally shared between the two Christian denominations. This was one of the reasons why Bonn, with its tradition of a nonsectarian university, was chosen over Cologne and Duisburg. Apart from a school of Roman-catholic theology and a school of Protestant theology, the university had schools for medicine, law and philosophy. Inititally 35 professors and eight adjunct professors were teaching in Bonn. For other uses, see Prussia (disambiguation). ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald is located in Greifswald, Germany, between the Islands Rügen and Usedom, and is the second oldest university in Northern Europe. ... Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The Humboldt University of Berlin (German Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) is Berlins oldest university, founded in 1810 as the University of Berlin (Universität zu Berlin) by the liberal Prussian educational reformer and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt whose university model has strongly influenced... The inscription upon Kants tomb in Kaliningrad. ... Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg The Martin-Luther-University of Halle-Wittenberg is located in the German city Halle, Saxony-Anhalt. ... The main building of the university, seen from the Pomeranian Bridge (Most Pomorski) spanning the Oder River. ...


The university constitution was adopted in 1827. In the spirit of Wilhelm von Humboldt the constitution emphasized the autonomy of the university and the unity of teaching and research. Similar to the University of Berlin, which was founded in 1810, the new constitution made the University of Bonn a modern research university. Wilhelm von Humboldt Friedrich Wilhelm Christian Karl Ferdinand Freiherr von Humboldt (June 22, 1767 - April 8, 1835), government functionary, foreign diplomat, philosopher, founder of Humboldt Universität in Berlin, friend of Goethe and especially of Schiller, is especially remembered as a German linguist who introduced a knowledge of the Basque... Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin The Humboldt University of Berlin (German Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin) is Berlins oldest university, founded in 1810 as the University of Berlin (Universität zu Berlin) by the liberal Prussian educational reformer and linguist Wilhelm von Humboldt whose university model has strongly influenced... Logo of the University of Bologna European research universities have a long history that arguably dates back to the founding of the University of Bologna in 1088, although the University of Paris and the University of Magnaura are other contenders for this position. ...


Only one year after the inception of the Rhein University the dramatist August von Kotzebue was murdered by Karl Ludwig Sand, a student at the University of Jena. The Carlsbad Decrees, introduced on September 20, 1819 lead to a general crackdown on universities, the dissolution of the Burschenschaften and the introduction of censorship laws. One victim was the author and poet Ernst Moritz Arndt, who, freshly appointed university professor in Bonn, was banned from teaching. Only after the death of Frederick William III in 1840 he was reinstated in his professorship. Another consequence of the Carlsbad Decrees was the refusal by Frederick William III to confer the chain of office, the official seal and an official name to the new university. The Rhein University was thus nameless until 1840, when the new King of Prussia, Frederick William IV gave it the official name Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität. A dramatist is an author of dramatic compositions, usually plays. ... August von Kotzebue August Friedrich Ferdinand von Kotzebue (May 3, 1761 in Weimar - March 23, 1819 in Mannheim) was a German dramatist. ... Karl Ludwig Sand (d. ... Friedrich Schiller University of Jena (FSU) is located in Jena, Thuringia in Germany and was named for the German writer Friedrich Schiller in 1934. ... The Carlsbad Decrees were a set of social restrictions introduced in Germany by Prince Klemens Wenzel von Metternich of Austria on September, 20 1819. ... Wikisource has an original article from the 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica about: Burschenschaft German Burschenschaften (abbreviated: B! , plural: B!B! ) are a special type of Studentenverbindungen (student fraternities). ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... The Carlsbad Decrees were a set of social restrictions introduced in Germany by Prince Klemens Wenzel von Metternich of Austria on September, 20 1819. ... Frederick William III (German: , August 3, 1770 – June 7, 1840) was king of Prussia from 1797 to 1840. ... Photograph of Frederick King Frederick William IV of Prussia (October 15, 1795 - January 2, 1861), the eldest son and successor of Frederick William III of Prussia, reigned as King of Prussia from 1840 to 1861. ...

Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz was a professor of chemistry at the University of Bonn from 1867 to 1896.
Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz was a professor of chemistry at the University of Bonn from 1867 to 1896.

Despite this problems the university grew and attracted famous scholars and students. At the end of the 19th century the university was also known as the Prinzenuniversität (English:Princes' university), as many of the sons of the king of Prussia studied here. In 1900 the university had 68 chairs, 23 adjunct chairs, two honorary professors, 57 Privatdozenten and six lecturers. Since 1896 women were allowed to attend classes as guest auditors at universities in Prussia. In 1908 the University of Bonn became fully coeducational. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz (September 7, 1829 – July 13, 1896) was a German organic chemist. ... Privatdozent (PD or Priv. ...


The growth of the university came to a halt with World War I. Financial and economic problems in Germany in the aftermath of the war resulted in reduced government funding for the university. The University of Bonn responded by trying to find private and industrial sponsors. In 1930 the university adopted a new constitution. For the first students were allowed to participate in the self-governing university administration. To that effect the student council Astag (German: Allgemeine Studenti­sche Arbeitsgemeinschaft) was founded in the same year. Members of the student council were elected in a secret ballot. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... A students union, student government, student senate, students association, or guild of students is a student organization present in many colleges and universities. ...


After the Nazi takeover of power in 1933 the Gleichschaltung transformed the university into a Nazi educational institution. According to the Führerprinzip the autonomous and self-governening administration of the university was replaced by a hierarchy of leaders resembling the military, with the university president being subordinate to the ministry of education. Jewish professors and students and political opponents were ostracized and expelled from the university. The theologian Karl Barth was forced to resign and to emigrate to Switzerland for refusing to swear an oath to Hitler. The Jewish mathematician Felix Hausdorff was expelled from the university in 1935 and committed suicide after learning about his impending deportation to a concentration camp in 1942. The philosophers Paul Ludwig Landsberg and Johannes Maria Verweyen were deported and died in concentration camps. In 1937 Thomas Mann was deprived of his honorary doctorate. His honorary degree was restored in 1946. The German word Gleichschaltung â’½ â’¾ (literally synchronising, synchronization) is used in a political sense to describe the process by which the Nazi regime successively established a system of totalitarian control over the individual, and tight coordination over all aspects of society and commerce. ... Adolf Hitler made believe he was the incarnation of the Führerprinzip The Führerprinzip, the German name for the leader principle, refers to a system with a hierarchy of leaders that resembles a military structure. ... Karl Barth Karl Barth (May 10, 1886 – December 10, 1968) (pronounced bart) a Swiss Reformed theologian, was one of the most important Christian thinkers of the 20th century; Pope Pius XII described him as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. ... Felix Hausdorff Felix Hausdorff (November 8, 1868 – January 26, 1942) was a German mathematician who is considered to be one of the founders of modern topology and who contributed significantly to set theory and functional analysis. ... Piles of bodies in a liberated Nazi concentration camp in Germany Prior to and during World War II, Nazi Germany under Hitler maintained concentration camps (Konzentrationslager, abbreviated KZ or KL) throughout the territories it controlled. ... For other persons named Thomas Mann, see Thomas Mann (disambiguation). ...


During the second World War the university suffered heavy damage. An air raid on October 18, 1944 destroyed the main building. The university was re-opened on November 17, 1945 as one of the first in the British occupation zone. The first university president was Heinrich Mathias Konen, who was expelled from the university in 1934 because of his opposition to Nazism. At the start of the first semester on November 17, 1945 the university had more than 10,000 applicants for only 2500 places. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Strategic bombing during World War II was greater in scale than any wartime attack the world had previously witnessed. ... The C-Pennant Occupation zones in Germany (1945) Capital Berlin (de jure) Political structure Military occupation Governors (1945)  - UK zone F.M. Montgomery  - French zone Gen. ... Nazism in history Nazi ideology Nazism and race Outside Germany Related subjects Lists Politics Portal         Nazism or National Socialism (German: Nationalsozialismus), refers primarily to the ideology and practices of the Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party, German: Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei or NSDAP) under Adolf Hitler. ...


The university greatly expanded in the postwar period, in particular in the 1960s and 1970s. Significant events of the postwar era were the relocation of the university hospital from the city center to the Venusberg in 1949, the opening of the new university library in 1960 and the opening of a new building, the Juridicum, for the School of Law and Economics in 1967. The 1960s decade refers to the years from the beginning of 1958 to the end of 1974. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany. ...


In 1980 the Pedagogigal University Bonn was merged into the University of Bonn, although eventually all the teachers education programs were closed in 2007. In 1983 the new science library was opened. In 1989 Wolfgang Paul was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics. Three years later Reinhard Selten was awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics. The decision of the German government to move the capital from Bonn to Berlin after the reunification in 1991 resulted in generous compensation for the city of Bonn. The compensation package included three new research institutes affiliated or closely collaborating with the university, thus significantly enhancing the research profile of the University of Bonn. Wolfgang Paul (August 10, 1913 - December 7, 1993) was a German physicist, who co-developed the ion trap. ... Hannes Alfvén (1908–1995) accepting the Nobel Prize for his work on magnetohydrodynamics [1]. List of Nobel Prize laureates in Physics from 1901 to the present day. ... Reinhard Selten (born October 5, 1930) is a German economist. ... The Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel, commonly called the Nobel Prize in Economics, is a prize awarded each year for outstanding intellectual contributions in the field of economics. ... This article is about the 1990 German reunification. ...


In the 2000s the university implemented the Bologna process and replaced the traditional Diplom and Magister programs with Bachelor and Master programs. This process will be completed by 2007.[2] The purpose of the Bologna process (or Bologna accords) is to create the European higher education area by making academic degree standards and quality assurance standards more comparable and compatible throughout Europe. ... Diplom (from Greek Δίπλωμα diploma) is an academic degree in some European countries including Germany, Austria, The Netherlands, Switzerland, Estonia, Croatia, Serbia and Greece. ... Magister (also magistar, from lat. ...


Academics

The University of Bonn has 27,000 students, and 4,100 of these are international students. Each year about 3,000 undergraduate students are graduating. The university also confers about 800 Ph.D.s and about 60 habilitations. More than 90 programs in all fields are offered. Strong fields as identified by the university are mathematics, physics, economics, neuroscience, medical genetics, chemical biology, Asian and Oriental studies and Philosophy and Ethics. The university has a standing faculty of more than 500 professors, an academic staff of 2,100 and a support staff of 1,500. The annual budget was more than 300 million Euros in 2006.[1] Habilitation is the highest academic qualification a person can achieve by his/her own pursuit in certain European countries. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Drawing of the cells in the chicken cerebellum by S. Ramón y Cajal Neuroscience is a field that is devoted to the scientific study of the nervous system. ... Medical Genetics is the application of genetics to medicine. ... Chemical biology is a scientific discipline spanning the fields of chemistry and biology that frequently employs compounds produced by synthetic chemistry to study and manipulate biological systems. ... This page meets Wikipedias criteria for speedy deletion. ... For the book by Edward Said, see Orientalism (book). ... For other uses, see Ethics (disambiguation). ...

The main building, viewed from the Hofgarten.
The main building, viewed from the Hofgarten.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 258 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 258 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ...

Schools

From the foundation in 1818 to 1928 the University of Bonn had five schools, that is, the School of Catholic Theology, the School of Protestant Theology, the School of Law and the School of Arts and Science. In 1928 the School of Law and the Department of Economics, that until then was part of the School of Arts and Science, merged into the new School of Law and Economics. In 1934 the until then independent Agricultural University Bonn-Poppelsdorf (German: Landwirtschaftliche Hochschule Bonn-Poppelsdorf) was merged into the University of Bonn as the School of Agricultural Science. In 1936 the science departments were separated from the School of Arts and Science. Today the university is divided into seven schools:

  • School of Catholic Theology (German: Katholisch-Theologische Fakultät )
  • School of Protestant Theology (German: Evangelisch-Theologische Fakultät )
  • School of Law and Economics (German: Rechts- und Staatswissenschaftliche Fakultät )
  • School of Medicine (German: Medizinische Fakultät)
  • School of Humanities (German: Philosophische Fakultät )
  • School of Mathematics and Science (German: Mathematisch-Naturwissenschaftliche Fakultät )
  • School of Agricultural Science (Landwirtschaftliche Fakultät)

Research Institutes

The Franz Joseph Dölger-Institute studies the late antiquity and in particular the confrontation and interaction of Christians, Jews and Pagans in the late antiquity. The institute edits the Reallexikon für Antike und Christentum, a German language encyclopedia treating the history of early Christians in the late antiquity. The institute is named after the church historian Franz Joseph Dölger who was a professor of theology at the university from 1929 to 1920.[3] Late Antiquity is a rough periodization (c. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... Cyclopedia redirects here. ...


The Research Institute for Discrete Mathematics focuses on discrete mathematics and its applications, in particular combinatorial optimization and the design of computer chips. The institute cooperates with IBM and Magma Design Automation.[4] Researchers of the institute optimized the chess computer IBM Deep Blue.[5] Discrete mathematics, also called finite mathematics, is the study of mathematical structures that are fundamentally discrete, in the sense of not supporting or requiring the notion of continuity. ... Combinatorial optimization is a branch of optimization in applied mathematics and computer science, related to operations research, algorithm theory and computational complexity theory. ... Integrated circuit of Atmel Diopsis 740 System on Chip showing memory blocks, logic and input/output pads around the periphery Microchips with a transparent window, showing the integrated circuit inside. ... For other uses, see IBM (disambiguation) and Big Blue. ... Magma Design Automation, Inc (Nasdaq: LAVA) is an electronic design automation (EDA) software company, founded in 1997, located in Santa Clara, California. ... Kasparov vs. ...


The German Reference Center for Ethics in the Life Sciences (German: Deutsches Referenzzentrum für Ethik in den Biowissenschaften) was founded in 1999 and is modeled after the National Reference Center for Bioethics Literature at Georgetown University. The center provides access to scientific information to academics and professionals in the fields of life science and is the only of its kind in Germany.[6] Georgetown University is a Jesuit private university located in Georgetown, Washington, D.C. Father John Carroll founded the school in 1789, though its roots extend back to 1634. ...

After the German Government's decision in 1991 to move the capital of Germany from Bonn to Berlin, the city of Bonn received generous compensation from the Federal Government. This led to the foundation of three research institutes in 1995, of which two are affiliated with the university: Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 526 pixelsFull resolution (1948 × 1280 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) de Forschungszentrum caesar in Bonn en center of advanced european studies and research (caesar), Bonn Photo by User:Qualle, 21 Mar 2005 File historyClick on a... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 526 pixelsFull resolution (1948 × 1280 pixel, file size: 395 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) de Forschungszentrum caesar in Bonn en center of advanced european studies and research (caesar), Bonn Photo by User:Qualle, 21 Mar 2005 File historyClick on a... Research center caesar (Center of Advanced European Study and Research) was founded in 1995 as part of the compensatory actions under the Berlin/Bonn law, which were intended to support structural change in the region of the former capital. ... This article is about the capital of Germany. ...

  • The Center for Development Research (German: Zentrum für Entwicklungsforschung) studies global development from an interdisciplinary perspective and offers a doctoral program in international development.[8]
  • The Center of Advanced European Studies and Research (CAESAR) is an interdisciplinary applied research institute. Research is conducted in the fields nanotechnology, biotechnology and medical technology. The institute is a private foundation, but collaborates closely with the university.

The Institute for the Study of Labor (German: Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit) is a private research institute that is funded by Deutsche Post. The institute concentrates on research on labor economics, but is also offering policy advise on labor market issues. The institute also awards the annual IZA Prize in Labor Economics. The department of economics of the University of Bonn and the institute closely cooperate. Founded in 1995, the Center for European Integration Studies (ZEI) is a prestigious research institute at the University of Bonn. ... European integration is the process of political and economic (and in some cases social and cultural) integration of European states into a tighter bloc. ... Research center caesar (Center of Advanced European Study and Research) was founded in 1995 as part of the compensatory actions under the Berlin/Bonn law, which were intended to support structural change in the region of the former capital. ... The Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) is a private, independent research institute in Bonn, Germany, which focuses on national and international labor markets. ... Deutsche Post Tower in Bonn Deutsche Post AG (ISIN: DE0005552004, LSE: DPO) is a German post, logistics and courier headquartered in Bonn, previously the German state-owned mail monopolist. ...


The Max Planck Institute for Mathematics (German: Max Planck-Institut für Mathematik) is part of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft, a network of scientific research institutes in Germany. The institute was founded in 1980 by Friedrich Hirzebruch. The Max-Planck-Institut für Mathematik is a mathematical research institute located in Bonn, Germany. ... The Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. ... Friedrich E.P. Hirzebruch (born 17 October 1927) is a German mathematician, working in the fields of topology, complex manifolds and algebraic geometry, and a leading figure in his generation. ...


The Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (German: Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie) was founded in 1966 as an institute of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft. It operates the radio telescope in Effelsberg. The Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy is located in Bonn, Germany. ... Since its inauguration in 1972, the Effelsberg 100-m radio telescope is one of the worlds largest fully steerable telescopes. ...


The Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods (German: Max-Planck-Institut zur Erforschung von Gemeinschaftsgütern) started as a research group in 1997 and was founded as an institute of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft in 2003. The institute studies collective goods from a legal and economic perspective. The Max Planck Institute for Research on Collective Goods is located in Bonn, Germany. ...

The Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA at the Department of Physics.
The Electron Stretcher Accelerator ELSA at the Department of Physics.

Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 604 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to de. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1600 × 1200 pixel, file size: 604 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) (All user names refer to de. ... Atom Smasher redirects here. ...

Research

University of Bonn researchers made fundamental contributions in the sciences and the humanities. In physics researchers developed the quadrupole ion trap and the Geissler tube, discovered radio waves, were instrumental in describing cathode rays and developed the variable star designation. In chemistry researchers made significant contributions to the understanding of alicyclic compounds and Benzene. In material science researchers have been instrumental in describing the lotus effect. In mathematics University of Bonn faculty made fundamental contributions to modern topology and algebraic geometry. The Hirzebruch-Riemann-Roch theorem, Lipschitz continuity, the Petri net, the Schönhage-Strassen algorithm, Faltings' theorem and the Toeplitz matrix are all named after University of Bonn mathematicians. University of Bonn economists made fundamental contributions to game theory and experimental economics. Famous thinkers that were faculty at the University of Bonn include the poet August Wilhelm Schlegel, the historian Barthold Georg Niebuhr, the theologians Karl Barth and Joseph Ratzinger and the poet Ernst Moritz Arndt. A quadrupole ion trap (also known as a Paul trap, QIT, twisted quadrupole ion trap or sometimes just ion trap) refers to an ion trap that uses static and radio frequency (RF) ~1MHz oscillating AC electric fields to trap ions as well a mass spectrometer that uses such a trap... The Geissler tube is a glass tube for demonstrating the principles of electrical discharge. ... Radio waves are electromagnetic waves occurring on the radio frequency portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. ... Alternative meanings: There is also an Electric-type Pok mon named Electrode. ... Variable stars are named using a variation on the Bayer designation format of Identifier <genitive of constellation>. In previous centuries few variable stars were known, so it seemed reasonable to use the letters of the Roman alphabet, starting from the letter R so as to avoid confusion with letter spectral... Cyclopropane is the smallest alicyclic compound. ... Benzene, or Benzol (see also Benzine), is an organic chemical compound and a known carcinogen with the formula C6H6. ... Water on the surface of a lotus leaf The Lotus effect in material science is the observed self-cleaning property found with lotus plants. ... A Möbius strip, an object with only one surface and one edge; such shapes are an object of study in topology. ... Algebraic geometry is a branch of mathematics which, as the name suggests, combines techniques of abstract algebra, especially commutative algebra, with the language and the problematics of geometry. ... In mathematics, the Hirzebruch-Riemann-Roch theorem, named after Friedrich Hirzebruch, Bernhard Riemann, and Gustav Roch, is Hirzebruchs 1954 result contributing to the Riemann-Roch problem for complex algebraic varieties of all dimensions. ... In mathematics, more specifically in real analysis, Lipschitz continuity, named after Rudolf Lipschitz, is a smoothness condition for functions which is stronger than regular continuity. ... A Petri net is a mathematical representation of discrete distributed systems. ... In mathematics, the Schönhage-Strassen algorithm is an asympotically fast method for multiplication of large integer numbers. ... In number theory, the Mordell conjecture stated a basic result regarding the rational number solutions to Diophantine equations. ... In the mathematical discipline of linear algebra, a Toeplitz matrix or diagonal-constant matrix, named after Otto Toeplitz, is a matrix in which each descending diagonal from left to right is constant. ... Game theory is a branch of applied mathematics that is often used in the context of economics. ... Experimental economics is the use of experimental methods to evaluate theoretical predictions of economic behaviour. ... August Wilhelm von Schlegel (September 8, 1767 - May 12, 1845), German poet, translator and critic, was born at Hanover, where his father, Johann Adolf Schlegel (1721_1793), was a Lutheran pastor. ... Barthold Georg Niebuhr. ... Karl Barth Karl Barth (May 10, 1886 – December 10, 1968) (pronounced bart) a Swiss Reformed theologian, was one of the most important Christian thinkers of the 20th century; Pope Pius XII described him as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ...


The university has nine collaborative research centres and five research units funded by the German Science Foundation and attracts more than 75 million Euros in external research funding annually. The Excellence Initiative of the German government in 2006 resulted in the foundation of the Hausdorff Center for Mathematics as one of the seventeen national clusters of excellence that were part of the initiative and the expansion of the already existing Bonn Graduate School of Economics (BGSE). The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (abbreviated DFG, German Research Foundation in English) is an important German research funding organization. ...


Ranking

According to the Academic Ranking of World Universities compiled by researchers of the Shanghai Jiao Tong University the University Bonn is ranked in the 101-150 area internationally and in the 6-11 area nationally.[9] The Times Higher Education Supplement ranks the University of Bonn 53rd worldwide in the science category and 84th worldwide in the social science category.[10] Webometrics ranks the University of Bonn 126th worldwide, 32nd in Europe and 9th nationally.[11] // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ...


In national rankings the University of Bonn is ranked in the top ten by the newsmagazine Focus[12] and the German Research Foundation.[13] The Humboldt Foundation ranks the University of Bonn fifth in the humanities and social sciences, sixth in the life sciences and seventh in science.[14] BBC Focus magazine is a monthly magazine which describes itself as the worlds best science and technology monthly. The magazine features articles loosely based around the subject of science and technology. ... The Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (abbreviated DFG, German Research Foundation in English) is an important German research funding organization. ... The Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (in German Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung) is a foundation of the German government for the promotion of international cooperation in the field of scientific research. ...


Campus

The Poppelsdorf Palace.
The Poppelsdorf Palace.

The University of Bonn does not have a centralized campus. The main building is the former residential palace of the prince-elector of Cologne (German: Kurfürstliches Schloss) in the city center. The main building was built by Enrico Zuccalli for the prince-elector of Cologne, Joseph Clemens of Bavaria from 1697-1705. Today it houses the faculty of humanities and theology and the university administration. The Hofgarten, a large park in front of the main building is a popular place for students to meet, study and relax. The Hofgarten was repeatedly the place for political demonstrations as for example the demonstration against the NATO Double-Track Decision on October 22, 1981 with about 250,000 participants.[15] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 498 pixelsFull resolution (2331 × 1452 pixel, file size: 390 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Castle of Poppelsdorf. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 498 pixelsFull resolution (2331 × 1452 pixel, file size: 390 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Castle of Poppelsdorf. ... Enrico Zuccalli, ( Johann Heinrich Zuccalli, * ca 1642 in Roveredo (Switzerland), † 8. ... Joseph Clemens of Bavaria. ... The NATO Double-Track Decision is the decision of the NATO from December 12, 1979 to offer the Warsaw Pact a mutual limitation of Medium-range ballistic missiles and Intermediate-range ballistic missiles combined with the threat that in case of disagreement the NATO would deploy more middle range nuclear...


The school of law and economics, the main university library and several smaller departments are housed in modern buildings a short distance south of the main building. The department of psychology and the department of computer science are located in a northern suburb of Bonn.


The science departments and the main science library are located in Poppelsdorf and Endenich, west of the city center, and housed in a mix of historical and modern buildings. Notable is the Poppelsdorf Palace (German: Poppelsdorfer Schloss), which was build from 1715 to 1753 by Robert de Cotte for Joseph Clemens of Bavaria and his successor Clemens August of Bavaria. Today the Poppelsdorf Palace houses the university's mineral collection and several science departments. Robert de Cotte (1656–Paris, 15 July 1735) was a French architect-administrator, under whose design control of the royal buildings of France from 1699, the earliest notes presaging the Rococo style were introduced. ... Joseph Clemens of Bavaria. ... Clemens August of Bavaria. ...


The school of medicine is located on the Venusberg, a hill on the western edge of Bonn. Several residence halls are scattered across the city. In total the University of Bonn owns 371 buildings.


University Library

The university library was founded in 1818 and started with 6,000 volumes inherited from the library of the closed University of Duisburg. In 1824 the library became legal deposit for all books published in the Prussian Rhine province. The library contained about 200,000 volumes at the end of the 19th century, and about 600,000 volumes at the outbreak of World War II. An air raid on October 10 in 1944 destroyed about 200,000 volumes and a large part of the library catalog. After the war the library was housed in several makeshift locations until the completion of the new central library in 1960. The new building was designed by Pierre Vago and Fritz Bornemann and is located close to the main building. In 1983 a new library building was opened in Poppelsdorf, west of the main building. The new library building houses the science, agriculture and medicine collections. Today the university library system the central library, the library for science, agriculture and medicine and about 160 smaller libraries. The university library holds 2.2 million volumes and subscribes to about 14,000 journals.[16] Gerhard Mercator University is a university in Germany that has many research projects. ... United States Library of Congress, Jefferson building A national library is a library specifically established by the government of a nation to serve as the pre-eminent repository of information for that country. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Strategic bombing during World War II was greater in scale than any wartime attack the world had previously witnessed. ... The card catalog at Yale Universitys Sterling Memorial Library goes almost completely unused, but adds to the austere atmosphere. ... Pierre Vago (August 30, 1910 in Budapest – February 1, 2002 in Noisy-sur-Ecole) was a notable French architect who worked on the Hansaviertel in Berlin. ...


University Hospital

The university hospital (German:Universitätsklinikum Bonn) was founded at the same time as the university and officially openend on May 5, 1819 in the Poppelsdorf Palace (German:Poppelsdorffer Schloß) west of the main building. In its first year, the hospital had thirty beds, performed 93 surgeries and treated about 600 outpatients. In 1883 the hospital moved to a new building in the city center of Bonn, and after World War II to the Venusberg on the western edge of Bonn. On January 1, 2001 the university hospital became a public corporation. Although the university hospital is since then independent from the university, the School of Medicine of the University of Bonn and the university hospital closely collaborate. Today the university hospital comprises about thirty individual hospitals, employs more than 670 physicians and more than 1,100 nursing and clinical support staff and treated about 39,000 inpatients.[17] Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Bonn is the 19th largest city in Germany. ...

The Akademisches Kunstmuseum.
The Akademisches Kunstmuseum.

Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 589 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 754 pixel, file size: 500 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Akademisches Kunstmuseum Bonn Source: de:Benutzer:Hausdorff-edition Fotographer / Drawer: de:Benutzer:Hausdorff-edition Ursprünglich hochgeladen nach de. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 589 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 754 pixel, file size: 500 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Description: Akademisches Kunstmuseum Bonn Source: de:Benutzer:Hausdorff-edition Fotographer / Drawer: de:Benutzer:Hausdorff-edition Ursprünglich hochgeladen nach de. ...

University Museums

The Akademisches Kunstmuseum (English: Academic Museum of Antiquities ) was founded in 1818 and has one of the largest collections of plaster casts of ancient Greek and Roman sculptures in the world. At this time collections of plaster casts were mainly used in the instruction of students at art academies. They were first used in the instruction of university students in 1763 by Christian Gottlob Heyne at University of Göttingen. The Akademisches Kunstmuseum in Bonn was the first of its kind, as at this time collections at other universities were scattered around universities libraries. The first director was Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker, who also held a professorship of archaeology. His tenure was from 1819 until his retirement in 1854. He was succeeded by Otto Jahn and Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl, who shared the directorship. From 1870 to 1889 Reinhard Kekulé von Stradonitz, nephew of the famous organic chemist Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz, was the director. In 1872 the museum moved to a new building that was formerly used by the department of anatomy. The building was constructed from 1823 to 1830 and designed by Karl Friedrich Schinkel and Hermann Friedrich Waesemann. Other directors of the museum were Georg Loeschcke (from 1889 to 1912), Franz Winter (from 1912 to 1929), Richard Delbrueck (from 1929 to 1940), Ernst Langlotz (from 1944 to 1966), Nikolaus Himmelmann (from 1969 to 1994) and Harald Mielsch (since 1994). All directors, with the exception of Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl held a professorship of archaeology at the university.[18] Christian Gottlob Heyne Odysseus and Euryclea, by Christian G. Heyne Christian Gottlob Heyne (25 September 1729-14 July 1812) was a German classical scholar and archaeologist. ... The Georg-August University of Göttingen (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, often called the Georgia Augusta) is a German university, founded in 1734 by George II, King of Great Britain and Elector of Hanover, and opened in 1737. ... Friedrich Gottlieb Welcker (1784-1868), German philologist and archaeologist, was born at Grünberg in the grand duchy of Hesse. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl (1806-1876), German scholar, was born in Thuringia. ... Reinhard Kekulé von Stradonitz, née Kekulé, [Kekulé von Stradonitz only after 1889] (Born 1839 in Darmstadt, Germany; died 1911 in Berlin?. Germany) Served as director of the collection of antique sculpture and vases at the Berlin Museum (1889-?) and also as the director of the antiquarium of the Berlin... Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz (September 7, 1829 – July 13, 1896) was a German organic chemist. ... The Old Museum in Berlin Karl Friedrich Schinkel (March 13, 1781 - October 9, 1841) was a German architect and painter. ... Hermann Friedrich Waesemann (June 6, 1813 - January 28, 1879) was a German architect. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Ritschl (1806-1876), German scholar, was born in Thuringia. ...


The Egyptian Museum (German: Ägyptisches Museum) was founded in 2001. The collection is dating back to the 19th century and was formerly part of the Akademisches Kunstmuseum. Large parts of the collection were destroyed in World War II. Today the collection comprises about 3,000 objects.[19]


The Arithmeum was openend in 1999. With over 1,200 objects it has the world's largest collection of historical mechanical calculating machines. The museum is affiliated with the Research Institute for Discrete Mathematics.[20] Computing hardware has been an important component of the process of calculation and computer data storage since it became useful for numerical values to be processed and shared. ...

Minke Whale skeleton, Museum Koenig.
Minke Whale skeleton, Museum Koenig.

The Teaching Collection of Archaeology and Anthropology (German: Archäologisch-ethnographische Lehr- und Studiensammlung) will be opened in 2008. The collection comprises more than 7,500 objects of mostly pre-Columbian art.[21] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 394 pixelsFull resolution (2469 × 1217 pixel, file size: 624 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Balaenoptera acustorostrata Skelett eines Zwergwals Photo taken by User BS Thurner Hof de:Museum Koenig, Bonn Feb 2005 File historyClick on a date/time to view... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 394 pixelsFull resolution (2469 × 1217 pixel, file size: 624 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Balaenoptera acustorostrata Skelett eines Zwergwals Photo taken by User BS Thurner Hof de:Museum Koenig, Bonn Feb 2005 File historyClick on a date/time to view... The Research Museum Alexander Koenig (German:Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig) is a natural history museums and zoological research institution in Bonn, Germany. ...


The Botanical Garden was officially founded in 1818 and is located around the Poppelsdorf Palace. A garden existed at the same place at least since 1578, and around 1720 a Baroque garden was built for Clemens August of Bavaria. The first director of the Botanical Garden was Nees von Esenbeck from 1818 to 1830. In May 2003 the world largest Titan Arum, some 2.74 m high, flowered in the Botanical Garden for three days.[22] Clemens August of Bavaria. ... Christian Gottfried Daniel Nees von Esenbeck in 1855 Christian Gottfried Daniel Nees von Esenbeck (February 14, 1776 - March 16, German botanist, physician, zoologist, and natural philosopher. ... Binomial name Amorphophallus titanum (Becc. ...


The natural history museum was opened in 1820 by Georg August Goldfuss. It was the first public museum in the Rhineland. In 1882 it was split into the Mineralogical Museum a museum of palaeontology, now named Goldfuß Museum of Palaeontology.[23] Georg August Goldfuss (April 18, 1782 - October 2, 1848) was a German palaeontologist. ...


The Horst Stoeckel-Museum of the History of Anesthesiology (German: Horst Stoeckel-Museum für die Geschichte der Anästhesiologie) was opened in 2000 and is the largest of its kind in Europe.[24]


The Museum Alexander Koenig is one of the largest natural history museums in Germany and is affiliated with the university. The museum was founded in 1912 by Alexander Koenig, who donated his collection of mounted specimen to the public. See also the separate article Museum Koenig.[25] The Research Museum Alexander Koenig (German:Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig) is a natural history museums and zoological research institution in Bonn, Germany. ...


Notable people

To date, six Nobel prizes and one Fields Medal have been awarded to faculty and alumni of the Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn: The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ...

Among its notable alumni and faculty are Pope Benedict XVI, Heinrich Heine, Heinrich Hertz, Karl Marx, Friedrich Nietzsche, Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz, Joseph Schumpeter, Konrad Adenauer, Max Ernst and Karl Barth. Reinhard Selten (born October 5, 1930) is a German economist. ... Wolfgang Paul (August 10, 1913 - December 7, 1993) was a German physicist, who co-developed the ion trap. ... Luigi Pirandello (June 28, 1867 – December 10, 1936) was an Italian dramatist, novelist, and short story writer awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1934. ... Otto Wallach (March 27, 1847 at Königsberg - February 26, 1931 at Göttingen) was a German Chemist who won the Nobel Prize in 1910 for work on alicyclic compounds. ... Portrait of Paul Heyse, by Adolph von Menzel Paul Johann Ludwig von Heyse (March 15, 1830 - April 2, 1914) was a distinguished German author. ... Philipp Eduard Anton von Lénárd, (June 7, 1862 in Preßburg, Austria-Hungary (today Bratislava, Slovakia)–May 20, 1947 in Messelhausen, Germany) was a Hungarian-German physicist and the winner of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1905 for his research on cathode rays and the discovery of... Gerd Faltings, June 2006 Gerd Faltings (born July 28, 1954 in Gelsenkirchen-Buer) is a German Lutheran mathematician known for his work in arithmetic algebraic geometry. ... Papal Arms of Pope Benedict XVI. The papal tiara was replaced with a bishops mitre, and pallium of the Pope was added beneath the coat of arms. ... Christian Johann Heinrich Heine (December 13, 1797 – February 17, 1856) was a journalist, an essayist, and one of the most significant German romantic poets. ... Heinrich Rudolf Hertz (February 22, 1857 - January 1, 1894) was the German physicist and mechanician for whom the hertz, an SI unit, is named. ... Karl Heinrich Marx (May 5, 1818 – March 14, 1883) was a 19th century philosopher, political economist, and revolutionary. ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philologist and philosopher. ... Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz Friedrich August Kekulé von Stradonitz (September 7, 1829 – July 13, 1896) was a German organic chemist. ... Joseph Schumpeter Joseph Alois Schumpeter (February 8, 1883 – January 8, 1950) was an economist from Austria and an influential political scientist. ... For other uses, see Konrad Adenauer (disambiguation). ... Max Ernst (2 April 1891 - 1 April 1976) was a German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet, considered one of the chief representatives of Dadaism and Surrealism. ... Karl Barth Karl Barth (May 10, 1886 – December 10, 1968) (pronounced bart) a Swiss Reformed theologian, was one of the most important Christian thinkers of the 20th century; Pope Pius XII described him as the most important theologian since Thomas Aquinas. ...


See also List of University of Bonn people Among the people who have taught or studied at the University of Bonn are the following: // Reinhard Selten - 1992 Nobel Prize in Economics for their pioneering analysis of equilibria in the theory of non-cooperative games Wolfgang Paul - 1989 Nobel Prize in Physics for the development of the ion trap...


References

  1. ^ a b c University of Bonn (June 2007). University of Bonn at a glance. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  2. ^ Becker, Thomas P. (May 2007). Geschichte der Rheinischen Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  3. ^ F.J. Dölger-Institut. Official Homepage of the F.J. Dölger-Institut. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  4. ^ Research Institute for Discrete Mathematics. Research of the Institute for Discrete Mathematics. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  5. ^ Karnbach, Bodo (October 2000). Chip-Design mit diskreter Mathematik - Weltweit erfolgreiche Kooperation verlängert. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  6. ^ German Reference Center for Ethics in the Life Science. Official Homepage of the DRZE. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  7. ^ Center for European Integration Studies. Official Homepage of the ZEI. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  8. ^ Center for Development Research. Official Homepage of the ZEF. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  9. ^ Shanghai Jiao Tong University (2006). Top 500 World Universities. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  10. ^ Times Higher Education Supplement (2006). World University Rankings 2006. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  11. ^ Webometrics. Webometrics Ranking of World Universities. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  12. ^ FOCUS Magazin (2007). FOCUS-Uniranking 2007. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  13. ^ Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (2006). Zusammenfassender Indikatorenvergleich für die 40 Hochschulen mit dem höchsten DFG-Bewilligungsvolumen: Absolute Betrachtung. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  14. ^ Alexander von Humboldt-Stiftung (2006). Das Humboldt-Ranking. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  15. ^ Haus der Geschichte der Bundesrepublik Deutschland. Weg der Demokratie - Path of Democracy. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  16. ^ Universitäts-und Landesbibliothek Bonn (October 2003). Geschichte der ULB Bonn. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  17. ^ Universitätsklinikum Bonn. Homepage of the University Hospital Bonn. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  18. ^ University of Bonn (January 2008). Official Homepage of the Akademisches Kunstmuseum. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  19. ^ Egyptian Museum of the University of Bonn (September 2006). Official Homepage of the Egyptian Museum. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  20. ^ Arithmeum. Official Homepage of the Arithmeum. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  21. ^ University of Bonn. Museums and Academic Collections. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  22. ^ Botanic Garden of the University of Bonn. Official Homepage of the Botanic Garden. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  23. ^ Institute of Paleontology. Geschichte des Museums und des Gebäudes. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  24. ^ University Hospital. Horst-Stoeckel-Museum für die Geschichte der Anästhesiologie. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.
  25. ^ Zoologisches Forschungsmuseum Alexander Koenig. Official Homepage of the Museum Koenig. Retrieved on 2008-02-08.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität
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Coordinates: 50°44′02″N, 7°06′08″E Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Bonn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (371 words)
The University of Bonn (German: Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität zu Bonn am Rhein) was founded on October 18, 1818, by the Prussian king Friedrich Wilhelm III, who had been ruling the Rhineland as a part of Prussia since 1815.
The university's forerunner was the Academy of the last Cologne Kurfürst (elector), which he had founded in 1777, and which had been turned into a university in 1786.
Pope Benedict XVI was a professor of fundamental theology at the University of Bonn from 1959 until 1963.
Bonn - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (667 words)
Bonn is a city in Germany (19th largest), in the Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia, located about 20 kilometres south of Cologne on the river Rhine in the north of the Siebengebirge.
Following World War II Bonn was in the British zone of occupation, and in 1949 became the capital of West Germany.
Bonn's international airport is Cologne Bonn Airport with low-cost connections to many European cities and a direct connection to Newark, New Jersey (Continental Airlines).
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