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Encyclopedia > University of Alaska Fairbanks

University of Alaska Fairbanks

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...

Motto Ad Summum
(Latin for "to the top")
Established 1917
Type Public
Sea-grant
Space-grant
Land-grant
Sun-grant
Endowment $61,726,927
Chancellor Steve Jones
Faculty 835
Students 9,380
Undergraduates 8,254
Postgraduates 1,126
Location Fairbanks, Alaska, USA
Sports Alaska Nanooks
Colors Blue and Gold
Mascot Nanook
Website www.uaf.edu

The University of Alaska Fairbanks, located in Fairbanks, Alaska, USA, is the second largest campus of the University of Alaska System, and is abbreviated as UAF. UAF is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, as well as participating in the sun-grant program through Oregon State University. It is also the site where the Alaska Constitution was signed in 1956. UAF was established in 1917 as the Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines, first opening for classes in 1922. A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are American institutions which have been designated by a Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The sun grant colleges are a group of five U.S. universities where Sun Grant Initiative programs have been established by the U.S. Congress in the Sun Grant Research Initiative Act of 2003 for the purposes of researching and developing sustainable and environmentally-friendly bio-based energy alternatives. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... A Chancellor is the head of a university. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... Alternate uses: Student (disambiguation) Etymologically derived through Middle English from the Latin second-type conjugation verb stŭdērĕ, which means to study, a student is one who studies. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Fairbanks (IPA: ) is a Home Rule City in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. ... The Alaska Nanooks are the University of Alaska Fairbanks sports teams, derived from the Inupiaq nanuq. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... Fairbanks is a city located in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. ... Official language(s) English[1] Spoken language(s) English 85. ... The University of Alaska is a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant university founded in 1917 in Fairbanks, Alaska. ... Land-grant universities (also called land-grant colleges or land grant institutions) are institutions of higher education in the United States which have been designated by Congress to receive the benefits of the Morrill Acts of 1862 and 1890. ... The United States of America National Sea Grant College Program encourages wise stewardship of marine resources through research, education, outreach and technology transfer. ... The U.S. Congress established the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Program in 1988. ... The sun grant colleges are a group of five U.S. universities where Sun Grant Initiative programs have been established by the U.S. Congress in the Sun Grant Research Initiative Act of 2003 for the purposes of researching and developing sustainable and environmentally-friendly bio-based energy alternatives. ... // The Alaska Constitution is the constitution of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1922 (MCMXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar). ...


UAF is home to seven major research units: the Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station; the Geophysical Institute, which operates the Poker Flat Research Range; the International Arctic Research Center; the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center; the Institute of Arctic Biology; the Institute of Marine Science; and the Institute of Northern Engineering. Located just 200 miles south of the Arctic Circle, the Fairbanks campus's unique location is situated favorably for Arctic and northern research. The campus's several lines of research are renowned worldwide, most notably in Arctic biology, Arctic engineering, geophysics, supercomputing, and aboriginal studies. The University of Alaska Museum of the North is also on the Fairbanks campus. The Alaska Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) was established in 1898 in Sitka, Alaska, also the site of the then-territorys first agricultural experiment farm. ... The Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks conducts research into space physics and aeronomy; atmospheric sciences; snow, ice, and permafrost; seismology; volcanology; and tectonics and sedimentation. ... The Poker Flat Research Range (PFRR) is a launch facility and rocket range for sounding rockets in the U.S. state of Alaska, owned and operated by the University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) Geophysical Institute since 1968. ... The International Arctic Research Center, or IARC, established 1997, is a research institution focused on integrating and coordinating study of climate change in the Arctic. ... The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) is an educational program affiliated with the University of Alaska Fairbanks, run by Director Frank Williams and funded by the University of Alaska system as well as the United States Department of Defense. ... World map showing the Arctic Circle in red A sign along the Dalton Highway marking the location of the Arctic Circle The Arctic Circle is one of the five major circles of latitude that mark maps of the Earth. ... Fairbanks is a city located in Fairbanks North Star Borough, Alaska, United States. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Engineering is the design, analysis, and/or construction of works for practical purposes. ... ‹ The template below has been proposed for deletion. ... A supercomputer is a device for turning compute-bound problems into I/O-bound problems. ...


In addition to the Fairbanks campus, UAF encompasses seven rural and urban campuses: Bristol Bay Campus in Dillingham; Chukchi Campus in Kotzebue; Interior-Aleutians Campus, which covers both the Aleutian Islands and the Interior; Kuskokwim Campus in Bethel; Northwest Campus in Nome; and the Tanana Valley Campus in Fairbanks, UAF's community college arm. Fairbanks is also the home of the UAF Center for Distance Education, an independent learning and distance delivery program. Dillingham is a city located in Dillingham Census Area, Alaska. ... Kotzebue is a city located in Northwest Arctic Borough, Alaska. ... Aleutians seen from space The Aleutian Islands (possibly from Chukchi aliat, island) are a chain of more than 300 small volcanic islands forming an island arc in the Northern Pacific Ocean, occupying an area of 6,821 sq mi (17,666 km²) and extending about 1,200 mi (1,900... Bethel (Mamterilleq in Central Alaskan Yupik) is a city located in Bethel Census Area in the U.S. state of Alaska, 340 miles (540 km) west of Anchorage. ... Aerial view of the harbor in Nome Nome is a city located on the southern Seward Peninsula coast of Norton Sound in the Nome Census Area of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... The current UAF Center for Distance Education (CDE) was created in 1987, pulling various distance education initiatives together under one roof, including a correspondence program that has been going strong since the early 1950s. ...


In fall 2006, UAF enrolled 9,681 students, of which 59 percent were female and 41 percent male; 89 percent were undergraduates and 11 percent graduate students.

Contents

History

Founding

Signers Hall
Signers Hall

The University of Alaska was established in 1917 as a college, but its origins lie in the creation in 1906 of a federal agricultural experiment station in Fairbanks, the sixth in Alaska. The station set the tone for the university that developed later, which is strongly research-oriented. In 1915, the U.S. Congress approved funds to establish a school of higher education and transferred land from the station for the purpose. The federal land grant was accepted by Territorial Governor John Strong in 1917. The new institution was established as the Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines in 1922, offering 16 classes to a student body of six (at a ratio of one faculty member per student). In 1923 the first commencement produced one graduate, John Sexton Shanly. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1,002 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Signers Hall on the UAF campus. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2272 × 1704 pixel, file size: 1,002 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Signers Hall on the UAF campus. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... An agricultural experiment station is a research center that conducts scientific investigations to solve problems and suggest improvements in the food and agriculture industry. ... Year 1915 (MCMXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday[1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... John Franklin Alexander Strong (October 15, 1856–July 27, 1929) was an American Democratic politician who was the Governor of Alaska Territory from 1913 to 1918. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... See also Academic dress Categories: Education | Academia ...


In 1931, the rest of the Alaska Agricultural Experiment Station was transferred to the college, and the Alaska Territorial Legislature changed the name in 1935 to the University of Alaska. As the university began to expand throughout the state, the Fairbanks campus became known as the University of Alaska Fairbanks in 1975; the two other primary UA institutions are the University of Alaska Anchorage and the University of Alaska Southeast in Juneau. Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Alaska Agricultural and Forestry Experiment Station (AFES) was established in 1898 in Sitka, Alaska, also the site of the then-territorys first agricultural experiment farm. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar). ... University of Alaska Anchorage is the largest member of the University of Alaska System, with more than 17,000 students, 14,000 of whom attend classes at the main Anchorage campus. ... The University of Alaska Southeast (UAS) is a regional university in the University of Alaska System. ...


Significant events

The Alaska Constitutional Convention was held on the university campus in November 1955. // The Alaska Constitution is the constitution of the U.S. state of Alaska. ... Year 1955 (MCMLV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays the 1955 Gregorian calendar). ...


Academics

Schools and colleges

UAF has nine academic schools and colleges:

  • the College of Engineering and Mines
  • the College of Liberal Arts
  • the College of Natural Science and Mathematics
  • the College of Rural and Community Development
  • the School of Education
  • the School of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences
  • the School of Management
  • the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences
  • Graduate School

Students can choose from more than 160 degrees and 20 certificates in more than 100 disciplines.


Libraries

—The Alaska Film Archives, housed in the Alaska and Polar Regions section of the Rasmuson Library, hold the largest collection of film-related material about Alaska.
—BioSciences Library (physically housed in the Institute of Arctic Biology, but administratively part of the Rasmuson Library)

The Elmer E. Rasmuson Library is the largest library in Alaska, housing more than 1. ... The Alaska Film Archives, located at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, holds the largest collection of film related material about Alaska. ... The Keith B. Mather Library is the science library housed in the International Arctic Research Center and serving it and the Geophysical Institute of the University of Alaska Fairbanks. ...

Athletics

University of Alaska Fairbanks sports teams are the Alaska Nanooks, derived from the Inupiaq "nanuq." The school colors are blue and gold. Alaska Nanooks compete at the NCAA Division I level for hockey and is a member of the Central Collegiate Hockey Association and plays at the 4,500 seat Carlson Center located in Downtown Fairbanks. Alaska Nanooks also have a Division I rifle team which has won nine NCAA National Rifle Championships (1994, 1999-2004, 2006-2007). The men's and women's basketball, cross country running and skiing, and women's volleyball teams are Division II members of the Great Northwest Athletic Conference, while the women's swim team is a member of the Pacific Coast Conference. Partly due to their isolation from the lower 48 and lack of dome, they do not currently have a football program. The Alaska Nanooks are the University of Alaska Fairbanks sports teams, derived from the Inupiaq nanuq. ... Inupiaq, Iñupiaq, Inupiak or Inupiatun is a group of dialects of the Inuit language spoken in northern and northwestern Alaska. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... Carlson Center is a 4,324-seat multi-purpose arena in Fairbanks, Alaska. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... The NCAA Rifle Championship is an annual co-educational rifle national collegiate championship sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ... The Great Northwest Athletic Conference (GNAC) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northwestern United States. ... The continental United States is a term referring to the United States situated on the North American continent. ...


Publishing

There are several book publishers at UAF, including the University of Alaska Press, the Alaska Native Language Center, Alaska Sea Grant, the University of Alaska Museum of the North, Cooperative Extension Service, and the Alaska Native Knowledge Network. The University of Alaska Foundation also publishes books. A publisher is a person or entity which engages in the act of publishing. ... The University of Alaska Press is a nonprofit scholarly publisher and distributor of works concerning Alaska, the northern Pacific Rim, and the circumpolar regions. ... Native languages of Alaska, copyright © 1982 Alaska Native Language Center The Alaska Native Language Center was established by State of Alaska legislation in 1972 as a center for research and documentation of the twenty Native languages of Alaska. ... A book is a set or collection of written, printed, illustrated, or blank sheets, made of paper, parchment, or other material, usually fastened together to hinge at one side. ...


Magazines include Agroborealis[1], a twice-annual produced by the School of Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences; Challenges in Science and Engineering[2], an annual produced by the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center; Ice Box[3], the UAF student literary magazine; and Permafrost[4], the UAF English department's literary magazine. The alumni magazine, a quarterly, is the Alumnus. The Arctic Region Supercomputing Center (ARSC) is an educational program affiliated with the University of Alaska Fairbanks, run by Director Frank Williams and funded by the University of Alaska system as well as the United States Department of Defense. ... A literary magazine is a periodical devoted to literature in a broad sense. ...


The student newspaper is the Sun Star[5], a merger of the Polar Star, an independent student paper, and the Northern Sun, the journalism department's student newspaper. Front page view of student newspaper The Daily Toreador. ...


Arts

The university hosts a Fine Arts complex, one room of which is named after long-time local chorister Eva McGown. The art department has a gallery, the UAF Art Gallery, which is used for student art shows, BFA and MFA thesis shows, and (occasionally) combined faculty shows. The complex includes two theatres, the Charles W. Davis Concert Hall and the Lee Salisbury Theatre. There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ...


As well as art, UAF offers MFA degrees in music and creative writing. The creative writing program is run by the English Department [1], and offers courses in fiction, creative nonfiction, poetry, and dramatic writing. Currently, faculty include Gerri Brightwell (fiction), Derick Burleson (poetry), David Crouse (fiction), Len Kamerling(film/dramatic writing), and Amber Flora Thomas (poetry).


Notes

  1. ^ Agroborealis official site
  2. ^ Challenges official site
  3. ^ Ice Box official site
  4. ^ Permafrost official site
  5. ^ Sun Star official site

See also

  • Associated Students of the University of Alaska Fairbanks

External links

Coordinates: 64°51′32″N, 147°50′08″W The Central Collegiate Hockey Association is a college athletic conference which operates mostly in Michigan and Ohio, although it also has members in Alaska, Indiana, and Nebraska. ... Bowling Green State University (BGSU) is a public four-year institution located in Bowling Green, Ohio, USA; about 20 miles south of Toledo, Ohio on I-75. ... Ferris State University is an institute of higher learning whose main campus is located in Big Rapids, Michigan, in Mecosta County, with a secondary campus in Grand Rapids, Michigan, and smaller programs located throughout the region. ... Lake Superior State University is a small public university in Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan. ... , This article is about the university in Oxford, Ohio. ... The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor (U of M, U-M or simply Michigan) is a coeducational public research university in the state of Michigan, and one of the foremost universities in the United States. ... Michigan State University (MSU) is a co-educational public research university in East Lansing, Michigan USA. Founded in 1855, it was the pioneer land-grant institution and served as a model for future land-grant colleges in the United States under the 1862 Morrill Act. ... The University of Nebraska at Omaha, founded 1908 as the University of Omaha, is the Omaha, Nebraska, campus of the University of Nebraska system, and is the second-largest institution of higher education in Nebraska (after the University of Nebraska-Lincoln). ... Northern Michigan University is a four-year university established in 1899 located in Marquette, Michigan of Michigans Upper Peninsula. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Ohio State University (OSU) is a coeducation public research university in the state of Ohio. ... Western Michigan University (abbr. ... The Great Northwest Athletic Conference (GNAC) is a college athletic conference which operates in the northwestern United States. ... University of Alaska Anchorage is the largest member of the University of Alaska System, with more than 17,000 students, 14,000 of whom attend classes at the main Anchorage campus. ... Central Washington University, or CWU, is an accredited four-year educational institution located in Ellensburg, Washington in the United States. ... Montana State University - Billings is a state university located in Billings, Montana (USA). ... Northwest Nazarene University is a private, co-educational Nazarene university in the United States. ... Saint Martins University (formerly Saint Martins College) is a private, co-educational Roman Catholic college in the United States. ... Centennial Fountain, designed by George Tsutakawa. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Western Oregon University, located in Monmouth, Oregon, USA, was established in 1856 by Oregon pioneers as Monmouth University, a private college, and later merged with another private institution to become Christian College. ... Western Washington University (also referred to as WWU or Western) is one of six state-funded, four-year universities of higher education in the U.S. state of Washington. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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