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Encyclopedia > University of Arizona

University of Arizona

Motto Bear Down!
Established 1885
Type Public
Academic term Semester
President Robert N. Shelton [1]
Staff 2,462
Undergraduates 28,442
Postgraduates 8,363
Location Tucson, Arizona, USA
Campus Urban, 380 acres (1.5 km²) (1,253,500 m²)
Yearbook Desert Yearbook
Nickname Wildcats(official)
Mascot Wilbur Wildcat
Athletics 18 varsity teams
Website www.arizona.edu

The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona, United States. The University of Arizona was the first university in the state of Arizona, founded in 1885, when Arizona was still a territory and is considered a Public Ivy. UA includes Arizona's only allopathic medical school. In 2006, total enrollment was 36,805 students. Image File history File links UASeal. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Bear Down is the official motto of the University of Arizona (UA), located in Tucson, Arizona. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Robert N. Shelton (born 1948), is currently Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Nickname: Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State Counties Pima Government  - Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area  - City  195. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Wilbur the Wildcat is the official mascot at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A land grant is a gift of land made by the government for projects such as roads, railroads, or rewards for military service, or especially academic institutions. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Nickname: Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State Counties Pima Government  - Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area  - City  195. ... Representation of a university class, 1350s. ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Public Ivy is a term first used by American author Richard Moll to mean a public institution that provide[s] an Ivy League collegiate experience at a public school price. ... The University of Arizona College of Medicine is the only MD-granting degree in the state of Arizona, and only accepts students who have attained the status of resident of the state of Arizona. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents

History

Founding

Old Main, the oldest building on the University of Arizona campus

The University of Arizona was approved by the Arizona Territorial Legislature in 1885. The city of Tucson had hoped to receive the appropriation for the territory's mental hospital, which carried a sum of money slightly larger than the $25,000 allotted to the territory's only university (the antecedent to Arizona State University was also chartered in 1885, but it was created as Arizona's normal school, and not a university). Tucson, having a smaller contingent of legislators than cities like Prescott and Phoenix, was granted last priority and was awarded the university, which disappointed many city residents. With no parties willing to step forth and provide land for the new institution, the citizens of Tucson prepared to return the money to the Territorial Legislature until two gamblers and a saloon keeper decided to donate the land necessary to build the school. Classes met for the first time in 1891 with 32 students in Old Main, the first building constructed on campus, and still in use to this day. [2] Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 3513 KB) Summary Old Main on the University of Arizona campus. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (3456x2304, 3513 KB) Summary Old Main on the University of Arizona campus. ... 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A normal school is an institution for training teachers. ... Nickname: The Old Pueblo Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Pima Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area    - City 505. ... Prescott Gurley Street in 1918 Prescott by night Prescott is a city in Yavapai County, Arizona, USA. The population was 33,938 at the 2000 census. ... Nickname: Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: , Country State Counties Maricopa Incorporated February 25, 1881 Government  - Type Council-Manager  - Mayor Phil Gordon (D) Area  - City  515. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Because there were no high schools in Arizona Territory, the University maintained separate preparatory classes for the first 23 years of operation.

Campus architecture and museums

The main campus sits on 380 acres (1.5 km²) in central Tucson, about one mile (1.6 km) northeast of downtown. There are 179 buildings on the main campus. Many of the early buildings, including the Arizona State Museum buildings (one of them the 1927 main library) and Centennial Hall, were designed by Roy Place, a prominent Tucson architect. It was Place's use of red brick that set the tone for the red brick facades that are a basic and ubiquitous part of nearly all UA buildings, even those built in recent decades. Indeed, almost every UA building has red brick as a major component of the design, or at the very least, a stylistic accent to harmonize it with the other buildings on campus. [1]


The campus is roughly divided into quadrants. The north and south sides of campus are delineated by a grassy expanse called the Mall, which stretches from Old Main eastward to the campus' eastern border at Campbell Avenue (a major north-south arterial street). The west and east sides of campus are separated roughly by Highland Avenue and the Student Union Memorial Center (see below).


The science and mathematics buildings tend to be clustered in the southwest quadrant; the intercollegiate athletics facilities to the southeast; the arts and humanities buildings to the northwest (with the dance department being a major exception as its main facilities are far to the east end of campus), with the engineering buildings in the north central area. The optical and space sciences buildings are clustered on the east side of campus near the sports stadiums and the (1976) main library.


Speedway Boulevard, one of Tucson's primary east-west arterial streets, traditionally defined the northern boundary of campus but since the 1980s, several university buildings have been constructed north of this street, expanding into a neighborhood traditionally filled with apartment complexes and single-family homes. The University has purchased a handful of these apartment complexes for student housing in recent years. Sixth Street typically defines the southern boundary, with single-family homes (many of which are rented out to students) south of this street.


Park Avenue has traditionally defined the western boundary of campus, and there is a stone wall which runs along a large portion of the east side of the street, leading to the old Main Gate, and into the driveway leading to Old Main.


Along or adjacent to all of these major streets are a wide variety of retail facilities serving the student, faculty and staff population: shops, bookstores, bars, banks, credit unions, coffeehouses and major chain fast-food restaurants such as Burger King and Chick-fil-a. The area near University Boulevard and Park Avenue, near the Main Gate, has long been a major center of such retail activity; many of the shops have been renovated since the late 1990s and a nine-story Marriott hotel was built in this immediate district in 1996. Burger King (often abbreviated to BK) is a large international chain of fast food restaurants, predominantly selling burgers, french fries, soft drinks, desserts, and various sandwiches. ... Chick-fil-A(IPA pronunciation: ) is a chain headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, that specializes in chicken entrees. ... Marriott International, Inc. ...


The oldest campus buildings are located west of Old Main. Most of the buildings east of Old Main date from the 1940s to the 1980s, with a few recent buildings constructed in the years since 1990.

Student Union Memorial Center
Student Union Memorial Center

The Student Union Memorial Center, located on the north side of the Mall east of Old Main, was completely reconstructed between 2000 and 2003, replacing a 270,000 square foot (25,000 m²) structure originally opened in 1951 (with additions in the 1960s). The new $60 million student union has 405,000 square feet (37,600 m²) of space on four levels, including 14 restaurants (including a food court with such national chains as Burger King, Panda Express, Papa John's Pizza and Chick-fil-A), a new bookstore that includes a counter for Clinique merchandise, 23 meeting rooms, eight lounge areas (including one dedicated to the USS Arizona), a computer lab, a U.S. Post Office, a copy center named Fast Copy, and a video arcade. [2] Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Burger King (often abbreviated to BK) is a large international chain of fast food restaurants, predominantly selling burgers, french fries, soft drinks, desserts, and various sandwiches. ... Panda Express logo Exterior view of a typical Panda Express restaurant. ... Papa Johns Pizza (NASDAQ: PZZA) is the third largest carryout and delivery pizza restaurant in the United States behind Pizza Hut and Dominos Pizza; it is based in Louisville, Kentucky. ... Chick-fil-A(IPA pronunciation: ) is a chain headquartered in Atlanta, Georgia, that specializes in chicken entrees. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Arizona (BB-39) in Pearl Harbor, see USS Arizona Memorial. ...


A list of dorms goes as follows:

  • Apache-Santa Cruz Hall
  • Arizona-Sonora Hall
  • Babcock Inn
  • Cochise Hall
  • Coconino Hall
  • Colonia de la Paz Hall
  • Coronado Hall
  • Gila Hall
  • Graham-Greenlee Hall
  • Hopi Lodge
  • Kaibab-Huachuca Hall
  • Manzanita-Mohave Hall
  • Maricopa Hall
  • Navajo-Pinal Stadium Hall
  • Pima Lodge & Pima House
  • Posada San Pedro Hall
  • Pueblo de la Cienega Hall
  • Sky View Apartments
  • Villa del Puente Hall
  • Yavapai Hall
  • Yuma Hall

For current museum hours, fees, and directions see "campus visitor's guide" in the external links. Cochise Hall is a dormitory at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ...

  • Much of the main campus has been designated an arboretum. Plants from around the world are labeled along a self-guided plant walk. The Krutch Cactus Garden includes the tallest Boojum tree in the state of Arizona.[3] (The university also manages Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park, located c. 85 miles (137 km) north of the main campus.)
  • Two herbaria are located on the University campus and both are referred to as "ARIZ" in the Index Herbariorum
    • The University of Arizona Herbarium - contains roughly 400,000 specimens of plants.
    • The Robert L. Gilbertson Mycological Herbarium - contains more than 40,000 specimens of fungi.
  • University of Arizona Museum of Art.
  • The Arizona Historical Society is located one block west of campus.
  • The University of Arizona Mineral Museum is located inside Flandrau Science Center. The collection dates back to 1892 and contains over 20,000 minerals from around the world, including many examples from Arizona and Mexico.
  • The University of Arizona Poetry Center
  • The Stevie Eller Dance Theatre, opened in 2003 (across the Mall from McKale Center) as a 28,600 square foot (2,660 m²) dedicated performance venue for the UA's dance program, one of the most highly regarded university dance departments in the United States. Designed by Gould Evans, a Phoenix-based architectural firm, the theatre was awarded the 2003 Citation Award from the American Institute of Architects, Arizona Chapter. [3]
  • The football stadium has the Navajo-Pinal-Sierra dormitory in it. The dorm rooms are underneath the seats along the South and East sides of the stadium. [4]

An arboretum is a botanical garden primarily devoted to trees and other woody plants, forming a living collection of trees intended at least partly for scientific study. ... Binomial name Fouquieria columnaris The boojum, Fouquieria columnaris, is a bizarre-looking tree native to Baja California, in the family Fouquieriaceae. ... Boyce Thompson Arboretum State Park is an Arizona state park located near United States. ... Divisions Chytridiomycota Zygomycota Ascomycota Basidiomycota The Fungi (singular: fungus) are a large group of organisms ranked as a kingdom within the Domain Eukaryota. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... The Center for Creative Photography (CCP), established in 1975 and located on the University of Arizona (Tucson) campus, is a research facility and archival repository containing the full archives of over 60 of the most famous American photographers including those of Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Harry Callahan and Garry Winogrand... Ansel Easton Adams (February 20, 1902 – April 22, 1984) was an American photographer, best known for his black-and-white photographs of the American West. ... For the song by Ai Otsuka, see Planetarium (song) // A planetarium is a theatre built primarily for presenting educational and entertaining shows about astronomy and the night sky, or for training in celestial navigation. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The University of Arizona Mineral Museum (UAMM), is currently located on the campus of The University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... McKale Center is an athletic arena located on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... The American Institute of Architects (AIA) is a professional organization for architects in the United States. ...

Organization

Regents

The University of Arizona, like its sister campuses Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University, is governed by the Arizona Board of Regents or the ABOR, a 12-member body. According to information published by the ABOR office and available on their Web site, eight volunteer members are appointed by the Governor to staggered eight-year terms; two students serve on the Board for two-year appointments, with the first year being a nonvoting apprentice year. The Governor and the Superintendent of Public Instruction serve as voting ex-officio members. The ABOR provides "policy guidance" and oversight to the three major degree-granting universities, as provided for by Title 15 of the Arizona Revised Statutes. Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a public university in Flagstaff, Arizona in the United States. ...


Administration

Presidents of the University


The current and 19th university president is Robert N. Shelton, whose term began in 2006. The former president, Peter Likins, vacated his post at the conclusion of the 2005-06 academic term.[1] Notable past UA presidents include Manuel Pacheco, Richard Harvill and John Schaefer. Robert N. Shelton (born 1948), is currently Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Academics

Academic subdivisions

The University of Arizona offers 334 fields of study at four levels: bachelor's, masters, doctoral, and first professional.


Academic departments and programs are organized into colleges and schools. Typically, schools are largely independent or separately important from their parent college. In addition, not all schools are a part of a college. The university maintains a current list of colleges and schools at http://www.arizona.edu/index/colleges.php [4].


Admissions

The UA is considered a "more selective" university by U.S. News and World Report.[5] The UA is also known for accepting homely women, especially compared to their superior counterparts in Tempe. In 2005, the UA matriculated 5,974 freshmen, out of 15,724 freshmen admitted, from an application pool of nearly 18,000 applicants. The average person admitted to the university as a freshman in 2005 had a weighted GPA of 3.38 and an average score of 1122 out of 1600 on the SAT admissions test. Ten students were Flinn Scholars and 104 were National Merit Scholars. [6] U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... A National Merit Scholarship is a college scholarship awarded by the National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC). ...


UA students hail from all states in the U.S. While nearly 72 % of students are from Arizona, 8 % are from California, followed by a significant student presence from Illinois, Texas, and Washington (2004).[7] The UA has approximately 2,200 international students representing 135 countries. International students comprise approximately 6 % of the total enrollment at UA.[7] For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Official language(s) English Spoken language(s) English 74. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) English[1] Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Largest metro area Chicago Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 25th  - Total 57,918 sq mi (149,998 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 390 miles (629 km)  - % water 4. ... Official language(s) No official language See languages of Texas Capital Austin Largest city Houston Largest metro area Dallas–Fort Worth Metroplex Area  Ranked 2nd  - Total 261,797 sq mi (678,051 km²)  - Width 773 miles (1,244 km)  - Length 790 miles (1,270 km)  - % water 2. ... Official language(s) English Capital Olympia Largest city Seattle Area  Ranked 18th  - Total 71,342 sq mi (184,827 km²)  - Width 240 miles (385 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 6. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Academic and research reputation

Among the strongest programs at UA are optical sciences, astronomy, astrophysics, planetary sciences, hydrology, hydrogeology, linguistics, philosophy, architecture and landscape architecture, engineering, and anthropology. For the book by Sir Isaac Newton, see Opticks. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Spiral Galaxy ESO 269-57 Astrophysics is the branch of astronomy that deals with the physics of the universe, including the physical properties (luminosity, density, temperature, and chemical composition) of celestial objects such as stars, galaxies, and the interstellar medium, as well as their interactions. ... Planetary science, also known as planetology or planetary astronomy, is the science of planets, or planetary systems, and the solar system. ... Water covers 70% of the Earths surface. ... Hydrogeology (hydro- meaning water, and -geology meaning the study of the Earth) is the part of hydrology that deals with the distribution and movement of groundwater in the soil and rocks of the Earths crust, (commonly in aquifers). ... Linguistics is the scientific study of language, which can be theoretical or applied. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Central Park, like all parks, is an example of landscape architecture. ... Engineering is the applied science of acquiring and applying knowledge to design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... Anthropology (from Greek: ἀνθρωπος, anthropos, human being; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the study of humanity. ...


Arizona is classified as a Carnegie Foundation "Doctoral/Research Universities—Extensive" university.[8] The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education is a report classifying all accredited degree_granting colleges and United States. ...


The university receives more than $400 million USD annually in research funding, generating nearly 75% of the research dollars in the Arizona university system. This figure is triple the total research funds generated by Arizona State University and Northern Arizona University combined,[9] and 26th highest in the U.S. (including public and private institutions).[8] The university has an endowment of $466.7 million USD as of 2006(2006 NACUBO Endowment Study) .[10] Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Northern Arizona University (NAU) is a public university in Flagstaff, Arizona in the United States. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


UA is awarded more NASA grants for space exploration than any other university nationally.[11] The UA was recently awarded over $325 million USD to lead NASA's 2007 mission to Mars to explore the Martian Arctic. The school's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory's work in the Cassini spacecraft orbit around Saturn is larger than that of any other university globally. The UA laboratory designed and operated the atmospheric radiation investigations and imaging on the probe.[12] The UA operates the HiRISE camera, a part of the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. This article is about the American space agency. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... The Lunar and Planetary Laboratory (LPL) is a research center for planetary science located in Tucson, Arizona. ... Cassini-Huygens is a joint NASA/ESA/ASI unmanned space mission intended to study Saturn and its moons. ... Adjectives: Saturnian Atmosphere [3] Scale height: 59. ... HiRISE The High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera is a camera onboard the Mars Reconaissance Orbiter. ... NASAs Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is a multipurpose spacecraft designed to conduct reconnaissance and exploration of Mars from orbit. ...

  • The Eller College of Management McGuire Entrepreneurship program is currently the number 1 ranked undergraduate program in the country, ahead of numerous Ivy League schools. This ranking was made by The Princeton Review and Entrepreneur Magazine.
  • The Council for Aid to Education ranked the UA 12th among public universities and 24th overall in financial support and gifts.[13] Campaign Arizona, an effort to raise over $1 billion USD for the school, exceeded that goal by $200 million a year earlier than projected.[14]

The logo of the National Science Foundation The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent United States government agency that supports fundamental research and education in all the non-medical fields of science and engineering. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... For the singer/songwriter, see Jon Peter Lewis. ... For the victim of Mt. ... Rhodes House in Oxford Rhodes Scholarships were created by Cecil John Rhodes. ... Barry Morris Goldwater (January 1, 1909 – May 29, 1998) was a five-term United States Senator from Arizona (1953–1965, 1969–87) and the Republican Partys nominee for president in the 1964 election. ... The Fulbright Program is program of educational grants (Fulbright Fellowships) sponsored by the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs of the United States Department of State. ... The National Merit Scholarship Program is an academic scholarship competition for recognition and college scholarships administered by National Merit Scholarship Corporation (NMSC), a privately funded, not-for-profit organization. ...

Notable associations

The Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) is a consortium of universities and other institutions. ... 50 cm refracting telescope at Nice Observatory. ... The Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) is a United States astronomical observatory located on a 2,096 m (6,880 ft) peak of the Quinlan Mountains in the Arizona-Sonoran Desert on the Tohono Oodham Nation, 88 kilometres (55 miles) southwest of Tucson. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ...

Notable rankings

  • The Eller College of Management's programs in Accounting, Entrepreneurship, Management Information Systems, and Marketing are ranked in the nation's top 25 by U.S. News & World Report. The Masters in MIS program has been ranked in the top 5 by U.S. News & World Report since the inception of the rankings.[16] It is one of three programs to have this distinction.
    • The Eller MBA program has ranked among the top 50 programs for 11 straight years by U.S. News & World Report. In 2005 the MBA program was ranked 40th by U.S. News & World Report. Forbes Magazine ranked the Eller MBA program 33rd overall for having the best Return on Investment (ROI), in its fourth biennial rankings of business schools 2005. The MBA program was ranked 24th by The Wall Street Journal's 2005 Interactive Regional Ranking.[13]
  • Out of more than 120 accredited design schools in the country, DesignIntelligence ranked the College’s School of Landscape Architecture as the No. 1 graduate program in the western region while the School of Architecture was rated No. 6 in the western region and 16th nationally for 2007
  • According to the National Academy of Sciences, the Graduate Program in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology is one of the top-rated research departments in ecology and evolutionary biology in the U.S.
  • The Systems and Industrial Engineering (SIE) Department is ranked 18th in the 'America's Best Graduate Schools 2006' by US News and World Report.

The Eller College of Management (Eller) is a top-ranked business school at the University of Arizona located in Tucson, Arizona. ... It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... Entrepreneurship is the practice of starting new organizations, particularly new businesses generally in response to identified opportunities. ... Management Information Systems (MIS), are information systems, typically computer based, that are used within an organization. ... “Next big thing” redirects here. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Wall Street Journal is an influential international daily newspaper published in New York City, New York with an average daily circulation of 1,800,607 (2002). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Central Park, like all parks, is an example of landscape architecture. ... This article is about building architecture. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... James E. Rogers College of Law is the law school at the University of Arizona located in Tucson, Arizona. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Earth science (also known as geoscience or the geosciences), is an all-embracing term for the sciences related to the planet Earth. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... // In the United States the Pharm. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Libraries

The U of A's main library
The U of A's main library

In 2005, the Association of Research Libraries, in its "Ranked Lists for Institutions for 2005", ranked the UA libraries as the 33rd overall university library in North America (out of 113) based on various statistical measures of quality; this is one rank below Duke University, one rank ahead of Northwestern University.[5] Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ... The Association of Research Libraries is an organization of research libraries in North America. ... Duke University is a private coeducational research university located in Durham, North Carolina, USA. Founded by Methodists and Quakers in the present-day town of Trinity in 1838, the school moved to Durham in 1892. ... For other uses, see Northwestern. ...


As of 2006, the UA's library system contains nearly five million volumes.


The Main Library, opened in 1976, serves as the library system's reference, periodical, and administrative center; most of the main collections and special collections are housed here as well. The Main Library is located on the southeast quadrant of campus near McKale Center and Arizona Stadium. McKale Center is an athletic arena located on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... Arizona Stadium is an open-air stadium located on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ...


In 2002, a $20 million, 100,000 square foot (10,000 m²) addition, the Integrated Learning Center (ILC), was completed; it is a home base for first-year students (especially those undecided on a major) which features classrooms, auditoriums, a courtyard with an alcove for vending machines, and a greatly expanded computer lab (the Information Commons) with several dozen Gateway and Apple Macintosh G5 workstations (these computers are available for use by the general public (with some restrictions) as well as by UA students, faculty and staff). Much of the ILC was constructed underground, underneath the east end of the Mall; the ILC connects to the basement floor of the Main Library through the Information Commons. As part of the project, additional new office space for the Library was constructed on the existing fifth floor. Gateway has several meanings. ... The first Macintosh computer, introduced in 1984, upgraded to a 512K Fat Mac. The Macintosh or Mac, is a line of personal computers designed, developed, manufactured, and marketed by Apple Computer. ...


The Science and Engineering Library is in an adjacent building from the 1960s that houses volumes and periodicals from those fields. The Music Building (on the northwest quadrant of campus where many of the fine arts disciplines are clustered) houses the Fine Arts Library, including reference collections for architecture, music (including sheet music, recordings and listening stations), and photography. There is a small library at the Center for Creative Photography, also in the fine arts complex, devoted to the art and science of photography. The Law Library is in the law building. The Center for Creative Photography (CCP), established in 1975 and located on the University of Arizona (Tucson) campus, is a research facility and archival repository containing the full archives of over 60 of the most famous American photographers including those of Ansel Adams, Edward Weston, Harry Callahan and Garry Winogrand...


Athletics

Main article: Arizona Wildcats

Like many large public universities in the U.S., sports are a major activity on campus, and receive a large operating budget. Arizona's athletic teams are nicknamed the Wildcats, a name derived from a 1914 football game with then California champions Occidental College, where the L.A. Times asserted that, "the Arizona men showed the fight of wildcats."[18] The University of Arizona participates in the NCAA's Division I-A in the Pacific Ten Conference, which it joined in 1978. The athletic teams at the University of Arizona are known as the Arizona Wildcats. ... For other uses, see United States (disambiguation) and US (disambiguation). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Occidental College, located in Los Angeles, California, is a small private coeducational liberal arts college. ... The Los Angeles Times (also L.A. Times) is a daily newspaper published in Los Angeles, California and distributed throughout the Western United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ...


Men's Basketball

The men's basketball team has been one of the nation's most successful programs since Lute Olson was hired as head coach in 1983, and is known as a national powerhouse in Division I men's basketball. As of 2007, the team has amassed 20 consecutive 20-win seasons, and reached the NCAA Tournament 23 consecutive years, which is the longest active and second-longest streak in NCAA history (University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill has the longest streak with 27). Lute Olson has taken the Wildcats to the Final Four of the NCAA tournament in 1988, 1994, 1997, and 2001. In 1997, Arizona defeated the University of Kentucky, the defending national champions, to win the NCAA National Championship (NCAA Men's Division I Basketball Championship) by a score of 84-79 in overtime; Olson's first national championship victory. The 1997 championship team became the first and only in NCAA history to defeat three number-one seeds en route to a national title. Current assistant coach, Miles Simon was chosen as 1997 Final Four MVP. Lute Olson has also led Arizona to the third highest winning percentage over the last twenty years. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the sport. ... Robert Luther Lute Olson (born September 22, 1934 in Mayville, North Dakota) is the current mens basketball head coach at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... Year 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1983 Gregorian calendar). ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is a public, coeducational, research university located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States. ... // Final four redirects here. ... The 1988 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The 1994 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The 1997 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 64 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... The 2001 NCAA Mens Division I Basketball Tournament involved 65 schools playing in single-elimination play to determine the national champion of mens NCAA Division I college basketball. ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... The Kentucky Wildcats are the mens and womens athletic teams representing the University of Kentucky (UK), a founding member of the Southeastern Conference. ... // Final four redirects here. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Miles Julian Simon (born November 21, 1975 in Stockholm, Sweden) is a former professional basketball point guard who played in Europe and briefly with the Orlando Magic of the NBA. Played for two seasons for the Dakota Wizards (Bismarck, ND) of the Continental Basketball Association, and led the Wizards to... At the conclusion of the NCAA mens and womens Division I basketball championships (the Final Four tournaments), the Associated Press selects a Most Outstanding Player. ...


In 1972 Fred Snowden was hired as the head basketball coach, making Arizona the first Division I school with an African American head coach. Fred Snowden was the head coach of the mens basketball team at the University of Arizona from 1972 to 1982. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ...


The Wildcats play their home games at the McKale Center in Tucson. A number of former Wildcats have gone on to pursue successful professional NBA careers (especially during the Lute Olson era), including Gilbert Arenas, Richard Jefferson, Mike Bibby, Jason Terry, Sean Elliott, Damon Stoudamire, Luke Walton, Hassan Adams, Salim Stoudamire, Andre Iguodala, Channing Frye and Steve Kerr. McKale Center is an athletic arena located on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... Gilbert Jay Arenas Jr. ... Richard Alle Jefferson (June 21, 1980, Los Angeles, California) is a 6 ft 7 in (2. ... Michael (Mike) Bibby (born May 13, 1978 in Cherry Hill, New Jersey) is an American professional basketball point guard for the NBAs Sacramento Kings, and the son of former NBA and UCLA player and former USC basketball coach and current Philadelphia 76ers assistant coach Henry Bibby. ... Jason Eugene Terry (born September 15, 1977 in Seattle, Washington) is an American professional basketball player currently playing with the Dallas Mavericks. ... Sean Michael Elliott (born February 2, 1968 in Tucson, Arizona) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Damon Lamon Stoudamire (born September 3, 1973 in Portland, Oregon) is an American NBA basketball player, currently playing for the Memphis Grizzlies. ... Luke Theodore Walton (born March 28, 1980 in San Diego, California) is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Hassan Adams (born June 20, 1984, in Los Angeles, California) is a former collegiate mens basketball player who attended the University of Arizona from 2002 to 2006. ... Charles Salim Stoudamire (born October 11, 1982 in Portland, Oregon) is an American professional basketball player in the NBA, currently with the Atlanta Hawks. ... Andre Tyler Iguodala (born January 28, 1984, in Springfield, Illinois) is an American professional basketball player who plays for the Philadelphia 76ers of the NBA. He was sometimes nicknamed Iggy, and The Other A.I. because his initials are identical to former Sixers teammate Allen Iversons. ... Image:Http://sportsmedia. ... Stephen Douglas Steve Kerr (born September 27, 1965 in Beirut, Lebanon) is a retired American professional basketball player. ...


Football

The football team began at the University of Arizona in 1899 under the nickname "Varsity" (a name kept until the 1914 season when the team was deemed the "Wildcats").[19] United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The University of Arizona is the only Pac-10 or Big-10 team to never appear in the Rose Bowl. The Rose Bowl can refer to: The Rose Bowl stadium in Pasadena, California. ...


The football team was notably successful in the 1990s, under head coach Dick Tomey; his "Desert Swarm" defense was characterized by tough, hard-nosed tactics. In 1993, the team had its first 10-win season and beat the University of Miami Hurricanes in the Fiesta Bowl by a score of 29-0. It was the bowl game's only shutout in its then 23-year history. In 1998, the team posted a school-record 12-1 season and made the Holiday Bowl in which it defeated the Nebraska Cornhuskers. Arizona ended that season ranked 3rd nationally and 2nd in several publications. The 1998 Holiday Bowl was televised on ESPN and set the now-surpassed record of being the most watched of any bowl game in that network's history (the current record belongs to the 2005 Alamo Bowl between Michigan and Nebraska). Of all of the teams in both the Big 10 and Pac 10, the University of Arizona is the only team that has not been to a Rose Bowl. Also, it is the only team in the Pac 10 that has never won the conference outright. The program is led by Mike Stoops, brother of Bob Stoops, the head football coach at the University of Oklahoma. Dick Tomey (born June 20, 1938, in Bloomington, Indiana) is a football coach. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the university in Coral Gables, Florida. ... The Fiesta Bowl, now sponsored by Tostitos tortilla chips (a Frito-Lay product), is a United States college football game played annually since 1971. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Holiday Bowl is a post-season NCAA-sanctioned Division I-A college football bowl game that has been played annually at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, California, since 1978. ... Seal of the University of Nebraska The University of Nebraska is one of two public university systems in the state of Nebraska, USA. The system has four universities and a technical college: University of Nebraska-Lincoln University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska at Kearney University of Nebraska Medical... ESPN/ESPN-DT, formerly an acronym for Entertainment and Sports Programming Network, is an [[United States|Amer<nowiki>Insert non-formatted text here--68. ... The Alamo Bowl is a major American college football bowl game played annually since 1993 in the 65,000-seat Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, UM or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Seal of the University of Nebraska The University of Nebraska is one of two public university systems in the state of Nebraska, USA. The system has four universities and a technical college: University of Nebraska-Lincoln University of Nebraska at Omaha University of Nebraska at Kearney University of Nebraska Medical... Michael J. Stoops (born December 31, 1961) is the head football coach at the University of Arizona, his first head coaching position. ... Robert A. Bob Stoops (born September 9, 1960 in Youngstown, Ohio) is the head coach of the University of Oklahoma football team. ... University of Oklahoma, abbreviated OU, is a coeducational public research university located in the U.S. state of Oklahoma founded in 1890. ...

Baseball

The baseball team had its first season in 1904. The baseball team has captured three national championship titles in 1976, 1980, and 1986, all coached by Jerry Kindall. Arizona baseball teams have appeared in the NCAA National Championship title series a total of six times, including 1956, 1959, 1963, 1976, 1980, and 1986 (College World Series). The team is currently coached by Andy Lopez; aided by Assistant Coach Mark Wasikowski, Assistant Coach Jeff Casper and Volunteer Assistant Coach Keith Francis. Arizona baseball also has a student section named The Hot Corner. This article is about the sport. ... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Gerald Donald Kindall (born May 27, 1935 in St. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... The College World Series is the tournament which determines the NCAA Division I collegiate baseball champion. ... Andy Lopez is currently the head baseball coach at the University of Arizona. ...


Softball

The Arizona softball team is among the top programs in the country and a perennial powerhouse. The softball team has won eight NCAA Women's College World Series titles, in 1991, 1993, 1994, 1996, 1997, 2001, 2006 and 2007 under head coach Mike Candrea (NCAA Softball Championship). Arizona defeated the University of Tennessee in the 2007 National Championship series in Oklahoma City. The team has appeared in the NCAA National Championship in 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2006, and 2007 a feat second only to UCLA, and has reached the College World Series 19 of the past 20 years. Coach Mike Candrea, along with former Arizona pitcher Jennie Finch, led the 2004 U.S. Olympic softball team to a gold medal in Athens, Greece. The Wildcat softball team plays at Rita Hillenbrand Memorial Stadium. Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Mike Candrea is the markedly successful head softball coach at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... NCAA womens softball champions Division I 1982 UCLA 2-0 (8 inn. ... The University of Tennessee (UT), sometimes called the University of Tennessee at Knoxville (UT Knoxville or UTK), is the flagship institution of the statewide land-grant University of Tennessee public university system in the American state of Tennessee. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... For the band, see 1997 (band). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Binomial name Ucla xenogrammus Holleman, 1993 The largemouth triplefin, Ucla xenogrammus, is a fish of the family Tripterygiidae and only member of the genus Ucla, found in the Pacific Ocean from Viet Nam, the Philippines, Palau and the Caroline Islands to Papua New Guinea, Australia (including Christmas Island), and the... Jennie Finch (born September 3, 1980), or occasionally using her married name, Jennie Daigle, is a softball player and an American athlete. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Athens (disambiguation). ... Rita Hillenbrand Memorial Stadium is the softball stadium for the University of Arizona. ...


Men's and Women's Golf

The university's golf teams have also been notably successful. The men's team won a national championship in 1992 (NCAA Division I Men's Golf Championships), while the women's team won national championships in 1996 and 2000 (NCAA Women's Golf Championship). This article is about the sport. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... The NCAA Division I Mens Golf Championships, played in late May or early June, is the top annual competition in U.S. mens collegiate golf. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... NCAA Champions for Womens Golf Division One 1982 Tulsa 1983 TCU 1984 Miami (Fla) 1985 Florida 1986 Florida 1987 San Jose St. ...


Men's Lacrosse

The lacrosse team is affectionately known as the “Laxcats”. Its existence, since the mid-sixties, is saturated with a rich tradition of success. In the 60’s, Arizona was a Division I Varsity program, coached by the legendary Carl Runk, an Arizona graduate and football player. In 1998 Carl retired after twenty-eight years at Towson University in Maryland. The most well known player to graduate from that era was a skinny, feisty goalie named Jerry Rivers. You may know him today as mega TV personality, Geraldo Rivera. During that Varsity era, the team rose as high as number 3 in the Nation. Towson University, formerly Maryland State Normal School (1866-1935), Maryland State Teachers College at Towson (1935-1963), Towson State College (1963-1976), Towson State University (1976-1997), is a public university located in Towson in Baltimore County, Maryland. ... Official language(s) None (English, de facto) Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Area  Ranked 42nd  - Total 12,407 sq mi (32,133 km²)  - Width 101 miles (145 km)  - Length 249 miles (400 km)  - % water 21  - Latitude 37° 53′ N to 39° 43′ N  - Longitude 75° 03′ W to 79° 29... For the British bandleader see Gerald Bright Geraldo Miguel Rivera (born July 4, 1943, as Gerald Michael Riviera), known on television as Geraldo Rivera or simply Geraldo is an American television journalist and former talk show host. ... For the British bandleader see Gerald Bright Geraldo Miguel Rivera (born July 4, 1943, as Gerald Michael Riviera), known on television as Geraldo Rivera or simply Geraldo is an American television journalist and former talk show host. ...


In the early 70’s Craig Hassell, a transplanted Long Island lacrosse fanatic, stepped up and kept the tradition alive. The 70’s rosters were packed with the types of free spirited players that typified the era. Predominately from Long Island and Maryland, these free spirits had little cares other than their dedication to the game. In 1976 the timing was right for yet another transplanted Long Islander to assume the responsibility for the stability of the University of Arizona Program. Mickey-Miles Felton, at the age of 30, had begun his Arizona career as a defenseman, was named the Head Coach. During Felton's tenure as Head Coach, he coached many notable players. One standout was from San Francisco who Felton recrutited with particular passion. His name was Nathaniel Schmidt. Schmidt, known throughout campus as the "Nate Dogg", was a short but fiery player who lead the team to several successful years. His official helmet from the 2001-2002 season now hangs proudly in Nate Dogg's favorite establishment, Dirtbags.


The Laxcats have claimed only one Conference Title, occurring in 1990. In 1997, the Laxcats were ranked Number 1 heading into the National Tournament but were upset early by Brigham Young University in the second round of the tournament. Following the 2001 season Mickey-Miles Felton stepped down with 278 career wins to assume the roll of General Manager. Assistant Coach Adam Hopkins, of New York Institute of Technology, was elevated to the top spot as Head Coach. Following the 2003 season, Hopkins left and his assistant Ken Broschart was moved into the Head Coaching position. Broschart brought in Matt Hunter, and the following year Tim Spruyt as the NYIT pipeline continued. Hopkins, Broschart, and Hunter were all All Americans while at NYIT. The New York Institute of Technology (also known as NYIT and New York Tech) is a private, co-educational college in New York in the USA. The college has three New York campuses, two on Long Island and one on the Upper West Side of Manhattan, as well as global...


Other

Three national championships for synchronized swimming were won in 1980, 1981, and 1984, though these championships were in the Association of Intercollegiate Athletics for Women, and not the NCAA. Russian synchronized swimming team, May 2007 Synchronized swimming is a hybrid of swimming, gymnastics, and dance. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1981 (MCMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link displays the 1981 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... The Association for Intercollegiate Athletics for Women was founded in 1971 to govern collegiate womens athletics in the United States and to administer national championships. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Although surprising to some, the University of Arizona has a noteworthy history in ice hockey. The school's club hockey team, known as the Icecats, has won over 520 games since its inception in 1978. The Icecats defeated Penn State for the National Collegiate Club Hockey National Championship in 1985. They are now part of ACHA Division I. Ice hockey, known simply as hockey in areas where it is more common than field hockey, is a team sport played on ice. ... Year 1978 (MCMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays the 1978 Gregorian calendar). ... The Pennsylvania State University The Pennsylvania State University (commonly known as Penn State) is a state-related land-grant university in Pennsylvania, with over 80,000 students at 24 campuses throughout the state. ... Year 1985 (MCMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays 1985 Gregorian calendar). ... Acha may refer to: Acha, Argyll and Bute, Scotland Acha (doll), a character in Namcos 1986 arcade game, Toy Pop Acha Mountain Fortress, an earthen fortress Achá American Collegiate Hockey Association American College Health Association Category: ...


Individual National Championships

A number of notable individuals have also won national championships in the NCAA. These include Amanda Beard in 2001 for swimming and Annika Sörenstam in 1991 in golf. The men's cross country has also produced two individual national titles in 1986 (Aaron Ramirez) and 1994 (Martin Keino) (NCAA Men's Cross Country Champions). The women's cross country also produced two individual national titles in 1996 and 2001 (NCAA Women's Cross Country Championship). Another notable individual was football standout Vance Johnson who won the NCAA long jump in 1982. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Amanda Ray Beard (Irvine, California, October 29, 1981) is an American Olympic swimmer. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... This article concentrates on human swimming. ...   (born October 9, 1970) is a Swedish professional golfer. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... The Minnesota State Highschool Cross Country Meet A cross country race in Seaside, Oregon. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ... NCAA Team Champions for Mens Cross Country Division One 1938 Indiana 1939 Michigan St. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... NCAA team Champions for Womens Cross Country Division One 1981 Virginia 1982 Virginia 1983 Oregon 1984 Wisconsin 1985 Wisconsin 1986 Texas 1987 Oregon 1988 Kentucky 1989 Villanova 1990 Villanova 1991 Villanova 1992 Villanova 1993 Villanova 1994 Villanova 1995 Providence 1996 Stanford 1997 Brigham Young 1998 Villanova 1999 Brigham Young...


Rivalries

A strong academic and athletic rivalry exists between the University of Arizona and Arizona State University located in Tempe. The UA leads the all-time record against ASU in men's basketball (138-73), football (44-35-1), and baseball (224-189-1) as of January 2006. The football rivalry game between the schools is known as "The Duel in the Desert." The trophy awarded after each game, the Territorial Cup, is the nation's oldest rivalry trophy, distinguished by the NCAA. Rivalries have also been created with other Pac-10 teams, especially University of California, Los Angeles which has provided a worthy softball rival and was Arizona's main basketball rival in the early and mid-1990s. Arizona State University (ASU) is a public research institution of higher education and research with campuses located in the Phoenix Metropolitan Area. ... Location in Maricopa County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Maricopa Incorporated November 29, 1894 Government  - Mayor Hugh Hallman Area  - City  39. ... The Territorial Cup is a trophy that is awarded annually to the winner of the college football game between the Arizona State University (ASU) Sun Devils and the University of Arizona (UA) Wildcats and has also served as the symbol of the long standing rivalry between the two schools. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ... This article is about the sport. ...


Mascot

The University mascot is an anthropomorphized wildcat named Wilbur. The identity of Wilbur is kept secret through the year as the mascot appears only in costume. In 1986, Wilbur married his longtime wildcat girlfriend, Wilma. Together, Wilbur and Wilma appear along with the cheerleading squad at most Wildcat sporting events.[20] Wilbur was originally created by Bob White as a cartoon character in the University's humor magazine, Kitty Kat. From 1915 through the 1950s the school mascot was a live bobcat, a species known locally as a wildcat. 1959 marked the creation of the first incarnated Wilbur, when University student John Paquette and his roommate, Dick Heller, came up with idea of creating a costume for a student to wear. Ed Stuckenhoff was chosen to wear the costume at the homecoming game in 1959 against Texas Tech and since then it has become a long-standing tradition. Wilbur will celebrate his 50th birthday in November 2009. Image File history File linksMetadata Wilma_wilbur. ... Anthropomorphism, also referred to as personification or prosopopeia, is the attribution of human characteristics to inanimate objects, animals, forces of nature, and others. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1777) The Bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American mammal of the cat family, Felidae. ... Wilbur the Wildcat is the official mascot at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... Year 1986 (MCMLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link displays 1986 Gregorian calendar). ... Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets cheerleaders at a college basketball game. ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1777) The Bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American mammal of the cat family, Felidae. ...


Zona Zoo

Main article: Zona zoo

The Official Student Section and Student Ticketing Program for University of Arizona Athletics // The Official Student Section and Student Ticketing Program for University of Arizona Athletics In the fall of 2002, ASUA (Associated Students of the University of Arizona) Senator Peter Wand and Assistant Athletic Director Scott Mackenzie collaborated to create the first official student spirit shirt for the University of Arizona men...

Image File history File linksMetadata No higher resolution available. ...

Officially implemented in 2003, Zona Zoo is the official student section and student ticketing program for the University of Arizona Athletics. The Zona Zoo program is co-owned by the Associated Students of the University of Arizona (ASUA) and Arizona Athletics, the program is run by a team of spirited individuals called the Zona Zoo Crew. Zona Zoo is one of the largest and most spirited student sections in NCAA Division I Athletics.


Notable venues

  • McKale Center, opened in 1973, is currently used by men's and women's basketball, women's gymnastics, and women's volleyball. The official capacity has changed often. The largest crowd to see a game in McKale was 15,176 in 1976 for a game against the University of New Mexico, a main rival during that period. In 2000, the floor in McKale was dubbed Lute Olson Court, for the basketball program's winningest coach. During a memorial service in 2001 for Lute's wife, Bobbi, who'd died after a battle with ovarian cancer, the floor was renamed Lute and Bobbi Olson Court. In addition to the playing surface, McKale Center is host to the offices of the UA athletic department. McKale Center is named after J.F. Pop McKale, who was athletic director and coach from 1914 through 1957. Joe Cavaleri ("The Ooh-Aah Man") made his dramatic and inspiring appearances there.
  • Arizona Stadium, built in 1928, seats over 56,000 patrons. It hosts American football games and has also been used for university graduations. The turf is bermuda grass, taken from the local Tucson National Golf Club. Arizona football's home record is 258-139-12. The largest crowd ever in Arizona Stadium was 59,920 in 1996 for a game against Arizona State University.
  • Jerry Kindall Field at Frank Sancet Stadium hosts baseball games.

McKale Center is an athletic arena located on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... For the song by James Blunt, see 1973 (song). ... Year 1976 Pick up sticks(MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The University of New Mexico (UNM) is a public university in Albuquerque, New Mexico. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1957 Gregorian calendar). ... Arizona Stadium is an open-air stadium located on the campus of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Common Bermudagrass Species Bermuda Grass (Cynodon dactylon) - other common names include Bahama Grass, Devils Grass, Couch Grass, Indian Doab, Grama, Scutch Grass - is a highly desirable turf grass in southern climates zones 9 - 12 needed for those regions for its heat and drought tolerance. ... Kindall Field is a baseball stadium in Tucson, Arizona. ... This article is about the sport. ... Rita Hillenbrand Memorial Stadium is the softball stadium for the University of Arizona. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport, in which a ball, eleven to twelve inches (or rarely, 16 inches) (28 to 30. ...

Current state of the university

  • Led by Roger Angel, researchers in the Steward Observatory Mirror Lab at UA are working in concert to build the world's most advanced telescope. Known as the Giant Magellan Telescope, the instrument will produce images 10 times sharper than those from the Earth-orbiting Hubble Telescope. The telescope is set to be completed in 2016 at a cost of $500 million USD. Researchers from at least nine institutions are working to secure the funding for the project. The telescope will include seven 18-ton mirrors capable of providing clear images of volcanoes and riverbeds on Mars and mountains on the moon at a rate 40 times faster than the world's current large telescopes. The mirrors of the Giant Magellan Telescope will be built at UA and transported to a permanent mountaintop site in the Chilean Andes where the telescope will be constructed.[21]
  • Reaching Mars in March 2006, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter contained the HiRISE camera, with Primary Investigator is scientist Alfred McEwen as the lead on the project. This NASA mission to Mars carried a UA-designed camera expected to capture the highest-resolution images of the planet ever seen. The journey of the orbiter was 300 million miles. The project is expected to be in its Primary Science Phase in the month of October.
  • Under construction is the Mars Lander known as the Phoenix Scout Mission, led by UA Scientist Peter Smith. The mission's purpose is to improve knowledge of the Martian Arctic. After landing on Mars, it will be the first mission completely controlled by a university.
  • A downturn in Arizona's economy in the 2000s led to less money being allocated by the state legislature to Arizona's universities. Academic programs were hard-hit, and the university was forced to consider extensive changes, beginning in 2002. As a result, a reorganization known as "Focused Excellence" aimed to focus the mission of the university on research, graduate training, and more selective undergraduate education, in part, by eliminating and merging less popular and low-revenue academic departments. The closure of some programs, notably the innovative Arizona International College and the School of Planning, provoked widespread protest. However, efforts to improve academic performance and to encourage new research areas were not enough to prevent a number of key departures from the faculty in the early 2000s, and budgets remain restricted. "Focused Excellence" was quietly wound up in 2006 and its website removed, but new President Robert Shelton's Dec. 2006 message to the University suggests further retrenchment is essential in the light of funding cuts.
  • The University of Arizona is the only remaining PAC-10 conference school to not award plus and minus grades for courses. Currently, grades are given on a strict 4-point scale with "A" worth 4, "B" worth 3, "C" worth 2, "D" worth 1 and "E" worth zero points. Discussions with students and faculty may lead the UA toward using a plus-minus grading system in the future. [22]

Steward Observatorys main office is located on the University of Arizona campus. ... The Giant Magellan Telescope is a ground-based telescope planned for completion in 2016. ... The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is a telescope orbiting the Earth at the outer edges of the atmosphere. ... 2016 (MMXVI) will be a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about volcanoes in geology. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Mount Cook, a mountain in New Zealand A mountain is a landform that extends above the surrounding terrain in a limited area. ... This article is about the mountain system in South America. ... The Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO), a part of Steward Observatory at the University of Arizona, operates the 12 Meter Telescope on Kitt Peak and the Submillimeter Telescope (SMT) on Mount Graham. ... Steward Observatorys main office is located on the University of Arizona campus. ... The Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) is located on a 6,875 ft peak of the Quinlan Mountains in the Arizona-Sonoran Desert on the Tohono Oodham Nation, 55 miles southwest of Tucson. ... The Submillimeter Telescope (SMT), formerly known as the Heinrich Hertz Submillimeter Telescope, is a submillimeter wavelength radio telescope located on Mount Graham, Arizona. ... Mount Graham is a mountain in southeastern Arizona in the United States. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... NASAs Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) is a multipurpose spacecraft designed to conduct reconnaissance and exploration of Mars from orbit. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the American space agency. ... Adjectives: Martian Atmosphere Surface pressure: 0. ... Phoenix is a robotic spacecraft on a space exploration mission to Mars under the Mars Scout Program. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ...

Student life

Recognized fraternities and sororities of the Greek System

There are currently (2005) 44 fraternity and sorority chapters that are recognized by the University of Arizona. As of 2006, approximately 10.3 % of male UA students were members of campus fraternities, and 10.8 % of female students were members of sororities. The fraternities and sororities are governed by 4 governing councils. The Interfraternity Council (IFC) represents 25 fraternities, the National Pan-Hellenic Council (NPHC) represents 6 historically African-American fraternities and sororities, the Panhellenic Association (PHC) represents 20 sororities and the United Sorority and Fraternity Council (USFC) which represents other minority based Greek organizations. The university maintains a full list of recognized fraternities and sororities as well as a map that highlights the locations of fraternity and sorority houses at http://www.union.arizona.edu/csil/greek/chapters/index.php [23]. The terms fraternity and sorority (from the Latin words and , meaning brother and sister respectively) may be used to describe many social and charitable organizations, for example the Lions Club, Epsilon Sigma Alpha, Rotary International, Optimist International, or the Shriners. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Recognized student clubs and organizations

As mentioned earlier, a new and expansive Student Union building,[24] opened in 2003; it is the largest student union in the U.S. not affiliated with a hotel. The University of Arizona is home to more than 500 philanthropic, multi-cultural, social, athletic, academic, and student clubs and campus organizations. A listing is found at Center For Student Involvement and Leadership (CSIL)[25] through the Student Union. Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


CSIL also houses the Arizona Blue Chip Program[26] one of the largest collegiate-level leadership development programs in the United States, with over 500 active students at any one time throughout the 4 years of the program. Blue Chip was founded in 1999 and has formed a partnership with the University of Wollongong, in Wollongong, Australia where a sister program, the Black Opal Leadership Development Program[27] began in February, 2005. Structure, curriculum, students and even staff are exchanged between the two institutions in a unique international leadership development initiative. This article is about the year. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Wollongong is the 3rd largest city in the state of New South Wales, Australia, after Sydney and Newcastle. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Through funding from the CSIL and the Associated Students of the University of Arizona, clubs are given the resources and encouragement to explore unusual interests.


Student government representation

The logo of the UA Residence Hall Association.

Overall, students at the University of Arizona have, since 1913, been represented by the Associated Students of the University of Arizona (ASUA). Representation is elected by the students every year (usually in March). In recent years, the Graduate and Professional Student Council (GPSC) has emerged to represent issues specific to non-undergrads. Image File history File links N466. ... Image File history File links N466. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


On-Campus residents also have their own Student Leadership Organization known as the Residence Hall Association. Anyone who lives on campus is automatically a member of RHA. The individual subunits of RHA consist of the hall councils of all 21 residence halls. Each Hall Council is composed of a President, a Director of Programming (for social events), a Director of Operations (for administrative duties), and two RHA Representatives who are sent to represent their hall at RHA General Body Meetings. At these meetings, the gathered representatives and RHA Executive Board, elected from within the RHA General Body, discuss issues and make decisions concerning all 6,000 on campus residents. The RHA Executive Board consists of 7 different elected positions (President, Vice President of Public Relations, National Communications Coordinator, Vice President of Finances, Vice President of Operations, Vice President of Services, and Vice President of Programming) along with an appointed Parliamentarian position and an advisor known as the Student Leadership Coordinator.


Miscellany

Film

  • The film Revenge of the Nerds (1984) was filmed at the University of Arizona. In the movie, the Alpha Beta "jock" house is the real-life home to the UA chapter of the Beta Theta Pi Fraternity. The dorm room (with the balcony) seen in the film is located on the third floor of historic Cochise Hall on campus.
  • In the 2006 film You, Me and Dupree, produced by Arizona Alum Scott Stuber, several characters are watching the Arizona Wildcats play football against Washington State University. While playing in their blue uniforms, Arizona scores on a fumble recovery.

It has been suggested that Revenge of the Nerds (2007 film) be merged into this article or section. ... This article is about the year. ... Beta Theta Pi (ΒΘΠ) is a social collegiate fraternity that was founded at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, USA, where it is part of the Miami Triad which includes Phi Delta Theta and Sigma Chi. ... Cochise Hall is a dormitory at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona. ... This be the Danster with a few new trickoms ahahahahahahahahahahahahah Hace fun life life // January 1 - NAFTA goes into effect. ... This article or section contains a plot summary that is overly long or excessively detailed compared to the rest of the article. ... Dennis Lee Hopper (born May 17, 1936) is an Academy Award-nominated American actor and film-maker. ... Sandra Annette Bullock (born July 26, 1964) is an American film actress. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... You, Me and Dupree is a comedy film released on July 14, 2006. ... Washington State University (WSU) is a major public research university in Pullman, Washington. ...

Novels

  • Portions of David Foster Wallace's novel Infinite Jest take place at the University of Arizona campus, including a scene in the administration building satirizing the school's bureaucracy. Foster Wallace is an alumnus of UA.

David Foster Wallace (born February 21, 1962) is an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer. ... Infinite Jest (1996) is a critically acclaimed novel written by David Foster Wallace. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      This article is about the sociological concept. ...

Comedy

  • The campus comedy group, Comedy Corner claims to be the oldest college sketch and improv comedy group.[28]

History

  • The current school colors are cardinal red and navy blue. Before 1900, the colors were sage green and silver. The switch was made when a lucrative discount on red and blue jerseys became available.[29]
  • Arizona's first mascot was a real desert bobcat named "Rufus Arizona", introduced in 1915.[30]
  • In 1952 Jack K. Lee, an applicant for the UA's band directorship, departed Tucson by air following an interview with UA administration. From his airplane window, Lee observed the huge letters on the roof of the UA gymnasium reading "BEAR DOWN." Inspired, Lee scribbled down the music and lyrics to an up-tempo song. By the time his plane landed, he had virtually finished it. A few weeks later Lee was named the UA band director, and in September 1952, the UA band performed "Bear Down, Arizona!" in public for the first time. Soon thereafter, "Bear Down, Arizona!" became accepted as UA's fight song (Bear Down).[31]
  • The Berger Memorial Fountain at the west entrance of Old Main honors the UA students who lost their lives in World War I, and dates back to 1919.[31]

An American college marching band on the field (University of Texas) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching â€“ with their musical performance. ... The Pride of Arizona [[{{{logo}}}|The Pride of Arizona]] The Pride of Arizona (POA) is the University of Arizonas Marching Band. ... The winning Super Bowl team receives the Vince Lombardi Trophy. ... For other uses, see Red (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Blue (disambiguation). ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... Binomial name (Schreber, 1777) The Bobcat (Lynx rufus) is a North American mammal of the cat family, Felidae. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Bear Down is the official motto of the University of Arizona (UA), located in Tucson, Arizona. ... “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ...

Traditions

  • A bell housed on the USS Arizona, one of the two bells rescued from the ship after the attack on Pearl Harbor, has a permanent home in the clock tower of the Student Union Memorial Center on campus. The bell first arrived on campus in July 1946. The bell is rung seven times each month at 12:07 p.m - symbolic of the battleship's sinking on Dec. 7, 1941 - to honor individuals at the UA, as well as after home football victories against non-Arizona teams.[32]
  • At the beginning of each school year, freshmen repaint the "A" on "A" Mountain, and for more than 100 years the "A" remains a Tucson and Wildcat landmark.[33] The "A" is now painted Red, White and Blue until all troops in foreign wars steming from the September 11th attacks return home. This was passed by the ASUA student government body shortly after the war in Afghanistan began in 2001.
  • Spring Fling is the largest student-run carnival in the U.S. and has been held annually by UA students since 1975.[34]

A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... Arizona (BB-39) in Pearl Harbor, see USS Arizona Memorial. ... This article is about the actual attack. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Picture of the A on Sentinel Peak A photograph of the Tucson Valley as seen from A Mountain Sentinel Peak, or more commonly known as A Mountain, is a prominent ridge in the Tucson Mountains west of Tucson, Arizona. ... Nickname: The Old Pueblo Location in Pima County and the state of Arizona Coordinates: Country United States State Arizona Counties Pima Mayor Bob Walkup (R) Area    - City 505. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Notable alumni and staff

Notable alumni include a former U.S. Secretary of the Interior, the U.S. Surgeon General, the creator of the television series "Sesame Street" and founder of the Children's Television Workshop, Arturo Moreno- the owner of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim Major League Baseball team, several NASA astronauts. The following is a list of encyclopedic people associated with the University of Arizona. ... The United States Secretary of the Interior is the head of the United States Department of the Interior, concerned with such matters as national parks and The Secretary is a member of the Presidents Cabinet. ... The Surgeon General of the United States is the leading spokesman on matters of public health in the Government of the United States. ... Sesame Street is an American educational childrens television series for preschoolers and is a pioneer of the contemporary educational television standard, combining both education and entertainment. ... Arturo Arte Moreno (born August of 1946) is a Mexican American billionaire who, on May 15, 2003, made history by becoming the first Hispanic to own a major sports team in the United States when he purchased the Anaheim Angels baseball team from the Walt Disney Company. ... Major league affiliations American League (1961–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 11, 26, 29, 30, 42, 50 Name Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim (2005–present) Anaheim Angels (1997-2004) California Angels (1965-1996) Los Angeles Angels (1961-1965) Other nicknames The Halos, The Wings, The Seraphs... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... This article is about the American space agency. ...


Nobel laureates on the faculty include two members of the College of Optical Sciences: Dr. Nicolaas Bloembergen (Physics, 1981) and Dr. Willis E. Lamb (Physics, 1955). For details, see Nobel Prize laureates by university affiliation. Winners of the Nobel prize are scientists, writers and peacemakers who have been awarded in their field of endeavour, and who are known collectively as either Nobel laureates or Nobel Prize winners. ... Nicolaas Bloembergen (born Dordrecht, March 11, 1920) is a Dutch physicist. ... Willis Eugene Lamb, Junior (b. ... The following list provides information on nobel laureates and their affiliation to academic institutions. ...


The UA has eight Pulitzer Prize winners (alumni and faculty), and more than 50 faculty as elected members of exclusive academies including Britain's Royal Society, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, among others. Two current UA professors were also recently named to Popular Science magazine's list of "Brilliant 10."[35] The Pulitzer Prize is an American award regarded as the highest national honor in print journalism, literary achievements, and musical composition. ... The premises of The Royal Society in London (first four properties only). ... The House of the Academy, Cambridge, Massachusetts. ... This article is not about the magazine, Popular Science Popular science is interpretation of science intended for a general audience, rather than for other scientists or students. ...


Outstanding athletes include NBA players Gilbert Arenas, Bison Dele, Richard Jefferson, Andre Iguodala, Luke Walton, Jason Terry, Hassan Adams, Channing Frye, Mike Bibby, Salim Stoudamire, Steve Kerr, Tom Tolbert, and Wooden Award Winner Sean Elliott, NFL Linebackers Tedy Bruschi, Lance Briggs, Antonio Pierce, NFL cornerback Chris McAlister. Gilbert Jay Arenas Jr. ... Bison Dele (April 6, 1969 – disappeared July 7, 2002), formerly known as Brian Williams (full given name Brian Carson Williams), was an American professional basketball player who finished his career as a center for the NBAs Detroit Pistons. ... Richard Alle Jefferson (June 21, 1980, Los Angeles, California) is a 6 ft 7 in (2. ... Andre Tyler Iguodala (born January 28, 1984, in Springfield, Illinois) is an American professional basketball player who plays for the Philadelphia 76ers of the NBA. He was sometimes nicknamed Iggy, and The Other A.I. because his initials are identical to former Sixers teammate Allen Iversons. ... Luke Theodore Walton (born March 28, 1980 in San Diego, California) is an American professional basketball player for the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). ... Jason Eugene Terry (born September 15, 1977 in Seattle, Washington) is an American professional basketball player currently playing with the Dallas Mavericks. ... Hassan Adams (born June 20, 1984, in Los Angeles, California) is a former collegiate mens basketball player who attended the University of Arizona from 2002 to 2006. ... Image:Http://sportsmedia. ... Michael (Mike) Bibby (born May 13, 1978 in Cherry Hill, New Jersey) is an American professional basketball point guard for the NBAs Sacramento Kings, and the son of former NBA and UCLA player and former USC basketball coach and current Philadelphia 76ers assistant coach Henry Bibby. ... Charles Salim Stoudamire (born October 11, 1982 in Portland, Oregon) is an American professional basketball player in the NBA, currently with the Atlanta Hawks. ... Stephen Douglas Steve Kerr (born September 27, 1965 in Beirut, Lebanon) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Byron Thomas Tolbert (born October 16, 1965 in Long Beach, California) is an American sports radio personality/television color analyst for the National Basketball Association. ... Sean Michael Elliott (born February 2, 1968 in Tucson, Arizona) is a former NBA basketball player. ... Tedy Lacap Bruschi (pronounced BREW-ski) (born June 9, 1973 in San Francisco, California) is an American football linebacker for the New England Patriots of the National Football League. ... Lance Briggs (born November 12, 1980 in Sacramento, California) is an American football linebacker who plays for the Chicago Bears. ... Antonio Pierce (born October 26, 1978 in Ontario, Canada) is a Middle Linebacker on the NFLs New York Giants. ... Christopher James McAlister (born June 14, 1977 in Pasadena, California) is a cornerback who plays for the Baltimore Ravens of the NFL. He went to the University of Arizona. ...


Golf Hall of Famer Annika Sörenstam attended Arizona from 1990-1992, and another current LPGA superstar, Lorena Ochoa, attended from 2000-2002. Softball star Jennie Finch and Olympic swimmers Amanda Beard, Ryk Neethling and Amy Van Dyken were also student athletes. // The World Golf Hall of Fame is located in St. ...   (born October 9, 1970) is a Swedish professional golfer. ... LPGA stands for Ladies Professional Golf Association. ... Personal Information Birth November 15, 1981 ) (age 25) Mexico Height 5 ft 6 in (1. ... Jennie Finch (born September 3, 1980), or occasionally using her married name, Jennie Daigle, is a softball player and an American athlete. ... Amanda Ray Beard (Irvine, California, October 29, 1981) is an American Olympic swimmer. ... Ryk Neethling (born November 17, 1977) is a South African swimmer and the winner of an Olympic gold medal. ... Amy Van Dyken (born February 15, 1973 in Englewood, Colorado) is an American swimmer who has six career Olympic gold medals. ...


Notable Actors Greg Kinnear, Garry Shandling, Michael Biehn, Valerie Perrine, Chase Hoyt, Rob Hyland, Samaire Armstrong, Jack Wagner, Kristen Wiig, Craig T. Nelson and Kate Walsh all attended the school Greg Kinnear (born June 17, 1963) is an Academy Award nominated American actor and television personality, who rocketed to stardom as the first host of E!s Talk Soup. ... Garry Shandling (born November 29, 1949) is an American comedian. ... Michael Connell Biehn (born July 31, 1956) is an American actor known for his roles in The Terminator (1984), Aliens (1986), The Abyss (1989), Tombstone (1993), The Rock (1996), and Grindhouse (2007). ... On the cover of Playboy, August 1981 Valerie Ritchie Perrine (born September 3, 1943) is an American actress and model. ... Chase Henry Hoyt (born August 29, 1980) is an American film, television, and stage actor. ... Rob Hyland (born June 11, 1967) is an American actor. ... Samaire (pronounced Sa-mee-rah) Armstrong (born October 31, 1980) is an American actress perhaps best known for her roles as Emily on Entourage and as Anna Stern on The O.C. Armstrong was born in Tokyo, Japan to a Scottish father, Hunter Armstrong, and an Italian mother, Sylvia. ... Jack Wagner (born October 3, 1959 in Washington, Missouri) is an Emmy Award-nominated American actor. ... Kristen Carroll Wiig (born August 22, 1973) is an American actress, comedian, and impressionist. ... Craig T. Nelson (born Craig Richard Nelson on April 4, 1944 in Spokane, Washington) is an American actor. ... Kathleen Erin Kate Walsh (born October 13, 1967) is an American film and television actress, currently known for her role as Dr. Addison Montgomery (former wife of Dr. McDreamy), on the hit ABC series Greys Anatomy. ...


Other notables include: Rande Gerber, Geraldo Rivera, Nicole Richie, Brooke Burke, comics artist Aline Kominsky-Crumb, singers Linda Ronstadt and Linda McCartney and authors Richard Russo, David Foster Wallace, Barbara Kingsolver and Kitty Kelley as well as film producer Jerry Bruckheimer and Jeff Rein, President and Chief Operating Officer of Walgreens. Rande Gerber (born April 27, 1962) [1] is the owner/operator of the Midnight Oil Chain of Bars and Lounges. ... For the British bandleader see Gerald Bright Geraldo Miguel Rivera (born July 4, 1943, as Gerald Michael Riviera), known on television as Geraldo Rivera or simply Geraldo is an American television journalist and former talk show host. ... Nicole Camille Richie (born September 21, 1981) is an American socialite, actress, author, and singer. ... Brooke Lisa Burke (born September 8, 1971) is an American television personality and model, known for hosting Wild On! (1999-2002) and Rock Star. ... Aline Kominksy-Crumb is an underground comix artist most famous for her autobiographical stories of growing up in New York during the 1960s. ... Linda Marie Ronstadt (born July 15, 1946 in Tucson, Arizona) is a popular vocalist with multiple Grammy Awards, numerous multi-platinum albums, an Emmy Award, a Tony Award nomination who has recorded over 30 studio albums and has made guest appearances on over 100 other albums. ... Linda Louise, Lady McCartney (September 24, 1941 – April 17, 1998) was an American photographer, musician, and animal rights activist. ... Richard Russo (born July 15, 1949) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American novelist. ... David Foster Wallace (born February 21, 1962) is an American novelist, essayist, and short story writer. ... Barbara Kingsolver (born April 8, 1955) is an American fiction writer. ... Kitty Kelley (born April 4, 1942) is an American investigative journalist and author of several best-selling biographies of celebrities and politicians, most of them unauthorized. ... Jerome Leon Bruckheimer (born September 21, 1945) is a film and television producer in the genre of action, drama, and science fiction. ... Jeff Rein is the president of Walgreens Drug Stores in the United States. ... Walgreen Co. ...


West Bank Story, directed and co-written by alumnus Ari Sandel debuted at Sundance Film Festival in 2005 and received the Academy Award for Best Live Action Short Film 2006. West Bank Story is a 2005 comedy short, directed by Ari Sandel, co-written by Sandel and Kim Ray, and featuring choreography by Ramon Del Barrio. ... Ari Sandel is the director of the short film, West Bank Story, which won the 2007 Academy Award in the category Best Short Film (Live Action). ... The Sundance Film Festival is a film festival in the United States, and ranks alongside the Cannes, France, Venice, Italy, Berlin, Germany, and Toronto, Canada festivals as one of the most prestigious in the world. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...


The UA is also the alma mater of Karl Eller for whom the business school is named. Karl Eller is an Arizona business leader and nationally recognized entrepreneur. ...


In 1959, Gordon Lish graduated with a bachelor's degree in English with honors from the University of Arizona. Gordon Jay Lish (born February 11, 1934 in Hewlett, New York) is an American writer. ...


References

  1. ^ a b Swedlund, Eric. "UNC's Shelton will lead UA", Arizona Daily Star, 28 January 2006. 
  2. ^ The Old Main. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  3. ^ Sandal, Inger. "Boojum boon for UA campus", Arizona Daily Star, 24 September 2004. 
  4. ^ Colleges & Schools. University of Arizona. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  5. ^ USNews.com: America's Best Colleges 2007: National Universities. Retrieved on December 19, 2006.
  6. ^ in Office of Institutional Research & Evaluation: The University of Arizona Fact Book 2005-06 (PDF). 
  7. ^ a b in Office of Institutional Research & Evaluation: The University of Arizona Fact Book 2004-05 (PDF). 
  8. ^ a b UA Highlights 2004-05. Retrieved on July 17, 2007.
  9. ^ Campus Highlights. Highlights and Rankings. University of Arizona. Retrieved on 29 March 2006.
  10. ^ University of Arizona. America's Best Colleges 2007. U.S.News & World Report. Retrieved on 2 September 2007.
  11. ^ The First UA Undergrad to Command a Camera on Mars. Retrieved on 2006-04-18.
  12. ^ The eyes of the world... and beyond. Arizona Board of Regents. Retrieved on 29 March 2006.
  13. ^ a b c d e
  14. ^ a b c d Academic Year 2004-05 Highlights (PDF). Retrieved on 28 January 2006.
  15. ^ Student Honors. Highlights and Rankings. University of Arizona. Retrieved on 29 March 2006.
  16. ^ Masters in MIS program. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  17. ^
  18. ^ The McKale Era -- Building an Athletic Tradition. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  19. ^ The First Football Team - 1899. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  20. ^ Wilbur & Wilma Wildcat. Traditions Tour. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  21. ^ Giant Magellan Telescope. Retrieved on 2006-07-12.
  22. ^ Arizona Summer Wildcat - Making the grade: UA's plus/minus debate - Monday, August 9, 2004. Retrieved on December 13, 2006.
  23. ^ http://www.union.arizona.edu/csil/greek/chapters/index.php. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  24. ^ home : arizona student unions (See above). Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  25. ^ Center For Student Involvement and Leadership (CSIL). Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  26. ^ Arizona Blue Chip Program. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  27. ^ Black Opal Leadership Development Program. Retrieved on November 23, 2005.
  28. ^ http://www.union.arizona.edu/csil/uab/comedycorner/
  29. ^ UA Colors. Traditions Tour. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  30. ^ Rufus Arizona. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  31. ^ a b Berger Memorial Fountain. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  32. ^ Ringing of the U.S.S. Arizona Bell. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  33. ^ 'A' Mountain. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  34. ^ Spring Fling. UA History. Arizona Board of Regents (2005). Retrieved on March 29, 2006.
  35. ^ Faculty Honors. Highlights and Rankings. University of Arizona. Retrieved on 26 January 2006.

is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 267th day of the year (268th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 353rd day of the year (354th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 193rd day of the year (194th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 347th day of the year (348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 327th day of the year (328th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 88th day of the year (89th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Coordinates: 32°13′54″N 110°57′07″W / 32.23167, -110.95194 Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Arizona Mathematics Homepage (Department of Mathematics, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ) (197 words)
Arizona Mathematics Homepage (Department of Mathematics, The University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ)
The University of Arizona is one of only a handful of Universities to have been awarded two VIGRE grants since the NSF started this prestigious program in 1998.
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University of Arizona - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4387 words)
The University of Arizona (UA or U of A) is a land-grant and space-grant public institution of higher education and research located in Tucson, Arizona.
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