FACTOID # 8: Bookworms: Vermont has the highest number of high school teachers per capita and third highest number of librarians per capita.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > University of Birmingham

University of Birmingham

Motto Per Ardua Ad Alta
Through hard work,
great heights are achieved
Established 1900
Type Public
Endowment £71 million [1]
Chancellor Sir Dominic Cadbury
Vice-Chancellor Professor Michael Sterling
Visitor The Lord President of the Council ex officio
Students 30,725 [2]
Undergraduates 18,765 [2]
Postgraduates 11,960 [2]
Location Birmingham, West Midlands, England
Colours
                                 
Website http://www.bham.ac.uk

The University of Birmingham is an English university in the city of Birmingham. Image File history File links Bham_crest_new. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Sir (Nicholas) Dominic Cadbury (born 12 May 1940) is a British businessman and member of the Cadbury chocolate manufacturing dynasty. ... A Vice-Chancellor (commonly called the VC) of a university in the United Kingdom, other Commonwealth countries, and some universities in Hong Kong, is the de facto head of the university. ... Professor Michael Sterling (born 9 February 1946) is the Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Birmingham. ... A Visitor, in United Kingdom law and history, is an overseer of an autonomous ecclesiastical or eleemosynary institution (i. ... The Office of Lord President of the Council is a British cabinet position, the holder of which acts as presiding officer of the Privy Council. ... This page includes English translations of several Latin phrases and abbreviations such as . ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Birmingham (pron. ... // The West Midlands is an area of central England. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Birmingham (pron. ...


Founded in 1900 as a successor to Mason Science College, and with origins dating back to the 1825 Birmingham Medical School,[3] it was the first of the co-called Red Brick universities to receive its Royal Charter.[4] Mason Science College was founded by Josiah Mason in 1875, the buildings of which were opened in Edmund Street, Birmingham, United Kingdom on 1 October 1880. ... The University of Birmingham Medical School is one of Britains largest and oldest medical schools with a yearly undergraduate intake of 450 students. ... Red Brick originally referred to the six civic British universities which were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and which achieved university status before World War II. The modern term roughly equates to those members of the so-called Russell group of universities founded between... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ...


The university is a member of the Russell Group of research universities and a founder member of Universitas 21. It currently has over 18,000 undergraduate and over 11,000 postgraduate students.[2] This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Universitas 21 is an international network of research-intensive universities, established as an international reference point and resource for strategic thinking on issues of global significance. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Quaternary education or postgraduate education is the fourth-stage educational level which follows the completion of an undergraduate degree at a college or university. ...

Contents

Campuses

Main and Selly Oak campuses

The Aston Webb building, Chancellor's Court.
The Aston Webb building, Chancellor's Court.

The university's main campus, in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham, is arranged around the 100-metre-high (328 feet) Chamberlain clock tower (nicknamed "Old Joe") commemorating Joseph Chamberlain, the university's first Chancellor. The Great Hall of the university is in the domed Aston Webb Building, which is named after one of its architects (the other was Ingress Bell). Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 601 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 601 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Edgbaston constituency shown within Birmingham Edgbaston is an area and ward in the city of Birmingham in England. ... Old Joe, the University Clock Tower The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower (grid reference SP048835) is a 100 metres (328 ft) tall clock tower in the centre of Chancellors Court at the University of Birmingham, England and was built to commemorate Joseph Chamberlain, the first Chancellor of the University. ... The Rt. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Sir Aston Webb, portrait by Solomon Joseph Solomon, ca 1906 Sir Aston Webb (May 22, 1849 - August 21, 1930) was an English architect, active in the late 19th century and at the beginning of the 20th century. ... Edward Ingress Bell (1834-1913) was an English architect of the late 19th and early 20th century, who worked for many years in partnership with the more well-known Sir Aston Webb. ...


The university's Selly Oak campus is a short distance to the south of the main campus. It was the home of a federation of nine higher education colleges, mainly focused on theology and education, which were integrated into the university for teaching purposes in 1999. Among these was Westhill College (later the University of Birmingham, Westhill) which merged with the university's School of Education in 2001. The UK daytime television show Doctors is filmed on this campus. The university also has buildings at several other sites in the city. Selly Oak constituency shown within Birmingham Selly Oak is an area in south Birmingham, England. ... Daytime television is the general term for television shows produced that are intended to air during the daytime hours. ...

"Old Joe", the University Clock Tower.
"Old Joe", the University Clock Tower.

The university's main campus occupies a site some 3 miles (4.8 km) south-west of Birmingham city centre. The original 25 acre site was given to the university in 1900 by Lord Calthorpe. The original buildings on the Edgbaston site were built at the turn of the 20th century. The original semi-circle of red-brick domed buildings form Chancellor's Court, at the centre of which stands the clock tower and which sit on a 30 ft (9.1 m) drop so the original architects placed their buildings on two tiers with a 16 ft (4.9 m) drop between them. The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower, affectionately known as "Old Joe", is dedicated to the university's first chancellor Joseph Chamberlain. The design of the clock tower draws its inspiration from the that of the Torre del Mangia, the medieval clock tower forming part of the Town Hall in Siena, Italy and is made from Accrington Red Brick. When it was built it was described as "the intellectual beacon of the Midlands" by the Birmingham Post. The clock tower was Birmingham's tallest building at 100 metres from the date of its construction in 1908 until 1969 and is still the third highest in the city. It is one of the top 50 tallest buildings (and the tallest clock tower) in the UK.[5] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 103 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mauricio Jimenez Garcia, I took this picture durin theautumn 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 103 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mauricio Jimenez Garcia, I took this picture durin theautumn 2003. ... Birmingham (pron. ... Old Joe, the University Clock Tower The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower (grid reference SP048835) is a 100 metres (328 ft) tall clock tower in the centre of Chancellors Court at the University of Birmingham, England and was built to commemorate Joseph Chamberlain, the first Chancellor of the University. ... The Rt. ... Torre del Mangia towering above of the Palazzo Pubblico The Torre del Mangia was built in 1334 and is located in Siena in the Tuscany region of Italy. ... Palazzo Pubblico The Palazzo Pubblico (town hall) is a palace in the city of Siena, Italy. ... Piazza del Campo Siena is a city in Tuscany, Italy. ... Clocktower at Geelong Grammar School, Victoria, Australia A clock tower is a tower built with one or more (often four) clock faces. ...


The clocktower has four clock faces are each 17 ft 3 in (5.25 m) in diameter. The minute hands are 13 ft 6 in (4.1 m) long. At its widest part, the hour hand is 2 ft (61 cm) across. The hands are made out of sheet copper and the frame is made of one solid casting, weighing half a ton (450 kg). The pendulum is 15 ft (4.6 m) long. The largest of the four hour bells weighs 13,619 lbs (6,177 kg).[6] The whole weight of the clock and bells exceeds 20 tons (18,150 kg). There is a long held superstition that if an undergraduate walks under the tower while it is chiming, they will fail their degree.


The grand buildings were an outcome of the £50,000 given by steel magnate and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie to establish a "first class modern scientific college"[7] on the model of Cornell University in the United States.[8] The University of Sydney in Australia was also modelled on Cornell. Funding was also provided by Sir Charles Holcroft.[9] Andrew Carnegie (last name pronounced , )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... “Cornell” redirects here. ... The University of Sydney, established in Sydney in 1850, is the oldest university in Australia. ... There have been two Baronetcies created for persons with the surname Holcroft, both in the Baronetage of the United Kingdom and both for members of the same family. ...


Architecture

Another redbrick building
Another redbrick building

The campus has a wide diversity in architectural types and architects. "What makes Birmingham so exceptional among the Red Brick universities is the deployment of so many other major Modernist practices: only Oxford and Cambridge boast greater selections".[10] The Guild of Students original section facing King Edward School was designed by Birmingham inter-war architect Holland Hobbiss who also designed the King Edward school opposite. It was described as "Redbrick Tudorish" by Nikolaus Pevsner.[11] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 169 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Thom Harrison, 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 169 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Thom Harrison, 2007. ... Sir Nikolaus Pevsner CBE (January 30, 1902 – August 18, 1983) was a German-born British historian of art and, especially, architecture. ...


The statue on horseback fronting the entrance to the university and Barber Institute of Fine Arts is a 1722 statue of George I rescued from Dublin in 1937. This was saved by Bodkin, a director of the National Gallery of Ireland and first director of the Barber Institute. The statue was commissioned by the Dublin Corporation from the Flemish sculptor John van Nost.[12] The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is an art gallery in the English city of Birmingham, situated in purpose built premises on the campus of the University of Birmingham. ... Dublin Corporation is the former name given to the city government and its administrative organisation in Dublin between the twelfth century and 1 January 2002. ... John Nost[1] (d. ...


Final negotiations for part of what is now the Vale were only completed in March 1947. By then, properties which would have their names used for halls of residences such as Wyddrington and Maple Bank were under discussion and more land was obtained from the Calthorpe estate in 1948 and 1949 providing the setting for the Vale.[13] Construction on the Vale started in 1962 with the creation of a three acre artificial lake and the building of Ridge, High, Wyddrington and Lake Halls. The first, Ridge Hall, opened for 139 women in January 1964, with its counterpart High Hall (now Chamberlain Hall) admitting its first male residents the following October.[14]


The university underwent a major expansion in the 1960s due to the production of a masterplan by Casson, Conder and Partners. The first of the major building to be constructed to a design by the firm was the Refectory and Staff House which was built in 1961 and 1962. The two buildings are connected by a bridge. The next major buildings to be constructed were the Wyddrington and Lake Halls and the Faculty of Commerce and Social Science, all completed in 1965. The Wyddrington and Lake Halls, on Edgbaston Park Road, were designed by H. T. Cadbury-Brown and contain three floors of student dwellings above a single floor of communal facilities.

Ceiling of Aston Webb building
Ceiling of Aston Webb building

The Faculty of Commerce and Social Science was designed by Howell, Killick, Partridge and Amis and is a long, curving two storey block linked to a five storey whorl. The two storey block follows the curve of the road and has load bearing brick cross walls. It is faced in specially-made concrete blocks. The spiral is faced with faceted pre-cast concrete cladding panels.[15] It was statutorily listed in 1993.[16] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 109 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Thom Harrison, 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (768 × 1024 pixel, file size: 109 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Thom Harrison, 2007. ... Look up whorl in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ...


Chamberlain, Powell and Bon were commissioned to design the Physical Education Centre which was built in 1966. The main characteristic of the building is the roof of the changing rooms and small gymnasium which has hyperbolic paraboloid roof light shells and is completely paved in quarry tiles. The roof of the sports hall consists of eight conoidal 2½-inch think sprayed concrete shells springing from 80 foot long pre-stressed valley beams. On the south elevation, the roof is supported on raking pre-cast columns and reversed shells form a cantilevered canopy. Also completed in 1966 was the Mining and Minerals Engineering and Physical Metallurgy Departments, which was designed by Philip Dowson of Arup Associates. This complex consisted of four similar three-storey blocks linked at the corners. The frame is of pre-cast reinforced concrete with columns in groups of four and the whole is planned as a tartan grid, allowing services to be carried vertically and horizontally so that at no point in a room are services more than ten feet away. The building received the 1966 RIBA Architecture Award for the West Midlands. [15] It was statutorily listed in 1993.[16] Taking the full five years from 1962 to 1967, Birmingham erected twelve buildings which each cost in excess of a quarter of a million pounds.[17] A schematic image of two cantilevers. ... Sir Philip Henry Manning Dowson (born 1924) is a leading British architect. ... Arup is a professional services firm providing engineering, design, planning, project management and consulting services for all aspects of the built environment. ... The Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) is a professional body for architects in the United Kingdom. ... Buckingham Palace, a Grade I listed building. ...


A year later, in 1967, Lucas House, a new hall of residence designed by The John Madin Design Group, was completed, providing 150 study bedrooms. It was constructed in the garden of a large house. The Medical School was extended in 1967 to a design by Leonard J. Multon and Partners. The two storey building was part of a complex which covers the southside of Metchley Fort, a Roman fort. In 1968, the Institute for Education in the Department for Education was opened. This was another Casson, Conder and Partners-designed building. The complex consisted of a group of buildings centred around an eight storey block, containing study offices, laboratories and teaching rooms. The building has a reinforced concrete frame which is exposed internally and the external walls are of silver-grey rustic bricks. The roofs of the lecture halls, penthouse and Child Study wing are covered in copper.[15] John Madin is a British architect. ... Metchley Fort was a Roman fort in what is now Birmingham, England[1]. It lies on the course of a Roman road, Icknield Street, on the site of the present Queen Elizabeth Hospital in Edgbaston. ...

The university's Learning Centre and Faraday sculpture
The university's Learning Centre and Faraday sculpture

Arup Associates returned in the 1960s to design the Arts and Commerce Building, better known as Muirhead Tower. This was completed in 1969.[15] The 16 storey tower is currently undergoing a £42.3 million refurbishment, designed by Associated Architects. It is estimated to be completed by August 2008.[18] The name, Muirhead Tower, came from that of the first philosophy professor of the University.[19] Upon completion, it will become the Schools of Social Sciences and Humanities as well as containing office space for Information Services. The podium will be remodelled around the existing Allardyce Nicol studio theatre providing additional rehearsal spaces and changing and technical facilities.[20] Image File history File links Size of this preview: 799 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (909 × 682 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture during 2004 spring. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 799 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (909 × 682 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I took this picture during 2004 spring. ... Associated Architects is a firm of architects based in Birmingham, England. ...


Located within the Edgbaston site of the university is the Winterbourne Botanic Garden, a 24,000 square metre (258,000 square foot) Edwardian Arts and crafts style garden. There has been much recent development on the western part of the campus. There are new academic buildings, including a learning resource centre and a pedestrian mall leads to the centre of the campus. The massive statue in the foreground was a gift to the University by its sculptor Sir Edward Paolozzi - the sculpture is named 'Faraday'. Winterbourne Botanic Garden is the botanical garden of the University of Birmingham, located in Edgbaston, Birmingham. ... The Edwardian period or Edwardian era in the United Kingdom is the period 1901 to 1910, the reign of King Edward VII. It is sometimes extended to include the period to the start of World War I in 1914 or even the end of the war in 1918. ... Small wooden sculpture depicting a Native American mother holding her child. ...


The University of Birmingham operates the Lapworth Museum of Geology in the Aston Webb Building in Edgbaston. It is named after Charles Lapworth, a geologist who worked at Mason Science College. The Lapworth Museum of Geology is a major geological museum run by the University of Birmingham in Edgbaston, Birmingham, England. ... Edgbaston constituency shown within Birmingham Edgbaston is an area and ward in the city of Birmingham in England. ... Charles Lapworth (September 20, 1842 – March 13, 1920) was an English geologist. ...


The considerable extent of the estate meant that by the end of the 1990s it was valued at £536 million.[21]


History

Birmingham Medical School and Mason Science College

The earliest beginnings of the university can be traced back to the Birmingham Medical School which began life through the work of William Sands Cox in his aim of a medical school along strictly Christian lines, unlike the London medical schools. The medical school was founded in 1828 but Cox began teaching in December 1825. Queen Victoria granted her patronage to the Clinical Hospital in Birmingham and allowed it to be styled “The Queen’s Hospital”. It was the first provincial teaching hospital in England. In 1843 the medical college became known as Queen’s College. [22] The University of Birmingham Medical School is one of Britains largest and oldest medical schools with a yearly undergraduate intake of 450 students. ... Blue plaque on House of Fraser in Temple Row William Sands Cox was a surgeon in Birmingham, England. ...


On February 23, 1875, Sir Josiah Mason, the Birmingham industrialist and philanthropist, who made his fortune in making key rings, pens, pen nibs and electroplating, founded Mason Science College. It was this institution that would eventually form the nucleus of the University of Birmingham. is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1875 (MDCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Sir Josiah Mason (February 23, 1795 - June 16, 1881) was an English pen-manufacturer. ... Birmingham (pron. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Business magnate. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Mason Science College was founded by Josiah Mason in 1875, the buildings of which were opened in Edmund Street, Birmingham, United Kingdom on 1 October 1880. ...


In 1882, the Departments of Chemistry, Botany and Physiology were transferred to Mason Science College, soon followed by the Departments of Physics and Comparative Anatomy. The transfer of the Medical School to Mason Science College gave considerable impetus to the growing importance of that college and in 1896 a move to incorporate it as a university college was made. As the result of the Mason University College Act 1897 it became incorporated as Mason University College on January 1, 1898, with the Right Honourable Joseph Chamberlain MP becoming the President of its Court of Governors. For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... Pinguicula grandiflora Example of a Cross Section of a Stem [1] Botany is the scientific study of plant life. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Comparative anatomy is the study of similarities and differences in the anatomy of organisms. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... University College can refer to several institutions: in Canada University College, University of Toronto University College of the North, The Pas, Manitoba University College of the Cariboo, Kamloops, British Columbia, merged with British Columbia Open University and renamed Thompson Rivers University Kings University College (Edmonton), Alberta in England University... is the 1st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Rt. ...


Royal Charter

View of "Old Joe" from the library entrance.
View of "Old Joe" from the library entrance.

It was largely due to Chamberlain's tireless enthusiasm that the university was granted a Royal Charter by Queen Victoria on March 24, 1900. The Calthorpe family offered twenty-five acres (10 hectares) of land on the Bournbrook side of their estate in July. The Court of Governors received the Birmingham University Act 1900, which put the Royal Charter into effect, on May 31. Birmingham was therefore arguably the first so-called red brick university, although several other universities claim this title, including the University of Manchester, since Manchester Victoria made significant developments towards the formation of a civic university proper in 1851, despite not gaining official status until 1903. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 103 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mauricio Jimenez Garcia, I took this picture durin theautumn 2003. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (480 × 640 pixel, file size: 103 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Mauricio Jimenez Garcia, I took this picture durin theautumn 2003. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... “Queen Victoria” redirects here. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Ğ: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... The Gough-Calthorpe family is a notable family from Birmingham, England. ... Area in Birmingham, UK bordered by Selly Oak to the South, Bournville and Selly Park to the east and Edgbaston to the north and west. ... For the ship of the same name, see Royal Charter (ship). ... is the 151st day of the year (152nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Red Brick originally referred to the six civic British universities which were founded in the industrial cities of England in the Victorian era and which achieved university status before World War II. The modern term roughly equates to those members of the so-called Russell group of universities founded between... Affiliations Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) Website http://www. ... The Victoria University of Manchester (almost always referred to as simply the University of Manchester) was a university in Manchester in England. ...


The transfer of Mason University College to the new University of Birmingham, with Chamberlain as its first Chancellor and Sir Oliver Lodge as the first Principal, was complete. All that remained of Josiah Mason's legacy was his Mermaid in the sinister chief of the university shield and of his college, the double-headed lion in the dexter. [23] It became the first civic and campus university in England. The University Charter of 1900 also included provision for a Faculty of Commerce, as was appropriate for a university itself founded by industrialists and based in a city with enormous business wealth. Consequently, the faculty, the first of its kind in Britain, was founded by Sir William Ashley in 1901, who from 1902 until 1923 served as first Professor of Commerce and Dean of the Faculty. From 1905 to 1908, Edward Elgar held the position of Professor of Music at the university. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Vanity Fair cartoon. ... The Principal is the chief executive and the chief academic officer of a University in Scotland and at certains institutions in Canada and other parts of the Commonwealth. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Sir William Ashley, by Bassano 11 May 1923 Sir William James Ashley (1860-1927), was an influential economic historian, operating in the latter part of the 19th century and the early 20th century. ... Sir Edward William Elgar, 1st Baronet, OM, GCVO (2 June 1857 – 23 February 1934) was an English Romantic composer. ...


Expansion

In 1939, the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, designed by Robert Atkinson, was opened. In 1956, the first MSc programme in Geotechnical Engineering commenced under the title of "Foundation Engineering", and has been run annually at the University of Birmingham since. It was the first geotechnical post-graduate school in England. In 1957, Sir Hugh Casson and Neville Conder were asked by the university to prepare a masterplan on the site of the original 1900 buildings which were incomplete. The university drafted in other architects to amend the masterplan produced by the group. During the 1960s, the university constructed numerous large buildings, expanding the campus.[15] In 1963, the University of Birmingham helped in the establishment of the faculty of medicine at the University of Rhodesia, now the University of Zimbabwe (UZ). UZ is now independent; however, student exchange programs persist. In 1973, University (Birmingham) railway station, on the Cross-City Line, was opened to serve the university. The university is the only university in Britain with its own railway station. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 649 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 649 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is an art gallery in the English city of Birmingham, situated in purpose built premises on the campus of the University of Birmingham. ... The Barber Institute of Fine Arts is an art gallery in the English city of Birmingham, situated in purpose built premises on the campus of the University of Birmingham. ... Robert Atkinson is the name of several people, including: Robert Chatham Atkinson, U.S. administrator. ... Bostons Big Dig presented geotechnical challenges in an urban environment. ... Sir Hugh Maxwell Casson (23 May 1910 – 15 August 1999) was a British architect, interior designer, artist, and influential writer and broadcaster on 20th century design. ... The University of Zimbabwe (UZ), is the first, largest and most complete university in Zimbabwe. ... University railway station is a railway station serving Birmingham University in the West Midlands. ... The Cross-City Line is a suburban railway line in the West Midlands region of England. ...


Birmingham also supported the creation of Keele (formerly University College of North Staffordshire) and Warwick Universities under the Vice-Chancellorship of Sir Robert Aitken who acted as 'Godfather to the University of Warwick'.[24] The initial plan was for a university college in Coventry attached to Birmingham but Aitken advised an independent initiative to the University Grants Committee.[25] Keele University is a research-intensive campus university located near Newcastle-under-Lyme in Staffordshire, England. ... University of Warwick Motto: Mens agitat molem Logo © University of Warwick The University of Warwick is a world-class campus university which, despite its name, is located mainly inside the southern boundary of Coventry, England, some 11 km ( 7 miles) from the town of Warwick, the remainder of the campus... For other uses, see Coventry (disambiguation). ...


Achievements

The university has been involved in many important inventions and developments in science. The cavity magnetron was developed at the university by John Randall and Harry Boot. This was vital to the Allied victory in World War II. In 1940, the Frisch-Peierls memorandum, a document which demonstrated that the atomic bomb was more than simply theoretically possible, was written. The university also hosted early work on Gaseous diffusion in the Chemistry department when it was located in the Hills building. Many windows in the Aston Webb building overlooking the former fume cupboards were opaque from being attacked by hydrofluoric acid well into recent years. A cavity magnetron is a high-powered vacuum tube that generates coherent microwaves. ... Sir John Randall Sir John Randall (March 23, 1905 – June 16, 1984) was a British physicist, credited with radical improvement of the cavity magnetron, an essential component of the centimetre radar, which was one of the keys to the Allied victory in the Second World War. ... Dr Henry Albert Howard Harry Boot (29 July 1917 — 8 February 1983) was a physicist who with Sir John Randall and James Sayers developed the cavity magnetron, which was one of the keys to the Allied victory in the Second World War. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... The Frisch-Peierls memorandum was written by Otto Frisch and Rudolf Peierls while they were both working at Birmingham University, England. ... The mushroom cloud of the atomic bombing of Nagasaki, Japan, 1945, rose some 18 km (11 mi) above the epicenter. ... -1... R-phrases , S-phrases , , , , Flash point nonflammable Related Compounds Other anions Hydrochloric acid Hydrobromic acid Hydroiodic acid Related compounds Hydrogen fluoride fluorosilicic acid Supplementary data page Structure and properties n, εr, etc. ...


Organisation

Academic departments

Being a large university Birmingham has departments covering a wide range of subjects, which are arranged into eight subject areas, which are Arts, Languages, Literature and History; Business; Education; Engineering (comprising Departments of Mechanical, Chemical, Civil, Electronic, Electrical and Computer Engineering and Metallurgy & Materials); Law; Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences; Science; and Social Sciences, Government and Politics.


On August 1, 2008, the university will be restructured and will be composed of five 'colleges':

  • Dentistry, Health Sciences and Medicine
  • Life and Environmental Sciences (Biosciences, Geography, Earth and Environmental Sciences, Psychology, Sport and Exercise Sciences)
  • Engineering and Physical Sciences (Physical Sciences includes Chemistry, Computer Science, Mathematics, Physics and Astronomy)
  • Arts and Law (Historical Studies, Humanities, Law)
  • Social Sciences (Business, Education, Public Policy, Social Sciences)

The university is home to a number of well-known research centres and schools, including the Birmingham Business School, the oldest business school in England, the University of Birmingham Medical School, which produces more medical doctors than any other university in Britain, the Institute of Local Government Studies, the Centre of West African Studies, the European Research Institute and the Shakespeare Institute. Between 1964 and 2002, the University of Birmingham was also home to the Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, a leading research centre whose members' work came to be known as the Birmingham School of Cultural Studies. Despite being established by prolific and world renowned theorists, such as Richard Hoggart and Stuart Hall, the department was controversially closed down. Birmingham Business School is part of the University of Birmingham in the UK and was originally established, as the School of Commerce, in 1902 making it the oldest Business School in England. ... The University of Birmingham Medical School is one of Britains largest and oldest medical schools with a yearly undergraduate intake of 450 students. ... Inlogov is the Institute of Local Government Studies at the University of Birmingham in the UK. It is a leading centre for the applied study of local and community governance. ... // Centre of West African Studies (CWAS) A division of the School of Historical Studies at the University of Birmingham (UK). ... The European Research Institute (ERI) is a research centre at the University of Birmingham dedicated to the study of the politics, economics, history, law, culture and society of Europe. ... The Shakespeare Institute is a college of the University of Birmingham, located in Stratford-upon-Avon and dedicated to the study of William Shakespeare and the literature of the English Renaissance. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies (CCCS) was a research centre at the University of Birmingham. ... Richard Hoggart (born September 24, 1918) is a British sociologist, widely known for his 1957 book The Uses of Literacy. ... There have been several well-known people named Stuart Hall, including: Stuart Hall - radio and TV presenter from the United Kingdom Stuart Hall - influential cultural theorist from the United Kingdom This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Libraries and collections

The University of Birmingham main library.
The University of Birmingham main library.

The University Information Services operates 10 libraries across the Edgbaston campus, Selly Oak campus, Birmingham City Centre and Stratford-upon-Avon. The University of Birmingham also contains a number of collections of rare books and manuscripts. The library has a large number of pre-1850 books dating from 1471 with approximately 3 million manuscripts.[26] The library also contains the Chamberlain collection of papers from Neville Chamberlain, Joseph Chamberlain and Austen Chamberlain, the Avon Papers belonging to Antony Eden with material on the Suez Crisis, the Cadbury Papers relating to the Cadbury firm from 1900 to 1960, the Mingana Collection of Middle Eastern Manuscripts, the Noel Coward Collection, the records of the English YMCA and the records of the Church Missionary Society. Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... This article is about the British prime minister. ... The Rt. ... The Rt. ... Robert Anthony Eden, 1st Earl of Avon, KG, MC, PC (June 12, 1897– January 14, 1977), British politician, was Foreign Secretary for three periods between 1935 and 1955, including World War II and Prime Minister of the United Kingdom from 1955 to 1957. ... Combatants Israel United Kingdom France Egypt Commanders Moshe Dayan Charles Keightley Pierre Barjot Gamal Abdel Nasser Abdel Hakim Amer Strength 175,000 Israeli 45,000 British 34,000 French 70,000 Casualties 197 Israeli KIA 56 British KIA 91 British WIA 10 French KIA 43 French WIA 650 KIA[1... Cadbury Schweppes plc (Cadbury Trebor Bassett), (NYSE: CSG) is a confectionery and beverage company with its headquarters in London. ... Noël Peirce Coward (December 16, 1899 – March 26, 1973) was an Academy Award winning English actor, playwright, and composer of popular music. ... The Church Mission Society (formerly the Church Missionary Society) is a voluntary society working with the Anglican Church and other Protestant Christians around the world. ...


NHS hospitals

The University of Birmingham Medical School and Queen Elizabeth Hospital
The University of Birmingham Medical School and Queen Elizabeth Hospital

The University of Birmingham's medical school is one of the largest in Europe with well over 450 medical students being trained in each of the clinical years and over 1,000 teaching, research, technical and administrative staff. The school has centres of excellence in cancer, immunology, cardiovascular disease, neuroscience and endocrinology and renowned nationally and internationally for its research and developments in these fields.[27] The medical school has close links with the NHS and works closely with 15 teaching hospitals and 50 primary care training practices in the West Midlands. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 131 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 450 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (600 × 800 pixel, file size: 131 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The University of Birmingham Medical School is one of Britains largest and oldest medical schools with a yearly undergraduate intake of 450 students. ... The National Health Service (NHS) is the publicly-funded healthcare system of the United Kingdom. ... The County of West Midlands is a metropolitan county in western central England with a population of around 2,600,000 people. ...


The University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust is the main teaching hospital in the West Midlands. It is very successful and has been given three stars for the past four consecutive years.[28] The trust also hosts the Royal Centre for Defence Medicine, based at Selly Oak Hospital, which provides medical support to military personnel such as military returned from fighting in the Iraq War.[29] Selly Oak Hospital is one of two hospitals which form the University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust, the other being the Queen Elizabeth Hospital in the Selly Oak area of Birmingham, England. ... For other uses, see Iraq war (disambiguation). ...


Off-campus establishments

A number of the university's centres, schools and institutes are located away from its two campuses in Edgbaston and Selly Oak:

The Shakespeare Institute is a college of the University of Birmingham, located in Stratford-upon-Avon and dedicated to the study of William Shakespeare and the literature of the English Renaissance. ... Stratford-upon-Avon Stratford-upon-Avon is a town in Warwickshire, England. ... The Ironbridge Institute is a centre offering postgraduate and professional development courses in heritage, and is a partnership between the University of Birmingham and the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. ... , This article is about the town of Telford, Shropshire. ... Cultural heritage (national heritage or just heritage) is the legacy of physical artifacts and intangible attributes of a group or society that are inherited from past generations, maintained in the present and bestowed for the benefit of future generations. ... Coniston is a village in the region of Furness, the area of Lancashire that moved into the administrative county of Cumbria, in the United Kingdom. ... The panorama across Eskdale from Ill Crag. ... Outdoor activities usually mean activities done in nature away from civilization, such as hill walking, trekking, canoeing, kayaking, climbing, caving, and arguably broader groups such as watersports and snowsport. ... Field work is a general descriptive term for the collection of raw data in the natural and social sciences, such as archaeology, biology, ecology, environmental science, geology,geography geophysics, paleontology, anthropology, linguistics, and sociology. ...

Chancellors

Birmingham has had six Chancellors since gaining its royal charter in 1900. The current Pro-Chancellor is Jim Glover and the Vice-Chancellor and Principal is Professor Michael Sterling. Joseph Chamberlain was the first commoner in 240 years to hold the post of Chancellor of a British university, and the first such chancellor ever not to have been a member of the Established Church. A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... Professor Michael Sterling (born 9 February 1946) is the Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Birmingham. ... In English history, the Established Church is the Church of England, the church which is established by the Government, supported by it, and of which the monarch is the titular head; until 1920 it also held the same position in Wales. ...

Chancellors
Name Duration
Rt. Hon. Joseph Chamberlain 1900-1914
Rt. Hon. Robert Cecil 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood 1918-1944
Rt Hon Sir Anthony Eden, Earl of Avon 1945-1973
Sir Peter Scott 1973-1983
Sir Alex Jarratt 1983-2002
Sir Dominic Cadbury 2002-present

The Rt. ... Edgar Algernon Robert Gascoyne-Cecil, 1st Viscount Cecil of Chelwood, previously known as Lord Robert Cecil (September 14, 1864 - November 24, 1958) was a lawyer, politician and diplomat. ... For the eponymous hat, see Anthony Eden hat. ... Statue of Sir Peter Scott at the WWT London Wetland Centre Sir Peter Markham Scott, CH, CBE, DSC, FRS, FZS, (September 14, 1909 – August 29, 1989) was a British ornithologist, conservationist, painter and sportsman. ... Sir Alexander Jarratt (born 19 January 1924) is a British businessman and former senior civil servant. ... Sir (Nicholas) Dominic Cadbury (born 12 May 1940) is a British businessman and member of the Cadbury chocolate manufacturing dynasty. ...

Reputation

The University ranked 26th out of 113 higher education institutions in The Times 2008 Good University Guide[31], and came 18th in The Guardian's 2008 rankings[32]. It is ranked fifth nationally for Research Excellence[citation needed]. The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom since 1788. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ...


Birmingham is rated equal 90th best university in the world in the Institute of Higher Education, Shanghai Jiao Tong University (IHE-SJTU) Academic Ranking of World Universities 2006.[33] In October 2006, the University was also ranked equal 90th best in the world by The Times Higher Education Supplement. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, also known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London that reports specifically on issues related to higher education. ...

Year The Times ranking The Guardian ranking IHE-SJTU world ranking THES world ranking
2008 26 / 113 18 / 123
2007 33 / 109 16 / 122
2006 33 / 109 16 / 122 90 90
2005 23 / 119 29 / 122 98
2004 23 / 119 22 / 109 93 126

Due to Birmingham's role as a centre of light engineering, the university traditionally had a special focus on science, engineering and commerce, as well as coal mining. It now teaches a full range of academic subjects and has five-star rating for teaching and research in several departments; additionally, it is widely regarded as making a prominent contribution to cancer studies. Surface coal mining in Wyoming. ...


The university is particularly known for its research, with two thirds of its departments ranked nationally or internationally outstanding in the last Research Assessment Exercise in 2001.[34] Languages, mathematics, biological sciences, physiotherapy, sociology and electrical and electronic engineering all recorded maximum points.[34] The Department of Political Science and International Studies (POLSIS) is ranked 4th in the UK and 22nd in the world in the Hix rankings of political science departments.[35] The Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) is an exercise undertaken every 5 years on behalf of the four UK higher education funding councils (HEFCE, SHEFC, HEFCW, DELNI) to evaluate the quality of research undertaken by British higher education institutions. ...


Student life

Guild of Students

The University of Birmingham Guild of Students was a founding member of the National Union of Students. The building in which the Union is housed was designed by the architect Holland W. Hobbiss. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 651 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... The University of Birmingham Guild of Students is the officially recognised body which represents over 25,000 students. ... The University of Birmingham Guild of Students is the officially recognised body which represents over 25,000 students. ... The National Union of Students (NUS) is the main federation of students unions that exist inside the United Kingdom. ... King Edwards School, Edgbaston Holland W. Hobbiss was an architect in the Birmingham area of England. ...


The Guild of Students has a radio station called BurnFM.com which, as of 2007, broadcasts via the Internet during term time in addition to twice yearly broadcasts on FM using Restricted Service Licences. It is also home to a television station, GTV (Guild Television), and a weekly newspaper called Redbrick. It also publishes a new literary magazine called Birmingham University Literary Magazine. BurnFM.com is a radio station based at the University of Birmingham in the United Kingdom. ... The abbreviations FM, Fm, and fm may refer to: Electrical engineering Frequency modulation (FM) and its most common applications: FM broadcasting, used primarily to broadcast music and speech at VHF frequencies FM synthesis, a sound-generation technique popularized by early digital synthesizers Science Femtometre (fm), an SI measure of length... A UK Restricted Service Licence (often called an RSL), is typically granted to radio stations and television stations broadcasting within the UK to serve a local community or a special event. ... Redbrick is the student newspaper of the University of Birmingham. ...


The Guild runs support facilities for its members, including an Advice and Representation Centre (ARC) and a Mentors project for the welfare of students in halls. The Guild has also recently pioneered a Community Warden scheme, encompassing twelve student Wardens who together patrol the streets of Selly Oak to improve such issues as housing, landlord and rubbish problems, as well as community cohesion.[36]


Housing

The university generally provides housing for all first year students. 90% of university-provided housing is inhabited by first year students.[37] Students then generally go on to cohabit in rented houses in the Selly Oak and Edgbaston area, or closer to the city centre. Selly Oak constituency shown within Birmingham Selly Oak is an area in south Birmingham, England. ... Edgbaston constituency shown within Birmingham Edgbaston is an area and ward in the city of Birmingham in England. ...


There are three catered halls of residence; Chamberlain and Mason Hall (undergoing refurbishment) and Manor House. The other thirteen student housing blocks are self-catering.[38] First year students are spread about amongst three 'villages'.


Vale Village

The Vale Village, overlooking Shackleton Hall

The Vale Village, includes the Shackleton, Maple Bank, Tennis Court, Elgar Court, Aitken and Chelwood residences. A sixth hall of residence, Mason Hall, is due to re-open in October 2008. Approximately 1,900 students live in the village.[39] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Thom Harrison, 2007. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 104 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Thom Harrison, 2007. ...


Shackleton Hall underwent a major refurbishment and was re-opened in 2004. There are 72 flats housing a total of 350 students. The majority of the units consist of six to eight bedrooms, together with a small number of one, two or three bedroom studio/apartments.[40] Maple Bank was refurbished and opened in summer 2005. It consists of 87 five bedroom flats, housing 435 undergraduates.[41] It is represented by the Maple Bank Residents Association.[37] The Elgar Court residence consists of 40 six bedroom flats, housing a total of 236 students.[42] It is the newest residence to be built, opening in September 2003.[38] Tennis Court is a popular residence as it is close to the campus. It consists of 138 three, four and five bedroom flats and houses 697 students.[43] The Aitken wing is a small complex consisting of 24 six and eight bedroom flats. It houses 147 students.[44] Chelwood is situated at the top of the Vale village overlooking the lake, and comprises 50 en-suite bedrooms.[45]


Pritchatts Park Village

The Pritchatts Park Village houses over 1,600 students in eight halls. The Beeches is small with 48 flats housing 240 undergraduate students on the outskirts of the village.[46] Hunter Court, also located on the outskirts of the village, consists of 64 flats with five and some seven study bedrooms and houses 332 undergraduate students.[47] Queen's Hospital Close, located on the outskirts of the village near Broad Street, consists of 52 units of mainly six study bedrooms and some eight and ten bedroom flats. It houses 330 students.[48] The Spinney is a small complex of six houses and twelve smaller flats, housing 104 students in total.[49] Ashcroft consists of four purpose built blocks of flats and houses 198 students.[50] The four storey Pritchatts House consists of 24 duplex units and houses 159 students.[51] Oakley Court consists of 21 individual purpose-built flats, ranging in size from five to thirteen bedrooms. Also included are 36 duplex units. A total of 213 students are housed in Oakley Court, made up of postgraduates and undergraduates.[52] Pritchatts Road is a group of four private houses that were converted into student residences. There is a maximum of 16 bedrooms per house.[53] Broad Street as seen from above Broad Street is a major thoroughfare to the immediate West of Birmingham city centre. ...


Selly Oak Village

Selly Oak Village consists of two residences; Jarratt Hall and Douper Hall. The village has 637 bed spaces for students.[54] Douper Hall consists of 28 flats accommodating from two to six persons for 117 undergraduate and postgraduate students.[55] Jarratt Hall is a large complex designed around a central courtyard and three landscaped areas. It houses a mixture of 620 undergraduate and postgraduate students.[56]


University Sport Birmingham

Sports track in October 2006
Sports track in October 2006
Synthetic pitches covered in snow during January 2004
Synthetic pitches covered in snow during January 2004

The university has many successful sports teams and has been consistently ranked in the top three of the British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) league table.[57] The university's reputation for sport is a long-standing one, and indeed until 1968 there was compulsory exercise for students.[34] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 100 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) I, the copyright holder of this work, hereby release it into the public domain. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... The British Universities Sports Association (BUSA) is the governing body for United Kingdom. ...


The recently re-branded University Sport Birmingham (USB) offers a wide range of competitive and participation sports, which is utilised by the student and local population of Birmingham. Alongside fitness classes such as yoga and aerobics, USB offers over 40 different sport teams, including rowing, football, rugby, field hockey, American football, ice hockey (Birmingham Eagles), triathlon and many more. The wide selection has ensured the university has remained one of the country's most active and colourful campuses with over 2000 students participating in sport. A coxless pair which is a sweep-oar boat. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... A game of field hockey in progress Field hockey is a popular sport for men and women in many countries around the world. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... The three components of triathlon: Swimming, Cycling, Running A triathlon is an athletic event consisting of swimming, cycling and running over various distances. ...


Appearances in popular culture

The university campus has been used as a filming location for a number of film and television productions, particularly those of the BBC which has a presence at the university's Selly Oak campus, the BBC Drama Village. Scenes from the John Cleese film Clockwise were filmed at the campus' east entrance, while several episodes of the BBC detective series Dalziel and Pascoe,[58] daytime soap Doctors[59] and CBBC series Brum have been filmed in and around campus. Interior and exterior scenes for a BBC adaptation of Birmingham alumnus David Lodge's novel Nice Work and BBC comedy drama A Very Peculiar Practice were also shot in and around the University campus and halls of residence with a number of students appearing as extras.[60] A trailer for the BBC's Red Nose Day 2007, featuring Lou and Andy from Little Britain, was filmed near the School of Biosciences.[61] For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Selly Oak constituency shown within Birmingham Selly Oak is an area in south Birmingham, England. ... The BBC Drama Village is a television production facility run by the BBC and based largely at the Selly Oak campus of the University of Birmingham in Birmingham, England. ... “Cleese” redirects here. ... Clockwise is a 1986 British comedy film starring John Cleese. ... Dalziel and Pascoe is a popular British television crime drama based on the Dalziel and Pascoe books by Reginald Hill, which was first broadcast in March 1996. ... Current CBBC Logo CBBC - short for Childrens BBC - is the brand-name for the BBCs childrens television programmes aimed at children aged between 6 and 12 years old. ... Brum is the name of a childrens TV programme about the adventures of a car of the same name. ... See: David Lodge (actor) for the British character actor. ... Nice Work (published in 1988) is a book by David Lodge which was also made into a television series. ... A Very Peculiar Practice was a BBC comedy-drama series, first shown in 1986. ... For a description of the origin of the term comic relief see comic relief. ... Louis Lou Bob Todd and Andrew Andy Pipkin are fictional characters from the cult BBC TV and radio show Little Britain, played by David Walliams and Matt Lucas respectively. ... This article is about the British TV show Little Britain. ...


David Lodge's novel Changing Places tells the story of exchange of professors between the universities of Rummidge and Plotinus, thinly disguised fictional versions of Birmingham and UC Berkeley, which was founded on both campuses having a replica of the Leaning Tower of Pisa. See: David Lodge (actor) for the British character actor. ... This article is about the thought experiment called changing places. To read about the novel by David Lodge, see Changing Places The changing places thought experiment was created by Max Velmans, Reader of Psychology at Goldsmiths College, University of London, and was discussed in his 2000 work, Understanding Consciousness. ... Rummidge is a fictional city used by David Lodge in some of his novels, particularly Changing Places, Small World: An Academic Romance, and Nice Work. ... The University of California, Berkeley (also known as Cal, UC Berkeley, UCB, or simply Berkeley) is a prestigious, public, coeducational university situated in the foothills of Berkeley, California to the east of San Francisco Bay, overlooking the Golden Gate and its bridge. ... The Leaning Tower of Pisa (Italian: ) or simply The Tower of Pisa (La Torre di Pisa) is the campanile, or freestanding bell tower, of the cathedral of the Italian city of Pisa. ...


Branding

The University's crest from the 1980s until 2005

In 2005 the University began rebranding itself as a less conservative institution, changing the logo from the simplified shield introduced in the 1980s to a more detailed design based on the shield as it appears on the University's original Royal Charter. Variations on this coat of arms also feature in much of the original architecture on campus, including the ceiling of the Great Hall. Old Birmingham University Crest from http://www. ... Old Birmingham University Crest from http://www. ...


As it stands, the university now has two logos to represent a dual image. After a £320,000 research project into the image of the university, it was decided that the university was viewed as an older institution by companies and potential investors and as such an updated image was required to redefine the university as being modern and up-to-date. The marketing brand makes use of the letters U and B to bracket key words and achievements associated with the University. A new "word marque", using the Baskerville font in honour of the Birmingham printer John Baskerville, is used as the primary logo when trying to attract both prospective investors and students. It also features on all university vehicles. The coat of arms, revised to more closely resemble that on the original university charter, appears on degree certificates and academic documents. The seating in the Great Hall has also been replaced with chairs embroidered with the new shield. The introduction of new signage throughout the campus (featuring the revised shield rather than the "U and B" logo) was completed at the end of 2006. The rebranding was not well received by many students and members of staff at the university, there having been little or no consultation prior to its introduction.[62] There were also concerns that the money could better have been used improving teaching facilities. Baskerville is a “transitional” typeface, designed by John Baskerville in England in the mid-18th century, revived in the early 20th century and widely used for books and other long texts. ... John Baskerville (January 28, 1706 - January 8, 1775) was a printer in Birmingham, a member of the Royal Society of Arts, and an associate of some of the members of the Lunar Society. ...


Notable alumni

Main article: List of University of Birmingham people

Birmingham's alumni include the politicians Neville Chamberlain, Baroness Amos and Chen Liangyu, General Sir Mike Jackson, formerly the most senior officer in the British Army, TV personality Chris Tarrant, actors Tamsin Greig, Norman Painting, Victoria Wood and Jane Wymark, the actor and musician Tim Curry, musician Simon Le Bon, sailor Lisa Clayton, athlete Allison Curbishley, zoologist Desmond Morris, theologian Robert Beckford, Chief Medical officer for England Sir Liam Donaldson, UN weapons inspector David Kelly, and co-founder Williams Formula One team Patrick Head. This is a list of notable alumni and staff of the University of Birmingham: // Sir Robert Aitken - Former Vice-Chancellor who helped set up the University of Warwick Sir Melville Arnott - Former William Withering Chair in Medicine George Augustus Auden - Former School Medical Officer and Lecturer in Public Health Professor... This article is about the British prime minister. ... Valerie Ann Amos, Baroness Amos, PC (born 13 March 1954), is a British Labour Party politician and life peer, currently serving as Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President of the Council. ... Official photo of Chen This is a Chinese name; the family name is Chen. ... General Sir Michael Jackson, KCB, CBE, DSO, ADC Gen (born 21 March 1944) is a British army officer, former commander of KFor in Kosovo as well as UNPROFOR (see Timeline of UN peacekeeping missions) commander in Bosnia. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... Christopher John Tarrant OBE (born 10 October 1946, Reading, Berkshire) is an English radio broadcaster, television presenter and war lord, now best known for hosting the TV game show Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?. // Tarrant was educated at the Kings School, Worcester (1960-4) where he excelled at... Tamsin Greig (IPA pronunciation ), born 12 July 1966)[1] is an English actress best known for her comedy performances. ... Norman Painting, OBE (Born April 23, 1924 in Leamington Spa, Warwickshire) is an actor who has played Phil Archer in the BBC Radio 4 soap opera The Archers since the pilot episodes were aired on the BBC Midlands Home Service in summer 1950. ... Victoria Wood OBE is a BAFTA award winning English comedian, actor, singer and writer born 19 May 1953 in Prestwich Village, Greater Manchester . ... An official publicity still of actress Jane Wymark. ... Timothy James Curry (born April 19, 1946) is an English actor, singer and composer, perhaps best known for his role as mad scientist Dr. Frank-N-Furter in The Rocky Horror Picture Show (1975). ... Simon John Charles Le Bon (born October 27, 1958) is the lead singer and lyricist of the pop/rock band Duran Duran. ... Lisa Clayton is the first British woman to sail single-handed and non-stop around the world. ... Allison Curbishley (born 3 June 1976) was a British athlete. ... Dr Desmond Morris (born 24 January 1928 in the village of Purton, UK) is most famous for his work as a zoologist and ethologist. ... Robert Beckford is a British academic, theologian and filmmaker based at the University of Birmingham. ... It has been suggested that Good doctors, safer patients be merged into this article or section. ... For other persons named David Kelly, see David Kelly (disambiguation). ... Not to be confused with Frank Williams Racing Cars, formed by Frank Williams 1967. ... Patrick Head (born June 5, 1945) in Farnborough, England, is co-founder and Engineering Director of the Williams Formula One team. ...


Several Nobel Prize Laureates are Birmingham alumni, including Francis Aston, Maurice Wilkins, Sir John Vane and Sir Paul Nurse. The Nobel Prizes (Swedish: ) are awarded for Physics, Chemistry, Literature, Peace, and Physiology or Medicine. ... Winners of the Nobel Prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... Francis William Aston (born Birmingham, September 1, 1877; died Cambridge, November 20, 1945) was a British physicist who won the 1922 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the invention of the mass spectrometer. ... Maurice Hugh Frederick Wilkins CBE FRS (15 December 1916 – 5 October 2004) was a New Zealand-born British molecular biologist, and Nobel Laureate who contributed research in the fields of phosphorescence, radar, isotope separation, and X-ray diffraction. ... Sir John Robert Vane (March 29, 1927 - November 19, 2004) was a British pharmacologist. ... Sir Paul M. Nurse, FRS, (b. ...


Notes

  1. ^ Financial Statements 2005-2006. University of Birmingham. Retrieved on 2007-04-25.
  2. ^ a b c d Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  3. ^ University of Birmingham: The Medical School
  4. ^ University of Birmingham, The Guardian, 1 May 2007, accessed 19 May 2007
  5. ^ SkyscraperNews: UK List
  6. ^ Great Bells of the British Isles, Guild of Carillonneurs in North America, accessed 28 May 2007
  7. ^ Edmund Burke (1900). The Annual Register. Rivingtons, 27. 
  8. ^ The Carnegie Committee, Cornell Alumni News, II(10), 29 November 1899, p. 6
  9. ^ Ray Smallman, A hundred years of distinction, BUMS centenary lecture, p. 5
  10. ^ Foster, 2005, p.242-3.
  11. ^ Braithwaite, 1987, p.20.
  12. ^ Ives, 2000, p.230; Rupert Gunnis, Dictionary of British Sculptors 1660-1851 (1968 revised edition), p.281 identifies it as a 1717 work for Essex Bridge, Dublin.
  13. ^ Ives, 2000, p.304
  14. ^ Ives, 2000, p.338
  15. ^ a b c d e Douglas Hickman (1970). Birmingham. Studio Vista Limited. 
  16. ^ a b Signalling the Sixties: 1960s Architecture in Birmingham
  17. ^ Ives, 2000, p.336
  18. ^ Estates Office: Muirhead Tower
  19. ^ Muirhead Tower of the University of Birmingham
  20. ^ Associated Architects: Muirhead Tower
  21. ^ Ives, E. (2000). The First Civic University: Birmingham, 1880–1980 – An Introductory History. Birmingham: University of Birmingham Press
  22. ^ University of Birmingham: The Medical School
  23. ^ Ives, E. (2000). The First Civic University: Birmingham, 1880–1980 – An Introductory History. Birmingham: University of Birmingham Press
  24. ^ Ives, 2000, p.342.
  25. ^ Ives, 2000, p.343.
  26. ^ University of Birmingham: Special Collections
  27. ^ The Medical School: Welcome
  28. ^ University Hospital Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust profile
  29. ^ The Royal Centre for Defence Medicine
  30. ^ The University of Birmingham Foundation, accessed 28 May 2007
  31. ^ http://extras.timesonline.co.uk/gug/gooduniversityguide.php
  32. ^ http://browse.guardian.co.uk/education?SearchBySubject=&FirstRow=10&SortOrderDirection=&SortOrderColumn=GuardianTeachingScore&Subject=University+ranking&Institution=
  33. ^ Top 500 World Universities (1-100)
  34. ^ a b c Profile: University of Birmingham, The Times, 15 August 2007, accessed 27 August 2007
  35. ^ Simon Hix, A global ranking of political science departments, Political Studies Review 2(3), pp. 293-313
  36. ^ BUGS: Community Wardens
  37. ^ a b Johnny Rich (2005). The Push Guide to Which University 2006. Nelson Thornes. ISBN 0748794891. 
  38. ^ a b University of Birmingham: Guide to accommodation
  39. ^ Student Accommodation: Vale Village
  40. ^ Student Accommodation: Shackleton
  41. ^ Student Accommodation: Maple Bank
  42. ^ Student Accommodation: Elgar Court
  43. ^ Student Accommodation: Tennis Court
  44. ^ Student Accommodation: Aitken
  45. ^ Student Accommodation: Chelwood
  46. ^ Student Accommodation: The Beeches
  47. ^ Student Accommodation: Hunter Court
  48. ^ Student Accommodation: Queen's Hospital
  49. ^ Student Accommodation: The Spinney
  50. ^ Student Accommodation: Ashcroft
  51. ^ Student Accommodation: Pritchatts House
  52. ^ Student Accommodation: Oakley Court
  53. ^ Student Accommodation: Pritchatts Road
  54. ^ Student Accommodation: Selly Oak Village
  55. ^ Student Accommodation: Douper Hall
  56. ^ Student Accommodation: Jarratt Hall
  57. ^ The BUSA Championship Results 2005/2006, BUSA, 6 July 2006
  58. ^ Buzz Issue 34 vol.3 November 2003. University of Birmingham. Retrieved on 2007-02-24.
  59. ^ Buzz Issue 35 vol.3 November 2003 Mid-month edition. University of Birmingham. Retrieved on 2007-02-24.
  60. ^ A Very Peculiar Practice. BBC. Retrieved on 2007-02-15.
  61. ^ http://www.rednoseday.com/fun-stuff/video/index.php?clip=littlebritain_trail
  62. ^ Silke, Andrew. "UB or Not UB?", bbc.co.uk, 2005-06-07. Retrieved on 2007-03-04. 

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 115th day of the year (116th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Guardian is a British newspaper owned by the Guardian Media Group. ... River Liffey: Millennium Bridge in front & Grattan Bridge behind. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 55th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 46th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The domain name bbc. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 158th day of the year (159th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Foster, A. (2005). Birmingham (Pevsner Architectural Guides). London: Yale University Press. ISBN 0-300-10731-5. 
  • Ives, E. (2000). The First Civic University: Birmingham, 1880–1980 – An Introductory History. Birmingham: University of Birmingham Press. ISBN 1-902459-07-5. 
  • The University of Birmingham Yearbook 2002–2003. 
  • Cheesewright, M. (1975). Mirror to Mermaid. Birmingham: The University of Birmingham Press. ISBN 0-7044-0130-4. 
  • Braithwaite, L. (1987). University of Birmingham Architectural Trail. Birmingham: The University of Birmingham Press. ISBN 0-7044-0890-2. 
  • Hughes, A. (1950). The University of Birmingham : A Short History. Birmingham: The University of Birmingham Press. 

External links

Buildings in Birmingham, England

Highrise (In height order): BT Tower | Beetham Tower | Chamberlain Clock Tower | Alpha Tower | Orion Building | The Rotunda | NatWest Tower | Five Ways Tower | Centre City Tower | 1 Snow Hill Plaza | Quayside Tower | Colmore Gate | The McLaren Building | Metropolitan House | Edgbaston House | Post & Mail Building | Jury's Inn Birmingham This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group, Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Mascot Beaver Affiliations University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Golden Triangle G5 Group Website http://www. ... Affiliations Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN) Website http://www. ... For the Australian university, see University of Newcastle, Australia. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... Queens University Belfast is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland and a member of the Russell Group (a lobby group of major research universities in the United Kingdom). ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... The University of Southampton is a university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south coast of Great Britain. ... Affiliations University of London Russell Group LERU EUA ACU Golden Triangle G5 Website http://www. ... The University of Warwick is a British campus university located on the outskirts of Coventry, West Midlands, England. ... Birmingham (pron. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The British Telecom Tower (formerly known as the Post Office Tower and, before that the GPO Tower) is a landmark in Birmingham, England, and is also the tallest building in the city. ... Beetham Tower nearing completion in February 2006. ... Old Joe, the University Clock Tower The Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower (grid reference SP048835) is a 100 metres (328 ft) tall clock tower in the centre of Chancellors Court at the University of Birmingham, England and was built to commemorate Joseph Chamberlain, the first Chancellor of the University. ... Alpha Tower now looks very outdated as it is surrounded by new developments in the redevelopment of Birmingham, UK. A prime example of architecture from the 1960s and 1970s which is now being widely disputed by the public and experts. ... The main tower of the Orion Building during the removal of scaffolding. ... The Rotunda is an iconic, cylindrical tower block in Birmingham, England. ... National Westminster House is a building owned by Natwest. ... Five Ways Tower is a commercial building in Birmingham, England. ... Centre City Tower is a commercial building in Birmingham, England. ... 1 Snow Hill Plaza from the front at ground level. ... Quayside Tower from the front. ... Colmore Gate. ... Side view The McLaren Building is a 79 m tall commercial building in Birmingham, England designed by Philip Bonham Associates. ... Metropolitan House is situated on the junction of one of Birminghams busiest roads, Hagley Road. ... Edgbaston House is a highrise commercial building in Birmingham. ... The corner of the remaining building. ... The Jurys Inn Hotel from the front. ...


Notable lowrise: 1-7 Constitution Hill | 17 & 19 Newhall Street | Birmingham Assay Office | Baskerville House | Central Library | Council House | Curzon Street railway station | Great Western Arcade | ICC | The Mailbox | Methodist Central Hall | Millennium Point | The Old Crown | Paradise Forum | Birmingham Proof House | Sarehole Mill | Symphony Hall | Town Hall | Victoria Law Courts 1-7 Constitution Hill The former H.B. Sale factory (Grid reference SP067876), at 1-7 Constitution Hill, Birmingham, England, at the acute junction with Hampton Street, is a Grade II listed building. ... The Bell Edison Telephone Building (17-19 Newhall Street), Birmingham Bell Edison logo in porch On the corner of Newhall Sreet and Edmund Street in the city centre of Birmingham, England, stands a red brick and terracotta Grade I listed building. ... Birmingham Assay Office The Birmingham Assay Office is one of the four remaining Assay Offices in the UK. The development of a silver industry in 18th century Birmingham was hampered by the legal requirement that items of solid silver be assayed, and yet the nearest Assay Offices were in Chester... Baskerville House, west facing side Industry and Genius, 1990, by David Patten, sculpture outside Baskerville House Baskerville House, previously called the Civic Centre, is a former civic building in Centenary Square, Birmingham, England. ... Birmingham Central Library is the main library in Birmingham, England. ... The Council House as seen from Victoria Square The Council House is the home of Birmingham City Council in Birmingham England. ... The front of the station Curzon Street Station was a railway station in Birmingham in the 19th century and is the worlds oldest surviving piece of monumental railway architecture. ... Great Western Arcade, Temple Row entrance Great Western Arcade The Great Western Arcade is a covered Grade II listed Victorian shopping arcade lying between Colmore Row and Temple Row in Birmingham, England. ... The International Convention Centre is a major conference venue in central Birmingham, England. ... Categories: Places of interest in Birmingham, England | Stub ... Methodist Central Hall The Methodist Central Hall, 196-224 Corporation Street, is a three storey red brick and terracotta Grade II* listed building with a distinctive tower at the northern end of Corporation Street, opposite the Victoria Law Courts. ... Millennium Point is a complex in Birmingham, situated in the developing Eastside of the city centre. ... The Old Crown at 188 Digbeth High Street (A41), Digbeth, a inn, is the oldest secular building in Birmingham, England. ... Paradise Forum, containing the Library Paradise Forum in central Birmingham, England is a 1960s arena containing bars, restaurants, small shops and stalls, and forming the main pedestrian thoroughfare between Centenary Square and the central shopping and business area of Birmingham. ... Birmingham Gun Barrel Proof House The Birmingham Gun Barrel Proof House was established in 1813 by an act of Parliament at the request - and expense - of the then prosperous Birmingham Gun Trade. ... Sarehole Mill Sarehole Mill Sarehole Mill (grid reference SP099818) is a Grade II listed water mill (in an area once called Sarehole) on the River Cole in Hall Green, Birmingham, England. ... Symphony Hall is a concert venue located inside the International Convention Centre (ICC) in Birmingham, England. ... The Town Hall emerging after years of refurbishment. ... Victoria Law Courts Birmingham Queen Victoria sits above the main entrance The Victoria Law Courts on Corporation Street, Birmingham, England is a Grade I listed, red brick and terracotta building. ...


Major railway stations: Moor Street station | New Street station | Snow Hill station
Major complexes: Brindleyplace | Bull Ring, Birmingham | Pallasades Shopping Centre
Sports venues: Alexander Stadium | Edgbaston Cricket Ground | NIA | St. Andrews | Villa Park
Lists of buildings: List of tallest buildings and structures in Birmingham | List of Birmingham board schools | Listed buildings in Birmingham
Birmingham Moor Street railway station is one of three main railway stations in the city centre of Birmingham, England. ... The tracks at the eastern end of Birmingham New Street station Class 390 no. ... The station entrance Birmingham Snow Hill station is a railway station located in the centre of Birmingham, England. ... Brindleyplace Brindleyplace (often written Brindley Place) is a large mixed-use canalside development, near the centre of Birmingham, England. ... Selfridges at the Bullring St Martins Church, with Selfridges in the background The interior of the Bullring The Bull Ring market has been an important feature of Birmingham since the Middle Ages. ... A 1960s shopping centre in Birmingham, UK. The centre was built as part of the renovation of New Street Station and is located over the station. ... The Alexander Stadium is the main athletics stadium in Birmingham, the largest city in the Midlands of England. ... Edgbaston Cricket Ground (sometimes called Edgbaston Stadium) is a cricket venue in the Edgbaston area of Birmingham, England. ... The NIA The National Indoor Arena (NIA) situated in Birmingham, England was opened in 1991. ... St. ... Villa Park is a football stadium in the district of Aston, in Birmingham, England. ... The Rotunda // This is a list of the tallest buildings in Birmingham, England. ... This is a list of the Birmingham board schools, built between the Elementary Education Act 1870 which established board schools, and the Education Act 1902, which replaced school boards with Local Education Authorities. ... There are almost 2,000 listed buildings in Birmingham, England. ...

Coordinates: 52°27′1.82″N, 1°55′50.16″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Birmingham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1917 words)
The University of Birmingham is an English university in the city of Birmingham.
The Chancellor of the University, the ceremonial figurehead, is Sir Dominic Cadbury.
The Birmingham University Guild of Students was the first purpose-built Students' Union in the country when it was built in 1930 (architect Holland W. Hobbiss), and was a founding member of the National Union of Students.
Definition of University of Birmingham (1000 words)
The University of Birmingham is the oldest of three universities in the English city of Birmingham.
Birmingham is a member of the Russell Group of Universities and a founder member of Universitas 21.
The Birmingham University Guild of Students was the first purpose-built Students' Union in the country when it was built in 1930.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m