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Encyclopedia > University College London
University College London

Motto: Cuncti adsint meritaeque expectent praemia palmae
Let all come who by merit deserve the most reward
Established: 1826
Type: Public
Endowment: £105.1 million [1]
Provost: Prof. Malcolm Grant
Faculty: 3,800
Students: 21,620[1]
Undergraduates: 11,970[1]
Postgraduates: 9,650[1]
Location: London
Campus: Urban
Colours:
                     
Affiliations: University of London
Russell Group
LERU
EUA
ACU
'Golden Triangle'
G5
Website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk

University College London (UCL) is the oldest multi-faculty constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the university's two original founding colleges. It is also the first British University to have been founded on a secular basis, and the first to admit students regardless of race, class, religion or gender. With 21,800 staff and students, UCL is the largest college of the University of London, and is larger than most other universities in the United Kingdom. It is a member of the elite Russell Group of Universities, a part of the 'G5' sub-group of super-elite UK universities, and a part of the Golden Triangle.[2] Image File history File links Logo of University College London, introduced 2005 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... The oldest surviving photograph, Nic̩phore Ni̩pce, circa 1826 1826 (MDCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... This does not cite its references or sources. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... GBP redirects here. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... Professor Malcolm Grant is the Provost of University College London. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Website http://www. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... According to its mission statement, the League of European Research Universities (LERU) is a group of European research-intensive universities committed to the values of high quality teaching within an environment of internationally competitive research. ... The European University Association (EUA) is the main voice of the higher education community in Europe. ... The Association of Commonwealth Universities represents over 480 universities from Commonwealth countries. ... The Golden Triangle is a group of leading research UK universities. ... G5 may refer to: PowerPC G5 Рa microprocessor branding used by Apple Computer Power Mac G5 iMac G5 Motorola G5 project - the failed Motorola PowerPC project to succeed its own PPC 74x. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... Website http://www. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... The G5 group of British universities refers to an unofficial group of five British universities that are known to generally dominate the top 5 positions in United Kingdom league tables, the most well-known of which are that of The Times, The Guardian and The Sunday Times. ... The Golden Triangle is a group of leading research UK universities. ...


UCL consistently ranks among the top five university institutions in the UK league tables, among the top three multi-faculty universities, and is currently in the top 10 universities globally, with an annual turnover of nearly £600 million.[3] In 2005, UCL was granted the power to award its own degrees, and currently offers its students the choice between a UCL or a University of London degree.[4] The current provost of UCL is Professor Malcolm Grant.[5] League Tables of British Universities, which rank the performances of universities in the United Kingdom on a number of criteria, have been published every year by The Times newspaper since the early 1990s. ... Professor Malcolm Grant is the Provost of University College London. ...

Contents

Geography and location

University College London (UCL) is located in Bloomsbury, central London. The main campus is located on Gower Street[6], although there are also other UCL buildings to be found throughout London. The Gower Street campus includes the UCL science and main libraries, the language departments, the history departments, the Bloomsbury theatre, the biology and physics departments, and the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology. A further set of buildings based around neighbouring Gordon Street and Gordon Square includes the Institute of Archaeology, the chemistry department, the Bartlett School of The Built Environment and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies. Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... Gower Street Gower Street is a street in Bloomsbury, central London, England, running between Euston Road to the north and Montague Place to the south. ... Bloomsbury Theatre The UCL Bloomsbury Theatre is a theatre on Gordon Street, Bloomsbury, Camden, London, owned by University College London. ... The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is run by the Institute of Archaeology, which is part of the University of London. ... Gordon Square Gordon Square is in Bloomsbury, London. ... The Institute of Archaeology is an academic department of University College London (UCL), in the United Kingdom. ... The Bartlett is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. ... The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the worlds leading specialist institutions [] and the largest national centre in the UK for the study of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia. ...


The area around UCL is occupied by a constellation of other renowned institutions, including the British Museum, the British Library, the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art, the British Medical Association, and other University of London schools and institutes, including the School of Oriental and African Studies, Birkbeck, University of London, the Institute of Education and the School of Advanced Study. London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ... British Library main building, London The British Library (BL) is the national library of the United Kingdom. ... RADAs theatre in London The Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in Bloomsbury, London, is considered to be one of the most prestigious drama schools in the world. ... // The British Medical Association (BMA) is the professional association and registered trade union for doctors in the United Kingdom. ... The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is a specialist constituent of the University of London committed to the arts and humanities, languages and cultures and the law and social sciences concerning Asia, Africa, and the Near and Middle East. ... Birkbeck, University of London, sometimes referred to by its former name Birkbeck College or by the abbreviation BBK, is a College of the University of London. ... The Institute of Education (IoE) is a postgraduate college and part of the University of London. ... The School of Advanced Study is a listed organisation of the University of London. ...


The nearest London Underground station to the main campus is Euston Square. Other nearby stations are Warren Street, Russell Square and Goodge Street, as well as Euston railway station. The London Underground is a rapid transit system that serves a large part of Greater London and some neighbouring areas of Essex, Hertfordshire and Buckinghamshire. ... Categories: Circle Line stations | Hammersmith & City Line stations | Metropolitan Line stations | London Underground stubs ... Warren Street Warren Street tube station is a London Underground station. ... Russell Square is a London Underground station on Bernard Street, Bloomsbury, not far from the British Museum and Russell Square Gardens. ... Goodge Street Goodge Street is a London Underground station on Tottenham Court Road. ... Euston station, also known as London Euston, is a major railway station to the north of central London and in the London Borough of Camden. ...


History

The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28 (know UCL Main Building).
The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28 (know UCL Main Building).

UCL was founded in 1826 under the name "London University", as a secular alternative to the religious universities of Oxford and Cambridge. [7] The philosopher Jeremy Bentham is considered to be the spiritual father of UCL, as he played a major role in the development of the College.[8] University Colleges main building in the late 1820s, with its classical portico and dome University College London has a long history, beginning in the early 19th century. ... The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28. ... The London University as drawn by Thomas Hosmer Shepherd and published in 1827/28. ... West India Import Dock, 1830. ... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... This article concerns secularity, that is, being secular, in various senses. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ...


It became University College London in 1836 and acquired degree-awarding powers, when it joined with King's College London to create the new University of London. In 1907 the University of London was reconstituted and many of the colleges, including UCL, lost their separate legal existence. This continued until 1977 when a new charter restored UCL's independence.[9] For other uses, see Kings College. ... Website http://www. ...


Academic Reputation

UK
2008 2007 2006 2005
Times Good University Guide 6th[10] 5th[11] 6th[12]
Guardian University Guide 5th[13] 4th[14] 7th[15]
Sunday Times University Guide 5th[16] 5th[17] 5th[17]
Daily Telegraph 6th[18]
World
2007 2006 2005
THES - QS World University Rankings 9 th[19] 25th[20] 28th[21]
Academic Ranking of World Universities 25th[22] 26th[23] 26th[24]

In specific areas of biomedical science UCL scores very highly. For example, UCL Neuroscience is ranked second in the world, and first in Europe, based on neuroscience and behaviour publications and citations assessed by Thomson ISI Essential Science Indicators, with more than twice as many publications and citations as any other European institution. Thomson ISI Essential Science indicators rank UCL first in Europe for clinical medicine. The THES - QS World University Rankings is an annual publication of university rankings around the world, published by The Times Higher Education Supplement (THES) and Quacquarelli Symonds (QS). ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ...


Alumni and academics

UCL alumni include both 'the Great and the Good', ranging from Mahatma Gandhi and Alexander Graham Bell, to Ricky Gervais and all four members of the band Coldplay. Important authors include Robert Browning, Raymond Briggs, GK Chesterton and Trevor Lock. Scientists and engineers include Francis Crick, John Ambrose Fleming, Joseph Lister, Roger Penrose, Colin Chapman, evolutionist John Maynard Smith and the aforementioned Bell. Politicians figure highly in the lists, notably the first and former prime ministers of Japan (Hirobumi Ito and Junichiro Koizumi respectively) and Chaim Herzog, the former President of Israel. Moreover, the founding father of Kenya, Jomo Kenyatta was a UCL graduate. Prominent UCL law graduates include the former Chief Justices of England (Lord Woolf), Hong Kong (Sir Yang Ti-liang), India (Justice A.S. Anand) and Ghana (Samuel Azu Crabbe); as well as the Attorneys-General of England (Lord Goldsmith; Patricia Scotland), Singapore (Tan Boon Teik; Chao Hick Tin) and Gambia (Hassan Bubacar Jallow). Many leading journalists attended UCL including three former editors of The Economist, most notably Walter Bagehot, and two editors of The Times Literary Supplement. A number of entertainers feature too, including Justine Frischmann, Jack Peñate and Jonathan Ross.[25] This is a list of notable individuals associated with University College London, including graduates, former students, and academics. ... “Gandhi” redirects here. ... Alexander Graham Bell (3 March 1847 – 2 August 1922) was an eminent scientist, inventor and innovator who is credited with the invention of the telephone. ... Ricky Dene Gervais (born 25 June 1961) is a triple Golden Globe-, double Emmy- and seven-time BAFTA award-winning English comedian, writer, actor and former New Romantic musician from Reading, Berkshire. ... Coldplay are an English rock band and formed in London, in 1998. ... Robert Browning (May 7, 1812 – December 12, 1889) was a British poet and playwright whose mastery of dramatic verse, especially dramatic monologues, made him one of the foremost Victorian poets. ... Raymond Briggs (born January 18, 1934) is an English illustrator, cartoonist, and author who has achieved critical and popular success among adults and children. ... For the town of Chesterton in Cambridgeshire, see Chesterton (Cambridge). ... Trevor Lock (born 2 September 1973) is an English comedian, actor and playwright. ... Francis Harry Compton Crick OM FRS (8 June 1916 – 28 July 2004), (Ph. ... Sir John Ambrose Fleming (November 29, 1849 - April 18, 1945) was an English electrical engineer and physicist. ... Joseph Lister, 1st Baron Lister (April 5, 1827-February 10, 1912) was a famous British surgeon who promoted the idea of sterile surgery while working at the Glasgow Infirmary. ... Sir Roger Penrose, OM, FRS (born 8 August 1931) is an English mathematical physicist and Emeritus Rouse Ball Professor of Mathematics at the Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford and Emeritus Fellow of Wadham College. ... Anthony Colin Bruce Chapman (19 May 1928 - 16 December 1982)[1] was an influential British designer, inventor, and builder in the automotive industry. ... Professor John Maynard Smith[1], F.R.S. (6 January 1920 – 19 April 2004) was a British evolutionary biologist and geneticist. ... Born in Hagi, Yamaguchi, Count Itō Hirobumi (伊藤 博文 Itō Hirobumi 1841–1909, also called Hirofumi/Hakubun) was a Japanese politician and the countrys first Prime Minister (and the 5th, 7th and 10th). ... Junichiro Koizumi , born January 8, 1942) is a Japanese politician who served as Prime Minister of Japan from 2001 to 2006. ... Chaim Herzog (‎, born Vivian Herzog, September 17, 1918 – April 17, 1997) served as the sixth President of Israel (1983–1993), following a distinguished career in both the British Army and the Israel Defense Forces (IDF). ... The President of the State of Israel (‎, Nesi HaMedina, lit. ... Jomo Kenyatta (October 20, 1889 – August 22, 1978) served as the first Prime Minister (1963–1964) and President (1964–1978) of Kenya. ... UCL may refer to University College London, in England Université catholique de Louvain, in Belgium Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction. ... Henry Kenneth Woolf, Baron Woolf, PC (born May 2, 1933), is the current Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, making him the second most senior judge in England and Wales after the Lord Chancellor. ... Yang Ti Liang (楊鐵樑) (born 1929 in Shanghai, China) is a retired judge in Hong Kong and a former Chief Justice of Hong Kong (1988-1996). ... Dr. Justice Adarsh Sein Anand (born November 1, 1936) was the Chief justice of Supreme Court of India, from October 10, 1998 to October 31, 2001. ... Samuel Azu Crabbe (18 November 1918 – 15 September 2005) was a barrister, solicitor and jurist. ... Peter Henry Goldsmith, Baron Goldsmith, PC, is the current Attorney General of England and Wales. ... Patricia Scotland, Baroness Scotland of Asthal, PC, is a barrister and junior minister in the United Kingdom. ... Chao Hick Tin (Chinese: 赵锡燊) is the current Attorney-General of Singapore. ... The Republic of The Gambia is a country in West Africa. ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... Walter Bagehot (3 February 1826 – 24 March 1877), IPA (see [[1]]), was a nineteenth century British economist. ... Justine Elinor Frischmann (b. ... Jack Fabian Peñate (born 2 September 1984, Blackheath, London) is a British singer-songwriter and musician, of English and Spanish descent, signed to XL Recordings. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


UCL has the highest number of academics of any university in the UK. Currently among UCL academics there are 35 fellows of the Royal Society, 22 Fellows of the British Academy, and 77 Fellows of the Academy of Medical Sciences. 20 Nobel prizes have been awarded to UCL academics and students (ten of which were in Physiology & Medicine) as well as three Fields Medals.[26][27] All five of the naturally occurring noble gases were discovered at UCL by Sir William Ramsay, who was chair of chemistry.[28] Plato is credited with the inception of academia: the body of knowledge, its development and transmission across generations. ... For other uses, see Royal Society (disambiguation). ... The British Academy is the United Kingdoms national academy for the humanities and the social sciences. ... The Academy of Medical Sciences is the United Kingdoms national academy of medical sciences. ... The Nobel Prize (Swedish: ) was established in Alfred Nobels will in 1895, and it was first awarded in Physics, Chemistry, Physiology or Medicine, Literature, and Peace in 1901. ... The obverse of the Fields Medal The Fields Medal is a prize awarded to two, three, or four mathematicians not over 40 years of age at each International Congress of the International Mathematical Union, a meeting that takes place every four years. ... The noble gases are a chemical series. ... Categories: People stubs | 1852 births | 1916 deaths | Nobel Prize in Chemistry winners | Discoverer of a chemical element ...


UCL buildings, departments and collections

UCL operates in many separate buildings. Whilst most of the buildings are concentrated in the Bloomsbury area of Central London (near Euston station), others can be found as far away as Old Street. Some of the buildings have been acquired through mergers with other colleges, and others have been newly built. The newest include the Engineering Wing on Malet Place and the Andrew Huxley Building within the Gower Street Site.[29] Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford...


UCL's newest buildings include the London Centre for Nanotechnology on Gordon Street and a new building for the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (formerly at Senate House) which was opened (by Princess Anne and the President of the Czech Republic, Václav Klaus) in October 2005 on Taviton Street.[30] The Institute of Ophthalmology opened a new wing in 2005 funded by the Wellcome Trust.[31] The London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) is a joint venture between University College London (UCL) and Imperial College London. ... The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the worlds leading specialist institutions [] and the largest national centre in the UK for the study of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia. ... The Senate House of the University of London Senate House, the administrative centre of the University of London, lies in the heart of Bloomsbury between the School of Oriental and African Studies to the north and the British Museum to the south. ... Princess Anne may refer to more than one person: Anne, Princess Royal (born 15 August 1950), daughter of Elizabeth II of the UK Anne, Princess of Orange (1709‑1759), daughter of George II of Great Britain Anne (1637‑1759), daughter of Charles I of England Princess Anne may refer to... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


UCL Library

The UCL library is divided across several sites within the UCL campus and across Bloomsbury.[32] Access to each library is gained by the use of an electronic swipe card through electronic security barriers. The libraries are linked together by a networking catalogue and request system called 'eUCLid'.[33] The largest collection of material is held in the 'Main Library' which is in the UCL Main Building. The 'Main library' contains UCL's collections relating to arts and humanities, history, economics, public policy and law.[34] The Flaxman Gallery, a collection of sculptures and paintings by artist John Flaxman is located inside the 'main library' in the Octagon building under UCL's central dome. Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... The Arts is a broad subdivision of culture, comprised of many expressive disciplines. ... For other uses, see Humanities (disambiguation). ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... For other uses, see Law (disambiguation). ... John Flaxman (July 6, 1755 - December 7, 1826), was an English sculptor and draughtsman. ...


The second largest library - the 'UCL Science library' occupies a building known as the 'DMS Watson building' on Malet Place. It contains UCL's books and journals related to Engineering, Mathematics, anthropology, geography and Science. It is adjacent to the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, access of which is currently made through the library. Other libraries within UCL include the 'Cruciform library' (medical science), the 'Environmental Studies library' (architecture and planning) and the School of Slavonic and East European Studies library on Taviton Street.[35][36][37] Engineering is the discipline and profession of applying scientific knowledge and utilizing natural laws and physical resources in order to design and implement materials, structures, machines, devices, systems, and processes that realize a desired objective and meet specified criteria. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... This article is about the social science. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is run by the Institute of Archaeology, which is part of the University of London. ... The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the worlds leading specialist institutions [] and the largest national centre in the UK for the study of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia. ...


UCL's 'Special Collections' contain UCL's collection of historical or culturally significant works. It is one of the foremost university collections of manuscripts, archives and rare books in the UK.[38] It includes collections of medieval manuscripts and early printed books, as well as significant holdings of 18th century works, and highly important 19th and 20th century collections of personal papers, archival material, and literature, covering a vast range of subject areas. Archives include the Latin American archives, the Jewish collections and the George Orwell Archive.[39] Collections are often displayed in a series of glass cabinets in the Cloisters of the UCL Main Building.[40] A manuscript (Latin manu scriptus written by hand), strictly speaking, is any written document that is put down by hand, in contrast to being printed or reproduced some other way. ... For alternate uses see: Archive (disambiguation). ... Book collecting is the collecting of books. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... The word Jew ( Hebrew: יהודי) is used in a wide number of ways, but generally refers to a follower of the Jewish faith, a child of a Jewish mother, or someone of Jewish descent with a connection to Jewish culture or ethnicity and often a combination of these attributes. ... George Orwell is the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair (25 June 1903[1][2] – 21 January 1950) who was an English writer and journalist well-noted as a novelist, critic, and commentator on politics and culture. ... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ...


The most significant works are housed in the 'Strong Rooms'. The special collection includes first editions of Newton's Principia, Charles Darwin's Origin of Species and James Joyce's Ulysses . The earliest book in the collection is 'The crafte to lyve well and to dye well', printed in 1505.[41] Sir Isaac Newton FRS (4 January 1643 – 31 March 1727) [ OS: 25 December 1642 – 20 March 1727][1] was an English physicist, mathematician, astronomer, natural philosopher, and alchemist. ... Newtons own copy of his Principia, with handwritten corrections for the second edition. ... For other people of the same surname, and places and things named after Charles Darwin, see Darwin. ... The 1859 edition of On the Origin of Species First published in 1859, The Origin of Species (full title On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, or the Preservation of Favoured Races in the Struggle for Life) by British naturalist Charles Darwin is one of the pivotal... This article is about the writer and poet. ... Ulysses is a novel by James Joyce, first serialized in parts in the American journal The Little Review from March 1918 to December 1920, and then published in its entirety by Sylvia Beach on February 2, 1922, in Paris. ...


Notable buildings and departments

The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... William Wilkins (31 August 1778 — 31 August 1839) was an English architect, classicist and archaeologist. ... The UCL Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience is a research institute located at University College London with a focus on studies of normal and pathological mental processes. ... The Bartlett is the Faculty of the Built Environment at University College London. ... This article is about building architecture. ... For planning in AI, see automated planning and scheduling. ... The Institute of Education (IoE) is a postgraduate college and part of the University of London. ... Bentham House on Endsleigh Gardens is the home of University College Londons reputable and prestigious Faculty of Laws. ... The Law Faculty of University College London is one of the foremost law schools in the United Kingdom, it is situated in the Bloomsbury area of central London. ... Zoology (from Greek: ζῴον, zoion, animal; and λόγος, logos, knowledge) is the biological discipline which involves the study of animals. ... The Institute of Archaeology is an academic department of University College London (UCL), in the United Kingdom. ... The Jill Dando Institute (JDI) is the worlds first university centre of crime science. ... The London Centre for Nanotechnology (LCN) is a joint venture between University College London (UCL) and Imperial College London. ... Sir Peter Brian Medawar (February 28, 1915 - October 2, 1987) was a British medical scientist who won the 1960 Nobel Prize in Medicine jointly with Sir Frank Macfarlane Burnet, for research into the nature of the immunological meaning of self as evidenced in skin graft acceptance and rejection in both... The Mullard Space Science Laboratory (MSSL) is the United Kingdoms largest university space research group. ... A small village near Abinger in the Mole Valley district of Surrey, England. ... This article is about the English county. ... The Pedestrian Accessibility and Movement Environment Laboratory (PAMELA) is an indoor 80 sq metre artificial pavement at a research center at University College London. ... The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the worlds leading specialist institutions and the largest national centre in the UK for the study of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia. ... The School of Slavonic and East European Studies (SSEES) is one of the worlds leading specialist institutions [] and the largest national centre in the UK for the study of Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Europe, and Russia. ... The Slade School of Fine Art is an art school based at University College London in the UK. The school traces its roots back to 1868 when Felix Slade decided to establish three Chairs in Fine Art, to be based at Oxford, Cambridge and London—though with only London offering... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... University College Hospital is a teaching hospital in London, part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and associated with University College London. ... University College London Union, founded in 1893, is widely believed to be Englands oldest students union. ... Bloomsbury Theatre The UCL Bloomsbury Theatre is a theatre on Gordon Street, Bloomsbury, Camden, London, owned by University College London. ... Tavistock Square Tavistock Square is a square in Bloomsbury, London. ... The subject of this article may not satisfy the notability guideline or one of the following guidelines for inclusion on Wikipedia: Biographies, Books, Companies, Fiction, Music, Neologisms, Numbers, Web content, or several proposals for new guidelines. ...

Museums and other collections

UCL is responsible for several museums[43] and collections in a wide range of fields across the arts and sciences:

  • Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology: one of the leading collections of Egyptian and Sudanese archaeology in the world. Open to the public on a regular basis.[44]
  • Grant Museum of Zoology And Comparative Anatomy: a diverse Natural History collection covering the whole of the animal kingdom. Includes rare dodo and quagga skeletons. A teaching and research collection, it is named after Robert Edmund Grant, UCL's first professor of comparative anatomy and zoology from 1828, now mainly noted for having tutored the undergraduate Charles Robert Darwin at the University of Edinburgh in the 1826-1827 session. Open at limited fixed times and by appointment.[45]
  • Geology Collections: founded around 1855. Primarily a teaching resource and may be visited by appointment.[46]
  • Art Collections: these date from 1847 when a collection of sculpture models and drawings of the Neo-classical artist John Flaxman was presented to UCL. There are over 10,000 pieces dating from the 15th century onwards including drawings by Turner, etchings by Rembrandt, and works by many leading 20th century British artists. The works on paper are displayed in The Strang Print Room, which has limited regular opening times. The other works may be viewed by appointment.[47]
  • Institute of Archaeology Collections: Items include prehistoric ceramics and stone artefacts from many parts of the world, the Petrie collection of Palestinian artefacts, and Classical Greek and Roman ceramics. Visits by appointment only.[48]
  • Ethnography Collections: This collection exemplifying Material Culture, holds an enormous variety of objects, textiles and artefacts from all over the world. Visits by appointment only.[49]
  • Galton Collection: The scientific instruments, papers and personal memorabilia of Sir Francis Galton. Housed in the department of biology. Visits by appointment only.[50]
  • Science Collections: Diverse collections primarily accumulated in the course of UCL's own work, including the operating table on which the first anaesthetic was administered. Items may be a viewed by appointment.[51]
Jeremy Bentham's Auto-Icon, the spiritual father of UCL in the Main Building

UCL is developing a new facility called The Institute for Cultural Heritage, which will allow public access to its collections to be greatly improved. UCL Library's Special Collections, will also move into the new building. The Institute for Cultural Heritage will feature permanent galleries for the Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology, galleries devoted to the Art and Library Special Collections, a gallery for temporary exhibitions from the other collections, lecture theatres and study rooms. Planning permission was granted in 2004, building work began in 2007 and it is scheduled to open in 2009.[52] The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology in London is run by the Institute of Archaeology, which is part of the University of London. ... For other uses, see Dodo (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Quagga (disambiguation). ... Robert Edmond Grant (1793-1874), born in Edinburgh and educated at Edinburgh University as a doctor, became one of the foremost biologists of the early 19th century at Edinburgh and subsequently a professor at London University, particularly noted for his influence on Charles Darwin. ... Charles Robert Darwin in 1854, five years prior to the publication of The Origin of Species Charles Robert Darwin (February 12, 1809 – April 19, 1882) was an English naturalist whose revolutionary theory laid the foundation for both the modern theory of evolution and the principle of common descent by proposing... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... John Flaxman (July 6, 1755 - December 7, 1826), was an English sculptor and draughtsman. ... J. M. W. Turner, English landscape painter The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted 1839. ... This article is about the Dutch painter. ... The Institute of Archaeology is an academic department of University College London (UCL), in the United Kingdom. ... Ethnography ( ethnos = people and graphein = writing) is the genre of writing that presents varying degrees of qualitative and quantitative descriptions of human social phenomena, based on fieldwork. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 78 KB)Jeremy Benthams Auto-Icon at University College London. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (600x800, 78 KB)Jeremy Benthams Auto-Icon at University College London. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ...


Medicine and UCL Hospital

The Royal Free and University College Medical School offers degrees in medicine which take six years to complete.[53] UCL has offered courses in medicine since 1825 but the current medical school is a merger of two other schools, that took place in 1998 .[54] The Cruciform (Medical School) viewed from the college portico. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ...

Whittington Hospital and Royal Free Hospital

Clinical medicine is primarily taught at three hospitals in London; University College Hospital, The Royal Free Hospital and The Whittington Hospital. University College Hospital is one of central London's largest NHS hospitals and is part financed by the university.[55] UCL's hospital facilities are located around Bloomsbury but the main hospital facility, including accident and emergency, is located on Euston Road. In 2004 work began to rebuild the main hospital, most of the work is now finished with the final extension due for completion by 2008.[56] UCL also operates its own medical research company called UCL Biomedica.[57] University College Hospital is a teaching hospital in London, part of the University College London Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and associated with University College London. ... The Whittington Hospital is a London, UK hospital in Archway, London Borough of Islington. ... The Royal Free Hospital is a large and modern London teaching hospital, United Kingdom. ... The National Health Service (NHS) is the publicly-funded healthcare system of the United Kingdom. ... Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... Euston Road is an important thoroughfare in central London. ... UCL BioMedica plc is a British company owned by University College London. ...


Students' accommodation

Many UCL students are accommodated in the college's own halls of residence or other accommodation, such as those below: Halls of residence in British English (commonly referred to as halls, and to a lesser extent hall) are a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students, similar to dormitories in the United States. ...

  • Arthur Tattersall House (115-131 Gower Street)
  • Astor College (99 Charlotte St)
  • Campbell House East and West (Taviton Street)
  • Ifor Evans & Max Rayne Student Residences (109 Camden Road)
  • Frances Gardner House and Langton Close (Gray's Inn Road)
  • John Tovell House (89 & 93-7 Gower Street)
  • John Dodgson House (Bidborough Street)
  • Ramsay Hall Student Residence (Maple Street)
  • Schafer House Student Residence (Drummond Street)
  • James Lighthill House (Pentonville Road)
  • Goldsmid House will close in 2008, as the land is to be developed into offices, shops and apartments due to its prime location on Oxford Street. The building is named after Sir F.H. Goldsmid, a treasurer of the University in the 19th century.

Most students in college or university accommodation are first-year undergraduates. The majority of second and third-year students and postgraduates find their own accommodation in the private sector. UCL students are also eligible to apply for places in the University of London intercollegiate halls of residence, such as Connaught Hall. There is also limited UCL accommodation available for married students and those with children at Bernard Johnson House, Hawkridge, Neil Sharp House and the University of London's Lilian Penson Hall.[58] In some educational systems, an undergraduate is a post-secondary student pursuing a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Website http://www. ... Connaught Hall is a fully catered hall of residence owned by the University of London and situated on Tavistock Square, Bloomsbury, London, UK. It is an intercollegiate hall, and as such provides accommodation for full-time students at institutions such as Kings College London, University College London, Queen Mary...


University College London Union

The University College London Union main building on Gordon Street, Bloomsbury
The University College London Union main building on Gordon Street, Bloomsbury

The union, founded in 1893, has a credible claim to be England's oldest students' union.[59] Today the union exists to provide a wide range of services to UCL students. It is run by elected student officers, and supports a range of services, including numerous clubs and societies, sports facilities, and an advice service, as well as a number of bars, cafes and shops.[60] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (3072 × 2304 pixel, file size: 3. ... University College London Union, founded in 1893, is widely believed to be Englands oldest students union. ... Bloomsbury may refer to: Bloomsbury, London, an area in the centre of the city the Bloomsbury group, an English literary group active around from around 1905 to the start of World War II. the Bloomsbury Gang, a political grouping centred on the local landowner, John Russell, 4th Duke of Bedford... University College London Union, founded in 1893, is widely believed to be Englands oldest students union. ... Clubs (♣) is one of the four suits found in playing cards, marked with a black trefoil; the term is translated from the Spanish basto. ... A society is a group of people living or working together. ... A sport consists of a physical activity or skill carried out with a recreational purpose: for competition, for self-enjoyment, to attain excellence, for the development of a skill, or some combination of these. ... The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) regulations in the United States, first enacted by Congress in 1975, exist to regulate and improve the average fuel economy of cars and light trucks (trucks, vans and sport utility vehicles) sold in the US. Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is the sales weighted... Retail redirects here. ...


King's College rivalry

Main Article Student Rags Student Rags were manifestations of the rivalry between Kings College London and University College London, the two oldest and largest Colleges of the University of Londons Colleges. ...


UCL has a long-running, mostly friendly rivalry with King's College London. UCL is often referred to by students from the latter using nicknames such as the "Godless Scum of Gower Street", in reference to a comment made at the founding of KCL, which was based on Christian principles. UCL students and staff also refer to King's as "Strand Polytechnic" in a similar attitude. Historically the university rivalry was known as 'Rags'.[61] For other uses, see Kings College. ...


KCL's mascot, "Reggie", was lost for many years in the 1990s. It was recovered after being found dumped in a field, restored at the cost of around £15,000 and placed on display in the students' union.[62] It is in a glass case and filled with concrete to prevent theft, particularly by UCL students who once castrated it. (KCL, to be fair, had also stolen one UCL mascot, Phineas).[63] It is often claimed that KCL students played football with the embalmed head of Jeremy Bentham. Although the head was indeed stolen, the football story is a myth which is denied by official UCL documentation about Bentham found next to his display case (his Auto Icon) in the college cloisters. The head is now kept in the college vaults.[64] Kings College London Students Union (commonly referred to as KCLSU) is the oldest students union in London, founded just before University College London Union. ... Jeremy Bentham (IPA: ) (26 February [O.S. 15 February 15] 1748) – June 6, 1832) was an English jurist, philosopher, and legal and social reformer. ...


Ethical investment policy

UCL's ethical investment policies exclude direct investment in tobacco companies. The policies do not exclude investment in arms companies. In 2006 Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) revealed that UCL was the largest known university investor in arms companies in the UK. UCL currently invests £1,591,627 in the companies Cobham plc and the Smiths Group (both of which manufacture components for military aircraft and other weapons systems). This sum amounts to 1.7% of UCL's total investment assets.[65] Campaign Against Arms Trade (CAAT) is a UK-based organisation which campaigns for an end to the international arms trade. ... Cobham plc is a British manufacturing company based in Wimborne. ... Smiths Group is a British engineering company involved in wide-ranging speciality engineering. ...


Filming at UCL

Main article: Filming at UCL

Due to its position within London and the historical nature of the UCL Main Building and quad, UCL has been used as a location for film and television recording. University College London depicting the British Museum in the film The Mummy Returns. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... The Main Building of University College London, including the Octagon (building), Quad, Cloisters and the Wilkins building. ... This article is about motion pictures. ...


Gallery

References

  1. ^ a b c Table 0a - All students by institution, mode of study, level of study, gender and domicile 2005/06. Higher Education Statistics Agency online statistics. Retrieved on 2007-03-31.
  2. ^ http://www.ucl.ac.uk/images/Uni-Lon.pdfPDF (225 KB)
  3. ^ UCL ACCOUNTS FOR 2007.{{PDFlink|http://www.ucl.ac.uk/finance/report_accounts07/report_accounts07.pdf[[Kibibyte|162 KB}}
  4. ^ Degree Awarding, University College London
  5. ^ UCL Provost and President
  6. ^ Campus location maps, University College London
  7. ^ History of UCL
  8. ^ UCL Bentham Project
  9. ^ Landmarks
  10. ^ The Times Good University Guide 2008. The Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  11. ^ The Times Good University Guide 2007 - Top Universities 2007 League Table. The Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  12. ^ The Times Top Universities. The Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  13. ^ University ranking by institution. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  14. ^ University ranking by institution. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  15. ^ University ranking by institution. The Guardian. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  16. ^ The Sunday Times Good University Guide League Tables. The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  17. ^ a b The Sunday Times University League Table. The Sunday Times. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  18. ^ University league table. The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved on 2007-10-29.
  19. ^ THES - QS World University Rankings. Retrieved on 2007-12-24.
  20. ^ THES - QS World University Rankings 2006. THES. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  21. ^ THES - QS World University Rankings 2005. THES. Retrieved on 2007-11-03.
  22. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University 2007
  23. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University 2006
  24. ^ Academic Ranking of World Universities by Shanghai Jiao Tong University 2005
  25. ^ University College London, famous alumni, Independent news
  26. ^ Facts and Figures
  27. ^ 20th Nobel Prize for UCL community
  28. ^ Sir William Ramsay: Noble Gas Pioneer—On the 100th Anniversary of His Nobel Prize
  29. ^ Faculty of Engineering Sciences
  30. ^ http://www.ucl.ac.uk/alumni/pdfs/news.pdfPDF (3.23 MB)
  31. ^ Institute of Ophthalmology
  32. ^ UCL Library Services - Sites
  33. ^ http://library.ucl.ac.uk/F?RN=632723792
  34. ^ UCL Library Services - Main Library
  35. ^ UCL Library Services - Cruciform Library
  36. ^ UCL Library Services - Environmental Studies Library
  37. ^ UCL Library Services - SSEES Library
  38. ^ UCL Library Services - Special Collections Library
  39. ^ UCL Library Services - Special Collections A-Z Directory
  40. ^ UCL Library Services - Special Collections Library
  41. ^ UCL Library Services - Special Collections Library
  42. ^ http://www.mssl.ucl.ac.uk/pages/
  43. ^ UCL Museums & Collections | Home
  44. ^ Welcome to The Petrie Museum of Egyptian Archaeology
  45. ^ UCL Museums & Collections
  46. ^ UCL Museums & Collections
  47. ^ UCL Museums & Collections
  48. ^ UCL Museums & Collections
  49. ^ UCL Museums & Collections
  50. ^ UCL Museums & Collections | Home
  51. ^ UCL Museums & Collections
  52. ^ Institute for Cultural Heritage (IfCH) at UCL- it looks like this!
  53. ^ Royal Free & University College Medical School
  54. ^ Royal Free & University College Medical School
  55. ^ UCLH Internet - University College London Hospital
  56. ^ University College Hospital Recent building work due 2008
  57. ^ Suspended Domain
  58. ^ Accommodation
  59. ^ Landmarks
  60. ^ UCL Union
  61. ^ Mayhem in the Metropolis: King's College versus University College in Student Rags
  62. ^ Mayhem in the Metropolis: King's College versus University College in Student Rags
  63. ^ Mayhem in the Metropolis: King's College versus University College in Student Rags
  64. ^ http://www.ucl.ac.uk/news/right-column/ucl-views/bentham
  65. ^ UCL investment in arms companies, Disarm UCL Campaign

The Higher Education Statistics Agency (HESA) was established in 1993 by the UK higher education institutions as the central source for the collection and publication of higher education statistics in the United Kingdom. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times is a national newspaper published daily in the United Kingdom (and the Kingdom of Great Britain before the United Kingdom existed) since 1788 when it was known as The Daily Universal Register. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see The Sunday Times (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article concerns the British newspaper. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 358th day of the year (359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London, England, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Times Higher Education Supplement, known as The Times Higher or The THES for short, is a newspaper based in London, England, that reports specifically on issues related to education. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “PDF” redirects here. ...

External links

^ The Sunday Times University Guide. The Times (2005). Retrieved on 2006-09-09. Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Coordinates: 51°31′29.24″N, 00°08′00.88″W This is a list of universities in the United Kingdom. ... Anglia Ruskin University, Cambridge & Chelmsford The Arts Institute at Bournemouth, Bournemouth University of the Arts London Camberwell College of Arts Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design Chelsea College of Art and Design London College of Communication London College of Fashion Wimbledon College of Art Aston University, Birmingham University... Anglia Ruskin University, formerly Anglia Polytechnic, is a university in England, with campuses in Cambridge and Chelmsford. ... Aston University from the Aston Expressway Aston University is a plate glass campus university, situated on a 40-acre (0. ... The University of Bath is a campus university located in Bath, England. ... Bath Spa University is a university based in, and around, Bath, England. ... 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Arkwright Building Nottingham Trent University (NTU) is a university in Nottingham, England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Oxford Brookes University is a public university in Oxford, England. ... The University of Plymouth is the largest university in the southwest of England, with over 30,000 students and is the fifth largest UK university based on student population. ... The University of Portsmouth is the only university in the city of Portsmouth, Hampshire. ... Whiteknights Lake Whiteknights Lake in winter The University Great Hall, on the London Road Campus The University of Reading is a university in the English town of Reading, Berkshire. ... Roehampton University is a campus university situated on two major sites at Roehampton in south-west London, in the United Kingdom. ... 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The Courtauld Institute of Art is a listed organisation of the University of London specialising in the study of the history of art. ... The Main Building The Ben Pimlott Building The Library Warmington Tower Goldsmiths, University of London (founded in 1891 as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute, rebranded from Goldsmiths College, University of London in 2006[2]) is a constituent college of the University of London specialising in teaching of and research into... Heythrop College is a college of the University of London situated in Kensington Square, Kensington, London. ... The Institute of Cancer Research is a college within the University of London. ... The Institute of Education (IoE) is a postgraduate college and part of the University of London. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... Website http://www. ... Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ... Main entrance The London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM or the London School) is a leading postgraduate institution in Europe for public health and tropical medicine, and is associated with the World Health Organization (WHO). ... Affiliations: University of London Association of Commonwealth Universities 1994 Group Website: http://www. ... The Royal Academy of Music (RAM) is a constituent college of the University of London, and is one of the worlds leading music institutions. ... Affiliations 1994 Group University of London ACU AMBA Website http://www. ... The Royal Veterinary College is the oldest and largest veterinary school in the United Kingdom. ... St Georges, University of London (SGUL) is a specialist medical college of the University of London. ... The School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS) is a specialist constituent of the University of London committed to the arts and humanities, languages and cultures and the law and social sciences concerning Asia, Africa, and the Near and Middle East. ... The University of the Arts London is a federal university and one of Europes largest and leading centres for education in art communication and design. ... Camberwell College of Arts is one of the University of the Arts Londons six constituent colleges, and is one of the worlds foremost art and design institutions. ... Central Saint Martins - Southampton Row, Holborn Central Saint Martins (ex-St Martins) in Charing Cross Road. ... Chelsea College of Art and Design (North Block). ... Lebanese Communist Party London College of Communication The London College of Communication (formerly the London College of Printing, and briefly London College of Printing and Distributive Trades) is one of the six constituent colleges of the University of the Arts London. ... London College of Fashion frontage above Oxford Street The London College of Fashion is a member of the University of the Arts London It specialises in undergraduate and postgraduate courses in fashion and related industries. ... Wimbledon College of Art is an art school based in Wimbledon and Merton Park, south-west London. ... Universities University of St Andrews, (St Andrews) University of Edinburgh, (Edinburgh) Heriot-Watt University, (Edinburgh) Napier University, (Edinburgh) University of Glasgow, (Glasgow) Glasgow Caledonian University, (Glasgow) University of Strathclyde, (Glasgow) University of Aberdeen, (Aberdeen) The Robert Gordan University, (Aberdeen) University of Dundee, (Dundee) University of Abertay Dundee, (Dundee) University of... The University of Aberdeen was founded in 1495, in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... The University of Abertay Dundee, usually known simply as Abertay University, is a university in Dundee, Scotland. ... The University of Dundee is the principal university in the city and Royal burgh of Dundee, Scotland. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Glasgow Caledonian University is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... The entrance to main reception at the Edinburgh campus. ... Napier University is a university in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Queen Margaret University (formerly Queen Margaret University College) is a university in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... The Robert Gordon University (often known as RGU) is a modern university located in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... St Marys College Bute Medical School St Leonards College[5][6] Affiliations 1994 Group Website http://www. ... The University of Stirling (Scottish Gaelic: ), (Scots: Varsitie o Stirlin), (Latin: Universitas Strivilinse) is a campus university, founded in 1967, in Stirling, Scotland. ... The University of Strathclyde (Scottish Gaelic: ) is a university in Glasgow, Scotland. ... It is proposed to create The University of The West of Scotland by a merger of the University of Paisley and Bell College in Autumn (fall) 2008. ... Wales has thirteen major universities. ... The University of Wales, Aberystwyth, a Member Institution of the federal University of Wales, was the first university institution to be established in Wales. ... The University of Wales, Bangor (UWB) is a constituent institution of the University of Wales based in the small city of Bangor in the county of Gwynedd in North Wales, United Kingdom. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... The University of Glamorgan (Welsh: Prifysgol Morgannwg) is a university in Glamorgan, Wales with campuses in Trefforest, Glyntaff, Merthyr Tydfil and Cardiff. ... University of Wales, Lampeter Prifysgol Cymru, Llanbedr Pont Steffan   University of Wales, Lampeter (Welsh: Prifysgol Cymru, Llanbedr Pont Steffan) is a university in Lampeter, Wales, the oldest degree awarding institution in Wales, and the third oldest in England and Wales after Oxford and Cambridge. ... The University of Wales, Newport is a University of Wales institution located in Newport. ... Swansea University (Welsh: Prifysgol Abertawe) is located in Swansea, Wales, United Kingdom. ... Trinity College, Carmarthen Trinity College, Carmarthen is a higher education college in Carmarthen, West Wales. ... Affiliations University of Wales, Coalition of Modern Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities Website http://www. ... The University of Wales (Prifysgol Cymru in Welsh) is a federal university founded in 1893. ... This is a list of universities, university colleges and colleges in Northern Ireland, United Kingdom. ... // Distance Education is a field of expertise exploring situations in which the learner and the teacher are separated in time, space or both. ... Queens University Belfast is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland and a member of the Russell Group (a lobby group of major research universities in the United Kingdom). ... The University of Ulster (UU) is a multi-centre university located in Northern Ireland and is the largest single university on the island of Ireland, discounting the federal National University of Ireland. ... Affiliations Alliance of Non-Aligned Universities, Association of Commonwealth Universities, European Association of Distance Teaching Universities, Middle States Association of Colleges and Schools Website http://www. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Website http://www. ... The University of Bristol is a university in Bristol, England. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the most prestigious universities in the world. ... The main building of Cardiff University Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Cardiff University Cardiff University (Welsh: Prifysgol Caerdydd) is a leading university located in the civic centre of Cardiff, Wales. ... The University of Edinburgh (Scottish Gaelic: ), founded in 1582,[4] is a renowned centre for teaching and research in Edinburgh, Scotland. ... Master of Theology (MTh) Dentistry Nursing Affiliations Russell Group Universitas 21 Website http://www. ... Affiliations Russell Group Association of MBAs IDEA League Association of Commonwealth Universities Golden Triangle Oak Ridge Associated Universities Nobel laureates 14 Website http://www. ... For other uses, see Kings College. ... The University of Leeds is a major teaching and research university, one of the largest in the United Kingdom with over 32,000 full-time students. ... The University of Liverpool is a university in the city of Liverpool, England. ... Mascot: Beaver Affiliations: University of London Russell Group EUA ACU CEMS APSIA Universities UK U8 Golden Triangle G5 Group Website: http://www. ... Affiliations: Russell Group, EUA, N8 Group, NWUA, Worldwide Universities Network (WUN), Association of Commonwealth Universities Website: http://www. ... For the Australian university, see University of Newcastle, Australia. ... The University of Nottingham is a leading research and teaching university in the city of Nottingham, in the East Midlands of England. ... The University of Oxford (informally Oxford University), located in the city of Oxford, England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Queens University Belfast is a university in Belfast, Northern Ireland and a member of the Russell Group (a lobby group of major research universities in the United Kingdom). ... The University of Sheffield is a research university, located in Sheffield in South Yorkshire, England. ... The University of Southampton is a university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south coast of Great Britain. ... The University of Warwick is a British campus university located on the outskirts of Coventry, West Midlands, England and is regarded as one of the countrys leading universities. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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College And University (0 words)
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University College London - 教育百科 (3623 words)
UCL was founded in 1826 under the name "University of London" as a secular alternative to the strictly religious universities of Oxford and Cambridge.
UCL's newest buildings include the London Centre for Nanotechnology on Gordon Street, aimed for completion in 2006 and a new building for the School of Slavonic and East European Studies (formerly at Senate House) which was opened (by Princess Anne and the President of the Czech Republic, Vaclav Klaus) in October 2005 on Taviton Street.
Many UCL students are accommodated in the college's own halls of residence or other accommodation; UCL students are also eligible to apply for places in the University of London intercollegiate halls of residence, such as Connaught Hall.
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