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Encyclopedia > University of Arkansas

University of Arkansas

Motto Veritate Duce Progredi
(Latin, "To Advance with Truth as our Guide")
Established 1871
Type Public University
Endowment $876.8 million [1]
Chancellor Dr. John A. White
President Dr. B. Alan Sugg
Faculty 858
Students 18,647
Undergraduates 14,353
Postgraduates 3,576
Location Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA
Campus College Town, 345 acres (139 hectares)
Sports Arkansas Razorbacks and Lady'Backs, NCAA Division I (I-A in football), Southeastern Conference. 8 men's varsity teams, 11 women's.
Website www.uark.edu

The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. It is the flagship campus of the University of Arkansas System and is located in Fayetteville, Arkansas. Founded as Arkansas Industrial University in 1871, its present name was adopted in 1899 and classes were first held in February 1872. It is noted for its strong architecture, agriculture (particularly poultry science)[2], creative writing and business programs.[3] It is also noted for the fact that University of Arkansas engineering students won the 2006 world championship for solar-powered boats. Image File history File links UniversityofArkansasSeal. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Fayetteville is a college town in Washington County, Arkansas, USA and home to the University of Arkansas. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... There is also a College Town next to the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst in Berkshire, England. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A hectare (symbol ha) is a unit of area, equal to 10 000 square metres, commonly used for measuring land area. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... (The) LadyBacks refers to any of the womens sports teams that competes officially for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Coeducation is the integrated education of men and women. ... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or rewards for military service, or especially academic institutions. ... A flagship is the ship used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships. ... The University of Arkansas System comprises five main campuses within the state of Arkansas, a medical school, two law schools, a unique graduate school focused on public service, and several community colleges. ... Fayetteville is a college town in Washington County, Arkansas, USA and home to the University of Arkansas. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This article is about building architecture. ... Creative writing is a term used to distinguish certain imaginative or different types of writing from technical writing. ... In economics, a business is a legally-recognized organizational entity existing within an economically free country designed to sell goods and/or services to consumers, usually in an effort to generate profit. ...


The University of Arkansas strives to be known as a "nationally competitive, student-centered research university serving Arkansas and the world." The school recently completed its "Campaign for the 21st Century," in which the university raised more than $1 billion for the school, used in part to create a new Honors College and significantly increase the university's endowment. Among these gifts were the largest donation given to a business school at the time ($50 million), and the largest gift given to a public university in America ($300 million), both given by the Walton Family Charitable Support Foundation.


Enrollment for the fall semester of 2007 was 18,647[4], with 3,021[5] (16.8%) being graduate students. The University campus comprises 130 buildings on 345 acres, including the Inn at Carnall Hall, which serves as an on-campus hotel facility. Academic programs are in excess of 200. The ratio of students to faculty is 17:1.

Contents

History

Plaque on University of Arkansas campus
Plaque on University of Arkansas campus

The University of Arkansas was founded in 1871, on the site of a hilltop farm that overlooked the Ozark Mountains, giving it the nickname "The Hill". Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 674 KB)plaque File links The following pages link to this file: University of Arkansas ... Download high resolution version (2048x1536, 674 KB)plaque File links The following pages link to this file: University of Arkansas ... This article is about the Ozark Plateau. ...


The University was established under the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act of 1862. The University’s founding also satisfied the provision in the Arkansas Constitution of 1868 that the General Assembly was to "establish and maintain a State University." The Morrill Land-Grant Acts are United States statutes that allowed for the creation of land-grant colleges. ... The Arkansas Constitution is the governing document of the U.S. state of Arkansas. ...


Initially, to found the University, $130,000 was raised by the citizens of Washington County. This was in response to the competition created by the Arkansas General Assembly’s Organic Act of 1871, providing for the "location, organization and maintenance of the Arkansas Industrial University with a normal department [i.e., teacher education] therein." Classes started in February 1872. ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Washington County is a county located in the U.S. state of Arkansas. ... In the history of the United States, an organized territory is a territory for which the United States Congress has enacted an Organic Act. ...


Completed in 1875, Old Main, a two-towered brick building designed in the Second Empire style, was the primary instructional and administrative building. It is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Its design was based on the plans for the main academic building at the University of Illinois, which has since burned down. However, the clock and bell towers were switched at Arkansas. The northern taller tower is the bell tower, and the southern shorter tower is the clock tower. One legend for the tower switch is that the taller tower was put to the north as a reminder of the Union victory during the Civil War. A second legend is that the contractor accidentally swapped the tower drawings after having had too much to drink. Although the southern tower was designed with clock faces, it never held a working clock until 2006. The bell tower has always had some type of chime, initially a bell that was rung on the hour by student volunteers. Electronic chimes were installed in 1959. In addition to the regular chimes of the clock, the university's Alma Mater plays at 5 p.m. every day. Old Main housed many of the earliest classes taught at the university, and has served as the offices of every college within the university during its history. Today, in addition to hosting classes, it contains the restored Giffels Auditorium and historic displays, as well as the administrative offices of the J. William Fulbright College of Arts & Sciences. Old Main is the oldest building on the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905 – February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ...


The lawn at Old Main serves as an arboretum, with many of the trees native to the state of Arkansas found on the lawn. Sitting at the edge of the lawn is Spoofer's Stone, a place for couples to meet and pass notes. Students play soccer, cricket and touch football on the lawn's open green.


Beginning with the class of 1876, the names of students at University of Arkansas are inscribed in "Senior Walk" and wind across campus for more than five miles (2.5 miles of sidewalk). The sidewalk is one of a kind nationally. More recently, the names of all the recipients of honorary degrees were also added. School superstition states that it is bad luck to step on the Class of 1900.


One of the more unusual structures at Arkansas is the Chi Omega Greek Theatre, a gift to the school by the national headquarters of the sorority. It marked the first time in the history of Greek letter social organizations that a national sorority had presented a memorial of its foundation to the institution where it was founded. Chi Omega was organized on April 5, 1895, at the University of Arkansas and is the mother (Psi) chapter of the national organization. The theater has been used for commencements, convocations, concerts, dramas and pep rallies. The largest crowd ever assembled there – upwards of 6,000, according to professor Walter J. Lemke – was for a concert by the Army Air Corps Band during World War II. From 1934 to 1991, the space under the stage was used for a rifle range by the Army ROTC. Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ...


The University of Arkansas became the first major Southern public university to admit an African-American student without litigation when Silas Hunt of Texarkana, an African American veteran of World War II, was admitted to the university's School of Law in 1948. Roy Wilkins, administrator of the NAACP, wrote in 1950 that Arkansas was the "very first of the Southern states to accept the new trend without fighting a delaying action or attempting to . . . limit, if not nullify, bare compliance." Today the School of Law continues to receive national awards and recognition for its high degree of diversity.


Vitamin E was co-discovered by UA Agricultural Chemistry Professor Barnett Sure (1920-51). Sure, along with fellow professor Marinus C. Kik (1927-67) made major advances in nutrition science during their long tenures at the University of Arkansas. Sure co-discovered vitamin E, and extended knowledge of how vitamin E, amino acids and B-vitamins function on reproduction and lactation. Kik developed the process for parboiling rice (a major agricultural crop in the state) to increase retention of vitamins and shorten cooking time. He documented benefits of adding fish and chicken to rice and grain diets to provide adequate protein for a growing world population. Sure and Kik were Agricultural Experiment Station scientists and professors in the UA Department of Agricultural Chemistry, which merged in 1964 with Home Economics, now the School of Human Environmental Sciences. Tocopherol, or Vitamin E, is a fat-soluble vitamin in eight forms that is an important antioxidant. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ...


In the 1920s, Loy Barnett, an engineering graduate student at the University of Arkansas, set forth the principle of high-level Class B plate modulation for radio transmission and developed the technology that allowed small- and medium-size AM radio stations to flourish across the United States. Barnett later joined RCA and continued research on broadcast technology into the 1960s. AM broadcasting is radio broadcasting using Amplitude Modulation. ...


The most widely-implemented automated mail sorting equipment in the world–the Wide Area Bar Code Reader–was developed by the University of Arkansas’ College of Engineering. A $50,000 grant from the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) to Professors Dwight F. Mix and J.E. Bass in 1989 began the research and development effort. By 1999, more than 15,000 University of Arkansas bar code readers were located in every major USPS facility, increasing the efficiency of processing 20 billion pieces of mail a year at a savings of $200 million. This R&D effort has spawned four additional electronic systems to help the USPS "read the mail."


During the 1980s, Professors Allen Hermann and Zhengzhi Sheng of the Department of Physics were in the vanguard of research in superconductivity: the phenomenon whereby Direct Current (DC) electricity, once started, can flow essentially forever. The Thallium-based material they discovered at Arkansas held the world's record for high temperature, 125K, for five years (1988-93) and drew international attention to the University. Their work led to numerous patents and a manufacturing agreement, as well as further advances in high-density electronics.


University of Arkansas plant pathologists George Templeton, Roy Smith (USDA), David TeBeest and graduate student Jim Daniels conducted research in the early 1970s that led to COLLEGO, the first biological herbicide for weed control in a field crop. Other UA scientists and students worked on the project that resulted in EPA registration of COLLEGO by Upjohn in 1982 for control of northern jointvetch in rice and soybeans. The work provided a model used worldwide to develop biological herbicides. Leadership in this area helped the U of A obtain grants from the USDA and others for construction of the Rosen Center for Alternative Pest Control.


Campuses and academic divisions

Altogether, there are eleven branches and three other units in the University of Arkansas System, including the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock and a branch campus in Pine Bluff. Other branch campuses are in Monticello, Little Rock, and Fort Smith. Additionally, the UA System includes two year or community college campuses in Hope, Batesville, De Queen, Morrilton, and the Phillips Community College in Helena. Units also under the UA System include the Clinton School of Public Service, the Criminal Justice Institute, the Arkansas Archeological Survey, and the Division of Agriculture. The University maintains the most advanced secondary educational institution in Arkansas, the Arkansas School for Mathematics, Science, and the Arts in Hot Springs, Arkansas. To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Location in Pulaski County, Arkansas Coordinates: , Country State County Pulaski Founded 1821 Incorporated 1831 Government  - Mayor Mark Stodola Area  - City  116. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Monticello is a city located in Drew County, Arkansas. ... Fort Smith is a city situated at the junction of the Arkansas and Poteau rivers. ... Hope is a small city located in Hempstead County, Arkansas. ... Batesville is a city in Independence County, Arkansas, 114 miles (183 km) north by east of Little Rock, the State capital. ... De Queen is a city located in Sevier County, Arkansas. ... Morrilton is a city in Conway County, Arkansas, 51 miles (82 km) northwest of Little Rock. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Helena-West Helena, Arkansas. ... William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe III[1] on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Public administration can be broadly described as the study and implementation of policy. ... Sign from the city limits. ...


The following degree-granting academic divisions are located on the Fayetteville campus:

The University of Arkansas is also the home for the Southeastern Conference Academic Consortium (SECAC), where the twelve member schools of the Southeastern Conferences pool resources to assist each other academically. credited to the United States Senate Historical Office Dale Leon Bumpers (born 12 August 1925) was a Democratic member of the United States Senate from the State of Arkansas, from 1975 until his retirement in January, 1999; and was governor of Arkansas from 1971 to 1975. ... This article is about building architecture. ... James William Fulbright (April 9, 1905 – February 9, 1995) was a well-known member of the United States Senate representing Arkansas. ... Professional social workers are concerned with social problems, their causes, their solutions and their human impacts. ... Samuel Moore Walton (March 29, 1918 – April 6, 1992), born in Kingfisher, Oklahoma was the founder of two American retailers Wal-Mart and Sams Club. ... Nursing is a profession focused on assisting individuals, families, and communities in attaining, re-attaining, and maintaining optimal health and functioning. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... The University of Arkansas School of Law was established in 1924 at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ...


Campus

The University of Arkansas campus sweeps across hilltops on the western side of Fayetteville, Arkansas. Among the 130 buildings on the campus, 11 buildings have been added to the National Register of Historic Buildings. There are over 100 buildings on the campus of the University of Arkansas and, many monuments, statues, and other structures. ...


Several buildings on campus, including the Fine Arts Complex and Carlson Terrace, a campus apartment complex, were designed by Fayetteville native Edward Durell Stone, who also designed the Museum of Modern Art in New York City and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C. The buildings are indicative of Stone's idiosyncratic modern style which included patterns of ornament. Fayetteville is a college town in Washington County, Arkansas, USA and home to the University of Arkansas. ... Edward Durell Stone (1902 Fayetteville, Arkansas - 1978 New York City) was an American modernist twentieth century architect. ... This article is about the museum in New York City. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... The Kennedy Center as seen from the Potomac River. ...


All computers with internet access on the University's campus have IP addresses beginning with 130.184. Also, all non-residence hall telephone numbers begin with 479-575 and most postal addresses include the zip code 72701. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ...


Sports

The Razorback is the mascot of the University of Arkansas
The Razorback is the mascot of the University of Arkansas

The mascot for the University of Arkansas is the Razorback, a type of wild boar, and Arkansas teams are often referred to as the Hogs (shortened version of Razorbacks). The school competes in the Southeastern Conference (SEC) in Division I of the NCAA. No school in the SEC has more total national championships than Arkansas, and only 4 schools nationwide (UCLA, Southern Cal, Stanford, and Oklahoma State) have more national titles than the Razorbacks. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Razorbacks, also referred to as an Old World swine, Eurasian wild boar, or Russian wild boar, are feral pigs that were brought to North America by the explorer Hernando de Soto during the mid-1550s. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... (The) LadyBacks refers to any of the womens sports teams that competes officially for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... The Southeastern Conference (SEC) is a college athletic conference headquartered in Birmingham, Alabama, which operates in the southeastern part of the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Arkansas is unusual among major U.S. universities in having separate men's and women's athletic departments (another example is fellow SEC school Tennessee). The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ...


Football

The school's football team is currently led by Coach Houston Nutt. The team plays its home games either at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium, located on the University of Arkansas campus, or at War Memorial Stadium, located in Little Rock. The football program won nine SWC titles, three SEC Western Division titles, and won a national title in 1964. During a stretch between December 1963 and January 1966, the Razorbacks won 22 straight football games. They are currently ranked 16th in the nation with a star running back Darren McFadden the favorite for the Heisman Trophy. United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium is the home of the Arkansas Razorbacks football team of the University of Arkansas, which is located in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA. The current head coach of the football team is coach Houston Nutt. ... War Memorial Stadium in Little Rock, Arkansas during an Arkansas Razorback football game. ... Location in Pulaski County, Arkansas Coordinates: , Country State County Pulaski Founded 1821 Incorporated 1831 Government  - Mayor Mark Stodola Area  - City  116. ... Darren McFadden (born August 27, 1987 in North Little Rock, Arkansas) is the 2006 All-American starting tailback for the University of Arkansas and the 2006 Doak Walker Award winner as the nations top running back, the first sophomore to ever win the award. ... Official Logo The Heisman Memorial Trophy Award (often known simply as the Heisman Trophy or The Heisman), named after former college football player and coach John Heisman, is awarded annually to the most outstanding collegiate football player in the U.S. The award is considered the highest individual player honor...


Men's Basketball

The men's basketball team head coach is John Pelphrey (previously at South Alabama). Dana Altman was hired on April 2, 2007 for the head coaching job but decided to return back to Creighton University the following day. [1] Altman would have replaced Stan Heath who was fired on March 26, 2007. The Razorbacks play their home games in Bud Walton Arena on the University of Arkansas campus. The team won the 1994 National Championship under coach Nolan Richardson, who was later dismissed by the University following a steady decline in the program and a 14-15 season. Richardson claimed publicly and in court proceedings to have been racially discriminated against. A federal judge in Little Rock, as well as the US Court of Appeals in St. Louis, sided with the U of A. The Arkansas Razorbacks Basketball team is the basketball team that represent the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... This article is about the sport. ... John Pelphrey (born July 18, 1968 in Paintsville, Kentucky) is the 14th head mens basketball coach at the University of Arkansas (hired April 2007). ... The South Alabama Jaguars mens basketball program has had a short but fairly successful history, despite being in the small Sun Belt Conference and located in a state dominated by football powerhouses Alabama and Auburn. ... Dana Altman (born on June 16, 1958 in Crete, Nebraska) is currently the head coach of the Creighton Bluejays mens basketball team. ... Stan Heath is the head mens basketball coach at the University of Arkansas Razorbacks (located in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... Inside of Bud Walton Arena during a game. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full 1994 Gregorian calendar). ... The NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Championship is held each spring featuring 65 of the top college basketball teams in the United States. ... Nolan Richardson (b. ... The United States District Court for the Eastern District of Arkansas is further subdivided into six divisions, which collectively cover 41 Arkansas counties. ... The United States Court of Appeals for the Eighth Circuit is a federal court with appellate jurisdiction over the following United States district courts: Eastern and Western Districts of Arkansas Northern and Southern Districts of Iowa District of Minnesota Eastern and Western Districts of Missouri District of Nebraska District of...


The school has been to six Final Fours (1941, 1945, 1978, 1990, 1994, 1995) and was named as the eighth-best program in history by Street and Smith's magazine. Street & Smith book department in 1906 Street & Smith composing room circa 1905-1910 Street & Smith bindery in 1910 Street & Smith or Street & Smith Publications, Inc. ...


Baseball

The baseball team, under Dave van Horn, reached the 2004 College World Series. They have made five trips to the College World Series (1978, 1985, 1987, 1989, 2004), going as far as the championship game. The team plays home games in Baum Stadium, which finished several major renovations in 2004. Baum was once recognized by Baseball America magazine as being the top collegiate ball park in America. The stadium has recently undergone expansion, including 20 new skyboxes (34 in all) and seats behind the bullpen in left. On May 5, 2007, a stadium record 10,541 fans saw Arkansas defeat LSU 5-0. The weekend series drew 29,931, which is the SEC all-time attendance record for a three-game series. This article is about the sport. ... Dave van Horn is head coach of the University of Arkansas Razorbacks baseball team. ... The 2004 College World Series was held June 18 through 28, 2004 in Omaha, Nebraska. ... Entrance to Baum Stadium. ...


Track and field

The most successful program in NCAA history, the Arkansas men's track and field teams, led by head coach John McDonnell are the most decorated teams in the athletics department. The program has won 43 national titles in Cross Country and Track & Field. One of its most famous stars is recent graduate Alistair Cragg who competed for Ireland at the 2004 Summer Olympics in Greece. Other Olympians have included Michael Conley, Daniel Lincoln, and Matt Hemingway. The team has a home indoor track at the Randal Tyson Track Center and outdoor field at John McDonnell Field, which is under renovation and expansion, and will host the 2009 NCAA Outdoor Track Championships. Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... John McDonnell is the head track coach for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... Alistair Ian Cragg an international track and field athlete was born in Johannesburg, on 13 June 1980, and was brought up in South Africa and has since lived in England and Fayetteville, Arkansas where he attended university. ... The ceremony for the lighting of the flame is arranged as a pagan pageant, with priestesses dancing. ... Michael Mike Conley (born October 5, 1962 in Chicago) is an American track & field athlete competing in the triple jump. ... Matt Hemingway (born October 24, 1972) is an American athlete who won a silver medal in the high jump at the 2004 Olympic Games. ... The Randal Tyson Track Center is a 5,100-seat multi-purpose arena in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ...


Women's Athletics

The women's teams at the University of Arkansas are referred to as the Lady Razorbacks or "Lady'Backs". There are 11 varsity women's sports: basketball, cross country, indoor and outdoor track, golf, gymnastics, soccer, softball, swimming & diving, tennis, and volleyball. Among the most successful Lady'Back teams are volleyball, with 11 SEC Western Division titles; cross country with more SEC championships than any member institution; basketball with 17 postseason appearances in 30 years, including the 1998 NCAA Final Four; track and field with six SEC titles and the first back-to-back women's SEC triple crowns; and gymnastics nationally-ranked since the start of the program in 2002 with two (soon three) NCAA appearances. Sprinter Veronica Campbell was the first Lady'Back to win a gold medal in the Olympics, with marathoner Deena Kastor bringing home a bronze medal in 2004. (The) LadyBacks refers to any of the womens sports teams that competes officially for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... A womens 400m hurdles race on a typical outdoor red rubber track. ... This article is about the sport. ... Gymnastics is a sport involving the performance of sequences of movements requiring physical strength, flexibility, balance, endurance, and kinesthetic awareness, such as handsprings, handstands, split leaps, aerials and cartwheels. ... Football is a ball game played between two teams of eleven players, each attempting to win by scoring more goals than their opponent. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ... For other uses, see Dive. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ... Volleyball is an Olympic sport in which two teams separated by a high net use their hands, arms or (rarely) other parts of their bodies to hit a ball back and forth over the net. ... Veronica Campbell (born May 15, 1982) is a track and field sprint athlete, competing internationally for Jamaica. ... Deena Kastor (née Drossin) (1973-) is an American distance runner. ...


Traditions

Senior Walk

The names of University of Arkansas students, starting with the first senior class of 1876, are carved into one of the concrete walkways or sidewalks on campus. This tradition was started by the 1905 graduating class of students, who drew their names into the walkway in front of Old Main, the oldest building on campus. Following classes added their names for more than a decade and then the university took over responsibility for adding new classes, as well as adding the names of students who graduated prior to 1905. Through most of the 20th century, the names were impressed in wet cement using brass letters. As the campus grew, and the graduating classes got bigger, the operation became unduly time-consuming. In 1986, the university's physical plant developed a special machine called the "Senior Sand Hog" to engrave the thousands of names required each year.[2] Old Main is the oldest building on the University of Arkansas campus in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ...


"Calling the Hogs"

Fans of the University of Arkansas have been "Calling the Hogs" since the 1920s. This tradition, which refers to the school's most popular cheer at sporting events, is said to have begun when a group of farmers attending a game began issuing hog calls to encourage a lagging Razorback football team. The encouragement worked and the attending crowd took notice of the farmers' calling. By the next game, a group of men had organized to cry "Wooo, Pig, Sooie". Since then, this rallying cry has grown to become a traditional school yell that is performed at most home sporting events, and is one of the best-known Razorback traditions outside of the University. The length of Woo is a matter of contention. Traditionalists will call for a full eight-second Woo. Calling the hogs is always accompanied by hand gestures. Fans raise both hands in the air and wave their fingers during the "Wooo." They then pump them down on the "Pig" and raise the right hand back up on the "Sooie."


"Calling the Hogs" Lyrics


Woooooooooo, Pig ! Sooie!
Woooooooooo, Pig ! Sooie!
Woooooooooo, Pig ! Sooie!
Razorbacks!!
[3][4]


Alma Mater

The current version of the University of Arkansas Alma Mater was written in 1909 by Brodie Payne, an alumnus of the University of Arkansas. He submitted his song to an ongoing competition that was trying to find a song for the university and won first prize. Henry D. Tovey, who was the director of the Glee Club at that time, set the song to music. In 1931, the University College Song Association in New York reviewed a collection of 500 college tunes, and the University of Arkansas Alma Mater was judged to be one of the twenty-five best college songs of the United States. Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Midtown Manhattan, looking north from the Empire State Building, 2005 New York City (officially named the City of New York) is the most populous city in the state of New York and the entire United States. ...


Alma Mater
Pure as the dawn on the brow of thy beauty
Watches thy soul from the mountains of God
Over the Fates of thy children departed
Far from the land where their footsteps have trod.
Beacon of hope in the ways dreary lighted;
Pride of our hearts that are loyal and true;
From those who adore unto one who adores us—
Mother of Mothers, we sing unto you.

We, with our faces turned high to the Eastward,
Proud of our place in the vanguard of Truth,
Will sing unto thee a new song of thanksgiving—
Honor to God and the Springtime of Youth.
Shout of the victor or tear of the vanquished;
Sunshine or tempest thy heart is e'er true;
Pride of the Hills and the white-laden Lowlands—
Mother of Mothers, we kneel unto you.

Ever the Legions of Sin will assail us,
Ever the Battle in Cities afar;
Still in the depths will thy Spirit eternal
Beckon us on like a piloting Star.
Down in dim years do thy dead children call thee,
Wafted to Sleep while the Springtime was new;
We, of the Present, thy hope of the Future—
Mother of Mothers, we pray unto you.
[5][6]


Fight Song

The current version of the University of Arkansas Fight Song was written in the late 1920s. The fight song is usually played at all home Razorback sporting events. Current head football coach Houston Nutt has established a tradition of singing (along with the Arkansas players) the fight song to the student section following every home and away football game win. This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Arkansas Fight Song Lyrics
Hit that line! Hit that line! Keep on going,
Move that ball right down the field!
Give a cheer. Rah! Rah! Never fear. Rah! Rah!
Arkansas will never yield!
On your toes, Razorbacks, to the finish,
Carry on with all your might!
For it's A-A-R- K-A-N- S-A-S for Arkansas!
Fight! Fight! Fi-i-i-ght!
[7][8]


School Colors and Mascot

The school color of cardinal red was chosen as the official school color by a vote of the student body in 1895. The two color choices were cardinal and heliotrope. White was added as a complementary color at a later date. Year 1895 (MDCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Cardinal is a vivid red, which gets its name from the cassocks worn by Catholic cardinals. ... Heliotrope is a pink-purple tint that is a representation of the color of the heliotrope flower. ...

Tusk, the live mascot for the University of Arkansas.
Tusk, the live mascot for the University of Arkansas.

The University of Arkansas mascot has not always been the Razorbacks. From 1894, when the football program began, until 1910, the official mascot was the Cardinals to complement the school color of cardinal red. In 1909, according to school lore, the head football coach Hugo Bezdek gave a speech to a large group of students at the Fayetteville train station after returning from a victory over LSU in 1909 during an undefeated season. Coach Bezdek informed the crowd that his team had performed "like a wild band of Razorback hogs." Although students had begun referring to the team as the Razorbacks as early as 1907, Bezdek's statement popularized the use of Razorback for the team. The Razorback, which is characterized by a ridged back and tenacious wild fighting ability, had long been associated with the backwoods of Arkansas. The students loved the comparison, and the nickname became increasingly popular. In 1910, the student body voted to change the official university mascot from the Cardinal to the Razorback. Image File history File links TuskMascot2. ... Image File history File links TuskMascot2. ... Tusk is the name of the official live mascot for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Hugo Francis Bezdek (April 1, 1883 in Prague, Austria-Hungary – September 19, 1952 in Atlantic City, New Jersey) was a Czech-American sports figure in the first half of the 20th century. ... For other uses, see LSU (disambiguation). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The live mascot tradition dates back to the 1960s and a number of hogs have represented Arkansas through the years. Tusk, a 380-pound Russian boar that closely resembles a wild razorback hog, is the current official live mascot. He resides on a local farm and leaves his home to attend all Arkansas home football games, and other select events. Tusk is the name of the official live mascot for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ...


Additionally, the University of Arkansas has a family of uniformed mascots. "Big Red", (also known as the "Fighting Razorback"), is the traditional mascot for the university and attends all athletic events. "Sue E" is the female hog and "Pork Chop" is the kid mascot. "Boss Hog" is a nine-foot inflatable mascot that joined the mascot family during the 1998-99 football season.[9]

The Razorback Marching Band in formation at Razorback Stadium.
The Razorback Marching Band in formation at Razorback Stadium.

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1066x799, 422 KB) Summary The University of Arkansas Razorback Marching Band in formation in the pre-game show before a game at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1066x799, 422 KB) Summary The University of Arkansas Razorback Marching Band in formation in the pre-game show before a game at Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium. ... Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium is the home of the Arkansas Razorbacks football team of the University of Arkansas, which is located in Fayetteville, Arkansas, USA. The current head coach of the football team is coach Houston Nutt. ...

Razorback Marching Band

Main article: University of Arkansas Razorback Marching Band

The Razorback Marching Band, one of the oldest collegiate bands in the United States, was formed in 1874 as the Cadet Corps Band as part of the military art department. The band participated in all the formalities of the Military Art Department, as well as playing for football games, pageants, and commencement exercises. In 1947, following a steady post World War II growth, the Cadet Corp Band was divided into the three current bands, a football band, a concert band, and an R.O.T.C. band. In 1956, the band adopted the name "Marching Razorbacks". In 2006 the Razorback marching band was awarded the highest honor bestowed upon a collegiate marching band, the Sudler Trophy. The Razorback Marching Band is the marching band of the University of Arkansas. ... Year 1874 (MDCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link with display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1947 (MCMXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1947 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wisconsin Band, known for its unique stop at the top high step, performs at the HHH Metrodome during a football game against arch-rival Minnesota. ...


Clubs and organizations on campus

There are 272 registered student organizations (RSOs) including special interest, religious, international and cultural organizations, honorary and professional service groups, and more.


The university is also home to two radio stations: KUAF, a public radio station and NPR affiliate, and KXUA, an eclectic student-run station. Public broadcasting (also known as public service broadcasting or PSB) is the dominant form of broadcasting around the world, where radio, television, and potentially other electronic media outlets receive funding from the public. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... KXUA is the student-run radio station at the University of Arkansas. ...


The University of Arkansas Press is known for publishing works on local and Southern history, including several by former President Jimmy Carter and the former national poet laureate Billy Collins. For other persons named Jimmy Carter, see Jimmy Carter (disambiguation). ... William J. (Billy) Collins (born March 22, 1941) is a poet who served two terms as the 11th Poet Laureate of the United States, from 2001 to 2003. ...


Greek Life

Sororities

Fraternities Chi Omega (ΧΩ) is the largest womens fraternal organization in the National Panhellenic Conference. ... Zeta Tau Alpha (ΖΤΑ) is a womens fraternity, founded October 15, 1898 at what used to be State Female Normal School but is now known as Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Pi Beta Phi (ΠΒΦ) is an international fraternity for women founded as I.C. Sorosis on April 28, 1867, at Monmouth College in Monmouth, Illinois. ... Delta Delta Delta (ΔΔΔ), also known as Tri Delta, is a national collegiate sorority founded on November 27, 1888. ... Phi Mu (ΦΜ) is the second oldest secret organization for women in the United States. ... Kappa Kappa Gamma (ΚΚΓ) is a college womens fraternity, founded on October 13, 1870 at Monmouth College, Illinois. ... Delta Gamma (ΔΓ) is one of the oldest and largest womens fraternities[1] in the United States and Canada, with its Executive Offices based in Columbus, Ohio. ... Alpha Delta Pi (ΑΔΠ) was founded May 15, 1851 at Wesleyan College in Macon, Georgia making it the first female fraternal organization. ... Alpha Chi Omega (ΑΧΩ, also known as A-Chi-O) is a womens fraternity founded on October 15, 1885. ... Kappa Alpha Theta (ΚΑΘ) is an international womens fraternity founded on January 27, 1870 at DePauw University. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Alpha Kappa Alpha (ΑΚΑ) Sorority, Incorporated, is Americas first Greek-letter organization established and incorporated by Black college women. ... Zeta Phi Beta (ΖΦΒ) Sorority Inc. ... Kappa Delta (ΚΔ) is a sorority founded at the State Female Normal School, now Longwood University in Farmville, Virginia. ... Sigma Phi Lambda (ΣΦΛ) Sorority is the largest womens fraternal organization for Christian women, or Chrisitan sorority in the United States with 22 active chapters, and the third of its kind, behind Alpha Delta Chi, founded in 1925, and Sigma Alpha Omega, officially founded in 1988. ... While the traditional womens fraternity or sorority was founded well before the start of the 20th century, the first ever Christian sorority was founded at UCLA in 1925 by ten women and named Alpha Delta Chi. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Social Club This article does not cite any references or sources. ... ΚΣ (Kappa Sigma) is an international fraternity with currently 236 chapters and 42 colonies in North America. ... Sigma Alpha Epsilon (ΣΑΕ) is a secret letter, social college fraternity. ... Pi Kappa Alpha International Fraternity (ΠΚΑ) is an international, secret, social, Greek-letter, college fraternity. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sigma Chi (ΣΧ) is one of the largest and oldest all-male, college, Greek-letter social fraternities. ... ΣΦΕ (Sigma Phi Epsilon), commonly nicknamed SigEp or S-P-E, is a social fraternity for male college students in the United States. ... Lambda Chi Alpha (ΛΧΑ), headquartered in Indianapolis, Indiana, is one of the largest mens general fraternities in North America with more than 250,000 initiated members and chapters at more than 300 universities. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ... Phi Delta Theta (ΦΔΘ) is an international fraternity founded in 1848 at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. ... FarmHouse Fraternity is an all-male international social fraternity founded at the University of Missouri in 1905. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Incorporated (ΩΨΦ) was founded on a cool Friday evening, November 17, 1911, at Howard University in Washington, D.C. by three undergraduate students and one faculty advisor. ... Alpha Phi Alpha (ΑΦΑ) is the first intercollegiate fraternity established by African Americans. ... Kappa Alpha Psi (KAΨ) is the second-oldest collegiate Greek-letter fraternity with a predominantly African American membership and the first black intercollegiate fraternity incorporated as a national body. ... Phi Beta Sigma (ΦΒΣ) Fraternity was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C. on January 9, 1914, by three young African-American male students. ... Phi Kappa Psi (ΦΚΨ, Phi Psi) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... ΦΚΤ (Phi Kappa Tau) is a U.S. national college fraternity. ... Zeta Beta Tau (ZBT, brothers of which are nicknamed Zebes) is a historically Jewish, presently nonsectarian international fraternity. ... Tau Kappa Epsilon (TKE or Teke, pronounced T-K-E or IPA , as in teak wood) is a college fraternity with chapters in the USA, and Canada, and affiliation with a German fraternity system known as the Corps of the Weinheimer Senioren Convent (WSC). ...

Professional and Honorary Beta Upsilon Chi, Brothers Under Christ, ΒΥΧ (pronounced Bucks) is the largest Christian social fraternity in the United States. ... While the traditional social fraternity is a well-established mainstay across the United States at institutions of higher learning, alternatives - in the form of social fraternities that require doctrinal and behavioral conformity to the Christian faith - developed in the early twentieth century which continue to grow in size and popularity...

Phi Alpha Theta is an American honor society for undergraduate students, graduate students, and professors of history. ... Kappa Kappa Psi is a national honorary band fraternity dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... The ΦΜΑ Sinfonia (usually referred to as Sinfonia rather than ΦΜΑ) is a collegiate social fraternity for men of musicianly character. ... Alpha Chi Sigma (ΑΧΣ) is a professional fraternity specializing in the field of chemistry. ... ΘΤ (Theta Tau) Fraternity was founded in 1904 by four engineering students at the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis. ... Alpha Gamma Rho (ΑΓΡ) is a social-professional fraternity in the United States, with over 65 university chapters. ... Tau Beta Sigma is a co-educational national honorary band sorority dedicated to serving college and university bands. ... Sigma Alpha Iota (ΣΑΙ) is a music fraternity for women. ... Alpha Rho Chi (ΑΡΧ) is a professional fraternity for students studying architecture. ... Alpha Epsilon Delta (ΑEΔ) is a national premedical honor society. ... Eta Sigma Phi (ΗΣΦ) (ESP) is a College honor society which grew out of a local undergraduate classical club founded by a group of students in the Department of Greek at the University of Chicago in 1914. ...

Notable people

This article does not cite any references or sources. ...

Pictures from Campus

Notes

is the 255th day of the year (256th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 305th day of the year (306th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 256th day of the year (257th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 36°04′07″N 94°10′34″W / 36.068681, -94.176012 The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship campus of the University of Alabama System. ... Athletic teams at The University of Alabama are known as the Crimson Tide. ... The Arkansas Razorbacks, also known as the Hogs, are the names of college sports teams at the University of Arkansas in Fayetteville, Arkansas. ... (The) LadyBacks refers to any of the womens sports teams that competes officially for the University of Arkansas Razorbacks. ... Auburn University (AU or Auburn) is a state university located in Auburn, Alabama, USA. With more than 23,000 students and 1,200 faculty, it is the largest university in the state,[5] and according to U.S. News & World Report, has a selectivity rating of more selective. ... Auburn Tigers is the name given to Auburn University athletic teams. ... For other uses, see LSU (disambiguation). ... LSU (Louisiana State University) is a member of the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) and the Southeastern Conference. ... The University of Mississippi, also known as Ole Miss, is a public, coeducational research university located in Oxford, Mississippi. ... University of Mississippi sports teams, originally known as the Mississippi Flood, were re-named the Rebels in 1935 and compete in the competitive twelve-member Southeastern Conference (West Division) of the NCAAs Division I. The schools colors are cardinal red (PMS 199) and navy blue (PMS 280), purposely... Mississippi State University is a land-grant university located in north east-central Mississippi, United States, in the town of Starkville and is situated 125 miles northeast of Jackson and 23 miles west of Columbus. ... The Mississippi State Bulldogs are the athletic teams of Mississippi State University. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... The University of Arkansas - Fort Smith is the fifth largest university in Arkansas, with a fall 2004 credit enrollment of 6,631. ... Dickinson Hall University of Arkansas at Little Rock is the third largest university, by enrollment, in Arkansas. ... The University of Arkansas at Monitcello, formerly Arkansas Agricultural and Mechanical College, is part of the University of Arkansas system and serves as both a public four-year institution and a venue for vocational and technical education. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff, is a historically black university located in Pine Bluff, Arkansas. ... Arkansas State University student union, Jonesboro, Arkansas Arkansas State University (A-State) or (ASU) is a public university and is the flagship campus of the Arkansas State University System, the states second largest college system. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The University of Central Arkansas is a state-run institution located in the city of Conway, the seat of Faulkner County, north of Little Rock. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Southern Arkansas University, formerly the Third District Agricultural School serves as a public four-year institution. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
University of Arkansas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (3684 words)
University of Arkansas Razorbacks, NCAA Division IA, Southeastern Conference.
The current version of the University of Arkansas Alma Mater was written in 1909 by Brodie Payne, an alumnus of the University of Arkansas.
Admiral Vern Clark is an alumnus of the University of Arkansas.
University of Arkansas at Monticello - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (442 words)
The University of Arkansas at Monticello, formerly Arkansas Agricultural and Mechanical College, is part of the University of Arkansas System and serves as both a public four-year institution and a venue for vocational and technical education.
The University is governed by the University of Arkansas Board of Trustees, which also oversees the operation of institutions in Batesville, DeQueen, Fayetteville, Fort Smith, Helena, Hope, Little Rock, Morrilton, and Pine Bluff.
The University of Arkansas at Monticello was established in 1909 by act of the Arkansas General Assembly to serve the educational needs of Southeast Arkansas.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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